Flawed choices

Will the federal Libs bring in more relief for houseless young couples? Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners? Will the CRA employees win the 30% pay raise they’re threatening to strike over? Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes? Is the federal government committed to more health care spending so your knee gets fixed faster?

Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed? Is it reckless or necessary that Canada takes in half a million new people a year? Should we have a carbon levy to fight climate change or is this another senseless tax grab? Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened? Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?

Was Covid a legitimate public health emergency, or a classic example of government overreach? And was it justified for the nation to plunge into deficit and over $1 trillion in debt because of the pandemic? Was that spending not a material cause of the inflation that led to a swelling of mortgage rates?

Lately what the feds think, and do, has had a material impact on our lives.

Since the Trudeau Liberals did a deal with the Singh NDPers, policy has drifted left. Spending has increased. Social programs augmented. And still we have a generational ‘housing crisis’ and people dying in ER waiting rooms. The trucker-led convoy a year ago lit a fuse. While the brutish, honking malcontents were a credit to nobody they decapitated the Cons and helped elect Pierre Poilievre. And thus a polarized political divide came to be.

PP said buying Bitcoin would help families cope with inflation. But BTC then lost 60% of its value. He said he would fire the head of the Bank of Canada for keeping rates too low for too long. But Tiff Macklem has raised them seven times and critics have decried any move to politicize the central bank. Poilievre laid the blame for crazy lines at passport offices and snarled air traffic at snow-entombed airports at Trudeau’s feet. He would cancel carbon taxes. He would slash government spending. Details to come.

The latest polls: Cons 35%, Libs, 30%, Dippers 21% (according to Canada 338). If an election were held today, Poilieve would have a minority, but be at risk to a Lib-NDP voting coalition. In recent weeks, the Cons have made strong gains. Does this mean, increasingly, Canada will be changing course on all those issues above, come the election next year?

Is Poilievre too wacky for most voters? Is Trudeau too woke to be tolerated any more? Did Singh make his socialist party completely irrelevant by propping up the Liberals for two years?

So there’s an election in a year and a bit. For ages now the Libs and Cons have been diddling around the 30% support mark, unable to break through to numbers that Mulroney or Chretien once enjoyed. During that time, Canadian politics has become more polarized. Unlike Brian or Jean, who governed from the middle, Steve and Justin pushed further to the ideological edges. Now, as a new book by punted Liberal finance minister Bill Morneau states, T2 governs from the fringes – giving gender, Indigenous and climate change issues precedence over boring stuff like defence, health care or (gulp) balancing the budget.

Take CERB, for example. Doling out billions during the pandemic in a gush of cash gave Canada its worst-ever balance sheet and helped double the national debt.

“During the period when the largest government expenditures as a portion of GDP were made in the shortest time since the advent of the Second World War,” Morneau writes, “calculations and recommendations from the Ministry of Finance were basically disregarded in favour of winning a popularity contest.”

Morneau told Trudeau the CERB giveaway was nuts. Trudeau shrugged. Then the guy with decades of Bay Street financial experience found himself replaced by, well, a non-financial finance minister. But Chrystia is loyal.

The message today is simple. Political polarization is bad. Look south for all the proof you need. It’s a Dem-MAGA war down there. Biden keeps spending. The Republicans now threaten to shut the place down.

Do a significant number of Canadians crave moderation? More of the Mulroney-Chretien-Martin brand of compromise and tempered governance? If the current Libs or Cons moved in that direction, would the odds of a majority government – with more stability and a lessened role for the crazies (like Jagmeet) – improve?

One poll says so. A large survey done for the Association for Canadian Studies found about 26% of Canadians claim they’re political moderate. Centrists. Almost 18% identify on the right (with Pierre) while close to 24% are on the left (Justin). The other third are unsure of where they lie on the political spectrum.

Also interesting: more Canadians in their thirties, than older voters, are rightists. The most lefties are between 18 and 24 (no surprise). People with more money lean right. Those with more education lean left. And the hot button topics are what you’d expect – Covid, vaccine, climate change, immigration, racism, gender, and Indigenous.

Can, or will, Poilievre dump the truckers and appeal to Bunnypatch soccer moms? Does Trudeau have it in him to pivot from social justice wokeness and talk to Bay Street? Or will 2024 be a rerun of 2020, leading Canada into a spiral of swelling debt and taxation?

Sigh. Does anyone else miss the Rhinos?

About the picture: “I’m a long time blog dog – I’ve even posted a comment once or twice (sorry about that – I couldn’t help myself),” writes Josh. “This is Charm,  our one year old Springer Spaniel. In the picture Charm is having a staring contest with a couple of neighborhood deer in the lower Laurentians north of Montreal. Thanks for sharing your insights every day.”

200 comments ↓

#1 Faron on 01.23.23 at 1:59 pm

Hey, speaking of flawed choices, here’s a great article on just how stupid pickup trucks have gotten in the US and Canada.

https://www.axios.com/ford-pickup-trucks-history

Less functional for actually hauling things, more usful for coddling big dudes’ fragile egos and super-sized iced double cappuccinos from timmies.

Oh, and they are very good at killing people. Both by running them over, colliding with their cars or emitting way too much CO2.

#2 chalkie on 01.23.23 at 2:04 pm

You have so many interesting topics today, hopefully we get comments from the whole variety of issues. There are so many things that Canadians have in front of them with little to no control to fix or change. I will just make comments on one and parts that are tied to it, the housing and inflation is close to my heart.

I have not quite yet bought into the housing pain will be lifted in short order, there are too many variables that remain with no clarity for the near future answers, nor do I feel comfortable that this week’s projected rate hike of ¼ percent will be the last one for Canada, I could easily see another ¼ percent hike after a pause allowing time for things to settle.

Yes, there will be a surge of buyers shortly, (spring market) but in my layman’s opinion, it will be short lived and any bubble will have thin spots around it. Spring home sales are always a bad example of the year to follow for the balance of the year, it is when most business transferring workers take place, being set up in the new home before school opens, there are also many benefits to selling this time of year, including good weather, higher price point, better curb appeal and follow the buyers who are out in droves in the busiest time of the home buy and sell spring market.

The Federal Government’s 2% inflation target WILL NOT be reached, what do we do then, learn to live with the new 3.5 or 4%, if we reach 4% inflation this year, that would still be double or 75 to 100% shortfall of the projected 2% inflation, of where we need to go, to kick this monster to the curb side. You will see a couple of well-known figures stand up and pound their chest in what we have accomplished, for the most part, they are just pawns sent before the cameras with begs of wind for the public.
I am closely related to a large real estate information source and he tells me that their phones are not ringing anywhere near to what it takes to say a move is happening, people should be calling in the agents right now to get ready for the spring sales, perhaps it is happening in other parts of the country, but not where I reside in Southern Ontario, none of their multiple offices are excited to what they see currently, according to their weekly conferences.
It is too early to make any projections just yet, time will show us who is at the helm, the buyers, or the sellers.
If I am wrong, may your coffee always be hot, green lights on your drives, and close parking spots in the parking lot.”
Quote of the day: In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield

#3 truefacts on 01.23.23 at 2:06 pm

Harper and Cretien had similar financial results – both eliminated deficits, paid off debt and reduced taxes…they were BOTH pretty centrist on that front…

#4 Ian on 01.23.23 at 2:06 pm

Rhino Party promises “Higher Education by building Taller Schools”

#5 truefacts on 01.23.23 at 2:09 pm

“Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?” – Garth
_______________________________________

Why do active duty soldiers not pay income taxes but the rest of us do?
I think the answer is that they a making a huge contribution to the country by serving.
Well, the moms and dads who raised the kids who became soldiers made a contribution by making them.
Canada fertility rate is 1.4 – demographic implosion.
I think that might be why…

#6 Tim on 01.23.23 at 2:10 pm

Anyone who campaigns on immigration reform would win by a landslide.

#7 Squire on 01.23.23 at 2:12 pm

Will the federal Libs bring in more relief for houseless young couples?
= Likely, especially if an election is planned.

Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners?
= Of course, they don’t understand taxing the rich means they and their captial take flight.

Will the CRA employees win the 30% pay raise they’re threatening to strike over?
= Most likely not and return to office of not negotiable.

Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes?
= Good chance.

Is the federal government committed to more health care spending so your knee gets fixed faster?
= Depends on how it can be tied to an election.

Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?
= because young families spend more than seniors.

Is it reckless or necessary that Canada takes in half a million new people a year?
= not necessarily but in our current environment it might be. There are many immigrants living with regret due to our hight cost of living.

Should we have a carbon levy to fight climate change or is this another senseless tax grab?
= tax grab. Another type of trickle up economics

Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?
= Yes but I would not lump the Aboriginal issues into the same category.

Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?
= Do corporations usually hire based on talent and brains ?

Was Covid a legitimate public health emergency, or a classic example of government overreach?
= it was a legitimate public emergency but never let a crisis go to waste as the liberals says…

And was it justified for the nation to plunge into deficit and over $1 trillion in debt because of the pandemic?
= could have been avoided, some of it related to an attempt at buying votes

Was that spending not a material cause of the inflation that led to a swelling of mortgage rates?
= it contributed, yes.

#8 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 2:17 pm

More of the Mulroney-Chretien-Martin brand of compromise and tempered governance?

Yes.

And “Does anyone else miss the Rhinos?”

Hell YES.

#9 Flop… on 01.23.23 at 2:17 pm

I don’t know what to expect when I open the brown envelopes nowadays, is going to be a trick, or treat.

I’m minding my own business, I try and go to work one day and get told to go home stay home.

I try and scramble for replacement work to no avail.

I call CRA to tell them the situation with no work on the horizon, they tell me to file for CRB.

I collect two payments totalling $1800, in the meantime I scour for work and am able to land some new contracts, while also applying for the job I currently hold.

They send another brown envelope asking if I was sure I was entitled to the payments, if not to send the money back.

The contractor that canceled the contracts because Covid had caused access to the site to be denied wrote CRA a letter saying that I tried to report to work each day but the clients of several jobs didn’t want any work being done at that particular time because of risk of Covid infection.

Currently in limbo, they haven’t acknowledged the letter or asked for the money back.

Then the other day I get another brown envelope, have they made a ruling?

No, they send me more money from a GST Climate Credit Thing-a-majig.

The money is not really what annoys me, it’s the backhanded suggestion that I ripped off the system.

That month off work I probably would have made $6000 before tax, they gave me $1,800 after tax, as replacement, I suspected they would been a little bit harder on me because I was self employed, I didn’t really want to apply but had no idea when the dark clouds would depart, I could have stayed on CRB for months but that’s not my style.

I would love to give them the $1800 back and tell them not to bother me again, but they’ll just want to be my buddy again next tax time.

Suck, blow?

The guys currently running things definitely suck…

M48BC

#10 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 2:18 pm

More of the Mulroney-Chretien-Martin brand of compromise and tempered governance?

Yes.

And “Does anyone else miss the Rhinos?”

Hell YES.

#11 Faron on 01.23.23 at 2:21 pm

Seems that Florida politicians think that having books in classrooms is a bad idea. This is Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451 stuff. This is how fascism takes hold. DeSantis is a much more useful idiot than Trump ever was. Power hungry, effective and lacking ethics.

We aren’t “there” yet in Canada, but there will be a time in the not too distant future (see the “discourse” around MAID, guns and soon abortion) when Canadians will have to look at what has taken place in the US and decide if that’s what Canada wants and if it doesn’t, then how it will go about preventing this.

#12 Jim on 01.23.23 at 2:22 pm

If the Cons would put forward a credible candidate with an actual platform, instead of extremist who stir up rage and have nothing positive to contribute, I would vote for them. Trudeau doesn’t deserve to hold office, due in incompetence and ineptitude. He’s cosyed up to China far too long and he’s ruining the country with immigration levels higher than any G7 country.

#13 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 2:28 pm

My favorite Rhino promises, and this is going way back, were:

1. Change Provincial borders to strips, coast to coast, starting at the 49th and keeping alternating until the North Pole that way everyone has the same problems: fisheries, energy, land claims, etc.

2. Erect a giant mirror across the river so that Quebec City can see how pretty it is.

There were many more but those 2 always stuck in my mind over the years.

#14 cuke and tomato picker on 01.23.23 at 2:39 pm

Wow Garth you have done an excellent job showing all the various things different parties have done and what our options are in the the next election. You are a true CANADIAN and have concerns as we all do about the direction this wonderful country is going. Personally we all want a better choice but we are stuck with a Justin and Jag. The best of the worst not good but we will survive.

#15 yvr_lurker on 01.23.23 at 2:41 pm

Lots of good questions, but unfortunately no answers and no relief in site. Since I have been voting age, Chretien and his pragmatism (and saying no to Iraq and working to honestly deal with the deficit) was, in my view, the best leader we have had.

I am not at all fond on any of the three choices we will have at the next election, and I can’t see myself getting off the couch on voting day.

#16 The real Kip (Ret) on 01.23.23 at 2:42 pm

If there’s an election this year then housing will be front and centre. Get ready for the next runup.

#17 mitzerboyakaQueencitykidd on 01.23.23 at 2:44 pm

i miss dief the chief

#18 alexinvestor on 01.23.23 at 2:44 pm

We give 7K to parents per kid because we want to encourage at least replacement level birthrates. Without enough future tax payers, the CPP and OAS payments will go poof. And much like anything, there’s clawback on the 7K.

