What matters

Centuries from now sentient AI research bots may – in trying to find out what happened – may come across this pathetic blog. Specifically, the steerage section. And likely, comments from the day before yesterday. They were epic.

You’ll recall the post ‘Quitters’ dealt with the four deadly horsepeople of the post-Covid world: WFH, the Great Resignation, Quiet Quitting and FIRE. All have to do with the evolution of ‘work’ and the fact lots of people want nothing to do with it.

So while old financial dudes like moi worry about productivity, efficiency, the GDP, competitiveness, fiscal and monetary policy plus public finances, it appears an entire cohort doesn’t actually give a fig. So after diligently plowing through a couple hundred posts (many critical of me for even writing about such stuff), here are some conclusions.

First, the anti-work bias is staggering. In comment after comment posters talked about workplace injustice, uncaring managers, disloyal corps, scant recognition and the massive waste of time that having a job represents. Since major employers are, if anything, far more aware of employee gratification (and retention) than ever before we have to conclude the workplace has not changed, but the workers sure as hell have.

Second, most people define ‘work’ in weird, narrow terms. Writing this blog six days a week is work. Starting companies from scratch is work. Running for public office and trying to get elected is work. None of those involve income, just expenses. I know. Volunteers work. Poets work. Parenting is work. Even dogs and horses work. Work means purpose – what you do with the precious commodity of time to help yourself and your family (which might mean getting paid) or your society. Work gives life structure and meaning. It helps form a legacy. Don’t sacrifice everything so your kids can be great. Be great yourself. Work at something, or risk being nothing.

Third, Covid really, really, really messed up our heads. Time to get over it. The pandemic was a one-off. Not coming again. Ottawa spent more than almost any government on the planet, per capita, stuffing Covid relief payments into bank accounts at the same time shuttering society. The result was an historic spike in the savings rate, a massive dependency on government, historic public debt and the sense that people could stop their routines and live nicely on the federal teat. Unsustainable.

Fourth, don’t trash others (like Boomers) to justify your own choices. We get that the Mills and Zs want wealth and houses and think both just tumbled into the hands of today’s wrinklies. But being ageist twerps won’t change anything. Nobody’s inherently bad because of their age.

Fifth, life is really long and costs a fortune. You need income and savings. Like, from working. Corporate pensions are getting rare. Public pensions are inadequate. Real estate costs a fortune. So do kids. Financing life takes income far in excess of what any government will provide and for that you need work. Even better, a career. To build one you might need to bow, scrape, eat crap along the way, be overworked at times, underpaid often and repeatedly prove your worth to lesser beings. Too proud to do that? Then reap the consequences.

If you don’t like the work you’re doing, get new work. Why not start your own? The best jobs I’ve had were the ones I created. Along the way lots of other people got jobs, too. I have made and lost a lot, but regretted little. At age 60 I earned all of the national professional designations required to be a fiduciary and investment advisor, and built this from zero. Imagine what you can do starting at 30.

Finally, this was the most myopic, navel-gazing, egocentric set of comments I have ever read. Evidently, companies and employers don’t matter. The economy doesn’t matter. Ambition is scorned. Co-workers are nothing. Managers are useless. Employees are victims. Owners are parasites. There’s no social contract.  It’s. All. About. You. Well, ask yourself if you’d like your family doctor to quietly quit and stop caring about your sick kid at 5:01 pm. What if all the teachers, cops, nurses, power workers, oncologists and farmers just stopped caring about others?

Two days ago I asked if the pandemic had brought enlightened change or just sloth and vanity.

I’m learning.

About the picture: “Hard to believe but your daily words of wisdom have book-ended the 11-plus great years we were fortunate to share with our amazing black lab Pepper,” write Geoffrey and Michelle. “Space permitting and before Socks and his merry band of bureaucrats declare that thenceforth her birthdate of August 28th, be now and forever known as “Feline Equality Day” or some such nonsense, please feel free to pop her picture up on the blog on or around that day. We’ll be out on Pepper’s favourite Okanagan beach scattering her ashes and raising a birthday toast to her indomitable canine spirit.  Here in wine country her yellow lab partner-in-crime Barley is currently experiencing loneliness on a scale that only a recently licensed Realtor can truly comprehend. But he’s not complaining about all the extra attention! Can’t thank you enough for all of your efforts. Educational. Entertaining. Enlightening.”

