Lucky dogs

Colour me lucky. I know it.

My dog loves me. Dorothy has put up with my foibles for fifty years. I still have hair. My professional colleagues are brilliant and my corporate partner enlightened. The finances are good, too. Making money was never my goal, and sometimes I’ve done things (like get into politics or own a few restaurants) that were financial disasters. But it’s all part of learning, doing, trying.

A few weeks ago I got some RSUs issued by my partner, for being a good boy. Those are ‘restricted stock units’ which vest after a period of time (like three years), and are taxable when accepted. The shares can be held for future appreciation (but the value is immediately added to your income) or they can be sold to cover the tax owing.

RSUs are not stock options. An option to buy equity in your employer is only a good deal if the stock’s current value is higher than the grant price. But an RSU – effectively a deferred bonus – is like a cash payment. When the shares vest, as mentioned, the CRA considers them to be a taxable benefit, identical to having been given a bunch of cash. So, pay up.

Here’s what happened. The RSUs were a very generous gift. Within days of receiving the units, tax was due. The amount sent to the CRA was considerably larger than the pile that remained. The effective tax rate I paid was 53.53%.

Am I bitter about ending up with just 46.4% of my gift while the government received more than I did?

No. My income is high. In Canada a financial advisor isn’t allowed to incorporate. It is my duty to pay tax. My country’s worth it. I’m privileged. That is not the point of this post.

But let’s consider a couple of issues.

First, how much is enough? The top tax rate in a majority of provinces now shoots over 50%. The federal Libs have mulled imposing an uber rate on incomes above the current threshold. The majority of the population is in favour, of course, because ‘progressive taxation’ is when the other guy pays. Wealth inequality is a political issue. Eat the rich.

However, will a (say) 60% marginal rate in Canada just further encourage those neurosurgeons, anaesthesiologists, corporate leaders, tech entrpreneurs, rock stars, blue chip lawyers, financial dudes or basketball titans to leave, offshore their wealth or find ways to avoid what seems like a punitive hit?

Of course it will. You’d do the same. And every time taxes have been raised, the amount collected has fallen short of projections. That’s exactly what happened when T2 upped the top rate in 2016, saying it would finance a small tax cut for other taxpayers. It didn’t. In the meantime we might have lost a mess of talented people.

The other point is perception. In our world of online envy and distraction, when it’s okay to make $500,000 a year as a TikTok influencer but grubby and wrong to earn the same as a bank forex trader, when people gladly pay for renovations in cash so the contractor can be a tax evader or average folk try to game the system but think Galen Weston is a criminal, we’ve lost perspective. Being successful is not wrong. It should be a goal.

Those at the higher end of the income scale subsidize the rest. It’s just a fact. The top 20% rake in 44% of all income – usually because they work hard, took risks and do complicated things – but they pay 53% of all income taxes. In contrast, the other 80% of people collectively receive 55.3% of income, yet pay only 47%. And this does not reflect a host of government benefits, from the Canada Child Benefit to GST credits and OAS payments, which are clawed back from, or not paid to, those who earn the most.

And let’s remember what the prime minister himself bragged about: one-third of working citizens pay no net tax. None.

Here’s the tally.

Who earns and pays in Canada?

Source: Statistics Canada, Fraser Institute

It may be time we all started asking politicians to spend less instead of taxing more. Even with a top 53.5% rate, plus a bevy of user fees, sales taxes and clawbacks, our nation shoulders $1.1 trillion in debt and will run deficits annually for years (or decades) to come. Unless the spending is contained, your successful grandkids – the surgeons and startup founders of the future – will be wondering if a 70% tax rate makes moving Stateside a no-brainer.

So, I sent in my wad. Like I said, no complaints. No moaning. No attempt to wiggle out of it. While in Parliament I tried to halt tax creep and raise awareness of the spiraling overhead and swelling debt. But I soon learned that’s not how leaders get elected, or stay elected in this country. Since then our debt has quadrupled. They don’t care.

May that soon change.

About the picture: “This is Louie the land lover,” writes blog dog Jeremy, “ashore at Denman Island,  BC. “

145 comments ↓

#1 Richard L on 10.30.22 at 1:23 pm

Very well said Garth. However as you point out there is no political party that will do anything significant to reduce spending. The electorate always thinks that the other guy will pay.

#2 Melon Tusk on 10.30.22 at 1:24 pm

YOU ARE NOT COMPLETE GARTH.

To be complete, you need a Tesla.

Then, and only then, once your life is green and you are a Net-Zero-Hero can you truly be complete.

#3 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 1:36 pm

Re: Oil
Does Alberta have any museums and/or any famous oil paintings that the “stop oil” protesters could target?
##########

We have some nice rainbow murals and sidewalks the little vandals can work on.

#4 Daveyboy on 10.30.22 at 1:36 pm

My Wife is a V.P. down here in the U.S. Her executive package allows her to defer 80 percent of her pay and bonus. Is there anything like that in Canada?

#5 Paddy on 10.30.22 at 1:40 pm

This question has haunted my mind for a while: how much tax is enough? It’s never enough as long as there are wealthy people with too much money to tax is the general consensus. Not much of a point to working hard, being successful and making mucho dinero when the government wants to essentially penalize you for doing those 3 things. I personally think enough tax, perhaps too much tax is taken in this country. It’s really how the government decides to spend the revenue. I’m sure it’s been said on this blog before but “it’s not a tax problem but rather a spending problem”

#6 bob on 10.30.22 at 1:52 pm

Hey Garth,

Do you think the Liberals, seeing the writing on the wall that their courting of the left, may back-fire due to Poilievre being so galvanizing on the right?

Do we, would you, trust the Liberals if they started to drift back to the middle and start reigning in spending?

Deeds speak. Rhetoric means nothing. – Garth

#7 Keith on 10.30.22 at 2:08 pm

There are serious consequences to going from a very large and inclusive working and professional middle class, to the past forty years of taking away pensions, single income house ownership, benefits, EI qualification, participation in paying income tax.

We aren’t all in it together, which is why we are a divided society. People who don’t pay income tax in this country have gone from being full participants in society financially and socially – owning a house, raising a family, having economic certainty of working income and retirement benefits.

People who aren’t paid a living wage, have to be subsidized by the state. The fact that more and more people don’t earn the living that their parents and grandparents made, comes with the consequences that we are living with. Those of us with income and asset are subject to the tyranny of democracy – those without, can vote to take from those that have.

#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 2:17 pm

Our tennis stars love to play for Canada but are not so proud as to want to pay the taxes.

Bianca Andreescu’s residence is Monaco as is Felix Auger-Aliassime. Pospisil and Shapovalov is Bahamas and Leylah Fernandez is Florida. Genie Bouchard’s residence is listed in Wiki as Las Vegas, Miami and Nassau … not sure how that works.

Steven Guilbeault who has Sports Canada in his portfolio says “Ultimately, despite the fact that the COC and Tennis Canada receive government funding, athletes are free to live where they want.”

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.

#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 2:18 pm

A friend of mine has two young sons in their early 20’s

One is a new cop the other is an apprentice heavy duty mechanic.
They are making excellent money BEFORE the overtime.
Both of them were hired, and were expected to work overtime due to the lack/shortage of employees in both professions.

BOTH of them are now questioning why they are being taxed so much.
They both realize the govt taxation is gutting their OT even if they max out RRSP and TFSA’s.

The govt has sucked all incentive out of these kids at the beggining of their working lives….to work overtime.

“Its not worth it”.

Well done Canada.
Our taxation rates have crushed the work ethic.
Perhaps we should rename the country “Can’t-uh-duh”

#10 Prince Polo on 10.30.22 at 2:19 pm

If voters want to alienate hard working taxpayers and demand we all get “free” ponies, who am I to argue with the “genius” of it? Besides, it’s already apparent that the critical thinking skills are mostly out-to-lunch (see what we’ve done to real estate prices).

Solution: best to LQAtM.

#11 cuke and tomato picker e on 10.30.22 at 2:21 pm

Yes if you save work hard a put away a tidy sum you are
rewarded by paying more INCOME TAX, Every year my wife and I get RRIF money in lump sum on Dec15 th so we have to evaluate and how much we should send to the government as with holding tax so there no big surprises
each tax season. However like you Garth we are thankful
to live in this wonderful country CANADA.

#12 millmech on 10.30.22 at 2:22 pm

I remember the blog being up in arms over those physicians “gaming” the tax system, basically being called cheats and thieves by our great leader.
Blog dogs lapped up the successful being brought down, now we can all enjoy 14 hr emergency room waits, multi- year wait lists to get a “thieving” family doctor, it is not worth it to be a medical specialist in Canada anymore.
Just think of those “greedy” cancer specialist, cardiologists that need to be economically hamstrung so we can all feel better about ourselves.
The grass is getting green down south and more and more will make their way to a less financially punitive jurisdiction.

#13 IHCTD9 on 10.30.22 at 2:26 pm

Post-Trudeau Canada is now a game of chess you play against Ottawa, and your fellow Canucks. The game begins when you graduate high school, checkmate results when you create a life for yourself where income(s) and expenses make sense. Hold the excuses and complaints.

#14 Ustabe on 10.30.22 at 2:28 pm

#3 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 1:36 pm

Re: Oil
Does Alberta have any museums and/or any famous oil paintings that the “stop oil” protesters could target?
##########
We have some nice rainbow murals and sidewalks the little vandals can work on.