#19 the Jaguar on 01.23.23 at 2:46 pm

‘….unable to break through to numbers that Mulroney or Chretien once enjoyed.’- GT ++

We’re not the same country anymore. We ’tisk, tisk’ with an eye roll at the shenanigans south of the border, but we have our own great divide right here in Canada. Is it political? Left versus right with a slice of centrist and crazy? Yes, but peel the onion back. The divide is primarily regional. Even if 26% of Canadians consider themselves ‘moderate’, they still continually vote based on regional self interest and tribal affiliations. Also known as “what’s in it for me”? How provinces reacted under Covid to neighbouring provinces was cold evidence of their self interest.

There will be many in Quebec and the Maritimes that won’t vote for Pierre P simply because he is identified with the ‘West’. They just won’t be able to bring themselves to do it, whatever policy initiatives he might bring to the table.

Likewise many in the West won’t vote Liberal because they feel betrayed by policies that disregarded their interests & contribution to the country’s growth, and because it’s a numbers game and they are ‘outgunned”.
What kind of country allows a party, ( Bloc Québécois 32 seats ) not represented nationally and with an exit agenda, to sit in the national house? A spineless one that doesn’t want to ruffle feathers, which is exactly why we are burning down our own house by focusing 24/7 on ‘Covid, vaccine, climate change, immigration, racism, gender, and Indigenous’, instead of delivering healthcare for a changing demographic, opening provincial trade barriers, and taking a long hard look at where we are spending like drunken sailors.

We have what we deserve given it all takes place right in front of our noses in daylight, and nobody wants to challenge the status quo. Cancel culture is just too big to fail these days. And everyone is distracted by house porn.

#20 Faron on 01.23.23 at 2:47 pm

#100 AnonyMusk on 01.23.23 at 1:16 pm

LOL, last we heard, your covered calls got assigned away. Never told us if you re-purchased.

Sail Away issued a likely SAGI this morning, so it might be a good time to go tactically short. Win rate on SAGIs is 100%.

I’ll see what things look like around Feb monthly expiry and decide. Others will hold and watch their paper gains evaporate. Again.

#21 Kurt on 01.23.23 at 2:50 pm

“Does anyone else miss the Rhinos?”

Yes.

#22 Adam Smith on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm

Look at poor Japan, their PM says their aging population is about to cause a collapse of their country.

In Canada, immigration can save us from our many bad financial decisions (and it’s also nice that immigrants tend to work hard, start more businesses on average, and be the least woke).

The trick is just getting the immigrants to not only go to two cities. If we could spread people out better, I think our housing and health care issues would be greatly ameliorated. Maybe have a law that your first five years in Canada have to be in a small city like Brandon.

#23 Oblio on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm

“People with more money lean right. Those with more education lean left.”
That is profound, and it will take ma a while to parse it, but off the top of my head does it infer that, generally speaking, rich people are uneducated?

#24 Anyone Know on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm

The tech companies with the big layoffs … anyone know whether layoffs are across all job types, or mostly not developers?

#25 Buford Wilson on 01.23.23 at 2:53 pm

PP will clean up the mess. As quick as a cat can blink its eye.

Forward Together.

#26 Dr V on 01.23.23 at 2:54 pm

….but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?” – Garth
——————————————————–

Depends how you look at it and how you “ladder” your
income.

Once you start collecting the public pensions, you have no way to hide or defer the income, so they go at the bottom of my income ladder. Max CPP and max OAP are about $1900/mo. Add in the pension income credit on about $2000 of RRIF income, you get close to $25k, or about $50k per senior couple, tax-free. If you are short on the public pensions, it can be made up with other sources.

That covers a lot for us. You have greater control on income above that, though dividends and interest in a non-reg account, or required RRIF withdrawals, must also be added.

#27 Let's debt ready on 01.23.23 at 2:55 pm

It’s hard to believe that a 20y debt romp can be fixed by our very competent leaders in a few months. If rates come down and the romp is to continue, a great reset may be required, no?

#28 Ed on 01.23.23 at 2:57 pm

Churches, restaurants & small businesses were forced to close due to risk of Covid, but BLM riots and even a federal election were just fine & safe.

No wonder Pierre resonates with so many.

Can’t wait till election debates begin although I doubt most Easterners will listen.

#29 Dave on 01.23.23 at 3:01 pm

Your Friend Ron Butler says the only solution is Lower House Prices!

Is he correct?

#30 elisa on 01.23.23 at 3:04 pm

I bet that Bill Morneau would not have any problem at all, if all of that CERB money was transferred to make a few more more McCain french fries.

Capitalize the profits and socialize the losses and corporate handouts.

#31 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 3:04 pm

A quick observation in Jan so far: my ETFs looking good. YTD, excl. dividends, my ETF price appreciation range is:

3.25% to 7.8%

which, you know, a couple more weeks like this and my 2022 stock price losses will have been reversed.

Of course, I have probably jinxed it all with the above but hey, celebrate the wins when you can I say.

#32 YearAndABit on 01.23.23 at 3:04 pm

Garth,

What’s your basis for claiming we’ll have an election in a year and a bit?

Wouldn’t the election be in 2025; 4 years from the last one? Or do you think the minority government will fall before then as they usually do (though why in a year and a bit)?

#33 Bezengy on 01.23.23 at 3:05 pm

So Bill Morneau wants us to anti up $28.50 to buy his book about how someone should do something to save Canada. This after he himself spent five years as finance minister, only resigning after being found guilty of three ethic violations related to the WE organization, not to mention the C-27 bill on pension reform where he was also investigated for ethic violations. I find it strange that he didn’t have the courage to air his frustration with Trudeau during the last election, it seems a little late for some self redemption effort to me. His book is a hard pass for me, and judging from the reviews it too appears to be failure. Worst finance minister in Canadian history.

#34 Paddy on 01.23.23 at 3:10 pm

“Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?”

Easy, because the Feds don’t give a flying you know what about old people. Their working/ contributing years are over and now the government views them as leeches on the system. The CCB incentivize parents to pump out more tax slaves..er..I mean children so they can grow up and serve the government with 40 years of work and then get old and the cycle repeats…..jeesh Garth come on man.

#35 albertaguy in ab on 01.23.23 at 3:15 pm

Speaking of flawed thinking…

It seems like a LOT of unemployed and or underemployed people in households without children are excluded from ANY support.

And WHY would any household earning $180,000 require ANY support – really? Wouldn’t a program with tapering support based on household income be more inclusive and help those with the lowest income most?

——–

As part of the Affordability Action Plan, millions of Albertans struggling with inflation and the high cost of living can apply for the Affordability Payments program until June 30, 2023.

Families with household incomes under $180,000 can apply for $600 per child under 18.

Seniors (65+) who have household incomes under $180,000 and do not receive the Alberta Seniors Benefit can apply for $600 per person.

Anyone receiving monthly benefits through AISH, Income Support, Alberta Seniors Benefit or services through Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PDD) will automatically get their personal $600 payment, but will need to apply for additional payments if they have kids under 18.

#36 Dogman01 on 01.23.23 at 3:29 pm

Zeihan on Canada – The Full Conversation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCFaPFibK-8&t=765s

My take\summary:
– China\Germany suffering demographic decline which creates scenario for re industrialization of NA and a general boom in NA.
– Canada needs 500,000 immigrants a year (and needs to house them and get them from congregating in Gateway cities) in order to participate in the re-industrialization of North America.
– Canada competes with USA for the high end labour but does not have density, likely USA will not be so friendly to Canada. Mexico labour complements USA Labour.
– Canada should concentrate on value added to raw materials and needs tons of capital Investment which thus far has all been going into Real Estate.

Interesting stuff.

#37 Dwilly on 01.23.23 at 3:29 pm

I’m one of the centrist, politically homeless.

I have ZERO desire to vote for Trudeau again. I had some hopes for Pierre, but also some large concerns and based on what I am seeing I’m not sure the benefits outweigh my concerns.

Certainly can’t vote NDP or PP.

I would DESPERATELY like to see a centrist party, with reasonable, moderate, facts-based people from both sides of the aisle. From the Conservative party, I like people Michael Chong. From the Liberal party, I’ve watched Nate Erskine-Smith and feel like people like the above are reasoned, and not blinded by ideology. There are some good ones left, but not many, I fear. Can anyone else point to other MPs from either party that fit the description above? I’d like to follow them more closely & support them.

#38 Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 3:29 pm

Lots of hot buttons there, Garth.

I try to stay in my lane without predicting or acting on predictions of macros, so my Canadian companies concentrate on certifications in our area of competence, employ many, earn good profits and run decent surpluses.

We avoid government and dislike taxes but will definitely accept freebies when the glad-handers get all up in our grill with Covid loans, grants and subsidies.

Covid emergency? My stance has always been that government reaction was a huge overreach. I did buy MRNA and Pfizer and did just dandy but have since sold both under the expectation that scrutiny of the rushed process will cause market unrest. We’ll see.

#39 Linda on 01.23.23 at 3:30 pm

Taxing ‘the old’ is a no-brainer. First of all, they are far more likely to have something to tax than young parents. Children are expensive & unlikely to be earning an income until their teenage years. So not tax generators so much as write-offs against income for the adults who are presumably earning an income. The concept of paying people to have children has been around for quite a while. Given that Canada’s birth rate is less than replacement chances are our population numbers would be dropping if it were not for immigration. That having been said, in a world of 8 billion with depleted resources a shrinking population might not be a bad thing. Will be interesting to see how Japan fares as its population drops.

#40 TurnerNation on 01.23.23 at 3:31 pm

#81 Steven Rowlandson on 01.23.23 at 7:13 am
What is meant by a buck and a half? $1.50 or $1,500,000?

^^ Our Forum Host slipped in a bit of CanCon music trivia??

Tragically Hip / Little Bones lyrics

Two fifty for a hi-ball
And buck and a half for a beer
Happy hour, happy hour
Happy hour is here

———-

Why? Because all but Big Global Tech and Big Box was declared Non-essential as of March 2020.
Closing/severely limiting small business capacity was for our health!?!

https://www.netnewsledger.com/2023/01/17/why-are-canadian-business-insolvency-filings-skyrocketing/
Why Are Canadian Business Insolvency Filings Skyrocketing
The increasing business insolvency filings in Canada have been making headlines, leaving many wondering what factors have led to headwinds hitting businesses at such an alarming rate. In Q4 of 2022, there was a 58.3% year-over-year increase in Canadian business insolvency filings…

#41 Dr V on 01.23.23 at 3:32 pm

“Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners……. Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes?” – Garth
————————————————————–

If anyone should know this, it is our host, a former minister of National revenue. Death by 1000 taxes.
Here are 4……oops thought of one more, so 5.

1) Lifetime max on TFSA contributions. Say $125k, because anyone with a maxed TFSA is “rich”.

2) Maximum allowable deduction for RRSP to be set at about $165k income, where the 18% limit matches the
current max of about $30k. Income above that (rich people) will be fully taxed.

3) cap gains rate increase to 60% or maybe 2/3,
because only rich people have cap gains. Or oldies who have held investments for a long time. Possibly a yearly tax-free limit set very low (like $1000-2500)

4) Reduced income splitting for higher income pensioners. Instead of 50%, maybe 40% and even put a lid on that of say $25000, maxing at pension income of about $60000. You know, “rich” people.

5) Dividend tax credit to survive, as the grossed-up
total income is fully taxed, except they will limit that
and put a small surcharge – maybe 5% – on dividend income above $10k – “rich people” dont cha know?

#42 Yorkville Renter on 01.23.23 at 3:33 pm

Centrism for the win!

#43 AM in MN on 01.23.23 at 3:34 pm

Plenty of opinions on this subject….

Wasn’t the RHINO Party going to bring back the stubby beer bottle? Could be a winning position today…

The financial mess of Governments at all levels isn’t going away. The question then is to the voters have the discipline to deal with it, or do they want their handouts and free services until the last bond can be sold?

Does Canada go the way or Argentina?

To correct Garth above, PP has been clear that he will get rid of Tiff because of his involvement in fiscal policy, not staying in his lane. He basically printed $400B and gave it to Jr. to spend buying votes with, and that needs to stop.

Every part of Canada could be very wealthy if it wanted to be, but I’m not so sure it does. When I speak with wealthy and entitled white liberals I just shake my head.

They just want the party to go on and the government to keep funding their lifestyles and being everyone’s daddy. It is not sustainable, you cannot consume forever by borrowing and not produce (either wealth or children)

I see a future where you’re going to need your family to look after you in your golden years, and there will be plenty of moaning by those that don’t have one.

#44 Jason on 01.23.23 at 3:37 pm

#15 Oblio on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm

That is profound, and it will take me awhile to parse it, but off the top of my head does it infer that, generally speaking, rich people are uneducated?
————————————————–

I’m guessing rich people are generally older (Boomers) and a smaller portion of them had a university education than younger folks.

Why couldn’t the Cons select a centrist leader? That would make my voting choice so easy. Now it’s not. Which is the lesser of two evils? I have no idea honestly.

#45 ErkStv! on 01.23.23 at 3:41 pm

“Is Trudeau too woke to be tolerated any more?”

Absolutely! And this is coming from an immigrant, millennial gay man, who voted Liberal before…
Cant even imagine what other more “mainstream” folks must think of the guy, if even I had enough…

“Is Poilievre too wacky for most voters?”

Nope. He comes across as a centrist for the most part, and someone who is not completely out of touch with reality and common sense.

“Did Singh make his socialist party completely irrelevant by propping up the Liberals for two years?”

Socialism should always be irrelevant.
It is actually scary that it is not.

#46 truefacts on 01.23.23 at 3:52 pm

One more thing…

Clawback for Child Benefits start in the 30K range while OAS only gets clawed back after income is over 80K!