210 comments ↓

#1 TurnerNation on 08.26.22 at 2:13 pm

Vulch 2023024 not now.

https://storeys.com/80000-mortgage-borrowers-trigger-point-boc-keeps-hiking-rates/
“80,000 Mortgage Borrowers to Hit “Trigger Point” as BoC Keeps Hiking Rates”

——-Control over Feeding. Our First World Way of Life is being wound down. Almost back to 2019 Normal yes?

https://tnc.news/2022/08/25/meat-climate-goals/
“A research report published by a federally-funded consultancy group says that Canadians must cut their meat and dairy consumption by half by the year 2050 to reach federal climate targets.
The report was published by World Animal Protection and Navius Research – both of which have received funding from the Trudeau government.

.China’s Now Testing Live Fish in Its Bid to Stop Covid Spreading (bloomberg.com)

.UK Supermarkets Are Throwing Away Expiration Dates on Food Items (bloomberg.com)

#2 Experience on 08.26.22 at 2:14 pm

I think if you take a look at the experience of most millennials you’d be in the same boat Garth … we are nothing but result of our experiences.

The System has given millennials:
University and debt, many with no good job or skills
Financial suppression and unaffordable housing from day 1 with many seeing they may never afford it
A pandemic that highlights life is fleeting, a lot is out of control and there is more to life than the grind

We’re all not that different just have different experiences

When the rat race doesn’t appear to lead to cheese the rats might just give up!

#3 Stroller on 08.26.22 at 2:17 pm

Fabulous piece. Have your minions submit it elsewhere for wider propagation.

#4 Shawn on 08.26.22 at 2:18 pm

Productivity and Efficiency?

So while old financial dudes like moi worry about productivity, efficiency, the GDP, competitiveness, fiscal and monetary policy plus public finances, it appears an entire cohort doesn’t actually give a fig.

****************************************
Not only does a huge swath of the population not give a fig about efficiency and productivity, they are quite hostile to it.

I have seen many online comments effectively “accusing” for example the oil and gas industry of producing more oil and gas with fewer workers.

The population is over whelmed with information but very few have a clue that efficiency and productivity improvements and doing more with less are exactly what increases GDP per capita and increases living standards.

People who mysteriously have hours every day to idle away online while sitting very well fed in comfortable homes and apartments cry that the standard of living has declined and that their lives are so very hard.

#5 mitzerboyakaQueencitykidd on 08.26.22 at 2:23 pm

Dogs are Great
beer is good
people are not special

the planet and insects will be fine without us
Happy Friday

#6 Prince Polo on 08.26.22 at 2:24 pm

Any comments on what JayPow said today about blasting inflation to smithereens?

Are you willing to give up the reins and let the pathetic steerage section up/downvote the lovers/H8Rs?

#7 Sail Away on 08.26.22 at 2:25 pm

Good blog, Garth! The people who most hate the success of others are ‘maturity stunted’. Whether they’ll ever evolve out of that is hard to say.

The hardest job I’ve ever had was department management because unproductive members took up way too much time. Until the epiphany: fire them. Everything improved. That’s also management.

In my current company, people needing management aren’t around long. It’s perfect. Our staff is absolutely top-notch. Motivated, self-starting, ambitious, independent and responsible. Lots of them millennials.
They exist.

#8 The General on 08.26.22 at 2:27 pm

Theses are the consequences of the everyone’s special, me generation. Everybody gets a ribbon or a medal, and mabey that’s a disincentive to the real winners to excel. Or glorifying unhealthy lifestyles, and then forcing everyone else to celebrate your poor life choices. Idiocracy is our future. Virtue signaling and gang-shaming will finish what’s left of our once envied dominion.

#9 Out Of Town For A Long While on 08.26.22 at 2:27 pm

Please tell me that the folks to whom you refer are not unique to Canada. Please tell me that the rest of the world is just as messed up as we are.

#10 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 2:28 pm

A very well written opinion piece.
Total agreement.
It’s going to be interesting watching Canada’s productivity ratings over the next 10,20,30 years.

#11 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 2:30 pm

So typical. Born on third base, thinking you hit a triple.

Just get your generation out of the way.