What a seemingly innocuous statement yet it is, at the same time, totally odious and unnecessary.

#15 Sail Away on 10.30.22 at 2:31 pm

Yes, Canada’s taxes on high income earners are too high. Our family is actively searching for our US retirement/tax residency location for this exact reason. Simple cause and effect.

As an example, my buddy in the US earns $350K per year and pays $90k total tax. Canada’s tax would be $145k on similar salary disregarding exchange rates.

$55k buys a lot of health insurance. Just a quick word on that point: when productively working in the US, health insurance is covered by the employer. Then after 65, Medicare kicks in and it’s pretty good. Many in my extended US family have had cancers and diabetes and replacements and nobody was thrust into penury. The health thing is mostly a liberal talking point.

The truth is that subsidized healthcare is most beneficial for those on the fringes, particularly new immigrants, unemployed, homeless, junkies, etc. And high earners fund far more than their share while receiving a similar level of care as everyone else. Not really attractive for those who can afford the best. A good friend of mine here recently had a knee replacement done in the US for $60k rather than waiting to grind through the Canadian system.

#16 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 2:31 pm

our nation shoulders $1.1 trillion in debt

———————–

Nice try. *

The “nation” shoulders a WHACK more debt than that (some number a few years old, so more but in the interests of Cdn EGO, I’ll use the smaller numbers):

$ Debt Billions
Gov: Fed & Prov….2,737.60
Household…………2,165.90
Corporate………….5,242.90
Total………………10,146.40

w/o Corporate…..4,903.50

REPHRASE:

our nation shoulders $10.15 trillion in debt

* If it makes you all feel better, use the $1 trillion instead.

The reference was to the fed debt only, obviously. But thanks for being a dink. – Garth

#17 The General on 10.30.22 at 2:40 pm

So the poorest people pay no tax you say? One way to do that is to buy contraband cigarettes, which are everywhere now. Or make your own booze. Or grow yourself some merry-wanna. Or work just enough hours to get on the E.I. gravytrain. The black market is flourishing right now. Sadly, after demonizing legal gun owners, the criminal elements have no problem acquiring firearms with ease. I guess with the looming digital currency, the government will be able to place their hobnail boots on everybody’s faces. Every breath you take, every move you make, they’ll be watching you.

#18 Mikey on 10.30.22 at 2:44 pm

#119 Rhonda on 10.30.22 at 1:21 pm

If you know anything about business or the free market you know Singh is a complete idiot!!

#19 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 2:44 pm

#2 Melon Tusk

you need a Tesla … your life is green and you are a Net-Zero-Hero

——————–

Hate to tell you this but if every motor vehicle in Canada were a Tesla 3 “Net-Zero-Hero” back in 2018,

the ENTIRE Cdn Electricity Grid will have collapsed.

Upon that having happened and Winter being what it is in Canada, there will be others colors you will turn BUT green is not one of them.

#20 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 2:50 pm

Garth, that is an interesting chart. But can you give the dollar figures for those percentage break downs ? E.G. what actual income is described by say the 20% to 40% bar ?
Those figures seem hard to find. Most of the official numbers seem to be based on which province you live in.

#21 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 2:52 pm

Unlike you

Mr. Upper Quintile

[a.k.a., My Liege & sometimes, Overlord]

and being in the Quintile to your Left on that tubular chart of yours I can assure you of this …

CRA will have to pry each and every penny from my cold, dead hands.

Still, I admire your chutzpah when it comes to shelling out cash. And good on you but not on me.

And yes, thank you for spreading it around. Mille Grazie for being you.

#22 the Jaguar on 10.30.22 at 2:53 pm

“…..when people gladly pay for renovations in cash so the contractor can be a tax evader or average folk try to game the system but think Galen Weston is a criminal, we’ve lost perspective.” GT +++

Ain’t it the truth. The ‘underground economy’ is probably larger than anyone knows or can measure, with undeclared rental income at the top of the list. Not sure these practices represent ‘lost perspective’. It’s more like Bill Clinton’s confession as to why he had an affair with Monica Lewinsky..”Because I could”.
Entitlement. The same sense of entitlement those who underreport income feel when they need to access government services paid for by those who declare their full income.

It could change as the world moves toward a cashless society. TurnerNation reminds us weekly on the approaching Orwellian age. GPS already on cellphones, companies being asked to disclose and trade information on their customers, and I have a feeling the CRA learned a lot from the CERB / ineligible recipient debacle. Tax avoidance is legit. Tax evasion needs to be dealt with and perps fined.

As for “halt tax creep and raise awareness of the spiraling overhead and swelling debt.”, can’t how this will ever happen unless more powers and oversight are transferred to the provinces from the Feds. Or bring Paul Martin out of retirement.

#23 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 2:54 pm

The reference was to the fed debt only, obviously. But thanks for being a dink. – Garth

Sticks and stones …

You stepped into that one on purpose and you know it Garth.

Nice try.

#24 The General on 10.30.22 at 2:59 pm

To be honest, it’s easy to buy cigarettes, pot, booze and guns with no tax at all, or paper trail. Now, if you’re living in the countryside growing food, raising some chickens, goats or cattle, that slips through the tax dragnet also. Bartering is coming back. You city slickers can keep your Starbucks and your McDonald’s. Country folks can survive.

#25 Leaf blowers build community - crank 'em up! on 10.30.22 at 3:06 pm

Garth is so right! And we don’t get any tax breaks for maintaining our property, either. I still pay HST on my leaf blower and gasoline taxes on the fuel.

So, hey, remember everybody, get out there now while the football game is on halftime.

Crank up your leafblower and rev it to at least 100 decibels, and just let-er rip!

It’s Sunday after all!

Don’t forget to inhale all the fumes you possibly can, they’re good for you and will make you smarter than your SJW neighbours on the left side.

Plus the beautiful noise will affect cognitive development and produce more supporters for Pierre and Max in the next elections.

Hurry though – there’s only a couple weeks left this year to use them.

What’s not to love about these great tools!

#26 yvr_lurker on 10.30.22 at 3:12 pm

Sorry, but I don’t blame those who might try to do a few small jobs on the side, paid by cash, when they pay their taxes on their main gig. Nor do I go after those seniors who rent out a room in their house on the side because their pension is not enough. These people are just trying to get by and they have never heard of an RSU nor will ever be gifted one. To equate this tax-avoidin lot with that ass Gaelen who effectively has been allowed in Canada to have a quasi-monopoly in the supermarket business in some parts of Canada, and effectively setting much higher prices and raking in uber-high profits, is utter BS.

However, I do well understand the impact of 54% marginals. I had an admin opportunity where I work (was voted by my peers to take on this task), which would have paid an extra 12K per year. However, there would have been a large stress in this position in dealing with challenging people and would have had me tied by an umbilical cell-phone line to the Dean’s office. A simple calculation would give me an extra 460.00 per month im my cheque after the 54% gets hoovered away. Not nearly worth it, and I declined. My neighbour down the street who is an elite tutor for kids of wealthy families charges 90.00 per hour and makes a really good living this way. I don’t ask questions, but frankly 460/90 is close to 5 hours of work.

So when the Gov’t is working at the margins of the Laffer curve (to the right of the maximum) where we effectively are now, people will optimize their positions in different ways (under the table jobs, cash deals, turning seemingly good promotions down for work-life balance) etc…

#27 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 3:15 pm

The American Dream.

Much said in these Comment sections about Canada.

Garth today just told us that America is not the only place where you can achieve the American Dream.

Garth did.

Here’s to North of the 49th 🍁 where dreams come true.

#28 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 3:15 pm

Too busy watching the Mexico GP. { Formula 1 } The leaf blower noise / smell will just add to the experience.

#29 LG on 10.30.22 at 3:16 pm

“Inflation, -that’s the price we pay for those government benefits everyone thought was free.” – Ronald Regan

Government spending creates inflation, then
inflation creates tax revenue for the government to spend.

#30 Linda on 10.30.22 at 3:21 pm

Excellent post. The chart is helpful, but do wonder what the income ranges are for each level. Did a bit of looking but pretty much all immediately searches only talked about earned income/salaries. Still, seems like to be counted in the top 20% one must earn/receive at least $130K per annum. So what I’m wondering is what are the income ranges for retirees? How much pension income would equate to being in say the top 10%? Is someone who receives $50K in annual gross pension income considered rich? StatsCan mentioned some 2 million Canadians (seniors) live on $17K per annum as of 2020. Obviously that is a very low income & I for one would not want to try to live on that little, but what do folks think is high pension income?

#31 TurnerNation on 10.30.22 at 3:30 pm

Pay your fair share!! And get this:
Just another day in the Former First World Countries.
Entering year 4, if you believe this is just happenstance
March 2020: every system designed to protect us has been turned against us. Permanently.

We were to be so healthy, enjoy such heath, after years of crushing Rules and Mandates??

—- Parent with injured child has to visit 5 ERs over two days, for help.

https://old.reddit.com/r/toronto/comments/yggw1u/amid_fears_health_system_is_buckling_toronto/iu9axll/

—————–

.SickKids seeing spike in ER patient volumes, with some waiting up to 12 hours. Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children is urging families to consider other options before coming in to the emergency department (cp24.com)

.Amid fears health system is buckling, Toronto hospitals to issue alerts about overcrowded ERs (cbc.ca)

——- Almost back to normal guys. We have strong moral and medical hygiene programs here ja ja.

https://canadatoday.news/ca/kelowna-woman-says-she-was-escorted-out-of-kgh-by-police-for-not-being-vaccinated-kelowna-news-125879/
A Kelowna woman says her vaccination status prevents her from visiting her ailing grandmother at Kelowna General Hospital.