In other works, poor working families with kids subsidize comparatively “wealthy” seniors…

#47 DON on 01.23.23 at 4:02 pm

#24 Anyone Know on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm
The tech companies with the big layoffs … anyone know whether layoffs are across all job types, or mostly not developers?

***********
The stories from the layoffs are slowly coming out with respect to google…long time developers, recruiters etc being laid off via email after realizing they no longer are able to log on when they show ip for work.

#48 Andrew on 01.23.23 at 4:03 pm

Lovely looking dog, very nice to see another springer spaniel featured.

#49 S O on 01.23.23 at 4:12 pm

A friend of mine is panicking to buy a house because he doesn’t want to re qualify under the new coming rates, I have a feeling allot of people will be rushing out to buy a house when they find out about the upcoming Mortgage l loan changes coming this fall/summer.

#50 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 4:12 pm

Garth’s CPP OAS tax argument is valid.

+65s get an age exemption of $7.7k which is whittled to 15% as a non-refundable tax credit. Hardly comparable to $7k/kid tax free.

As of 2020 the proportion of +65s, per CRA, in the $46,605 or less tax bracket are:

76.4%.

And their Gov pensions are NOT tax free.

So you know this BS here about RRIFs (irrelevant to the argument) and helpful AB are just that, BS.

The $7k/kid is a vote getting cash give away no more, no less. Ask the couples without children what they think: if it’s vote bribery or not?

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/170802/cg-a003-eng.htm

#51 PBrasseur on 01.23.23 at 4:13 pm

This country is screwed on so many levels it doesn’t really matter who wins the next election. You can bet you last dollar on health care imploding and AWOL productivity!

It’s too late to fix it, unfortunately you just can’t transform a civil servants/real estate economy into to a productive economy with a magic wand and that’s before mentioning the reversed age pyramid (all provinces except Alberta), smart money should be on our mediocre leadership to make things even worse.

#52 an investor on 01.23.23 at 4:18 pm

“A large survey done for the Association for Canadian Studies found … 18% identify on the right (with Pierre) while close to 24% are on the left (Justin) … also interesting … people with more money lean right. Those with more education lean left.” Garth

Who funds the Association for Canadian Studies? Soros? The WEF? China? … I’ve never heard of them.

And why is it that these educated liberals are earning less money than uneducated conservatives? Does this mean that an education reduces your income potential or does the ACS believe Poilievre’s support comes from a fringe minority of uneducated Canadians who dislike the CBC while 82% of voters either like or don’t mind an authoritarian government? Which is it?

Polls are designed to influence the electorate. They’re fake.

News you don’t like = fake. – Garth

#53 dosouth on 01.23.23 at 4:26 pm

The first part of your post today made me feel that finally I was not alone in questioning all these drastic/dramatic changes at the behest of the loudest ‘ME’ group of the day. Thank you

Each statement/question you pose would make a great questionnaire in itself.

Heck ask the founder of Home Depot who has been put to pasture by the very people he “made” and is being cancelled at the age of 93. Experience and time gets absolutely no respect in this era of profit and wokeness. Huh, go figure…

Agree with Bernie Marcus or not….he makes some interesting comments and
observations

#54 Some other Mark on 01.23.23 at 4:28 pm

Today’s photo is beautiful.

#55 Grandv!ew on 01.23.23 at 4:31 pm

I can only say that for most people it is not only ideological. Entire conversation about left or right or center is mute point. Right now we have a burning house (our country) to deal with and all arguing about who started the fire is not productive. Sheer incompetence if not outright treasonous level of incompetence on the part of elected representatives needs to be sanctioned by electing someone who is actually capable and willing of running the government. I consider myself centrist but current administration is incompetent and it really does not matter on what side of the isle they position themselves. They need to be replaced for the sake of our country ASAP. Whether that is PP or anyone else I don’t think situation can be any worse then what it is now.

Please consider just these two examples

https://twitter.com/RobertFife/status/1617488885033930752

https://twitter.com/gmforbes35/status/1617531847755567105

#56 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 4:32 pm

For all the Canadians fed up of Canadian realtors and Trudeau.
Buy in Florida. 1000 homes under 150k!!
https://www.zillow.com/fl/?searchQueryState=%7B%22pagination%22%3A%7B%7D%2C%22usersSearchTerm%22%3A%22FL%22%2C%22mapBounds%22%3A%7B%22west%22%3A-90.19864396874999%2C%22east%22%3A-77.41055803124999%2C%22south%22%3A23.17772230256679%2C%22north%22%3A32.13560726887992%7D%2C%22regionSelection%22%3A%5B%7B%22regionId%22%3A14%2C%22regionType%22%3A2%7D%5D%2C%22isMapVisible%22%3Atrue%2C%22filterState%22%3A%7B%22price%22%3A%7B%22min%22%3A0%2C%22max%22%3A150000%7D%2C%22mp%22%3A%7B%22min%22%3A0%2C%22max%22%3A718%7D%2C%22sort%22%3A%7B%22value%22%3A%22globalrelevanceex%22%7D%2C%22ah%22%3A%7B%22value%22%3Atrue%7D%7D%2C%22isListVisible%22%3Atrue%2C%22mapZoom%22%3A6%7D

#57 CL on 01.23.23 at 4:32 pm

Everyone and everything has a past due date. JT is past his so there will be change. And mark this post, Freeland will never become an *elected* prime minister. However, she may become one by default after JT steps down. But she won’t be elected as one.

All parties and politics are dysfunctional in today’s world, foster division and hate among the citizenry. There are no heroes on the horizon and many people have lost hope.

The funny thing is, the world has seen all of this before. We just weren’t alive to see it so we think it’s all new.

#58 Re-Cowtown on 01.23.23 at 4:33 pm

I read an interesting discussion of Green Energy and the electrical grid recently. The gist of the article was that a natural limit exists that will prevent renewables from comprising more that around 35% of the grid.

The reason is that renewables intermittent nature requires a large back up of fossil, nuclear or hydroelectric (FNH) to balance out the on/off nature of renewables.

The calculations suggest that as you add an additional 5% renewables, you’ll need to add roughly twice as much backup FNH capacity to stop the grid from crashing.

As nuclear takes a decade or more to bring on stream and we’ve already built dams of consequence in virtually all suitable locations, were left with using fossil fuels to back stop renewables.

Which brings us to the unkindest cut of all: Adding more renewables means that you must increase CO2 emissions twice as fast or crater the grid. Until now, FNH generation hads been able to “paper over” the stupidity of renewables, but Germany is hitting the wall of that stupidity and has turned to buring huge amounts of dirty coal to make the renewable math work. Trudeau? No math.

Alberta’s Sovereignty Act: Protecting Albertans from people who can’t do math, physics, chemistry, science or basic engineering.

#59 Grandv!ew on 01.23.23 at 4:38 pm

Question:

If CRA employees win 30% increase on their incomes what should be the percent increase for CPP and QPP and OAS.
Same… or maybe Half of theirs….. or negligible 3% or less?

#60 Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 4:47 pm

#48 Andrew on 01.23.23 at 4:03 pm

Lovely looking dog, very nice to see another springer spaniel featured.

——–

Yes! Springers are fantastic.

Unless you’re a pheasant or grouse. Then they are the Grim Reaper.

Beautiful animal, Charm.

#61 Editrix on 01.23.23 at 4:55 pm

I miss Mel Hurtig’s National Party.

#62 Odif on 01.23.23 at 5:00 pm

Joke’s on you, I’ve been voting Rhino this whole time. Until our parties propose to do a government for all Canadians, I refuse to vote for fringe. Trudeau, Pierre and Jagmeet are an embarrassment.

#63 BABY'S BUM on 01.23.23 at 5:08 pm

Lots of questions you have.
Here’s mine……

Does it really matter who you vote for anymore?

It always matters. – Garth

#64 sarah on 01.23.23 at 5:13 pm

You mention an election next year, but I thought it was fall of 2025?

#65 Linda on 01.23.23 at 5:18 pm

#43 ‘AM’ – if StatsCan has been given accurate responses to those census forms that get sent out from time to time, not quite 50% of Canadian households comprise of 1 or 2 people. Family isn’t what it used to be!

#66 Oblio on 01.23.23 at 5:18 pm

#44 Jayson
I think you’ve nailed it –age & expectations.

As for the CPC and a centralist leader, they had one in O’Toole (until the piranhas ate him, just like how the BC Conservative Party piranhas devour all their leaders).

#67 VladTor on 01.23.23 at 5:19 pm

My opinion is here:

Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners?

–>Yes for sure.

Will the CRA employees win the 30% pay raise they’re threatening to strike over?
–> No max 5-10%

Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes?
—> Yes. We have no choice

Is the federal government committed to more health care spending so your knee gets fixed faster?

—> Yes. But we need not only money. Need reasonable new health program

Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?

—> Oldies should be not taxable CPP and OAS. They spend money for food and health – finally those money stay in Canada economy.

Is it reckless or necessary that Canada takes in half a million new people a year?

—> No for sure. Numbers should be decresed sharply for now. For example health system not ready for this amount immigrants. I’m not sure that they find job in current economy reality.

Should we have a carbon levy to fight climate change or is this another senseless tax grab?

—> we need cancel carbon tax. Other countries should pay us for our forests.

Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?

—> Yes. Overdone!

Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?

—> Only one criteria should be regard – professional knowledge for particular job. Other criteria’s – discrimination.

Was Covid a legitimate public health emergency, or a classic example of government overreach?

—>Government did well. They have now choice b’s nature of viruses was unknown.

And was it justified for the nation to plunge into deficit and over $1 trillion in debt because of the pandemic?

—-> No excuses! Government could do better.

Was that spending not a material cause of the inflation that led to a swelling of mortgage rates?

—> Yes and No! Yes – 10%. No 90%. Inflation already was increased around the world to this time. Only one problem was reason – unlimited printing USA dollar.

#68 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:26 pm

We would like half a million like this.
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/209-8th-St-SW-Watertown-SD-57201/230099599_zpid/?fbclid=IwAR0sk8T7b7KKM_wj8yOPse1GmZiFuUL1PV8NYRW3IySp5Z02pgtyG-1GX4I

#69 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 5:29 pm

All the other barn burning questions in the first 3 paragraphs aside.

If Morneau was able to run at the head of the Liberals and sweep all the financially stunted apologist appeasement monkeys that are Trudeau’s cabal….

The Liberals would probably win a majority.

Trudeau, Freecash, all of the inner cabinet….need to go.
They’ve done enough damage.

#70 Tim on 01.23.23 at 5:30 pm

I do not miss the Rhinos. Jokey “none of the above” parties play games with the most serious responsibility a citizen has. They were a luxury we could afford back in the day but the stakes are too high now. Screw people who treat democracy as a joke.

I like that you’re asking a bunch of questions in this post.

Speaking for myself (now in the top 10% of personal income earners in Canada) I like the Trudeau/Singh coalition. The past forty years (of which I’ve been an adult for thirty) have seen a paring away of social safety nets and basic security for low-income working people. I worked a minimum wage job in Montreal in the 1990’s and I was so happy. I didn’t worry about losing my job because any minimum wage job could have supported me. Rent was cheap, even in the city. The smartphones and internet and AI chatbots that have been offered up as a consolation prize for housing shortages, a gig economy, climate apocalypse, wealth polarization and the utter extirpation of all the interesting, economically “unproductive” artists and musicians and weirdos who used to fill my neighborhood is not a good deal.

We (the 21st century West) are the richest society that has ever existed. Can we afford a universal basic income that would let people who don’t want to work, or work full-time, spend their days doing other things? I don’t know. But I do know the good things of the world were more evenly distributed. You could be broke and still have a roof over your head. You didn’t have to choose between having money and being happy. You didn’t have to choose the highest-paying job over the one you enjoyed doing because you just couldn’t afford not to have the extra $10k.

I would give up my $100k salary in exchange for knowing I could live on $10k in Montreal again, like I did before.

#71 Smart Raccoon on 01.23.23 at 5:31 pm

If anyone can help a fellow raccoon hibernate for the winter by using Bill Morneau’s book as nesting and lavatory material that would be great.

Doubt any middle class Canadian would resonate with his book.

#72 Tim on 01.23.23 at 5:34 pm

Oh, and PS: To have an election, here or in the U.S., that didn’t feel like a life-or-death cage match between a candidate I can tolerate and a literal fascist.

#73 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:35 pm

We love investing in towns like Watertown, South Dakota. Affordable homes walkable to family recreation facilities, stores & services etc.

The mid west is a great play for the future.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/209+8th+St+SW,+Watertown,+SD+57201,+USA/@44.8921363,-97.1206953,797m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x52cd282a856d0601:0xb60df39a448da6d8!2s209+8th+St+SW,+Watertown,+SD+57201,+USA!3b1!8m2!3d44.8920406!4d-97.1214436!3m4!1s0x52cd282a856d0601:0xb60df39a448da6d8!8m2!3d44.8920406!4d-97.1214436

#74 Brian on 01.23.23 at 5:42 pm

UBI was tried once before, it was called communism.
I think we all know how well that worked out!

#75 PeterfromCalgary on 01.23.23 at 5:45 pm

“Will the federal Libs bring in more relief for houseless young couples?” They will promise it to before the next election but it won’t really help them.

” Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners?” Yes even though it is too high already .

“Will the CRA employees win the 30% pay raise they’re threatening to strike over?” Less than 30% but still way too much.

“Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes?” Yes despite inflation being a hidden capital gains and interest tax.