Boomers, be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

#12 Brian on 08.26.22 at 2:34 pm

Interview with macro economist Luke Gromen discussing the topic of today’s youth work ethic at the 46:30 mark in the video. This delves into the thinking of the younger generation. It makes you understand their point of view, whether you think it’s right or wrong.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5h_ND1h5gfU

#13 Bucky on 08.26.22 at 2:35 pm

Atlas Shrugged

#14 canuck on 08.26.22 at 2:38 pm

I enjoyed the read because at 60, I found myself packaged out of a very well paying job a few months ago.
I’m learning quickly that employers would rather have youth and passion over wisdom, experience and passion.

My wife has been bugging me to quit looking and do my own thing. I think she’s right and if Garth can start his own gig at 60, why can’t I? I’m nowhere ready to retire and have what many younger people seem to have lost… work ethic. I’m not afraid to work, make something successful and contribute.

Thanks for the reminder, Garth.

#15 Dan on 08.26.22 at 2:40 pm

“It’s. All. About. You”

Of course it is, as it should be. Name me one instance where it isn’t about the individual. Kids? Pretty sure parents don’t huddle pre kids and say: ” gee Martha, the world needs more mouths to feed, let’s create some”. Politics? Now there’s a fine group of narcissistic hypocrites (especially these days) that I’ve ever seen. Volunteering? Even there, one gets gratification. Work? Loyalty should cut both ways, but it doesn’t. I’m a boomer and I remember how loyalty went out the door when I started work in the early 80’s. Nothing new there.

Give the people “free money”, and see how many take it and run. Conversely, tax them too aggressively, and see the changes there too.

#16 AM in MN on 08.26.22 at 2:46 pm

All brought to you by the Govt’s at all levels, and their “experts”.

Covid didn’t mess with anyone’s head, the Government’s actions did. For most of us it was a 2 day cold.

Stop giving free everything and the attitudes will sort themselves out in time. This includes entitled boomers who think they are “owed” 30 years of free health care, even though they didn’t raise a future generation of workers and wealth creators to pay for it.

Similar to the day of reckoning hitting Europe this winter after actively destroying their energy industry, hoping to provide a comfortable life powered by pixie dust.

It sometimes takes a while, but the days of reckoning always come for those who choose to live in a fantasy world. Unfortunately, in a democracy they also hurt the 30% who don’t!

#17 The General on 08.26.22 at 2:49 pm

“The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in DEMOCRATIC society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.

Edward L. Bernays- Propaganda (1928). I can see clearly now….

#18 Tim on 08.26.22 at 2:51 pm

Speaking as a 67-year old who worked like crazy my whole life and was well-enough compensated to become one of your customers, I think you’re missing a few things.

First, there’s a difference between a job and a vocation. I (and I think you) were lucky in finding ourselves things to do that we would have been doing anyhow if we couldn’t figure out how to get paid for doing them, so that the work itself added value to life. There are a whole lot of people who are not equivalently lucky, for whom their job is just a job, a way to make enough money to live and eventually retire. It’s reasonable to expect them to work hard enough to provide value, but not too much more than that.

Second, you are not an ordinary person. You are significantly gifted and lucky enough that your gifts are in directions that can be deployed to achieve worldly success. Me too. I am annoyed by wealthy people who ascribe all their success to intelligence and hard work, discounting the luck of the draw. As evidence I offer the people I know who are smarter and harder-working than me and are just barely getting by. In my experience, luck is a sizable component of any successful career.

Third, if I sort all the unhappy people I know into baskets based on what’s making them unhappy, “shitty boss” and “shitty employer” are two of the biggest baskets. Half of people are below the average of their peers, and that includes managers, CEOs, and Board members. Finally, I don’t want to go all Marxist, but many companies operate under powerful incentives to exploit their employees unmercifully, to treat them as fungible units of labor. There’s a reason why “Dilbert” was so popular, in its day.

Now, one good way to not have a lousy boss is to become the boss, but that option is not widely available, just as a matter of arithmetic.

When I started typing this I wasn’t sure of the conclusion, but I think it’s something like (1) I have a lot of sympathy for people who just see work as work and will do their part but lack enthusiasm and (2) A lot of the grief that employers are getting from their employees is their own fault. If you offer a pleasant and rewarding place to work, you can expect extra effort from your employees. If not, not. Plenty don’t.

#19 highlander on 08.26.22 at 2:55 pm

Rock on Garth! Take that y’all in steerage :)

#20 KNOW IT ALL on 08.26.22 at 2:55 pm

Well when you have raised a society of “spoiled bratz” thats what happens.

The infrastrucsture is already in place.

Those who want to work we reward them.Those who don’t own and control nothing.

So be it. Move on.