#32 baloney Sandwitch on 10.30.22 at 3:31 pm

Every time a post like this appears about income taxes in Canada, the malcontents come out like cockroaches. If you are that unhappy here, then please leave and don’t let the door knob hit you in the ass as you exit.

Sure we have high taxes and harsh winters, but there are lots of good things here, like less corruption, less violence, less polarization, better social safety nets, affordable education. Its upto you to see if the glass is half empty or half full and make any changes you need to. Or you can be loser, take your marbles and go the states (if they will let you in, doubtful given the loser that you are).

#33 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 3:34 pm

#25 Leaf blowers build community – crank ’em up!

Don’t forget to inhale all the fumes you possibly can, they’re good for you and will make you smarter than your SJW neighbours on the left side.

——————

That will also do this to you:

https://twitter.com/ClownWorld_/status/1586378443947548672/photo/1

62 years worth of Proof:

https://twitter.com/bsant54/status/1586708458144948227

[The leaf blower originated in 1947]

Forget the DIET, throw you leaf blower away … oops … recycle your leaf blower. Mea SJW PC Culpa.

#34 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 3:37 pm

@#14 Ustabe
“What a seemingly innocuous statement yet it is, at the same time, totally odious and unnecessary.”

++++

Sooo, it’s ok for (environmental) protesters to splash paint, glue, whatever on very old, priceless paintings at world renowned Art galleries but (political) protesters splashing paint on taxpayer funded, rainbow painted, crosswalks is “odious”?

A protest for one is good for all?
OR
Your protest has more legitimacy than everyone’ else’s protest?

#35 Grateful in Victoria on 10.30.22 at 3:38 pm

Good article. And yes, we should ask politicians to spend less or as my husband says waste less. None of us minds government spending on education and health care, roads, etc. but some of the spending is sheer waste.
The problem as I see it and saw it from working for government for a few decades is that no one is minding the bottom line in government. Politicians simply don’t care as they have a different agenda. Public servants often don’t understand or don’t care because it isn’t their money. And if most managers and directors don’t spend their whole budget, it gets cut the following year. The result is March Madness. March is the biggest month of wasteful spending.
So, like you, most of us don’t mind paying taxes because we live in a great country but I watch my daughter and her husband pay well over a hundred grand a year in taxes and it bugs me.
That said, when their son was born and needed to spend several weeks in the NICU they didn’t have to pay for that. To this day they remember that and don’t complain about their taxes.

#36 Alberta Ed on 10.30.22 at 3:41 pm

Well said. But I suspect most Canadians are paying half of their income or more if you count in all the thousands of hidden taxes.

#37 GratefulCanadian on 10.30.22 at 3:42 pm

“Those at the higher end of the income scale subsidize the rest. It’s just a fact.” – correct, emphasis on “higher” (this is generally professionals doing relatively complex work, and who cannot offset their tax burden). Because those on the “highest” levels of income don’t subsidize anyone, because very often they don’t pay much tax. The highest-taxed in contemporary Canada are households bringing in 200-250K pre-tax, not those making millions or more.

“The top 20% rake in 44% of all income” – yes, but not evenly distributed.

“usually because they work hard, took risks and do complicated things – but they pay 53% of all income taxes” – nope; rather rarely because they work hard (most have magaged to “charge rent” – not RE rent, but through monopolies, lobbying, patents); the complicated things they do often relate to elaborate tax avoidance schemes; and the 53% of “all income taxes collected” might sound like a lot, but being left with almost half of a humongous income (assuming they pay half in tax, which is unlikely) is still disproportionate compared to paying 35% tax on an insufficient income when assessed with current cost of living.

The issue with income tax in Canada isn’t only the high taxation levels, but also with what one gets in exchange. Part of the population keeps thinking it’s stellar services they get and feels privileged, but that group is sadly shrinking. From education to medical care, other countries have similar or slightly higher taxation levels, but the deliverables are sky-high compared to what we’re getting there. Some continue to deny that, but their conviction is less strong than in years past.

#38 BC Doc on 10.30.22 at 3:46 pm

A good opinion piece from the Globe and Mail (behind the paywall):

OPINION
Decline of the Liberal empire in Canada
Under Justin Trudeau, the Liberals have lost many of the values and stabilizing influences that kept his predecessors connected to Canadians

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-liberal-party-decline-justin-trudeau/

To paraphrase Ronald Reagan, “I didn’t leave the Liberal Party, the Liberal Party left me.” As a Canadian immigrant who holds liberal values, I continue to hope for a purge within the LP of Canada.

#39 Warren Blacking on 10.30.22 at 3:48 pm

New tax system required:

Personal exemption of $45,000, flat rate tax for anything above that, with no deduction, exemption or credit system.

Tax rate set once every five years.

The portion of tax revenue set aside for social services is capped, not endlessly expanding, and when those funds are exhausted, they are exhausted.

Here endeth the lesson.

#40 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 3:48 pm

#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 2:17 pm
Our tennis stars love to play for Canada but are not so proud as to want to pay the taxes.

Bianca Andreescu’s residence is Monaco as is Felix Auger-Aliassime. Pospisil and Shapovalov is Bahamas and Leylah Fernandez is Florida. Genie Bouchard’s residence is listed in Wiki as Las Vegas, Miami and Nassau … not sure how that works.

Steven Guilbeault who has Sports Canada in his portfolio says “Ultimately, despite the fact that the COC and Tennis Canada receive government funding, athletes are free to live where they want.”

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.
——————–
Boris Becker had a residence in Monaco, too.
Google how that turned out.

#41 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 3:51 pm

#4 Daveyboy on 10.30.22 at 1:36 pm
My Wife is a V.P. down here in the U.S. Her executive package allows her to defer 80 percent of her pay and bonus. Is there anything like that in Canada?
——————
Just ask your smart wife.

#42 Dr V on 10.30.22 at 3:51 pm

98 Summertime

“Europe produces 40 % of its energy from renewables…”
—————————————————

I’d have to read your source to get the context. it may be true for what Europe produces, but apparently not for what it consumes. More like 31% and that is if you include the nuclear.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/02/24/why-europe-depends-on-russia-for-natural-gas.html

Quebec does better.

https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/en/data-analysis/energy-markets/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles-quebec.html

BC quite comparable.

#43 TurnerNation on 10.30.22 at 3:54 pm

Anybody parking their EV inside a home garage?
OOF look at that acrid smoke. Better up the Karbon taxes.

https://twitter.com/AwakeRubes/status/1586049280376438785
Keep buying those EV vehicles as they are SO SAFE!!!!
Happening near our family business. Waterloo Region Vehicle. Fire department has no idea how to put out! Imagine if you were stuck in the vehicle???

———————
Year 4. get used to it.

.Continued ‘critical staffing shortages and high patient volumes’ impact Durham Region emergency departments (cp24.com)

——- Our rulers would never do this to us!

https://seek.rockefeller.edu/flipping-a-switch-inside-the-head/
Flipping a Switch Inside the Head
With new technology, scientists are able to exert wireless control over brain cells of mice with just the push of a button. The first thing they did was make the mice hungry.
Friedman’s team realized that they could use a genetically engineered virus to create doorways into a neuron’s outer membrane.

—— File this one under Former First World Country and Control over our Food Supply (no trucks = no food at the grocery store)

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-10-19/a-25-day-diesel-supply-and-surging-demand-are-a-worry-for-biden#xj4y7vzkg
Diesel Supply of Just 25 Days Poses Problem for Biden
Biden administration calls diesel supplies ‘unacceptably low’

#44 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 4:04 pm

baloney Sandwitch, #13. The don’t let the door hit your ass line is getting very tired. Not just you but all uses of the phrase.
Have you actually ever tried to leave Canada and take up residence / become a property owner somewhere else , particularly as a retired person ?
I would be looking for an English speaking country that has a similar climate to what I now have in the Lower Mainland. But with a lower cost of living. Similar health coverage is a must, good health now , but the years are ticking by.
I think you will find it’s a very short list. Good chance I would have left 5 years or more ago when I retired{ England ,Wales prefered } but no grandparent born there { 2 great grand parents , but they are too distant for me to qualify }.
No interest in a Spanish. Portuguese or other speaking area. I speak English, and want to live like I am a returned distant relative, not a total outsider to the culture. Very open to suggestions, can you name one ?

#45 Joseph R on 10.30.22 at 4:07 pm

#24 The General on 10.30.22 at 2:59 pm
To be honest, it’s easy to buy cigarettes, pot, booze and guns with no tax at all, or paper trail. Now, if you’re living in the countryside growing food, raising some chickens, goats or cattle, that slips through the tax dragnet also.

————————————————

Agriculture is heavily tax-subsidies by the same city slickers you frown upon.

Sheesh!

#46 Dr V on 10.30.22 at 4:08 pm

It will be death by 1000 taxes.

1) Increase the GST (just by 1%) then only partly cover it off with an increase to the credit (for the people hit hardest)

2) Lifetime limit for TFSA contributions (because only the rich have TFSAs)

3) Increase every marginal rate by 1%, then partly cover it off by increase to basic personal exemption

4) increase cap gains inclusion to 66%. Dont want to go too big as it will hurt retirees trying to unload investments.