” Is the federal government committed to more health care spending so your knee gets fixed faster?” A little but it will not help your knee.

“Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?” To buy votes from young couples.

Is it reckless or necessary that Canada takes in half a million new people a year? “The bureaucracy can’t keep up so slow down until that is fixed.

“Should we have a carbon levy to fight climate change or is this another senseless tax grab?” Senseless tax grab fuel is price inelastic!

“Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?” I’ll give a firm pass on that question as should His Majesty’s Official opposition!

” Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?” Brains and talent is way more important but Canada has a lot of women with both so it all depends on who the candidates are.

#76 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:48 pm

Another batch of workers thrown out on the street.

https://www.cnbc.com/2023/01/23/crypto-exchange-gemini-lays-off-10percent-of-workforce-.html?fbclid=IwAR3RtFDyAqy6s9-oDs-vaq_2OezvFGc4HQ88hmsSrTueIKvL2uA9PjVIQ1o

#77 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:56 pm

Country roads take me home…
Watertown, South Dakota
https://youtu.be/UBQ9bAhLric

#78 Alois on 01.23.23 at 6:00 pm

Democracy?

Was awesome ..
….THE best system of governance ever ….

For about 5 minutes….

…..and then has been corrupted and co-opted ever since.

#79 4 out of 3 people find math hard on 01.23.23 at 6:03 pm

58 Re Cowtown
Tesla just built a new factory that can make up to 10,000 sea container sized batteries to be used by the power utilities. ( @ over $2,000, 000 per battery plus a 15 year manditory mainenace program per battery) They have over two year wait in back orders. Tesla Energy will become a bigger revenue source than the “Auto ” side , and will have gross margins approaching 50%. There is no reason to have fossle fuel “back up”
https://youtu.be/z7vhMcKvHo8

#80 PBrasseur on 01.23.23 at 6:05 pm

Inflation is as much a productivity problem as a demand issue. Higher demand is not a problem if productivity can respond…

This is why taxing more cap gains would be so incredibly stupid. It would be an investment and productivity killer and the last thing we need right now.

So no it is not happening, even our mediocre leaders know better.

#81 HH on 01.23.23 at 6:08 pm

I have been complaining about the unfairness of tax free child benefits while old people have to pay taxes on their OAS and CPP benefits for awhile but Ottawa doesn’t give a flying fig about it or, at least, so far they don’t.
And yes policies cater way too much to aboriginals and transgenders.

#82 Joe Cool on 01.23.23 at 6:17 pm

Ha! I had forgotten about the Rhinos. Takes me back to 1988!

#83 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 6:17 pm

We spend our time and efforts looking for great homes at great prices that don’t need much work to turn them into showpieces. They are all over North America.
You just have to look.
https://www.captivatinghouses.com/2023/01/23/1871-fixer-upper-for-sale-in-wilmington-illinois/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1871_fixer_upper_for_sale_in_wilmington_illinois&utm_term=2023-01-23

#84 Penny Henny on 01.23.23 at 6:17 pm

#31 Dolce Vita on 01.23.23 at 3:04 pm
A quick observation in Jan so far: my ETFs looking good. YTD, excl. dividends, my ETF price appreciation range is:

3.25% to 7.8%

which, you know, a couple more weeks like this and my 2022 stock price losses will have been reversed.
//////////////////

Hmmmmmmmmm,
it’s funny that all of last year you came here to brag about how well your portfolio was doing and your 20%+ dividends (from obviously a very small holding of yours) but now we hear the truth.
You were down last year by a more than decent amount.
You sir are a phony. Was there ever any doubt.

#85 Mikedaengineer on 01.23.23 at 6:21 pm

Garth et al:

There is really only one clear solution. Increase the velocity of money. Then scoop the taxes on stuff purchased and all the activity around it. So simple it is stupid. Punt the carbon taxes. Punt 10% of the government workers at all levels. Stop giving my tax dollars I. Foreign aid without having a general vote on it. Drop the taxes on gasoline….there are like many other examples where our government spends my money and there is no benefit to the average Canadian.

Put the money into the hands of the Canadians where it belongs. They will spend it. The government wins on the economic activity that it produces. Taxing the shit out of Canadians is a globalist ploy to make you accept that you will own nothing and be happy. Trudummy and the nice folks in Ottawa are to busy lining their pockets and could care less about Canada.

#86 Annek on 01.23.23 at 6:24 pm

alexinvestor on 01.23.23 at 2:44 pm
“We give 7K to parents per kid because we want to encourage at least replacement level birthrates. Without enough future tax payers, the CPP and OAS payments will go poof. And much like anything, there’s clawback on the 7K.”
….
If young couples are going to have kids, this is not really going to encourage them. This is really a vote tactic.
You really think that couples discuss” Let’s have another kid. We get $7000 tax free. So let’s go for it! “ Having a child costs hundreds of thousands . Lol

#87 Flop… on 01.23.23 at 6:25 pm

Forgive me Father Garth, for I have sinned.

Again.

Well, it had been a few days since I did my TFSA donation for the year, just logged on to see everything was settled properly.

Bricks and mortar visits stopped me from doing anything stupid, I always answered “No”, even when they asked what my name was.

There’s such a thing as too convenient.

Don’t look at the GIC section, avoid that don’t waste 5k like last time.

What’s that, high interest savings account promotion rate, don’t even think about it, your blog and spiritual advisor will tan your ass.

Hold steady.

25k minimum to get an extra bit of interest, don’t fall for it, let’s see how much you’ve got collecting dust in your checking account.

Enough to enter the contest, resist, I said resist.

Too late, finger slipped, I guess, least I’ve now got another dumb deposit to stop my GIC buddy from being lonely at night.

Could have been worse, I guess, could have experimented with Bitcoin…

M48BC

#88 Mattl on 01.23.23 at 6:32 pm

Trudeau has been bad for high wage earning Canadians, and future generations of Canadian. But I wouldn’t say he has been bad for Bay Street. He ran on a bunch of big changes to corporate tax code but did very little – he has in fact gone after the upper middle class wage earner. I pay significantly higher tax rate then say a PREC.

Bay Street has performed pretty well under him. Banks have been smashing it. He has mostly spent, with a lot of that wealth making it’s way to the top – he has been a failure on the income side, most of his initiatives hurting the upper middle class (more carbon tax on fuel, fantastic) and small business.

#89 Quintilian on 01.23.23 at 6:33 pm

#69 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 5:29 pm

Trudeau, Freecash, all of the inner cabinet….need to go.
They’ve done enough damage.

You honestly think that Pepe can win?

If he veers toward pragmatism, he loses the nutbars on the right. If he veers toward the centre he becomes a Liberal.

The Cons vote is inefficient.

Thank the Gods.

Alberta can’t be trusted to make the right choice.
Nice place, great people, but incredibly inept/bungling politicians.

#90 David Mel on 01.23.23 at 6:33 pm

Love the comments. For a dumb guy, any chance of expanding on the issues?

#91 crossbordershopper on 01.23.23 at 6:38 pm

It seems like a reason to move to the USA. Where weather is better, wages are higher, paid in US$, taxes are lower, and access to business and opportunity is more.
Its not complicated, Canada is living on its past, and the current direction is ambiguous. We dont know if we are part of Nato, if we are an envionmental country or an oil producer, if we are shamefull of our past. The recent change of the bridge or something after McDonald, should be scrapped. I think Canada should try to figure out what it is and go from there.
In the mean time, time passes and you only live once, why try to fix something when the road is better somewhere else. your kids will thank you.

#92 Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 6:40 pm

#73 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:35 pm

We love investing in towns like Watertown, South Dakota.

——–

South Dakota is fantastic! A great place to invest and live.

#93 Reality is stark on 01.23.23 at 6:42 pm

None of the above.
The Feds have increased taxes disproportionately.
The Provinces have increased taxes disproportionately.
Now it is time for Municipalities to increase taxes disproportionately.
That in a nutshell is how problems are solved in Canada.
That is also why housing is unaffordable.
People in this country are unable to see the forest for the trees.

#94 Proud CERBian on 01.23.23 at 6:44 pm

Do not insult my people, Garth. We are the foundation of New Canada.

More cheques, please.

#95 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 6:55 pm

@#89 Quintillian Questions

“You honestly think that Pepe can win?”

+++
Reading and comprehension aren’t your strong points are they.

Where did I say PP could win?
Where did I even mention PP?
Or are you so blinded by your partisan views you see things that aren’t there?

IF Morneau was leading the Liberal Party and IF he was allowed to sweep aside all the financially illiterate appeasement monkeys that infest the top echelons of the Liberal Cabal Cabinet….he would have a good chance at a majority.

Trudeau, Freecash , all of the inner cabinet are a disaster.
They need to go.
It’s that simple….or in your case….
That complicated.

#96 Miff Tacklem on 01.23.23 at 6:56 pm

Election coming sooner rather than later. PM Trudeau already calling Mr. Poilievre a racist. That shtick only lasts a few months, six at most. Shows PM is scared. His internal polling must show a rapidly widening gap between the C and L camps. Also, can’t trust polling on where citizens sit on the political spectrum. Everyone knows that in urban areas, admitting your views more closely align with the Conservatives is tantamount to admitting being uncultured. Same reason Garth disrespectfully nicknamed Mr. Poilievre. That, and jealousy that he’s likely to win.

#97 Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 6:59 pm

Re: South Dakota

My bro lives near the boundary lakes with Minnesota and skiing is their family’s obsession- especially when the spring sun melts the snow surface and it freezes overnight. Get up early, strap on the skate skis and fly. Across the crusty fields, marshes, lakes- through the places you can’t walk in summer. Out to the ice fishing shack to catch dinner. Put on the downhill skis, hook up the dogs and ye gods. Exhilarating.

#98 PBrasseur on 01.23.23 at 7:16 pm

Want to improve things in this country?

Lots you could do.

Abolish capital gains taxes completely to stimulate investment. Lower taxes on the rich.

Fire as many civil servants as you can and make the rest work 40 hours a week instead of 35. Shrink all these manpower and capital sucking governments.

Allow private doctor insurance to compete with the communist monopoly.

Exploit as much as our resources as possible, including offshore and fracking.

Stop encouraging consumption to stimulate the economy and unproductive money pits like real estate.

That a start!

#99 toronto1 on 01.23.23 at 7:22 pm

Interesting topic …. it appears that an election may be closer then next year…. NDP and Libs acting like they are campaigning….

Not sure what the wise men know- but if the economy is going to get worse, better to have election now as in bad times the incumbent normally goes.

lot of variables at play, its not popular but what if the BoC ends up hiking rates one more time of January, maybe two times? what if rates hold for a long time and there is no pivot this year… how would that affect the election cycle?

Basically, for it to be advantageous to call in election later this year, next year, the next rate hike needs to be the last, pivot has to happen by year end, RE has to have already bottomed and job losses need to be minimal, anything other and it will be a net negative.

I think that days of majority govt are long gone in Canada…. coalition is the best chance for the left to retain power but they are short lived…. and if they call too many elections the populace might get peed off and vote in the other party….

#100 jess on 01.23.23 at 7:22 pm

LockBit Gang Using Musk’s Internet Services, Laundering BitCoin in Hong Kong, China

Print article
Published: 16 January 2023
Written by Will Neal

https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/17244-lockbit-gang-using-musk-s-internet-services-laundering-bitcoin-in-hong-kong-china

also expressed alarm over the growing diversification of services and operational models within the cybercriminal community in recent years. The competition across this increasingly reputation-driven criminal sector is fierce, and has also created opportunities for accomplished hackers to effectively work as freelancers for multiple groups. It’s a trend keenly reflected by LockBit’s operations over the past few months, during which the group’s leadership has engaged in multiple smear campaigns against rival ransomware gangs, as well as launching several PR-stunts to promote their services and attract new blood.”

https://www.tvo.org/video/are-cyberattacks-the-new-normal

#101 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 7:23 pm

@#1 faron
“Hey, speaking of flawed choices, here’s a great article on just how stupid pickup trucks have gotten in the US and Canada.

https://www.axios.com/ford-pickup-trucks-history

+++
One of the best articles I have seen in a long time critiquing Big American Trucks.

I have owned a Toyota 4wd pickup from 1986 – 2006 ( two door with an 8 ft box ) .
I used it for work , camping, skiing and hiking.
After many years I bought another Toyota Tacoma 4wd in 2014.
I wanted a two door with an 8ft box.
“Sorry, dont make them anymore.”
The closest I could get was a 2 door “extra cab” with a short box….but I had to wait an additional 2 months.
I settled for the 4 door short box.
Sadly Toyota and the other asian truck makers have tried copying the “full sized American trucks”
I have driven them occasionally and can’t understand why anyone would use one as a commuter.
Massive, fuel sucking beasts.

But people are fatter and need bigger seats these days.
Perhaps gas at 3/liter this summer will start to cure the Big Truck craze
Annoying as hell but it works

#102 Yukon Elvis on 01.23.23 at 7:25 pm

Sigh. Does anyone else miss the Rhinos?
++++++++++++++++.
I am waiting for Doug Henning and the Natural Law Party to come back and save us.

#103 Victor Llearna on 01.23.23 at 7:29 pm

Canada is pretty much doomed to have a Trudeau-Singh Coalition for the next decade. Even if Peter Polliver wins next election it will be at best a minority (unless Quebec were out of the picture. wouldn’t that be nice).