Now whats the next hot sector to wage my hard earned dollars on?

#21 Captain Uppa on 08.26.22 at 2:58 pm

I missed the comments yesterday.

However, I will just say this about WFH.

I have a deliverable that needs to be produced on time and in a quality fashion. I consistently meet this target – in fact, I never have missed it.

So…

What does it matter WHERE or WHICH HOURS OF THE DAY that I do it? A company does not pay me to commute in horrible traffic or public transit and sit in a cubicle from 9-5.

It pays me to produce that deliverable in a timely manner with great quality.

WFH has brought me great work-life balance and has made me much happier, which in turn has made my work better.

No reason to hate on WFH or on those who don’t.

Not sure what the big controversy is all about.

#22 Søren Angst on 08.26.22 at 2:59 pm

Dear Overlord (and his “and built this” minions),

Nicely said Garth, indeed.

You always were a Rock Star to me and you still are.

https://youtu.be/TnAgc1kgvLc?t=19

#23 Alberta Ed on 08.26.22 at 3:00 pm

There are plenty of young people around who are ambitious and willing to take a risk — call it adventure. The entitled grifters and whiners who think life owes them a living will end up owing, not owning. My first job out of university paid $75 a week, which worked out to about $1.25 an hour. Took lots of risks, and prospered with some excellent companies. FWIW, my worst job was in government. I lasted a year and quit in disgust, appalled by the corruption and lack of work ethic.

#24 wallflower on 08.26.22 at 3:01 pm

At some point between the 70s and 80s the culture changed
From
When I grow up, I work
(which implies self responsibility)
To
When I grow up, I get a job
(which implies somebody else’s responsibility)
Then inbetween the 90s and 2010 things became,
When I grow up, I get a government sponsored job
(ranging from teacher to bureaucracy civil servant)

In speaking with my 40 something acquaintances it seems job prospects are more likely to not show for interviews and new hires may or may not show up for first day of work.

The arc of this morphology is long.

#25 Grazie on 08.26.22 at 3:01 pm

Hi Garth,

This is the most enlightening blog post about Work I ever come across. Thank you for sharing it!

#26 Regular Reader on 08.26.22 at 3:01 pm

Cheap money makes people myopic and not to care for the society they live in.

I have not yet heard of any societal disintegration where the currency was strong, yet there are plenty of such examples where currency was loose.

I’ve heard the story that French tried to pay their soldiers with playing cards at the battle of Abrahams plains. Was it a surprise they lost it?

#27 DJ AB on 08.26.22 at 3:05 pm

This is why you are a failed politician, to much truth in your words.

Thanks for all you do, we….the silent hard working readers, appreciate it.

#28 an investor on 08.26.22 at 3:06 pm

“Work gives life structure and meaning. It helps form a legacy. … Work at something, or risk being nothing.”

Absolutely. 100%.

#29 The General on 08.26.22 at 3:08 pm

Will the next generation worker book off early, when the next ice-storm happens? Will they walk out when the next pandemic begins? Will they stick to their regular schedule after a major snowstorm make’s roads impassable? Will they blame anyone but themselves as they freeze in a cold, dark condo, that they overpaid for, because they couldn’t afford to pay their bills? We shall see.

#30 Diamond Dog on 08.26.22 at 3:11 pm

I enjoyed your segment from 2 days back, Garth. Lots of comments, didn’t read most of them, would have triggered me so I sort of know better.

Just wanted to add something I ran across perusing daily online media by several feeds:

https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/25/economy/long-covid-work/index.html

It eludes to something I mentioned last winterish concerning the numbers of Americans taking a leave from work due to long Covid symptoms. If memory serves, 5.5 to 7.5 million Americans were estimated by the CDC last fall to have been admitted in hospitals due to Covid.

After tallying the dead (1 million and growing) plus those sick at home, the percentage of long Covid ranged from 25 to 40% and I came up with a number of long Covid sufferers to be around 2.5 to 3 million working Americans. This was before last winter. Keep in mind that in 2019, 130.6 million U.S. citizens were employed. So, in my mind, back of the napkin, 2 to 2.5% of the workforce was out of work because of long Covid.

The article above suggests the number could be as high as 4 million. Of course, this covers higher numbers of infections over the winter but it suggests that if the number is 4 million, 3% of the work force is out of action because they are too sick to work.