5) Turn the RRSP deduction into a form of credit where the max bracket would be at $165k so that all income above that is taxed at the full marginal rate.

#47 Dirtydebtor on 10.30.22 at 4:15 pm

I finished engineering school in Canada. Got a job – which was exceptionally difficult to get out of school in 2015, in BC. Over 40 applications, one interview, thankfully I landed it. 57k per year start, it was a bit above average for the time.

I left Canada for NZ in 2018. My wage went from 67k CAD to 100k CAD equivalent.

Got a couple raises, eventually was on to 130k equivalent CAD by the time I had my NZ equivalent of P. Eng.

Started my own company. Make great money. The top tax rate here is 39%. (It used to be 33%, but the labour government brought in a top rate of 39% for earnings over 180k).

There is no equivalent to TFSAs, RRSPs, RESPs etc down here. Because there is no capital gains tax, on any investments. All corporate dividends are taxed and counted as income tax however.

Making great money, paying a lot of tax, investing a ton. Enjoying the beautiful weather. Family back in BC trying to convince me to come home… Sorry, but I can’t afford to. Houses in the Fraser Valley selling for 1.5 million, towns for 1M. Rent is ridiculous. All my old engineering school friends working at RJC and other big firms are all on 80k/year.

Despite the terrible weather, traffic, I would be keen to come home. But now that I’ve got a kid, it’s just financially impossible.

Meanwhile down here, I’m making tons of money. My rent is way cheaper than what I would pay in Canada, and I’ve got ocean views with 8 months of summer weather. You should see what 2 million buys you on Aucklands North Shore!

I am proud to be Canadian, and grateful for everything canadas given me. But sorry, the juice aint worth the squeeze.

I’m sure I could live decent in Alberta or the prairies, but at the end of the day, I’m a 13 hour flight from Vancouver now. In Calgary it would be a ten hour drive. Not much difference.

#48 pBrasseur on 10.30.22 at 4:28 pm

In general those making more money do subsidize the rest, not primarily with taxes but by being more productive and creating wealth.

That’s how capitalism work, and it does work if you let it!

#49 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 4:32 pm

#40 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 3:48 pm
#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 2:17 pm
Our tennis stars love to play for Canada but are not so proud as to want to pay the taxes.

Bianca Andreescu’s residence is Monaco as is Felix Auger-Aliassime. Pospisil and Shapovalov is Bahamas and Leylah Fernandez is Florida. Genie Bouchard’s residence is listed in Wiki as Las Vegas, Miami and Nassau … not sure how that works.

Steven Guilbeault who has Sports Canada in his portfolio says “Ultimately, despite the fact that the COC and Tennis Canada receive government funding, athletes are free to live where they want.”

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.
——————–
Boris Becker had a residence in Monaco, too.
Google how that turned out.
########
Yes, I’m familiar with Boris’s story. I’m sure this generation has better financial advisors.

#50 Flop… on 10.30.22 at 4:33 pm

I was lucky when I arrived in Canada that Mrs Flop’s dental practice agreed to grandfather me in, after my wife had been going there since she grew her first set of chompers.

The main guy,malthough in the twilight of his career, that he extended by keeping in shape, including doing the Grouse Grind on a regular basis,eventually stepped aside, did things the old school way which I appreciated.

I had really good teeth until I was around 20, then after increasing my sugar intake by way of bar beverages, followed by another 3 or so years of backpacking, even more beverages, and no dental check ups, by the time I had arrived in Canada my pegs were a bit of a mess.

Things didn’t look too bad up front, but at the back, fairly decent cavities needed filing, was warned about bone loss, but done in his normal caring, kind, non-sensationalist way.

There was only two seats in the old practice, with a small partition in between, sometimes we would occupy both chairs at the same time, with myself just getting a cleaning,I would try to wind my wife up to get her to put less sugar in her coffee, then the Dr would give her the all clear, What The Floss.

Anyway the old guy retired, they moved across the street to a bigger, more modern practice, where I now watch the Global News Loop on the tv bolted to the ceiling, I’m not sure if watching Global News, or getting your teeth worked on is more painful, but I don’t recommend doing both at the same time.

The new gang wants to upsell everything, it seems, I’m up for medical proactiveness to a point, but they proposed ripping out a couple of teeth to fill up the bone loss to prevent future tooth loss, didn’t sound necessary to me, but I went to the specialist appointment out of respect to hear them out.

I think they thought they had talked me into it, I agreed to revisit at a later date, so when my dental hygienist returned from maternity leave, she was surprised at what she saw on the screen during the initial catch-up.

“You’ve still got all your teeth!” she blurted out, before grabbing the tools of the trade and parting my jaw to take a closer look.

I knew it was time for a Flopperism to break the awkward pause.

Yeah, I replied, guess I’m gonna have to pay Full Teeth Tax this year…

M48BC

#51 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 4:35 pm

@#32 baloney
“Sure we have high taxes and harsh winters, but there are lots of good things here, like less corruption, less violence, less polarization, better social safety nets, affordable education. ”

+++

I used to be that naïve.
Back when Ed Broadbent led the NDP.
Then my parents started charging me room and board.
Perhaps your parents should do the same.

#52 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 4:42 pm

New Zealand would be a great choice to relocate to. But as a retired person I would have to be able to invest N.Z. $750,000 plus have a additional N.Z. $500,000 in the bank and have an anual income of at least N.Z. $60,000. I am afraid I fall somewhat short.
Sounds like you would have to be a top 10% Canadian net wealth person to retire to N.Z. from Canada.

#53 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 4:43 pm

#42 Dr V on 10.30.22 at 3:51 pm
98 Summertime

“Europe produces 40 % of its energy from renewables…”
—————————————————

I’d have to read your source to get the context. it may be true for what Europe produces, but apparently not for what it consumes. More like 31% and that is if you include the nuclear.

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/02/24/why-europe-depends-on-russia-for-natural-gas.html

Quebec does better.

https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/en/data-analysis/energy-markets/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles-quebec.html

BC quite comparable.
########

It’s amazing how ‘sustainable’ you can be when you can flood away thousands of square kilometers of people and caribou land unabated. Makes you feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

“The project flooded 11,500 km2 of wilderness land that was home to the James Bay Cree and Inuit.”

#54 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 4:43 pm

@#38 BC Doc
“As a Canadian immigrant who holds liberal values, I continue to hope for a purge within the LP of Canada.”

+++
As a Canadian, I also used to hold Liberal values…
I couldnt stand PM Harpers arrogant Omnibus Bills and his increasinly arrogant attitude with voters.
I voted Liberal.
Wasnt too worried until they were hijacked by a Woke, politically correct, group of elitist snobs that turn their nose up at anyone that isn’t… just… like… them….
And they couldn’t balance a teetertotter in a kindergarten playground…let alone a budget.
I will never vote Liberal again.

A pox on them all.

#55 The General on 10.30.22 at 4:48 pm

#45- Joseph: Are you serious? Who said I was knocking you pansiefied city slickers? Now, you tell me where all the subsidies are. Do you like eating, because a magical fairy don’t sit on a combine all day and night to feed you. Sheesh!!! Btw, a combine is a contraption used to thresh grain/corn/canola etc.

#56 Grunt on 10.30.22 at 4:51 pm

Fully agreed on the debt.

No worries on Canada. Always been a 2 X 4 thickies country with a brain drain and always will be.

#57 Flop… on 10.30.22 at 4:57 pm

Dragonfly, here’s an article for you to check out.

You seem to want cooler, raining weather, so Ireland fits that bill.

Panama, Costa Rica, seem to regularly come in at or near the top places.

English speaking seems a requirement, so that rules out Australia…

M48BC

14. Ireland
A warm welcome awaits foreign retirees in Ireland, which is renowned for its friendly people, verdant countryside, captivating culture, exemplary healthcare, and more. No wonder the nation appears in so many best places to retire round-ups, including the latest Natixis Global Retirement Index, in which it comes fourth. There’s just one big catch. Non-EU citizens have to provide evidence of an annual income of at least €50,000 ($61k) to qualify for residency.

9. Malta
Obtaining residency in English-speaking Malta is a relative walk in the park. Non-EU retirees simply have to apply on an annual basis and pay a small fee for the privilege. The Southern Mediterranean nation doesn’t disappoint with retirees lauding its climate, culture, cuisine, beaches, landscapes, healthcare and cost of living, which is lower than many other countries in Europe.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/top-countries-to-retire-to-revealed/ss-BB1euiAX#image=1

#58 Quintilian on 10.30.22 at 4:58 pm

“Colour me lucky. I know it.
My dog loves me. Dorothy has put up with my foibles for fifty years. I still have hair.”
Wow, just Wow Wow Wow!
You are one lucky man.

And one of the rare curmudgeon baby boomers that has their priorities straight.

And whose self-worth is not directly proportional to their net worth.

Don’t get me wrong, I have a clear understanding of the value of money.
However, most the curmudgeons in my orbit are still in the phallic stage, except the fascination is with money rather than their genitalia.

They are such a bitter group, always complaining about taxes, the government, their blind borderline hatred of millennials, anti-immigrant, with an absurd preoccupation with people’s Latte expenses.