#104 Therese McCabe on 01.23.23 at 7:39 pm

I did vote for the rhinos. When I saw a rhino representative saying he was going to explain his platform for us and proceeded to point to the stage beneath his feet and say ” this is my Platform, it’s made of wooden planks” I was hooked

#105 Nonplused on 01.23.23 at 7:43 pm

“Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed? ”

Wait… Kids get $7,000 tax free? When did this start? How come I didn’t get in on it?

CPP & OAS payments are only taxed if you have other income. It’s not a lot of money so it doesn’t really get much into the tax brackets if it your only source of income. You might pay a little bity bit of tax.

The carbon question is simple. The fate of the world, in so much as it does depend on carbon emissions, will be determined by the poor in China, India, Africa, and South America, not by us. All we are doing is virtue signaling. We aren’t even helping a little bit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJdqJu-6ZPo&ab_channel=OxfordUnion

If you really want to put a lid on CO2 emissions, send the solar panels to Africa. At least it’s reliably sunny there.

As for all the other political stuff, I don’t think your commentary is helping. You want everyone to coalesce around the middle, but I ask, “What middle”? Trudeau? If that’s the middle then I’ll take the extremes. Obviously not Poilievre, you’ve made that so utterly and abundantly clear. So then who? And let’s also ask if enlightenment is to be found exactly half way between the opposite extremes. What if, despite his flaws, Poilievre is 75% enlightened, but Trudeau only 25% (I’m being generous). What if neither has any enlightenment at all?

To survive the insanity, I suggest “single issue voting”. Chances are nobody is capable of evaluating the nuances of all the issues at once before casting their vote anyway. My single issue will be the economy, because if we screw that up, none of the other issues can be dealt with for long. A rich nation might be able to address Native concerns and health care and maybe even climate; a poor nation will not.

#106 The Pendulum Swings on 01.23.23 at 7:54 pm

Woke is Marxism rebranded. The farther this ideology takes us, the closer we are get to seeing the edge of the cliff.

It’s natural to turn in the opposite direction. History shows this.

If people were paying attention to the sign posts along the way, we wouldn’t gotten this far.

We have the government we deserve. They were elected.

#107 Longterm on 01.23.23 at 7:58 pm

Seems like proportional representation is the answer we need to force all parties to work together.

I’d take issue that climate change is a ‘fringe issue.’ If planetary limits and the biosphere that underpin human civilization are considered to be a ‘fringe issue’ then it’s clear that the yardstick (GDP) is all wrong.

Don’t be surprised when the ‘boring’ centrist issue like healthcare and a balanced budget become untenable fantasies as economic and social systems unravel in the face of widespread drought and crop failure, mass migration, and the shock waves ripple through the global economy and we see the the breakdown of nation states.

The multi-year drought that helped bring on social unrest, radicalization and the Syrian civil war has had profound impacts on Europe [fuelling Brexit, right wing populism etc]. And yet Syria has a population of only ~20 million. Now look at south and SE Asia and it’s 2-3 billion people through these planetary limits and social stability lenses and you may soon realize that the price of housing in Toronto becomes rather unimportant.

#108 Nonplused on 01.23.23 at 8:08 pm

#23 Oblio on 01.23.23 at 2:52 pm
“People with more money lean right. Those with more education lean left.”
That is profound, and it will take ma a while to parse it, but off the top of my head does it infer that, generally speaking, rich people are uneducated?

———————————-

As a general rule, if your education isn’t vocational in some way (STEM, trades, maybe business and law), it isn’t a path to financial success unless you also become a tenured professor. You’ll never recover your student loans on an NPV basis. How smart is that decision?

Remember folks, anyone can get an education. It doesn’t mean anything until you figure out what to do with it. Unfortunately, they can’t teach that.

#109 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.23.23 at 8:11 pm

54 Some other Mark on 01.23.23 at 4:28 pm
Today’s photo is beautiful.
——————
I had the same thought.
Mother Nature in its glory.
No car, no people in sight.

#110 Unpinned on 01.23.23 at 8:12 pm

T-2 cannot change his stripes as he is known in all circles as the “Centre of the Virtue Signalling Global Industrial Complex”. T-2 has made hurculean efforts to massage Canada into the “North American green eco park aka the American European ideal” but the climate and the people cannot be coralled into the green theme park even with Hydro-Quebec wearing its halo. Never imagined Canada at such a miserable threshold asfaras quality of life and options for mobility or lack of mobility in social and housing choices.

#111 Kootenay Dave on 01.23.23 at 8:21 pm

Perhaps we need to realize the narrative should be poor/middle class vs. the rich/powerful. They have us so sidetracked on right vs. left wing, Fox vs. CNN… when in reality, the sides actually agree on 66% of the topics. The middle class is getting destroyed, both left and right, and one side or the other ain’t going to fix that.

#112 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.23.23 at 8:21 pm

Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 6:40 pm
#73 American House Buyer on 01.23.23 at 5:35 pm

We love investing in towns like Watertown, South Dakota.

——–

South Dakota is fantastic! A great place to invest and live.
————————
Great.
Why don’t you move there, already.
And give us all a break.

#113 Gen Z on 01.23.23 at 8:23 pm

#71 Smart Raccoon on 01.23.23 at 5:31 pm

If Morneau was still Finance Minister, he would find a way to tax your tiny little nest to pay for tax breaks for the billion-dollar frozen French fries company.

#114 Wrk.dover on 01.23.23 at 8:28 pm

Will the federal Libs bring in more relief for houseless young couples?

Seems impossible, but will do a token fail.

Will Ottawa increase the tax load on higher income-earners?

Likely

Will the CRA employees win the 30% pay raise they’re threatening to strike over?

Something along that line, compromised in increments.
(remember other inflationary times & the settlements)

Are we finally on the cusp of higher capital gains taxes?

Must be

Is the federal government committed to more health care spending so your knee gets fixed faster?

Obviously not.

Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents,

Because that is all that they get. Chump change, relatively. Two months rent? Or three.

but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?

Not if that is their total income

Is it reckless or necessary that Canada takes in half a million new people a year?

Without housing and medical capacity, it is heinous

Should we have a carbon levy to fight climate change or is this another senseless tax grab?

It would be with Trudeau/Singh committee architecture

Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?

It’s over the top, but to a degree needed attention

Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?

All three should be used in thirds collectively, to advantage, over the present mediocre HR policy

Was Covid a legitimate public health emergency, or a classic example of government overreach?

It was an emergency before the govt reacted, then the reaction became a bigger crisis. Imagine had it been Ebola, with those open skies policies.

And was it justified for the nation to plunge into deficit and over $1 trillion in debt because of the pandemic?

That was totally the wrong tactic, unless we wanted a 75 cent dollar in 2023 rather than par, Could have had zero inflation only in Canada, had we catagorized the needs and doled the money with a monitored system connected to SIN#’s, for auditing, when time caught up.

Was that spending not a material cause of the inflation that led to a swelling of mortgage rates?

The mortgage rates were from ZIRP for a decade too long.

The consumer inflation is on the 75 cent dollar in a nation that imports via Amazon, and exports via little to no value added bulk stuff, with minimal labour, thus wages connected to the sale

#115 Damifino on 01.23.23 at 8:33 pm

#105 Nonplused

The fate of the world, in so much as it does depend on carbon emissions, will be determined by the poor in China, India, Africa, and South America, not by us. All we are doing is virtue signaling. We aren’t even helping a little bit.
——————————————-

Absolutely. Yet few Canadians recognize how childishly misguided are the gestures constituting our “planet saving” efforts. The next banned item will be the plastic clips that close bread bags. Jonathan Swift could not have dreamed up anything more absurd.

I used to wonder how the Germans could be so clueless as to allow Putin to control much of the energy fueling their economy and vast industrial base.

Then I look around at my own countrymen and realize Germany holds no monopoly on magical thinking. The greatest example of disconnection from reality is currently the de-facto King of Canada.

#116 DON on 01.23.23 at 8:35 pm

#101 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 7:23 pm
Perhaps gas at 3/liter this summer will start to cure the Big Truck craze
Annoying as hell but it works.

**********
You may be right this summer. Back to $1.80 on the Island in Jan…Diesel much higher an Jan is a slow moving month. China opening is set to weigh in and War is raging on in the Ukraine.

Time will tell.

My only problem with a Toyota is the box size.

#117 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 8:56 pm

@#112 Ponzie
“Great.
Why don’t you move there, already.
And give us all a break.”

+++
Sorry to break it to you but Sail Away could live on Mars and eat the Moons’ green cheese and still comment here.
It’s called the in….ter….net

#118 Yukon Elvis on 01.23.23 at 9:04 pm

#103 Victor Llearna on 01.23.23 at 7:29 pm

Canada is pretty much doomed to have a Trudeau-Singh Coalition for the next decade.
+++++++++++
I think that you are correct. LibDip coalition for the foreseeable future. Free stuff.

#119 Stephen on 01.23.23 at 9:04 pm

I am a moderate and I have no where to park!

#120 Hmm on 01.23.23 at 9:08 pm

well, the current cons will never be close to being centrist so it’s fairly certain where the next election is headed.
Even harper wasn’t this far out in the weeds.

#121 West New West on 01.23.23 at 9:17 pm

I always like to listen to Cretien, Layton and Flaherty, each for their own reasons. All of them were leaders in their own way.

Today ChatGPT showed that she could get a B to B minus on a Wharton MBA, thereby reducing its ‘value’ of USD47K down to the price of an internet connection. Whoa.

#122 Hmm on 01.23.23 at 9:17 pm

@#101 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 7:23 pm
@#1 faron
“Hey, speaking of flawed choices, here’s a great article on just how stupid pickup trucks have gotten in the US and Canada.

https://www.axios.com/ford-pickup-trucks-history”

+++
One of the best articles I have seen in a long time critiquing Big American Trucks.

I have owned a Toyota 4wd pickup from 1986 – 2006 ( two door with an 8 ft box ) .
I used it for work , camping, skiing and hiking.
After many years I bought another Toyota Tacoma 4wd in 2014.
I wanted a two door with an 8ft box.
“Sorry, dont make them anymore.”
The closest I could get was a 2 door “extra cab” with a short box….but I had to wait an additional 2 months.
I settled for the 4 door short box.
Sadly Toyota and the other asian truck makers have tried copying the “full sized American trucks”
I have driven them occasionally and can’t understand why anyone would use one as a commuter.
Massive, fuel sucking beasts.

But people are fatter and need bigger seats these days.
Perhaps gas at 3/liter this summer will start to cure the Big Truck craze
Annoying as hell but it works

++++++++++++++

pickup trucks are a badge just like a bmw or porche.
most folks would be driving a kia sub compact if they bought for actual need.

#123 AR on 01.23.23 at 9:20 pm

“Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?”

In my 30+ years of work experience far more mediocre men were promoted than talented women. So it’s not either or. ‘Talent and brains’ or women. It’s just time to stop automatically favoring mediocre men.

#124 Outrage on 01.23.23 at 9:29 pm

Wow, 32 % for CRA pay raise for 3 years . I guess they think inflation will last Good for them. Everyone should get this deal . I love it.
Housing prices and rental prices should help bring a lot of new immigrants.

#125 Tom from Mississauga on 01.23.23 at 9:34 pm

Zero talk of economic growth, just culture war crap. The Prairies have the cheapest electricity on earth now. Why aren’t we moving up the value chain and milling all of our grain for export?

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 9:37 pm

@#122 Hmmm
“pickup trucks are a badge”
+++
Careful your anti blue collar ignorance (bias?) is showing.
I use my truck for work….every day.

Perhaps you should suggest I take all my tools and material a bus to all my jobsites like Ponzie
Saving the planet and all that…

#127 Longterm on 01.23.23 at 9:46 pm

#108 Nonplused on 01.23.23 at 8:08 pm

As a general rule, if your education isn’t vocational in some way (STEM, trades, maybe business and law), it isn’t a path to financial success unless you also become a tenured professor. You’ll never recover your student loans on an NPV basis. How smart is that decision?

***

In a comment section full of seeping generalizations, this one takes it to a whole new level.

#128 Two-thirds on 01.23.23 at 9:52 pm

“Centrism” has been recently tried by the Cons, with O’Toole as leader, and where did it get them?

In the last election, O’Toole’s platform closely matched the Liberals’, even outspending T2’s electoral promises. O’Toole was very restrained in his political postures and overruled the right-est factions in his party. He presented himself as competent, moderate, and a Canadian from middle class origins. By recent political standards, he did not rock the boat much and did not seek polarization.

His moderate, “right of centre” platform did not result in a win for the Cons. They won the popular vote, for the second consecutive time, but lost overall.

If this was the result of the Cons being “centrists”, why try this again? Todays “centre” is seriously to the LEFT of Chretien’s or Martin’s, so can anyone call themselves “conservative” anymore?!

Next time, Rhinos sound great!

#129 Squire on 01.23.23 at 10:11 pm

#113 Gen Z on 01.23.23 at 8:23 pm
#71 Smart Raccoon on 01.23.23 at 5:31 pm

If Morneau was still Finance Minister, he would find a way to tax your tiny little nest to pay for tax breaks for the billion-dollar frozen French fries company.
————————————————–
That French Fry company created jobs because the taxes were low enough so that the jobs could be here instead of Mexico.
When Ronald Reagan became President in 1981 he cut taxes for the wealthy and everyone thought he was nuts. But this change brought in capital and created what you now know as the tech boom such as Microsoft etc etc. Keep taxing the rich to oblivion and you’re only job will be a barista (maybe)

#130 Catalyst on 01.23.23 at 10:13 pm

“Why do we give $7,000, tax-free, per kid to parents, but CPP and OAS payments to oldies are taxed?”

The child payments are a joke, if you actually work you don’t get anything.