There are any number of explanations for this if the numbers flesh out, but these explanations would be the parts of the sum. We discussed on this blog specific deficiencies related to the severity of Covid since deficiencies in Vit D and Zinc specifically impair immune response. Won’t get into the specifics as to why or how, its easy to find online. Covid can also cause deficiencies just from having the disease. Deficiencies are likely a big contributor to long Covid, but I wander.

There are other factors worth considering, one of which is forever chemicals. A recent study was done that connected the dots between higher levels of forever chemicals in human blood to higher numbers of Covid cases and longer recovery times. Key to the findings were forever chemicals reducing immune response. We do see wider reported cases and hospitalizations in the western world compared to the rest of the world. Better statistics and access to health care is a contributing factor, but the numbers are noticeably higher in the western world and it looks as though forever chemicals is a smoking gun.

https://www.cbsnews.com/sacramento/news/covid-complications-pfas-forever-chemicals-link-julie-watts-investigates/

Just today, the EPA is designating certain forever chemicals as hazardous, but this file for those in the know, has a long way to go:

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/epa-designate-forever-chemicals-hazardous-130141068.html

To summarize, laziness and want to sitteth on asseth is just a part of this psychological mess from the pandemic. Another part of it and the numbers are starting to flesh this out, is long Covid due to a combination of specific deficiencies and chemicals, some of which is coming from the food supply.

A bug comes along and sure enough, puts a spotlight on poor regulation (food supply, manufacturing, chemical waste) that our governments world wide should have been on decades ago. Why do we have 40+% obesity if not for poor regulation of the food supply? 4 out of 5 will have sluggish livers and brain fog from this. We wonder why we like to WFH, look at how fat and therefore lethargic so many of us are and its not entirely our fault here! It all comes back to poor regulation of the food supply (who’s responsible for putting addictive sugars in everything or using forever chemicals in the packaging!) and the corporate greed and political corruption that has systemically made it so.

The link below just on forever chemicals gives us the scope of it:

https://www.euronews.com/green/2022/08/04/rainwater-everywhere-on-earth-unsafe-to-drink-due-to-forever-chemicals-study-finds

Quick story (if such a thing exists), Dupont in the 70’s knew by then that their forever chemicals were causing cancer and that they couldn’t be broken down in the human body, so they looked for blood from their employees to see how high the levels of forever chemicals were (you know, potential class action lawsuits against them and all that). So, they looked for clean blood to use as a baseline.

Much to Dupont’s surprise, they couldn’t find clean blood anywhere in North America so they tested blood in Asia, Africa, Europe, South America… and they couldn’t find clean blood there either. This is the early 70’s we are talking about, they’ve been freely polluting since (until spinning off their Teflon division 6 or 7 years ago and are rebooting forever chemicals under different names). They had to use blood kept on file from U.S. soldiers pre dating the Korean war to find untainted blood.

It’s in seals, polar bears, penguins, its in rain water ok, its everywhere. The truth about consumer protection in the U.S. and by proxy Canada? There isn’t much. They’ll keep bacterial out breaks down to a dull roar and do their best to prevent anything that kills you within the first couple weeks but beyond that, it’s buyer beware.

We like to turn a blind eye for profit, it’s what humans do from the corp to the shareholder. It’s widespread, as easy to spot as price gouging in inflationary times. It seeps into various forms of systemic corruption and erodes the value of life… its greed. Avarice. And it’s costing us dearly in ways we can’t imagine. Like the forever chemicals we have in our systems that we never asked for, in the rain water for 50 years now… and many of us still don’t know about, purposely.

Do readers follow?

#31 A01 on 08.26.22 at 3:11 pm

Hi Garth, big fan love the blog and your advice 99% of the time. I also really appreciate the effort it takes to write every day and I never miss a post. However, all the people I know are still working their assess off, regardless if it’s WFH, Hybrid, or in the office.

#32 Working Class on 08.26.22 at 3:13 pm

Preach it!

I’m amazed at how far we’ve come from the days when my grandparents immigrated to this country and had to work double shifts just to put food on their table. They took nothing for granted, worked hard, and built wealth along the way one painstaking step at a time.

#33 Søren Angst on 08.26.22 at 3:14 pm

#6 Bucky

So did Maslow.

https://www.masterclass.com/articles/a-guide-to-the-5-levels-of-maslows-hierarchy-of-needs

And unlike Atlas the Titan God, Abraham the human got it right about humanity since time immemorial.

And always will.