But most disturbing, is that at their age, they are still mostly unwise, uniformed, often too opinionated.

#59 I can see clearly now on 10.30.22 at 5:01 pm

#9 FARTZ
……..

that sounds like right wing conspiracy vitriol to me.

Can’t understand why they would complain.

#60 The General on 10.30.22 at 5:04 pm

#51- c.e.f. : You make some valid arguments, Mr. Fart’s. In fact, I agree with your comments more every day. Except anything about operation Z. By the way, I’d prefer Greenbacks over Rubles this time, if you can swing it. Cheers!

#61 Please tell us on 10.30.22 at 5:07 pm

Soren Angst,

When you wake up in the morning do you extract your brain and put it in a blender, then type diatribe?
The blog wants to know.

#62 IHCTD9 on 10.30.22 at 5:14 pm

#41 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 3:51 pm
#4 Daveyboy on 10.30.22 at 1:36 pm
My Wife is a V.P. down here in the U.S. Her executive package allows her to defer 80 percent of her pay and bonus. Is there anything like that in Canada?
——————

Just ask your smart wife
——-

C’mon ponz, they live in the US already. Smart wife has already answered.

#63 Dr V on 10.30.22 at 5:16 pm

53 Don G

“The project flooded 11,500 km2 of wilderness land that was home to the James Bay Cree and Inuit.”
—————————————————-

Indeed. All energy comes with a price. Most think electricity comes from a hole in the wall.

#64 1% prepper on 10.30.22 at 5:31 pm

Amen. Went from mid 6 figures annual INCOME TAX bill to now ZERO. Decided it wasn’t worth it to work so hard and have the government take half. Rearranged my life. Stopped consuming and now pretty much living off my savings at 50. Happy to receive my HST credit and low income support, and looking forward to CPP, OAS, and GIS. Let someone else finance Justin’s drunken spending orgy.

#65 TMac on 10.30.22 at 5:34 pm

“It is my duty to pay tax. My country’s worth it.”
I do agree with you Garth, I am in this tax bracket as well.
However one has to ask themselves while being taxed this much. Are my tax dollars being spent properly? I weigh this question with “are the services provided by my government getting better or worse?”
At this point in time I would argue no. There is more waste now than ever before for less service. This waste is getting even more costly. Where does it stop? Do we pay 60%? 80%? You cannot tax a nation into prosperity. Ever.
If this is the case there should be an option for anyone to pay less in order to take care of themselves more.
Not a full withdrawal from the system but, at least enough for someone to buy what they need from the private sector.
As a baseline for simplicity sake the government should only be in charge of some basic needs such as:
A simplified social safety net, infrastructure, health care, education and defense.
Most everything else could and should be up to the individual.

#66 The General on 10.30.22 at 5:35 pm

Dear Mr. Fart’s: May I suggest you read Mr. Putin’s speech at the Valdai club or watch it. You and Mr. Putin have some disturbingly similar views, Mr. Fart’s. It’s approximately 4 hours long and was delivered just the other day. Take care.

#67 Tom on 10.30.22 at 5:39 pm

I’m surprised about that graphic but isn’t that what we want to see? Obviously, a lot of those high income earners (like myself) are able to game the system and not pay our fair share

#68 Steph on 10.30.22 at 5:39 pm

Garth isn’t wrong. I left my high salary job last year. I go back for the occasional contract but I work less than half the year now. The tax bill wasn’t worth it, and having time to travel, spend time with family, and work on my terms is much more satisfying then giving away half my paycheque.

the best part? I now work 40% of the year and take home 60% of my income.

#69 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 5:40 pm

#28 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 3:15 pm
Too busy watching the Mexico GP. { Formula 1 } The leaf blower noise / smell will just add to the experience.
#####
Forgot that was this weekend. Thanks for the prompt.

#70 Wrk.dover on 10.30.22 at 5:43 pm

Garth; the best way to make your case, would be to have one of your quants chart when the rate of creep hits 100% in the near future.

The situational absurdity would be apparent.

As for eight figure earners, Robin Hood was the good guy.

#71 Jane24 on 10.30.22 at 5:46 pm

Hey Dragonfly

I suggest Cyprus. Used to be run by the Brits for many years so very Anglo, most folk speak English, lovely folk too, great weather and beaches, open retirement visa programs with low 10% world-wide income tax. $400,000 Canadian buys a lovely house with pool. Great health care system. What’s not to like.

Second suggestion is the Azores between Newfoundland and Dublin. Part of Portugal so has the open 10% income tax program for retirement. Population is about 50% Portugese and 50% retired Canadians. Very international feeling there. Great health care. Wonderful homes with sea views for that same $400,000 Cdn. Many homes flying maple leaves outside. I had a very strange pub night on St Mary’s island once. I was the only Brit in there, everyone else was retired from Ontario!

#72 Born in Hamilton on 10.30.22 at 5:49 pm

Today’s article hits home. My wife is an experienced operating room RN who left Canada for the U.S. three years ago. Likes it here and will soon become a citizen. Canada lost a good one.

#73 Valleyboy on 10.30.22 at 5:56 pm

When you say debt, you are talking about the non government getting more. Why would you want to scale back the non governments money?

#74 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 6:02 pm

Thanks Flop. Ireland would indeed fit the bill. A significant number of my ancestors came from there. But a century or more ago.
However the required 50,000 Irish Pound yearly income is over $86,000 CDN. I didn’t even earn that much when I was working let alone retired.
I will have to look into Malta. but it sounds too hot for me. I very much like the temperate rain forest environment of Langley except how it turns my house to compost. I spend quite a bit of time out in the forest. Both rainy and dry season.

#75 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 6:08 pm

Sorry , thats 50,000 Euro, but still about $67,000 Canadian / year. Thats more than I have coming in.

#76 truefacts on 10.30.22 at 6:12 pm

Pierre Poilievre has talked about “METR” (marginal effective tax rates).
In some cases due to clawbacks for things like Child Tax Benefit, each incremental dollar is reduced by 80% in some cases!
How much is “fair share”?

#77 Reality is stark on 10.30.22 at 6:14 pm

Another good article.
Now you guys are starting to get on point.
However you did not discuss the increased taxation of luxury goods. So your figures are highly understated.
Our political elite operate on the prayer of high commodity prices. They do not administrate anything, they just write blank cheques.
If China falters further our dollar will collapse.
I guarantee you our public servants couldn’t give a rat’s ass. They already have your money locked up in their pensions.
You on the other hand will need to work until 70 just to survive.

#78 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 6:15 pm

#49 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 4:32 pm
#40 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 3:48 pm
#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 2:17 pm
Our tennis stars love to play for Canada but are not so proud as to want to pay the taxes.

Bianca Andreescu’s residence is Monaco as is Felix Auger-Aliassime. Pospisil and Shapovalov is Bahamas and Leylah Fernandez is Florida. Genie Bouchard’s residence is listed in Wiki as Las Vegas, Miami and Nassau … not sure how that works.

Steven Guilbeault who has Sports Canada in his portfolio says “Ultimately, despite the fact that the COC and Tennis Canada receive government funding, athletes are free to live where they want.”

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.
——————–
Boris Becker had a residence in Monaco, too.
Google how that turned out.
########
Yes, I’m familiar with Boris’s story. I’m sure this generation has better financial advisors.
—————
The EU is unifying their tax system.
Very few places left to go for tax cheaters.

#79 Armpit on 10.30.22 at 6:22 pm

When i was younger and struggling in my life, I worried about my budget. Now… I worry about T2’s budget.

#80 PeterfromCalgary on 10.30.22 at 6:24 pm

So houses in the GTA are going for millions. While in Detroit the average house sell for 85K. So why not just trade Northern Ontario for Detroit. Housing problem solved of coarse the USA will never give up Detroit sports teams but they can move!

#81 AM in MN on 10.30.22 at 6:26 pm

This is the issue of why all democracies eventually fail. When the majority can tax the wealth of the minority, eventually the minority quit producing and it all falls apart.

The max revenue comes at about 30% tax rate, the Laffer curve & others have studied this.

There can be bumps in the road to oblivion. Check out the latest election in Vancouver. Ken Sim started a new party 18 months ago. Just won Mayor & Council and School Board, every member owing their seat to him. He just shut down memberships to his party os that it can’t be taken over. Won’t spend 4 years fighting a rear guard action.

The hunt is on for spending cuts and economic growth, along with reducing crime. I suspect money will start flowing in big time over the next few years.

Not everyone has the emotional connection to a country that Garth has. Some simply need to put their family first, especially when you have children.

Lots of opportunities out there for making money, nothing wrong with spending some time figuring out how to keep some of it. A good place to start is having family you can trust to work with over multiple generations.

Start a business, whatever it is you do, incorporation can help. Play across borders where you can.

#82 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 6:31 pm

#51 FURZ
I used to be that naïve.
Back when Ed Broadbent led the NDP.
Then my parents started charging me room and board.
Perhaps your parents should do the same.
——————
Now it all makes sense.
Neglected kids make bitter and angry adults.

#83 PeterfromCalgary on 10.30.22 at 6:32 pm

We should probably try to keep the mineral rights in any trade for Detroit for northern Ontario. Lets figure out how to solve Canada’s housing problem in the comments people!

#84 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 6:34 pm

#63 Dr V on 10.30.22 at 5:16 pm
53 Don G

“The project flooded 11,500 km2 of wilderness land that was home to the James Bay Cree and Inuit.”
—————————————————-

Indeed. All energy comes with a price. Most think electricity comes from a hole in the wall.