Secondly, aren’t cpp contributions pre-tax? Makes sense it would get taxed when it pays out.

#131 AM in MN on 01.23.23 at 10:24 pm

#79 4 out of 3 people find math hard on 01.23.23 at 6:03 pm
58 Re Cowtown
Tesla just built a new factory that can make up to 10,000 sea container sized batteries to be used by the power utilities. ( @ over $2,000, 000 per battery plus a 15 year manditory mainenace program per battery) They have over two year wait in back orders. Tesla Energy will become a bigger revenue source than the “Auto ” side , and will have gross margins approaching 50%. There is no reason to have fossle fuel “back up”

———————————————————-

Lots of cancelled orders on the Tesla units as well.

The Chinese made Lithium Phosphate ones from CATL and BYD are eating their lunch, including in the vehicle market. No Cobalt, much less fire risk.

Elon tried to buy CATL years ago and they said no. They will overtake Tesla. Also, Tesla sells the power converters, and they are much less capable than some of the European ones.

Either way, the market keeps growing. Supplying some equipment to a project just outside of LA that has 1100 containers from BYD. 500MW – 4hr. That’s just one of the many being installed right now.

Still going to need natural gas as a back up. The turbine plants are cheap (right now about 1/15th of the $/MW cost of the new nuke plant in Georgia or the Site C dam in BC.

The cost of natural gas in North America is globalizing, just like liquid oil, now that it can be exported as LNG. Thus, the cost of solar power in a sunny place is lower than the fuel cost of natural gas, when the sun is shining. When it isn’t, and the batteries are depleted, you crank up the gas turbines.

Every battery vendor and solar panel vendor has a huge backlog right now, but there will be winners and losers.

Many are now working on the grid technology to use this power with no turbines running, and thus it will become just a straight fuel cost fight going forward.

#132 mike from mtl on 01.23.23 at 10:29 pm

Honestly I don’t know how we’d survive decades into the future. The USA is in disarray but we’re somehow going to replace our population through dumb immigration and somehow leave a better place? Really are we that dumb?

T2 and the Communists promise equal rights when they full well know we’re screwed is depressing. But hey… pack it in to the only few liveable spaces we have with zero regard, no problem those evil landlords are the problem clearly!

Voting is a huge waste of time, no-one ever broke ugly ‘the system’ by voting it out fyi.

#133 NoName on 01.23.23 at 10:31 pm

i see what you did there. ;-)

#134 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 10:35 pm

@#127 Longterm
“In a comment section full of seeping generalizations, this one takes it to a whole new level.”

+++
Ok I’ll bite.
In a world of 5 trades retiring for 1 trade replacing them…

I have my coffee served to me by a university educated, heavily indebted, minimum wage, barely surviving on tips, barista….. screaming at the inequities of the world as hey brag about their latest $1500 tattoo.
Bad choices are….bad choices.
Wouldn’t be the first time a Bachelor of Basket Weaving realized their degree was 4 years of wasted time and…money.
Deal with it or do something different.
People grow tired of whiners.

#135 Brute on 01.23.23 at 10:45 pm

“ brutish, honking malcontents” sure Garth, keep telling yourself that.

It was a festival of love but you had to be there. The only brutes that showed up in Ottawa were the RCMP thugs in jackboots.

#136 Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 10:55 pm

#112 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.23.23 at 8:21 pm
Sail Away on 01.23.23 at 6:40 pm

South Dakota is fantastic! A great place to invest and live.

—————

Great.
Why don’t you move there, already.
And give us all a break.

—————

I have it on good authority that South Dakota recently received an internet connection, so you can hear my melodious harmony from afar. Like Christopher Plummer in that true Austrian classic.

#137 Summertime on 01.23.23 at 10:59 pm

To maintain the debt driven ‘economy’ and the chokehold by the banks of everything moving the central ‘bankers’ and the government need to erase or at least significantly ease the debt.

So the plan is apparently to drive significant inflation (happening as we speak), lie about it (changing the way it is measured) and talk about rates hike while doing practically nothing (rates in normal markets with current inflation would be 12-15 % at minimum, not 4 %) in a hope that the debt while rising in nominal terms will decline in real terms so it becomes ‘manageable’ and the whole Ponzi scheme can go for a little while longer.

Except that inflation will significantly reduce consumption and real economy.

So decline of the real standard of living to 40 – 50 %, maybe more from the good times from the past is pretty much given.

House prices going from 3-4 to 12-15, then 20 time annual gross income.

Food skyrocketing.

The cheap energy is becoming scarce.

And the good news is that this is just the beginning.

Life will go on for some, some others will have to restrict their consumption, abandon plans for family and kids but luckily for our elite overlords somewhere out there are endless hordes of doctors, engineers, who will die to come to Canada to work for 15-20 bucks an our in an increasingly non-competitive economy with very little productivity and added value in order to pay for 1.5- 2 million dollar cheap wooden houses, buy $42 Caesar salad (but hey, it is ‘party’ size), $ 27 a kilo chicken breast $ 25 a kilo cheese and 10 bucks a kilo GMO tomatoes.

The average sheeple is just a spot on the wall, a fart in the elevator for the ultra rich with the jets and luxury yachts (apparently excluded from carbon taxes) that can not be tolerated any more, specially as it wants to continue eating, having kids and consuming the precious energy, hence the current situation that will and can only become worse.

#138 fishman on 01.23.23 at 11:04 pm

It must be particularly irksome for lil potato to be out fabulized by a younger & more fabulous Mr. Fabulous. Lil potato as drama queen: Mr. Fabulous a drag queen. lil potato haughttily shrugs off his detractors. Mr. Fabulous ignores them. Lil potato has groovy socks. Mr Fabulous has gorgeous stolen Hermes scarf. Lil potato is French–ish. Mr. Fabulous is Jew–ish. Mr. Fabulus can flit around congress secure in the knowledge his precious vote can make or break the Ukraine. lil potato gets flitted around by a Russian bear after taking a huge bite & locking into a Ukraine victory. With no chance of letting go, breaking off his fabulously perfect teeth & messing his fabulous gorgeous hair. Unable to keep his eyes off the blood spats increasingly thrown onto his beautiful fabulous socks. Georgie Boy has taken the Fabulist Crown from lil potato..

#139 B&W on 01.23.23 at 11:06 pm

“Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?”

I must say, this is a very apples and oranges sentence.

Aboriginals have been screwed royally out of their land, out of opportunity to discover their destinies. Land, which the crown admits is theirs.

Comparing this to someone who wishes to transition for entirely personal reasons, something people have been doing for decades before Bruce got a ESPY courage award – is as apples and oranges as it gets.

These two things are not comparable. No one is coming to take Trans-owned land and give them $5 a year for it under some Treaty, which any court would invalidate immediately, if it ever got a proper day in court.

I have this sinking feeling that politicians are just using LGBTQ and other minority issues to make us circle the drain while they get away with non-democratic unethical behaviour denying all Canadians their rights.

#140 Observer on 01.23.23 at 11:18 pm

#123 AR on 01.23.23 at 9:20 pm
“Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?”

In my 30+ years of work experience far more mediocre men were promoted than talented women. So it’s not either or. ‘Talent and brains’ or women. It’s just time to stop automatically favoring mediocre men.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yup. So how do we do that? One way might be “to have the cabinet balanced by gender” whilst ensuring that regardless gender, those hired are qualified.

Ministers are not hired, but appointed from a very small pool of caucus MPs. – Garth

#141 DON on 01.23.23 at 11:29 pm

#129 B&W on 01.23.23 at 11:06 pm
“Have we overdone public policy catering to transgenders and Aboriginals, or is this enlightened?”

I must say, this is a very apples and oranges sentence.

Aboriginals have been screwed royally out of their land, out of opportunity to discover their destinies. Land, which the crown admits is theirs.

Comparing this to someone who wishes to transition for entirely personal reasons, something people have been doing for decades before Bruce got a ESPY courage award – is as apples and oranges as it gets.

These two things are not comparable. No one is coming to take Trans-owned land and give them $5 a year for it under some Treaty, which any court would invalidate immediately, if it ever got a proper day in court.

I have this sinking feeling that politicians are just using LGBTQ and other minority issues to make us circle the drain while they get away with non-democratic unethical behaviour denying all Canadians their rights.

********
Well stated.

The last paragraph hits the bullseye!

Baffle with bull shit!
Divide and Conquer.
Never let a crisis go to waste.
And always have a pocket full of Candy.

#142 Damifino on 01.23.23 at 11:36 pm

#120 Hmm

well, the current cons will never be close to being centrist so it’s fairly certain where the next election is headed.
—————————-

Yep… Prime Minister Singh.

#143 DON on 01.23.23 at 11:42 pm

#128 Two-thirds on 01.23.23 at 9:52 pm
“Centrism” has been recently tried by the Cons, with O’Toole as leader, and where did it get them?

In the last election, O’Toole’s platform closely matched the Liberals’, even outspending T2’s electoral promises. O’Toole was very restrained in his political postures and overruled the right-est factions in his party. He presented himself as competent, moderate, and a Canadian from middle class origins. By recent political standards, he did not rock the boat much and did not seek polarization.

His moderate, “right of centre” platform did not result in a win for the Cons. They won the popular vote, for the second consecutive time, but lost overall.

If this was the result of the Cons being “centrists”, why try this again? Todays “centre” is seriously to the LEFT of Chretien’s or Martin’s, so can anyone call themselves “conservative” anymore?!

Next time, Rhinos sound great!

************

I would argue that context of the day matters. Covid election and people seeking stability. Trudeau is past his best before date. Mr. O’Toole might have been in the right place at the wrong time.

The Conservatives need to clean out the back room boys prior to the next election and find a Garth like candidate to lead them. Some things are really plain and simple…but change takes effort.

#144 A festival of love on 01.23.23 at 11:55 pm

#135 Brute on 01.23.23 at 10:45 pm
“ brutish, honking malcontents” sure Garth, keep telling yourself that.

It was a festival of love but you had to be there. The only brutes that showed up in Ottawa were the RCMP thugs in jackboots.
____________________________________________

The only thing that got “jacked” was the hijacking done by the alt rights.

Rolling protest that occupied Ottawa was hijacked from the start
For all of those who wish to portray the Ottawa occupation as a trucker-supported freedom protest, you need to start taking a closer look at the organizers.

https://lethbridgeherald.com/commentary/letters-to-the-editor/2022/02/09/truckers-protest-has-been-hijacked-by-right-wing-agitators/

#145 Calguy on 01.24.23 at 12:05 am

One thing not mentioned is the increased pressure on our infrastructure in terms of housing, education , health care and transportation. Immigration is already putting pressure on these. Schools here in Calgary are overcrowded with classes at 40 in some high schools. If the Liberals want increased population then give provinces money for schools and hospitals. Too much, too soon. This government wasted billions giving to other countries and ignored Canadians!

#146 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 12:21 am

#141 Don
I have this sinking feeling that politicians are just using LGBTQ and other minority issues to make us circle the drain while they get away with non-democratic unethical behaviour denying all Canadians their rights.

********
Well stated.

The last paragraph hits the bullseye!

Baffle with bull shit!
Divide and Conquer.
Never let a crisis go to waste.
And always have a pocket full of Candy.
———————————-
Don,
So, you believe the conspiracy theory that Trudeau is using “non-democratic, unethical behaviour to deny all Canadians their rights”?
You got some proof to back this up?

#147 Longterm on 01.24.23 at 12:25 am

#134 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.23.23 at 10:35 pm

No biting necessary. I’ve nothing against trades – worked in many machine and welding shops and might go back to that at some point.

It’s the sweeping generalization made by that other dude and seemingly seconded by you that nobody with a ‘basket weaving degree,’ by which I take it is anything that isn’t science, engineering, or business is useless and a poor choice and produces whiners.

Besides the millions of people who demonstrably counter this ridiculous generalization [I personally know dozens of them], here’s my case. Two BAs and an MA, and I’ve run the editorial side of two publishing companies [one sold for some serious coin] and I get to engage with interesting authors and thinkers from across the world on a daily basis. Student loans paid for by that career. I also set-up a real estate holding company in the year 2000 [recruiting some engineering friends into it after teaching them how to do a property P&L] then we sold that portfolio in 2014.

I also built my own timber frame house with my own hands, doing everything myself purely for the learning and the challenge of it. From design, to foundation, to timber chiselling, to the roof, and finishing work, etc. Everything except for the wiring and plumbing for which I paid some trades out of my more than ample ‘basket-weaving degree’ income. So ultimately their income was on the back of all of the basket weaving.

Yet I’m hardly an anomaly and there are plenty of similar and probably way better stories out there. The basket weavers are a clever, interesting, and diverse bunch. The point is that the generalization by you and the other dude is BS along with the perception of whining.

Lastly, I didn’t mention that those 7 years in three different universities in two different cities were also extremely interesting, challenging, and mind expanding. Much more than the years I spent grinding and machining metal in shops with AC/DC on endless repeat on the hard rock station and guys talking about their trucks at coffee break.

Lastly, lastly, actual basket weaving is, incidentally, actually very challenging and basically a long and illustrious trade that isn’t used much anymore.

#148 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 12:40 am

#137
The average sheeple is just a spot on the wall, a fart in the elevator for the ultra rich with the jets and luxury yachts.
—————————-
Wow,
I never looked at FURZ that way.
I thought he’s doing quite well.
With his plunging business, and all.

#149 DON on 01.24.23 at 1:27 am

I follow the Aussie housing market and behold.

“There are generally three stages to any property bust.