#34 Cheese on 08.26.22 at 3:16 pm

I’ve continued working at the hospital daily since the pandemic started, it pays poorly, but it is helping people and that keeps me going. I invest as much as humanly possible, so I think things will be ok in the long run. Just work hard and save, hopefully things will work out.

#35 some guy on 08.26.22 at 3:16 pm

There are definitely things I work on that cost me a lot of money….like my golf game.

#36 Felix on 08.26.22 at 3:18 pm

DELETED (Cruel)

#37 "NUTS!" on 08.26.22 at 3:20 pm

Garth, I’ve followed your Blog since it’s inception. This is by far and away the most relevant and accurate post I’ve read. Beautifully written.

#38 Quixotic on 08.26.22 at 3:20 pm

The impact of the pandemic speaks to our choices and response. When work becomes less meaningful, how do we find or create fresh value? I appreciate Garth’s patience and urging to look beyond our own needs and consider ways to contribute meaningfully. I used to feel angry and resentful at work. Few years ago, I chose to go back to study and change careers. Starting a small business now in my late 50s. Despite the “me first” expressions the other day, readers and writers in this section seem to long for this community. That’s a sign of hope.

#39 Don Guillermo on 08.26.22 at 3:22 pm

First, the anti-work bias is staggering. In comment after comment posters talked about workplace injustice, uncaring managers, disloyal corps, scant recognition and the massive waste of time that having a job represents.
%%%%%%%%%%%%
If it’s this apparent amongst followers of Greaterfool imagine what it’s like in the GP. Not good.

#40 Kurtis Blow on 08.26.22 at 3:22 pm

Since this blog is all about appreciating hip hop, let me roll for you my 1980 classic Hard Times. Russell Simmons helped me write this back in the day.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euj32zH-qQc

Sing along now…

Yo Kurt, man, you got some bank?
Yo, my brother, I ain’t really got it like that
What we got here is hard times
I hear you, brother, but what’s up with that?

Hard times spreading just like the flu
You know I caught it just like you
The prices going up, the dollars down
You got me fallin’ to the ground
Turn around, get ready, check out the time
Get ready all people for the future shock
Hard times (Hard times)
Hard times (Hard times)

Hard times people of the planet
Times are tough, tough is granted
Hard times coming to your town
Get ready cause you know, we’re gonna throw down
I’m gonna go out there and get the skills
My life’s been down and I need a thrill
Hard times (Hard times)
Hard times (Hard times)

Hard times’s got my pockets all in change
I tell ya what, it don’t have my brains
Will I ever-ever-ever reach my peak
We need that dollar every day of the week
Hard times you know, it’s a natural trip
I’m gonna keep about it, so we’ll not slip
Hard times (Hard times)
Hard times (Hard times)

Hard times is nothing new or mean
I’m gonna use my strong mentality
Like the cream of the crop and the crop of the cream
Beating hard times, that is my dream
Hard times in life, hard times in death
I’m gonna keep on fighting ’till my very last breath
Hard times (Hard times)
Hard times (Hard times)

Pretty spot on right?

I let RUN DMC cover it in 1984…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNPsMe7u74o

Peace out.

#41 SunShowers on 08.26.22 at 3:24 pm

There is no such thing as “quiet quitting.”
It’s called Acting Your Wage.

If I call up a restaurant and order a medium 2 topping pizza, and I’m not given a large 4 topping pizza for the same price in accordance with some misplaced expectation of mine vis a vis a social contract, is that restaurant “quiet quitting” me?

You get what you pay for.

If you really want to know what happened to your vaunted social contract, ask yourself this: What came first? The disappearance of DB pensions, wage stagnation, offshoring, and outsourcing. Or millennials entering the workforce?

Just wanna make sure you put the blame in the right place, because I sure as heck am not busting my butt holding up my end of a deal that the capitalist class (who are disproportionately boomers, sorry to say) welshed on before I was even born.

#42 Søren Angst on 08.26.22 at 3:25 pm

Flop…

Your two IQ of 51–70 compatriots surfed Canal Grande in Venezia.

https://twitter.com/washingtonpost/status/1563061545198055424

Barred from Venezia. Mucho € e-boards confiscated. Fined a whack of € for their IQ of 51–70 effort.

Puff piece by Washington Post whom I gave a piece of mind to.

Typical know nothing (but think they do) Americani.