###########$
I’ve worked on energy projects for most of my career so we both agree I get a little triggered when Legault comes across with his smug condescending attitude.

#85 Soviet Capitalist on 10.30.22 at 6:39 pm

Very well said.

#86 Paul on 10.30.22 at 6:42 pm

Old ancient proverb don’t eat the chicken that lays the Golden egg!

#87 Fred Hache on 10.30.22 at 6:44 pm

The chart illustrates the imbalance of the tax system. If the middle quintile earns 16% of the income, in my view, it should be paying 16% of the taxes. The lower two quintiles can pay a lower share of taxes and the upper two quintiles can pay a higher share. Fiscal responsible government will not occur unless the middle is burdened with the true cost of program spending.

#88 Cow Man on 10.30.22 at 7:01 pm

#24 The General

To your surprise the government has records of all livestock in Canada. For over 40 years all bovines have to be double ear tagged at birth. “For Health Reasons” Agriculture Canada states. When the animals go to a slaughter house the tag numbers are recorded and can be traced back if the owner did not sell the animal through recorded transaction.

Small flock chicken owners are also recorded unless they grow their own grain and hatch their own chicks. Feed stores will not sell incubator chicks without a record of where they are to be housed. Also for health reasons.

There are always ways to circumvent the system; but it is hardly worth the trouble since it costs more to feed back yard chickens with purchased chicken feed than to buy the eggs and the meat.

#89 bubu on 10.30.22 at 7:02 pm

I would be happy with split income if not less taxes… And yes, I complain because I work 60-70 hours a week for my high income. What is the incentive to do it anymore? Honestly, I’m thinking to get a government job 9 to 5. I just had an interview but I still debate what to do as a director position makes less than half what I make now… Maybe work only 3-4 more years and retire is better…

#90 Doing my Part on 10.30.22 at 7:02 pm

I’d like to see a picture of Ponzi as I have a visual based on his negative attitude and general distaste for anything but his own opinion. I can’t not think about a europeon Archie Bunker when I read his comments.

#91 Flop… on 10.30.22 at 7:15 pm

4 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 6:02 pm
Thanks Flop. Ireland would indeed fit the bill. A significant number of my ancestors came from there. But a century or more ago.
However the required 50,000 Irish Pound yearly income is over $86,000 CDN. I didn’t even earn that much when I was working let alone retired.
I will have to look into Malta. but it sounds too hot for me. I very much like the temperate rain forest environment of Langley except how it turns my house to compost. I spend quite a bit of time out in the forest. Both rainy and dry season.

//////////////////////////////

Yeah, my retirement will probably be plucked out of the bargain bin at the last minute, as I’m not a big earner but like my travel and new experiences.

I’ve copped a ribbing on here for my indecisiveness, but in a whole bunch of countries they allow blue collar bums like me in, so if you can dream it, you can do it.

I wouldn’t qualify for Ireland either at the present time but things are always changing.I once had an Irish work visa but never activated it after meeting my wife and settling in Vancouver for the weather and affordable real estate.

I wouldn’t get to hung up on the language thing that much, I’ve been to around 30 countries, lots of countries with English as a second language, I was even dumb enough to live in France with no French when I got off the plane, you want to know what’s going on, but you don’t need to what everyone is grizzling about.

Growing up in Australia, I thought Japanese was more appropriate so that what language I studied in high school, never been there yet.

Those 25 countries on the link I supplied have vastly different entry requirements, Panama seems like it has a low bar, with decent quality of living so I will put that one up.

If you’re not into it that much financially, then maybe hybrid 6 months here, 6 months wherever could work.

Keep looking, like I said, things change.

When I first applied for a Canadian work visa I was too old, later that year they put the age requirement back 5 years, I think, that change in policy allowed me to come here and meet my wife and changed the second half of my life, so far.

Maybe another Bureaucratic stroke of a pen will change the last third of my life…

M48BC

—————————————————————

2. Panama
Panama has previously topped the International Living index for a number of years and remains an outstanding retirement destination. In addition to the Central American country’s low cost of living, fabulous climate, beaches, amenities and healthcare, Panama provides seniors with unparalleled benefits and discounts such as 25% off utility bills and half-price movie and show tickets. Expats need only be in possession of a Pensionado visa, which is available to anyone with a monthly income of $1,000 or more, to reside there.

#92 Steve on 10.30.22 at 7:16 pm

What is loss in Canada is the responsibility to pay your fair share of the cost of society. When we have former prime minister taking cash payments then negotiating with CRA for taxes, we are lost.
Our taxes pay to our society, yet we have government who seems to fail to understand this by allowing spending scandals. We don’t want to become Greece where tax evasion is a sport. We need CRA to crack down on tax cheaters. Contractor taking cash is stealing from your neighbours or future generations since they need to pay for that loss revenue.

#93 Tony on 10.30.22 at 7:21 pm

All the rich people I know parked their money offshore ages ago. I better not name names because some are household names. People who I’m related to some of their relatives are in the Canadian Who’s Who.

#94 Unpinned on 10.30.22 at 7:31 pm

DELETED (Anti-immigration)

#95 TheDood on 10.30.22 at 7:31 pm

#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22 at 2:17 pm
Our tennis stars love to play for Canada but are not so proud as to want to pay the taxes.

Bianca Andreescu’s residence is Monaco as is Felix Auger-Aliassime. Pospisil and Shapovalov is Bahamas and Leylah Fernandez is Florida. Genie Bouchard’s residence is listed in Wiki as Las Vegas, Miami and Nassau … not sure how that works.

Steven Guilbeault who has Sports Canada in his portfolio says “Ultimately, despite the fact that the COC and Tennis Canada receive government funding, athletes are free to live where they want.”

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.
_______________________________

If you were a young athlete making millions, what would you do? Stay in Canada, freeze, and pay a bomb to live here? I think not. People wonder why a Canadian team hasn’t won a Stanley Cup in 30 years? Same reason. The best players want to be south of the border. Better weather, less scrutiny from media, less taxes, higher quality of life, etc.

#96 Frequent flyer on 10.30.22 at 7:51 pm

Tax rates in this country are a disgrace and a disincentive. People no longer want to work OT or even take on a second part time job which is what my generation used to do to get ahead in life. Government just takes it.

For example a very, very good finishing carpenter I know will not work more than 15 hours a week. He can get by and he refuses to work more to fund government debt or $6000 London hotel rooms for the political elite. He’s currently on a job where he was offered $10/hr above what he currently charges so the job might move more quickly. He turned it down. Wasn’t enough left after tax for him to bother. His counter offer was that for anything less than an additional $25 it wasn’t worth it for him to disrupt his work/life balance.

What a mess we’re in.

#97 Ole doberman on 10.30.22 at 7:51 pm

Government needs taxes as the monetary system is collapsing from debt.

The West and NATO need war so they can use it as an excuse to default all debt, and move to a digital currency.

#98 Randy on 10.30.22 at 7:53 pm

You should know that you can’t rise to the top in business, entertainment or politics unless you are a gender inverted freemason cabal member…

#99 Mad Vlad on 10.30.22 at 7:53 pm

#32 baloney Sandwitch

Yup there’s always someone like you in every group… “if you don’t like it then leave” we will never fix our problems with that attitude.

BTW: you spell sandwich wrong.

#100 Drill Baby Drill on 10.30.22 at 8:13 pm

We are about to get Triple Triple Tripled.

#101 Shawn on 10.30.22 at 8:25 pm

#71 Jane24 on 10.30.22 at 5:46 pm

Second suggestion is the Azores between Newfoundland and Dublin.

****************************
Wife and another couple spent a day in the Azores on a trans-Atlantic cruise. Very temperate climate becasue of the gulf stream. Looked like a great place to do for example an internet business from.

It looked like a relatively low income place and therefore your Canadian pension would go far.

I liked that the beer was far cheaper than on the cruise ship.

Would be a reasonable retirement place but probably not if you have kids or grandkids in Canada as it’s too hard to get to.

#102 Ustabe on 10.30.22 at 8:36 pm

My wife of almost 50 years and I spend (pre-Covid) quite a bit of time in Portugal.

Whether in Lisbon or Tavira, from shop keepers to government officials most of the folks speak and use English better than a lot of the posters on here.

They advise me by giving me advice, know what I mean?

#103 Linda on 10.30.22 at 8:37 pm

#35 ‘Grateful’ – about your comment that the government employees don’t care because ‘its not their money’. Actually, it IS their money. Anyone who lives/works in Canada & pays taxes are putting “their” money into the hands of the government. So it isn’t that those public employees don’t care. It is that they, like most of us, have little say in how those taxes are allocated/spent. The politicians determine how our $ are spent; the public service merely enacts the spending of said $ as directed by policy decided by those self same politicians.

#104 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 8:41 pm

#90 Doing my Part on 10.30.22 at 7:02 pm
I’d like to see a picture of Ponzi as I have a visual based on his negative attitude and general distaste for anything but his own opinion. I can’t not think about a europeon Archie Bunker when I read his comments.
——————
I’d go with ANDY CAPP.
My favorite cartoon.
Great Brit Humour.
Too bad they cancelled it, due to pressure from Over sensitive people.

#105 Nonplused on 10.30.22 at 8:43 pm

The formula for government tax rates is as follows: As much as they can.