Phase one: The first is the tightening of monetary policy. This could be because the central bank has lifted its cash rate. Or, it could be because of an external shock to the banking system.

As interest rates rise, the amount that new mortgagees can afford to borrow begins to fall. This leads to a lower marginal bid in property prices and they roll over.

Phase two: The second phase is psychological. As price falls spread, buyers begin to retrench, and the volume of transactions falls away. For while, we see a standoff between sceptical buyers and grumpy sellers until the latter capitulate.

So far this process is an orderly correction and can take prices down by 10 per cent plus. This is the kind of correction Australian property has seen repeatedly in 2002, 2008, 2012, and 2018.

Phase three: But, there is a third phase that has overtaken other markets if not Australia’s. It is when the price falls move towards 20 per cent. If the credit that was extended to generate the boom was poorly managed then such a magnitude of asset price falls is large enough to cause macroeconomic and financial instability.

For example, this is where New Zealand finds itself today. Its pandemic property boom was large and the bust is proving to be just as big, already down 13 per cent with interest rates still rising and the central bank forecasting recession…”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/nasty-phase-of-house-prices-could-see-them-fall-by-20-per-cent/news-story/0ab3848e90db964bc0bec10d251aae94%3Famp&ved=2ahUKEwit1YCyyN_8AhVmMzQIHRCqDJ8Q0PADKAB6BAgNEAE&usg=AOvVaw3fUMXF02rXzmNdRpoxikWS

#150 NoName on 01.24.23 at 1:30 am

#87 Flop… on 01.23.23 at 6:25 pm

i see what you did there. ;-)

when i hit submit faster than i remember i didn typo…

Last time i held GIC was around late 2000-ish market was in bad shape then, i ported pension from my previous job.

Bank lady suggested some balanced fund and i was un easy to do it, so i we split half to GIC 3 or 4 yrs and other half to fund she choses. And wen to races bank lady won by dollar amount.

If that wasn’t bad enough, I forgot to cancel auto renew GIC and so i did 2 terms in GIC purgatory…

#151 Dr V on 01.24.23 at 2:04 am

Ah trucks. Got one. F150. Was my work truck, but they let me keep it as a retirement gift. Handy for gardening runs and recyling large items. Always try to multi-task by doing several errands with it. Also gets snow duty. Hoping to keep it under 5000km for the year.

Ever notice that most a-holes in trucks drive Rams? Not
that they are all a-holes. And old geezers like
GM/chevys? Fords seem to have a broader owner base and some a-holes. I’m less of an a-hole since I stopped working. Honest.

An a-hole in a Ram rolled coal on me one day while I was riding my bike. Very strange behaviour. Maybe I can get bike jersey that has a Ford truck on it.

#152 Allan on 01.24.23 at 2:35 am

Kanada is helping the Earth planet by taking people from overcrowded places.
Because of vast, almost empty swaths, Kanada is statistically underpopulated.

#153 Chaddywack on 01.24.23 at 2:38 am

The conservatives cannot win by being Liberal lite. O’Toole was a nice enough guy, but had zero charisma and was trying to replicate Trudeau. Left wing voters are not going to vote for a Conservative saying he’s liberal, they’ll just vote for the real thing.

I think PP deserves a chance. Generally successful leaders cater to their base during leadership campaigns, but then govern from close to the centre. I’m optimistic Canadians will give PP a chance….can’t be worse than 7 years under Trudeau who has basically turned Canada into a college campus.

And…yes it’s way too much catering to Aboriginals and transgender………..just listen to CBC, you’d think 50% of people are gay/lesbian and 1 in 10 are transgender; the coverage is ridiculously disproportionate!

#154 Albertistan on 01.24.23 at 2:40 am

Nice looking Springer, Josh.
It looks to be a Field Bred Springer, an upland machine.

#155 American House Buyer on 01.24.23 at 4:00 am

DELETED

#156 Brazil Nut on 01.24.23 at 4:26 am

Down here in Brazil it is mandatory that everyone votes. We were out of the country and had to go to the electoral office and explain and PROVE that we were out of the country and could not vote. (a person is assigned a district and must vote in their home district so voting at a consulate is not allowed unless certain difficult steps are taken) So we gave the proof AND paid a small fine for missing the vote. At least this way you know the consensus of the people. Of course as one has seen, here in Brazil it doesn’t always mean a smooth election. But at least a leader is chosen with a true majority. Not by roughly 35% of the population (like who shows up in Canada). In Brazil if you do not vote (or justify your absence) you can lose your drivers licence, passport etc. My suggestion to Canada, since it’s Leader loves to give so much money away, is to give a $500.00 tax credit to whoever votes. $500.00 for a couple hours of your time. See how many more people show up…

#157 Seasmy31 on 01.24.23 at 6:28 am

#5 truefacts
Why do active duty soldiers not pay income taxes but the rest of us do?
You must be joking, misinformed or else what kind of BS are you trying to spread? I have heard this falsity before but not in a very long time because most people know the facts by now. Every member of our armed forces pays Income Tax.

#158 under the radar on 01.24.23 at 6:34 am

Pick up trucks – I have a few cars, including a pickup. The most versatile, get you out of a jamb, go anywhere , anytime ,any weather vehicle is my pick up. And it drives like a dream and has enough leather inside for a couple of couches.
Waiting for my TRX to be delivered. – That truck is useless, but will do anything very quickly.

#159 lets' stop sexism on 01.24.23 at 7:35 am

How is it not possible to have a balanced cabinet with brains and talent? The only way would be if women did not have the brains and talent of men or vice versa.
So which is it Garth?
Are you saying they can’t find enough of one gender with brains and talent?
Which one would it be?

#160 Wrk.dover on 01.24.23 at 7:55 am

Most four door trucks are so full of unorganized clutter, there is only room for two peeps, in a crunch. Six door are next, already available from the aftermarket conversion industry.

I once drove an 80’s two door PU 6000km in six days, and felt like a praying mantis the whole way.

When I stow and carry tools & or cargo of value and volume, dry & secure in my spacious vans (with the useful sliding side doors), I just shake my head nope, while observing the Theodore Tug Boat personalities bullying their way along the byway in empty open body low sided ‘trucks’, with front ends modelled after ride-on lawn mowers.

#161 J on 01.24.23 at 8:11 am

#157 Seasmy31
#5 truefacts
Why do active duty soldiers not pay income taxes but the rest of us do?

Soldiers pay income taxes. Only on deplyoment on international operations are tax free at the Federal level.

https://turbotax.intuit.ca/tips/deductions-for-military-and-police-personnel-132#:~:text=For%20members%20of%20the%20Canadian,risk%20levels%20of%20your%20mission.

#162 J on 01.24.23 at 8:14 am

#115 Damifino
“The next banned item will be the plastic clips that close bread bags.”
They have already replaced the clips with cardboard here in Ontario. Of course they dont work as well.

#163 joega on 01.24.23 at 8:29 am

What about Erin O’Toole? He shifter to the centre and was tossed out. I don’t think cons are going there again. They are putting their faith in Trumpism even if it is a milder version.
The deciding Voters only care about how the leader looks on TV no matter what they say in polls.

#164 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.24.23 at 8:31 am

@#152 Allan
“Because of vast, almost empty swaths, Kanada is statistically underpopulated.”
++

People go where the work is.

Work isnt in “vast, empty swaths”….unless you’re a mountain man hunting Grizz….
P.S. don’t forget the bug spray.

#165 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.24.23 at 8:36 am

New Zealand has banned the sale of cigarettes to anyone born after the year 2008.
Now Australia is banning alcohol sales in certain areas to “curtail violence”

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/australia-limits-alcohol-sales-alice-springs-amid-crime-wave-2023-01-24/

One wonders when the socialist leaning nanny state leadership here in Canada will decide to copy that.

#166 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 8:38 am

#158 under the radar on 01.24.23 at 6:34 am
Pick up trucks – I have a few cars, including a pickup. The most versatile, get you out of a jamb, go anywhere , anytime ,any weather vehicle is my pick up. And it drives like a dream and has enough leather inside for a couple of couches.
Waiting for my TRX to be delivered. – That truck is useless, but will do anything very quickly
—————————-
You must be a purebred Albertan cowboy.
A dying breed, for sure.

#167 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 9:03 am

156 Brazil Nut on 01.24.23 at 4:26 am
Down here in Brazil it is mandatory that everyone votes. We were out of the country and had to go to the electoral office and explain and PROVE that we were out of the country and could not vote. (a person is assigned a district and must vote in their home district so voting at a consulate is not allowed unless certain difficult steps are taken)
———————
Brazil is a good example why Democracy cannot be forced on the People.

#168 Prince Polo on 01.24.23 at 9:36 am

The question is, how do we increase taxes without harming growth and innovation? Since growth is the best (and only) way to increase living standards and reduce inequality, pulling it off requires a thoughtful tax policy. I am not a fan of wealth taxes—especially 5% ones on top of large unrealized capital gains taxes. Growth requires letting people earn a positive return on risky investments. There are much better approaches out there.

Source: https://allisonschrager.substack.com/p/notes-from-the-inner-sanctum

#169 Sail Away on 01.24.23 at 9:44 am

#157 Seasmy31 on 01.24.23 at 6:28 am
#5 truefacts

Why do active duty soldiers not pay income taxes but the rest of us do?

—————

You must be joking, misinformed or else what kind of BS are you trying to spread? I have heard this falsity before but not in a very long time because most people know the facts by now. Every member of our armed forces pays Income Tax.

—————

It’s true, S, when deployed in a recognized conflict, soldiers pay no tax.

One slight correction: ‘active duty’ just means soldiers who are fulltime military, and they do pay taxes. The tax free status only kicks in when deployed to combat.

#170 Under the radar on 01.24.23 at 9:54 am

166 Nope ,some days I just like to feel like Satan driving my chariot through hell.

#171 Retired Ron on 01.24.23 at 10:01 am

With 35% support, the Conservatives would form a minority Gov. For a variety of self serving reasons the Bloc Québécois would support the Conservatives and PP would become the next PM of Canada.

The two major parties in Canada tend to oppose from the Right or Left and but Govern from the Centre. I see no reason why this would change now.

Unlike most of the legacy media, (this old Liberal supporter) doesn’t think a Conservative minority would be the end of the world, because as I said, both Libs and Cons tend to gravitate to the centre when in power.

Canada has vast regional, linguistic, and cultural differences, the only way to govern this country is from a relatively narrow band near the middle of the political spectrum. Parties that ignore this rule are short lived.

#172 Quintilian on 01.24.23 at 10:28 am

#129 Squire on 01.23.23 at 10:11 pm

When Ronald Reagan became President in 1981 he cut taxes for the wealthy and everyone thought he was nuts. But this change brought in capital and created what you now know as the tech boom such as Microsoft etc etc. Keep taxing the rich to oblivion and you’re only job will be a barista (maybe)

CRAZY TALK

That theory has been long discredited. The last Conservative buffoon that tried to resurrect such quackery lasted a few hours as Prime Minister.

Yes, the financial dudes in suspenders tossed Liz Truss into the rubbish bin.

#173 Slim on 01.24.23 at 10:37 am

Conservatives need to shake the ghost of Preston Manning and his Reform Party.

#174 Sail Away on 01.24.23 at 10:40 am

Ponz and me in South Dakota having a moment.

https://twitter.com/zigadeb/status/1617372340702281729?s=46&t=rwNmu8e_tfhXdV6d86E1dw

#175 Quintilian on 01.24.23 at 10:45 am

Crowdie, what do you have against educated people?

Why do you disparage people with a BA or MA?

The reason they may be working as a barista at Starbucks is not because they have university degrees; it could be for many reasons.

And really, how many people with degrees are working at Starbucks, give your head a shake.

#176 Observer on 01.24.23 at 10:48 am

#140 Observer on 01.23.23 at 11:18 pm
#123 AR on 01.23.23 at 9:20 pm
“Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?”

In my 30+ years of work experience far more mediocre men were promoted than talented women. So it’s not either or. ‘Talent and brains’ or women. It’s just time to stop automatically favoring mediocre men.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yup. So how do we do that? One way might be “to have the cabinet balanced by gender” whilst ensuring that regardless gender, those hired are qualified.

Ministers are not hired, but appointed from a very small pool of caucus MPs. – Garth

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Ooops. Yeah, I knew that. Was thinking about government employees when I copied/pasted part of your comment.

#177 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 10:52 am

165 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.24.23 at 8:36 am
New Zealand has banned the sale of cigarettes to anyone born after the year 2008.
Now Australia is banning alcohol sales in certain areas to “curtail violence”

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/australia-limits-alcohol-sales-alice-springs-amid-crime-wave-2023-01-24/

One wonders when the socialist leaning nanny state leadership here in Canada will decide to copy that
————————-
Getting ahead of yourself, again, as usual.
Booze is actually more accessible these days than in the past.
Private liquor stores everywhere.
And the Government stores are open on Sunday and longer hours, and much greater selection.
If anything, the cons would probably be more likely to restrict liquor consumption.
The Prohibition in the States came from the religious right.

#178 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 11:00 am

162 J on 01.24.23 at 8:14 am
#115 Damifino
“The next banned item will be the plastic clips that close bread bags.”
They have already replaced the clips with cardboard here in Ontario. Of course they dont work as well.
————————
How hard is it to bring a cloth bin?

#179 Re-Cowtown on 01.24.23 at 11:00 am

#79 4 out of 3 people find math hard on 01.23.23 at 6:03 pm
58 Re Cowtown
Tesla just built a new factory that can make up to 10,000 sea container sized batteries to be used by the power utilities. ( @ over $2,000, 000 per battery plus a 15 year manditory mainenace program per battery) They have over two year wait in back orders. Tesla Energy will become a bigger revenue source than the “Auto ” side , and will have gross margins approaching 50%. There is no reason to have fossle fuel “back up”
https://youtu.be/z7vhMcKvHo8

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Question #1. Where will all the raw materials come from for the battery packs? We’re limited out right now on certain elements like cobalt. There just isn’t any more around. Unless Tesla wants to increase the number of child-slaves mining it in the Congo:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelposner/2020/10/07/how-tesla-should-combat-child-labor-in-the-democratic-republic-of-the-congo/?sh=291b63075cd0

Battery storage costs are extremely high, 3-4X the original cost of the electricity. And a Costco sized warehouse filled with batteries would last a neighborhood a couple of hours at best.

I seriously doubt that people will sit still for $3000/month electrical bills. They’ll start tearing down their neighbors fences for firewood or burning old tires for heat long before that happens.

Any politician or NGO activist who supports grid storage is pro-child slavery and bad at math.

#180 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.24.23 at 11:07 am

Further to booze restrictions:
And don’t forget the juicy booze taxes (15% in BC) that the Government would forgo.

#181 Harvey on 01.24.23 at 11:24 am

“The most lefties are between 18 and 24 (no surprise). People with more money lean right. Those with more education lean left. And the hot button topics are what you’d expect – Covid, vaccine, climate change, immigration, racism, gender, and Indigenous.” – Garth

The output from our Marxist-NWO Education System …..Brainwashed Zombies

#182 Dharma Bum on 01.24.23 at 11:24 am

“Does it make sense to have the cabinet balanced by gender, or should brains and talent be the criteria?” – Garth
———————————————————————————————————

WARNING! * DANGER! *WARNING! * DANGER! * WARNING! *

This inflammatory statement has deemed you a threat to society!

Please report immediately to headquarters for mandatory re-education. Your classmate will be Jordan Peterson.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zePYlaVVo_M

#183 Senator Bluto on 01.24.23 at 11:25 am

US Attorney General Garland stated that the rules were the same regarding Joe Biden’s and Donald Trump’s investigations into classified documents:

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2023/01/24/merrick-garland-claims-no-double-standard-of-justice-in-bidens-classified-doc-scandal/

Garland is correct; the rule followed was that Democrats are innocent until proven guilty and Republicans are gulity until proven innocent. The rules were followed completely, transparently and consistently. No story here.

#184 the Jaguar on 01.24.23 at 11:29 am

re:#170 Under the radar on 01.24.23 at 9:54 am
166 Nope ,some days I just like to feel like Satan driving my chariot through hell.+++

He’s referring to his ride-on lawnmover. He’s ‘King of the World’ when he’s on that thing…

#185 Dharma Bum on 01.24.23 at 11:39 am

SOUTH DAKOTA…

I drove through it 2 weeks ago on the way to Red Deer.

Stopped in Sioux Falls to shop at Duluth Trading, stopped at Wall Drug (iconic 1930s drug store turned massive tourist trap souvenir emporium), picked up a couple of Harley t-shirts in the famous Sturgis, saw Mt. Rushmore, saw the Crazy Horse Memorial, drove through the Badlands, then exited into Montana via Wyoming.

South Dakota.

People actually LIVE there????

#186 Borden Renter on 01.24.23 at 11:47 am

Garth, the ‘right’ is a reactionary force to ‘progressivism’. Still is. You should know this. The fact about the truckers is they were the ‘equal and opposite reaction’ to Trudeau’s policies. Nothing more. People don’t put money/career on the line and drive across this country to a protest for no reason. Continuing to deride these people is failing to understand them and just makes discourse worse. If Trudeau 2 wasn’t so divisive and partisan, I doubt much would have happened, but that was never going to be the case with him or his cronies. Just look at our ‘Minister of Environment and Climate Change’, this cabinet is a sick joke.

What many Canucks have failed to learn over the past few decades, is that government actively ****s up everything it touches. There are no exceptions. It’s so bad that our health care system is falling apart, the military is in shambles, housing is out of control, no new infrastructure can get built without years of delay, if at all, and the list goes on. The only answer most people seem to come up with is that we need yet another government department or commission to oversee the previous failings of the other government departments. It’s all so easy, you see.

I don’t see a way out of this without systemic or financial collapse. The mid-wits will clamour for communism-lite to save them (at least 60% of Canadians or more), and the answers they come up with will be worse than the original problems. Additionally, most people (a good deal of conservatives included) won’t come to the logical conclusion here: warm-body democracy has been an abject failure. The free-stuff brigade will always outnumber the financially solvent, and the level of discourse was always going to descend to where it is, and continue to go lower.

I think we’ll go out like Constantinople: only instead of priests debating while the walls fell, university professors will be too busy arguing over how diverse the groups of angels dancing on the pinhead should be.

The middle won’t hold, it shifts to one extreme or the other, as is its nature.

#187 Victor V on 01.24.23 at 11:49 am

https://www.thestar.com/business/2023/01/24/hundreds-of-thousands-of-jobs-at-risk-if-bank-of-canada-raises-key-rate-for-eighth-time-wednesday-economists-warn.html

Another rate hike from the Bank of Canada this week risks pushing the Canadian economy into a deep recession that could cost hundreds of thousands of people their jobs, a growing number of economists worry.

The Bank is set to announce Wednesday morning whether it will be raising its key overnight lending rate for the eighth straight time, and markets are already pricing in a 25 basis-point (quarter of a percentage point) hike.

That increase, said economist Jim Stanford, would be a grievous mistake for a simple reason: The economy still hasn’t felt the full impact of the seven rate hikes in 2022, and is already struggling.

“I’m still convinced we’re likely facing a recession this year and it will be all the deeper if the Bank of Canada continues this single-minded crusade,” said Stanford, chief economist at the Centre for Future Work.

Sensationalist. Jim Stanford is a union shill. Pure bunk. – Garth

#188 Dr V on 01.24.23 at 12:19 pm

147 Longterm – thank you for sharing your story.

This is a great topic and worth a day’s post on it’s own.
Our esteemed host has an English lit degree, and has
been a teacher and great help to thousands. You story sounds….. similar……maybe too similar? Garth is that you??

I feel the growth of the Post-secondary education industrial complex has resulted in a monster that is very self serving. Feed the peeps anything to get them signed up and in debt for a few years. I think Canada has now reached the top in the percentage of the population with a uni degree. So is there an issue and what is it?

While the world needs journalists, philosophers, historians, it becomes an issue of how many when we lack skilled trades, engineers and health care workers.
I dont know if our immigration policies target those careers.

I have nothing against young people following their passions, just dont complain about the lack of jobs in your chosen field or the large debt you have accumulated. And we are bombarded with these stories.

#189 Faron on 01.24.23 at 12:22 pm

#185 Dharma Bum on 01.24.23 at 11:39 am
SOUTH DAKOTA…

I drove through it 2 weeks ago on the way to Red Deer.

Stopped in Sioux Falls to shop at Duluth Trading,

I knew a lady who lived in Duluth. She got bit by a dog with a rabid tooth. She went to her grave a little too soon. And she flew away howling at the yellow moon.

Meat Puppets, “Lake of Fire”

#190 Faron on 01.24.23 at 12:31 pm

#181 Harvey on 01.24.23 at 11:24 am

The output from our Marxist-NWO Education System …..Brainwashed Zombies

It never fails to impress me that right wing power brokers (almost all of them with ivy-league level educations) have convinced the conservative huddled masses (that’s you Harvey) that getting an education is a bad thing. You have agreed to remain ignorant so thay you may be most optimally exploited.

“progressive taxation is bad” yes massa

“massive pollution of your environment is anavoidable and good” yes massa

“Only certain people should be allowed full liberties” yes massa.

“A deep understanding of history, science, arts, technology lead to woke principles” yes massa. whatever you say massa.

What a sht show.

#191 Flaming Anarchist on 01.24.23 at 12:32 pm

Retired after working 30 years with the BC Ministry of Forests and Lands. When it comes to Government I don’t think anyone is driving the bus anymore. Environmental laws are written to favour companies. Kick the can down the road is the real approach taken by Government. Favourite statement “we are going to have a conversation about”. I had to ask to get out of meetings to get my work done.

Carbon taxes and renewables are not working, oil consumption is still growing as are CO2 emissions. Increasing mining to support these ideas will leave a legacy of mining pollution and tailings ponds. What about promoting the idea of consuming less? Smaller houses, smaller vehicles. Instead we have big heavy electric Hummers and F150’s with no recycling plants for the spent batteries.

Borrow more money to keep the voters happy is the only solution. Our leaders are like parents who can never say no to their childrens endless demands, meanwhile racking up their HELOC to fill the demands.

I stopped voting because I don’t see our politicians having any viable solutions. The real solutions are uncomfortable. An endless rising line of credit to make everyone happy will not solve our problems, nor will your electric Hummer. It’s time to grow up and face the hard choices, even though everyone feels entitled.

If you stopped voting you should stop commenting. You don’t matter. – Garth

#192 Sail Away on 01.24.23 at 12:51 pm

#175 Quintilian on 01.24.23 at 10:45 am

And really, how many people with degrees are working at Starbucks, give your head a shake.

———

Let me Google that for you:

Wow, lots.

“The most common highest degree level of Starbucks employees is bachelors, with 47% of employees having at least a bachelors.

The most common major among Starbucks employees is business. 20% of Starbucks employees majored in business.”

https://www.zippia.com/starbucks-careers-10803/demographics/

#193 Faron on 01.24.23 at 12:52 pm

#174 Sail Away on 01.24.23 at 10:40 am

Love it. @ClownWorld is an Excellent glimpse into the far-right Sail Away media diet not unlike that Bizpacreview garbage post that included video of the murder of two young tourists deemed too idealistic.

@ClownWorld Includes such gems as

— a sticker depicting a hand gun (device designed for the purpose of killing humans) and the words “…wireless hole puncher.”

— a tee shirt depicting George Washington with a pseudo-quote that includes the line “…stacking bodies by now”.

— endless anti-trans and anti-black memes and content.

Trashy.

#194 Linda on 01.24.23 at 1:09 pm

#59 ‘Grandview’ – CPP & OAS are fully indexed to official inflation, so those geezers got a 6.3% increase to their benefits for 2023. Whoo-hoo! Break out the champagne & caviar! Given that ‘average’ CPP payments at age 65 in October 2022 were estimated to be a mighty $717.15 (hardly anyone gets ‘full’ CPP) that gave a whopping $45.18 more per month for those old folks to spend – before tax, that is. What more can one wish for? OAS for those under age 75 is now over $687 per month before tax. Between ‘average’ CPP plus OAS those geezers get over $17k per annum (before tax) to live on. Which for those who have no other savings etc. allows them to qualify for GIS benefits in addition to CPP/OAS. Yep, they are living the good life in their golden years.

#195 millmech on 01.24.23 at 1:13 pm

Good to see Tesla has crashed down below $100 as many experts here predicted, crypto too has cratered along with it, just as the soothsayers foretold!
Stay safe, this is the way.

#196 Faron on 01.24.23 at 1:27 pm

#188 Dr V on 01.24.23 at 12:19 pm
147 Longterm – thank you for sharing your story.

Excellent comment Longterm and my experience as well.

Why do countries like Germany succeed in filling trade positions where North America fails?

1) pathways

2) worker protections esp healthcare and organized labour

Universities have grown to meet demand because primary and secondary ed systems pipeline students toward a university degree and it’s not a woke thing. This has historical roots. As North America grew into Neo Liberalism after WWII, demand for workers was disproportionately in post-sec degree fields because trade work was gradually being offshored. High demand made for high wages thus the degree made sense. Inertia was established and blue collar worker protections and job protections were steadily eroded making “blue collar” work less and less desirable in North America. The culture for trade work withered and fewer and fewer teens would seek that path. The cycle becomes reinforcing as long as there is sufficient growth in those fields.

Germany is an industrial powerhouse because it regulated stronger protections for those workers and those jobs. They have better standing in society, thus teens see tradework as more of an option there.

This is changing and will continue to change in North America as the globalist order fractures in coming decades. Strong unions are key here. Worker organization is rapidly increasing now that the labor shortage has given workers pricing power. People will take a trade job if they know an org has their back and if social support is in place to provide in case they become injured on the job.

Consider that crowdie’s barista might have sucked at a trade job too. The economy is very good at putting (non-immigrant) people where they are needed and suited.

And what I wrote has more to do with corporate work than small business, but small businesses compete in the same labour pool, so are carried along for the ride.

#197 Barzy on 01.24.23 at 1:30 pm

Rhimo’s platform:

1.Build a bridge over Sask so we dont have to drive through it on way to the Rockies/BC. OR move the province west of BC…lol

#198 4 out of 3 people find math hard on 01.24.23 at 1:36 pm

191: Flaming Anarchist: Look up “Redwood Materials”. This is a company founded by an Ex Tesla executive for the sole perpose of recycling the batteries of electric vehicles. Elon Musk has said batteries are the best ‘ore” in the world. Eventually, everything energy will be sustainable and recycled.

#199 mnpr on 01.24.23 at 4:23 pm

#186 Borden Renter on 01.24.23 at 11:47 am

thanks for that. an equal and opposite reaction. been thinking that for a while. thanks for putting it nicely into words.

#200 Buford Wilson on 01.24.23 at 5:00 pm

..be careful what you wish for.

Please don’t use worn out clichés like that, Garth.