The formula for government borrowing is as follows: As much as they can.

You’d think that increased taxes would lead to less borrowing, but there is no evidence that is the case. Instead, increased tax revenue leads governments to assume they can support higher interest charges.

The only way to slow the process down is to change the government. But that is only temporary. Eventually the government debt must be defaulted on through inflation or outright.

As for progressive tax rates, they are nice because it makes it look to 80% of the voters that only 20% of the voters are going to get screwed. However, that is a misconception. We all pay the same effective tax rate. The difference is that the top 20% collect the tax from the bottom 80% through high fees and prices, and then forward the money on to the government. If we had a flat tax rate, lawyers and doctors wouldn’t be so damn expensive.

Of course the downside of this method is that whatever you tax becomes disincentivized, so you get less lawyers and doctors until the price goes up high enough to cover the taxes. So you, as part of the 80%, get less service and higher prices. Fun!

#106 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 9:15 pm

@#82 Poor Ponzies Parental Problems
“Now it all makes sense.
Neglected kids make bitter and angry adults.”

+++
I’m sorry to hear you were neglected.

#107 I don't know on 10.30.22 at 9:22 pm

While I admire our host’s noble take on paying tax, I disagree with the overall message here that Canadian taxes are “too high”.

It’s become quite clear that a country’s overall standard of living does not correlate well with general taxation rates.

If anything, slightly higher taxation rates usually translate to a higher standard of living for the average person.

The grass is not greener. The US, while still a wonderful country, has plenty of problems that we do not have to contend with.

IDK

#108 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 9:24 pm

Lula beat Bolsanaro in Brazils federal election.

Bolsanaro promised to deny accepting the vote results if he lost.

Another Trump… another insurrection?

#109 The General on 10.30.22 at 9:25 pm

#88- Cow Man: Yes, cattle are tagged, Yes, you need a chicken coop before you buy chickens. Barter could include chicken for beef, feed grain for pork, eggs for honey or picking rocks for some contraband ganja.

#110 I don't know on 10.30.22 at 9:31 pm

#97 Ole doberman on 10.30.22 at 7:51 pm

The monetary system is actually more secure than it was prior to Feb 2022. For anyone paying attention, aligning with Russia does not put you in great company. There are no viable, trustworthy alternatives despite of what the trolls on social media say.

Fact is NATO is a defensive alliance that has done a great job of keeping the peace on the European continent since 1945.

Russia was the country that did the invading.

IDK

#111 Doug t on 10.30.22 at 9:31 pm

#106 fartz

LOL KABOOM

#112 Doug t on 10.30.22 at 9:36 pm

Let me tell you how it will be
There’s one for you, nineteen for me
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman

Should five per cent appear too small
Be thankful I don’t take it all
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman

If you drive a car, I’ll tax the street
If you try to sit, I’ll tax your seat
If you get too cold I’ll tax the heat
If you take a walk, I’ll tax your feet

Taxman!
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman

#113 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 9:37 pm

#103 Linda on 10.30.22 at 8:37 pm
#35 ‘Grateful’ – about your comment that the government employees don’t care because ‘its not their money’. Actually, it IS their money. Anyone who lives/works in Canada & pays taxes are putting “their” money into the hands of the government. So it isn’t that those public employees don’t care. It is that they, like most of us, have little say in how those taxes are allocated/spent. The politicians determine how our $ are spent; the public service merely enacts the spending of said $ as directed by policy decided by those self same politicians.
—————-
Well, that’s how a democracy works.
Voters elect a government based on the party platform, and how they perceive the party will spent the tax dollars.
For instance, voters generally believe that the Cons spending will be more “conservative”, and the libs and sozis will spend like drunken sailors.
Just joking of course, but that’s how most Western Governments work.
I’m not sure how the individual taxpayer can determine national spending policies.
The suggestion has been made that taxpayers send in their money, and stipulate where and how it should be spent.
Pretty impractical, don’t you think.
Remember, if you’re not happy with the Government throw the rascals out at election time.
Party with the most votes gets to govern, and Coalitions are ok.
Nothing wrong with that IMHO.

#114 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.30.22 at 9:44 pm

@#113 Ponzies Predominant Puffed Precranial Pumpkin

“Nothing wrong with that IMHO.”

+++
I didnt realize someone with such a inflated cranium could be humble…..

#115 Melon Tusk on 10.30.22 at 9:57 pm

#19 Søren Angst on 10.30.22 at 2:44 pm
#2 Melon Tusk

you need a Tesla … your life is green and you are a Net-Zero-Hero

——————–

Hate to tell you this but if every motor vehicle in Canada were a Tesla 3 “Net-Zero-Hero” back in 2018,

the ENTIRE Cdn Electricity Grid will have collapsed.

Upon that having happened and Winter being what it is in Canada, there will be others colors you will turn BUT green is not one of them.

Charge them from your roof solar panels Strange Son.

#116 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.30.22 at 10:18 pm

#105 Nonplussed
If we had a flat tax rate, lawyers and doctors wouldn’t be so damn expensive.
——————-
Gotta dispute that.
Doctors wages in progressive tax countries in Europe are lower.
In Canada and the States they charge so much, because they have to recuperate the enormous cost of their education which is free in many countries in Europe.
And also Liability Insurance is much higher in Common Law Countries.

#117 k on 10.30.22 at 10:53 pm

Garth ! You nailed it again ! Not sucking up too much I hope but I will say you have a very realistic and respectful view of your place in the Canadian material and political landscape. Successful yet humble. And that Capitalism is working and alive and well. Remember 80 % of North Americans worth over $5 million made it on their own by working hard and being frugal. No Starbucks every day idiots. The Woke and possible Millenial view is that those same people inherited the dough or their in some how with some stock market connections . NDP envy ! No Down Payment Party .

#118 Don Guillermo on 10.31.22 at 12:35 am

#95 TheDood on 10.30.22 at 7:31 pm
#8 Don Guillermo on 10.30.22

Felix and Lehlah are my favorites.
_______________________________

If you were a young athlete making millions, what would you do? Stay in Canada, freeze, and pay a bomb to live here? I think not. People wonder why a Canadian team hasn’t won a Stanley Cup in 30 years? Same reason. The best players want to be south of the border. Better weather, less scrutiny from media, less taxes, higher quality of life, etc.
@@@@@@@@

I’d pick Nassau. I prefer to be in a similar time zone as friends and family. The Caribbean is nice as long as you can avoid sargassum. Mediterranean beaches are rocky and too cold in winter months. West coast of Mexico is best but isn’t a tax haven so there is that.

#119 Gene Sullivan on 10.31.22 at 12:48 am

High Land Value tax and low income tax (10-15%) will not only solve our real estate problem and lack of productivity but will also remove our current wealth gap. I always wondered why you never spoke about the High Land Value tax combined with low income tax idea.

Love you blog, read it daily and comment rarely but support you fully.

#120 millmech on 10.31.22 at 2:00 am

#9 CEF
There is a company from the States actively recruiting tradesmen for the USA, very good pay and benefits, also there is another company out of Prince George recruiting trades for the southern parts of the States as well.
Tell the buddy to get his kid red sealed asap and get him down there, there is a severe shortage of HD mechanics, millwrights, welders and it will be one of the best decisions economically that he will ever make.

#121 millmech on 10.31.22 at 2:29 am

#32
Yup the door did not hit their ass on the way out, but it did swing shut to reasonable wait times and adequate care as the doctor shortage wave has become a tsunami.
The tide drawing out is when we should have collectively looked at retention of medical personnel, but in our arrogance, we said statements like yours, (inferred they were cheaters who were screwing over the little guy) thinking they would never leave.
Well, they left and those who have stayed behind are being penalized with long hours that will be taxed away by an unappreciative populace.
Expect more to leave for better money or that they have become burnt out.
I guess instead of advertising $500k for a medical professional with 12 plus years of schooling and a high debt load we could just advertise for what they really get paid after taxes, $200k and then see how many are breaking down the door to get in. I know tradesmen who have not graduated high school who make more than doctors in our country.

#122 Igor Ditzenhoff on 10.31.22 at 3:21 am

#44 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 4:04 pm
I speak English, and want to live like I am a returned distant relative, not a total outsider to the culture. Very open to suggestions, can you name one”

You seem to like places with crap rainy weather like UK or Ireland ….why not look at Goa, Penang, or elsewhere in Southeast Asia. Great weather, food, and medical care is a bit like hotels, from 1 to 5 star. You pay at the level you can afford but you can always get immediate service on demand at the private (but more expensive places). No 10 hour waits….

#123 JM Keynes on 10.31.22 at 6:35 am

Yes, I can see the exodus to the good ol’ USA happening in countries like Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands which have a higher income tax rate than Canada. The fact that the wealthiest in society have made their wealth in the form of capital gains and not personal income is conveniently left out of your article Garth. Further, that capital gains are only half taxed in Canada and that the poorest segment of society have no capital assets is also conveniently left out. And for all those whose educations in Canada was at a fraction of the cost of US education and then decide to bail to the US, adios amigos.

#124 Dharma Bum on 10.31.22 at 8:28 am

Message to Government:
Spend less.
Tax less.
Shrink yourselves as much as possible.
Minimize.
Stop all the make-work projects.
Just cut it out.
Stay out of our lives.
Just do your jobs.
Quit wasting our money.

#125 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 8:41 am

@#121 millmech
“The tide drawing out is when we should have collectively looked at retention of medical personnel, but in our arrogance, we said statements like yours, (inferred they were cheaters who were screwing over the little guy) thinking they would never leave.’

+++
Speaking of kids and doctors.
I have told this story before and it confirms the bureaucratic ineptitude of our beloved govt.

A friends son won a scholarship to study medicine at Dalhousie. Part of the deal when he graduated. He had to stay in Nova Scotia to practice medicine.
He graduates, no work placement for him.
So they scratch his GP commitment to the Province.
But they offer to send him to Magill to study Heart Medicine for free if he agrees to set up practice in Montreal.
Graduates, full honors….still no work.
The govt wipes that medical school debt and offer him more training out West.
Now?
Canada never did hire him. They spent millions training him and he is now working in the States making HUGE bucks.
I’m sure his story of govt promises and inept govt planning isn’t the only one out there in Can’t-uh-duh
Excellent Mark

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 8:48 am

@#58 Quinty’s Questionable Qualities
“But most disturbing, is that at their age, they are still mostly unwise, uniformed, often too opinionated.”

+++

You seem to have peaked early in that dept.
Its all downhill from here Quinty.

#127 Randy on 10.31.22 at 9:04 am

The basic business model for Dentistry is Drilling, Filling and Billing while telling people to keep drinking fluoride so they stay dumbed down. Never tell the truth about what really causes dental and gum diseases…

#128 SunShowers on 10.31.22 at 9:19 am

Raise the capital gains inclusion rate to 100%, and cut income taxes to compensate.

Reward neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, corporate leaders, tech entrepreneurs, rock stars, blue chip lawyers, financial dudes and basketball titans for the work they actually do, instead of rewarding idle wealth generation.

#129 IHCTD9 on 10.31.22 at 9:22 am

#44 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 4:04 pm
_____

I don’t think a retired non rich dude is getting actual Citizenship anywhere worth going. Once you’re old (and not rich), you’re pretty much sunk.

Then there’s the options available. I could get Dutch Citizenship, and retire in the Netherlands or the Caribbean. Sounds good right? It’s not. Not for me anyway. Definitely not cheap either.

I’m lucky in that I like Winter, and most of the activities a rural Canadian typically enjoys – which makes living up North a no brainer. The activities are cheap, houses are cheap, cost of living is good enough. Not perfect, but virtually unbeatable for a guy like me. Some of these little towns are already legit retirement communities (ie Elliot Lake, Huntsville, Bancroft etc… these are too expensive for the most part though).

You’d probably be best served just looking north or east within BC. Maybe away from the coast a bit. Seems to me there are low cost quaint little towns you could shack up in. Get a place with a big garage and wrench away all day every day. Small town BC holds a lot of appeal for me too – but the costs of moving in, and then doing stuff + living there would start adding up quick.

#130 Wrk.dover on 10.31.22 at 10:55 am

#44 Dragonfly58 on 10.30.22 at 4:04 pm
_______________________________

Vancouver January average, 1.4>6.9
Yarmouth -6.9>0.8

Records, Van Jan -17.8 > 15.3
Yarmouth Jan -21.3 > 14.0

Gulf of Maine now 5>10 F above normal at all depths.

Yarmouth high records smashed regularly every month.

Yarmouth, not Lunenburg, not Halifax, not Sydney.
Certainly not Moncton!

Barrington or Cape Sable Island would be warmer though, and heading out of Yarmouth in the other direction be ready to parlon Acadian, much more than the other way, with the exception of the Pubnicos.

A guy like you could possibly attempt to restore his Lola, on your income level with Yarmouth RE prices, while heating the garage with wood. Plus, the marine industry would keep your pockets full. Your best bet is to move to Meteghan and arrange to work limited part time at A.F. Theriault Shipyard, where they fabricate everything imaginable for the fishery. It will be fun!

#131 Linda on 10.31.22 at 10:59 am

#113 ‘Ponzie’ – indeed, that is how democracy works. I was merely pointing out to ‘grateful’ that public service employees are not the ones making the decisions to spend tax dollars.

#132 Sail Away on 10.31.22 at 11:10 am

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 8:48 am
@#58 Quinty’s Questionable Qualities

“But most disturbing, is that at their age, they are still mostly unwise, uniformed, often too opinionated.”

—————

You seem to have peaked early in that dept.
It’s all downhill from here Quinty.

—————

I also find it very disturbing that these people are still uniformed at their age. And what type of uniform?

#133 Faron on 10.31.22 at 12:07 pm

#124 Dharma Bum on 10.31.22 at 8:28 am

Hey, you should help out Don Guacamole. He is triggered and needs a safe space; something you are an expert in IIRC.

#134 Ustabe on 10.31.22 at 12:18 pm

I also find it very disturbing that these people are still uniformed at their age. And what type of uniform?

You know, in this mixed bag of Halloween candy you really are the candy corn. Everywhere and useless.

I’m really missing your posts on how rich you and your brothers are, these latest ones about how rich your friends and acquaintances are miss the boat. We need to learn more about you…come on, you can do it!

#135 Russ on 10.31.22 at 12:18 pm

Sail Away on 10.31.22 at 11:10 am

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 8:48 am
@#58 Quinty’s Questionable Qualities

“But most disturbing, is that at their age, they are still mostly unwise, uniformed, often too opinionated.”
—————
You seem to have peaked early in that dept.
It’s all downhill from here Quinty.
—————
I also find it very disturbing that these people are still uniformed at their age. And what type of uniform?
==========================

It seems disturbing alright.

People in uniform & opinionated at that age are more likely to be found in the services field, such as Environment Canada and “mall cops”.

Probably more weighting to the insecurity areas of work.

#136 Crystal ball futurist on 10.31.22 at 12:22 pm

Big govt needs big money.
They make the rules.
I’m glad we do not have 100% tax on the highest tax bracket.
I understand the pain.

#137 Inadequate on 10.31.22 at 12:35 pm

Any taxation greater than 50% is a simple act of theft. It is unethical and wrong. Back in the day when surtax was introduced, I thought that it was a great idea as a student. I have changed my mind since. You can’t blame people for paying cash to avoid the tax. Laffer Curve explains it very well. Perhaps the politicians should learn about it.

#138 Yukon Elvis on 10.31.22 at 1:03 pm

Dividends are all in today. Time for the self imposed mandatory quarterly buy this morning. BNS @ $66 with tax advantaged div of 6.23% and p/e ratio of 6.92. Bottom may not be in but close enough. Bargoon time for me. MFC paying 5.86% with p/e ratio of 5.82. Some good deals out there right now.

#139 David on 10.31.22 at 1:36 pm

I retired in 2012 after my wife pointed out that my income was almost equivalent to taxes and expenses. I was working for free. I now live without working on company dividends from previous investments. I recommend it.

#140 Faron on 10.31.22 at 1:48 pm

Replying to:

#134 Ustabe on 10.31.22 at 12:18 pm
#58 Quintilian on 10.30.22 at 4:58 pm

In reference to:

#135 Russ on 10.31.22 at 12:18 pm
#132 Sail Away on 10.31.22 at 11:10 am
#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 8:48 am

Ain’t it amazing how those three, by replying to Quintillian’s comment, identified themselves into the group:

“curmudgeons, phallic stage, fascination is with money, bitter, complaining about taxes, blind borderline hatred of millennials, anti-immigrant, absurd preoccupation with people’s Latte expenses, unwise, uniformed, often too opinionated.”

If they weren’t offended and stung, they would have remained silent. Well done Boyz.

#141 Sail Away on 10.31.22 at 1:48 pm

#134 Ustabe on 10.31.22 at 12:18 pm

I’m really missing your [Sail Away’s] posts on how rich you and your brothers are, these latest ones about how rich your friends and acquaintances are miss the boat. We need to learn more about you…come on, you can do it!

——–

Aw, that’s sweet.

Patience, my friend, and I’ll get to it, but for the time being need to concentrate at least a bit on running my companies after lots of time away hunting and exploring tax-advantaged US retirement locations.

#142 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 1:49 pm

@#127 Randy
“Never tell the truth about what really causes dental and gum diseases…”

+++

Candy as a kid and no brushing….
Sugar in coffee as a Kidult and no flossing….

#143 David Greene on 10.31.22 at 2:56 pm

That’s the part the dentists talk about. The parts they don’t talk about are:

– healthy diet
– exercise
– mineral deficiencies
– infectious pathogens

================================
#142 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.31.22 at 1:49 pm

@#127 Randy
“Never tell the truth about what really causes dental and gum diseases…”

+++

Candy as a kid and no brushing….
Sugar in coffee as a Kidult and no flossing….

#144 Concerned Citizen on 10.31.22 at 4:46 pm

High tax rates is down the list of reasons for leaving Canada. Until recently – with the health care system and other systems collapsing – we’ve received a lot of services for that money.

The main reason for people to leave now is the ridiculous housing bubble. If you’re a highly skilled young person, you’d be a fool – for purely economic reasons – to stay in Canada. The country enthusiastically and relentlessly pursues policies that work directly against the interests of young people.

It’s a national emergency that all politicians pretend doesn’t exist. It will come back to haunt us in a big way.

#145 Tom from Mississauga on 10.31.22 at 5:05 pm

Former Magna CEO Don Walker complained about our punitive taxes on getting talent to come here to for R&D