#43 Brett in Calgary on 08.26.22 at 3:25 pm

I maintain that demographics (not any one age is too blame) are a major factor in our current economic shape. However, most Canadians (again of all ages) could use a little suffering (all do respect to COVID) to appreciate the greatness we have here. I think that suffering is just around the corner in 2023, and I hope it cleanses us of our spoiled nature.

#44 Warren-the-lagging_indicator on 08.26.22 at 3:26 pm

Well this is what happens when you arrogantly shift human rights from ‘lesser beings’ <- kind of gross, no?, toward corporate entities. Now that humanity is waking up to these satanic forces, it is all going to crumble down, including the stock market, until we democratically and lawfully remove those that are knowingly degrading society from power. They are the piteous ones. Like the phoenix rising metaphor, it will be biblical. You know, the love of money and all that.
Sound crazy?

#45 RG on 08.26.22 at 3:27 pm

Garth, while you were busy self-actualizing, productivity and efficiency gains went directly to the super-wealthy and their enablers in government and the managerial class. For the rest, the economy is full of bulls*** jobs, debt is endemic and lifelong, and the basics of living are unaffordable. I do not understand how you can be so clear-thinking on so many subjects yet so myopic towards the fact that suffering is widespread and increasing, and that individual efforts to rise above a crushing, relentless, massive and powerful system are mostly doomed.

#46 Ronaldo on 08.26.22 at 3:39 pm

#11 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 2:30 pm
So typical. Born on third base, thinking you hit a triple.

Just get your generation out of the way.

Boomers, be part of the change.

Or be run over by it
————————————————————-
You havn’t a clue what you’re talking about. Give it up.

#47 Kurt on 08.26.22 at 3:42 pm

I know of exactly one retiree who admitted regretting it. The rest all say that they should have done it sooner. However, all of them have things that give their lives meaning – home and garden, family, community service. All of these things could be construed as “work”; what makes them different is that the goals come from within, and reflect a greater range of values than “shareholder value” – a euphemism that hides a variety of sins. It is not the creation of value that is the problem, it is the seizing of it from others that is corrupt and corrupting (and this applies not only to business…)

#48 ElGatoNeroYVR on 08.26.22 at 3:42 pm

#2 Experience on 08.26.22 at 2:14 pm
«»When the rat race doesn’t appear to lead to cheese the rats might just give up!
========
You might want to give this classic a quick read .
https://www.amazon.ca/Who-Moved-My-Cheese-Mazing/dp/0399144463

#49 Steven Rowlandson on 08.26.22 at 3:44 pm

If the following is correct the governments and real estate markets have a problem and it isn’t a small one.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/jerome-powell-warns-interest-rates-are-going-to-stay-high-1.1810921

#50 Is anybody listening? on 08.26.22 at 3:45 pm

Canada’s Big Banks Prepare for Mortgage ‘Trigger Point’ with Bank of Canada set to Raise Rates

From London, Ontario mortgage broker Mark Mitchell.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2aoyjVCEic

#51 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 3:50 pm

BANNED

#52 Keith on 08.26.22 at 3:53 pm

Right around the time interest rates hit 20%, employers started living in a world of labor surplus. The highest number of births in a single year in Canada, was 1961 incidentally. Employers reacted by ending pay raises in real terms, increasing the qualifications for the job, and demanding work beyond 35 or 40 hours per week in exchange for the salary offered. The world changed, and the most adaptable survived.

As the youngest of the baby boomers reach retirement age, for the first time in decades employers are not facing a surplus of labor. They are not able to treat workers the same way, yet workers are a long way from being treated as well as they were pre 1980. It’s a market. If you want great workers, try being a great employer. PS, fancy words (we value our people) are not enough. Survival of the most adaptable. Read the market and respond. It’s back to providing meaning in the workplace, and if its not a passion it’ll have to be money.

#53 active on 08.26.22 at 3:53 pm

Oh Garth, our ageless wonder…quit being so dramatic!

At the end of the day, life is all about the choices we make ….if you want to work until you die, GO FOR IT!

If a millenial wants to retire at 35 with 2M liquid – GO FOR IT!

we as a society judge way too often and it’s pathetic…live your life, let others live theirs, and stop thinking you know better.

#54 calgaryPhantom on 08.26.22 at 3:53 pm

“Efficiency” = combining 2jobs or more in one

Boomer Managers used to manage, but now the requirement is a “technical” or “hands on” manager.

In the name of efficiency, North American greedy corps and wealthy individuals have gone to the extreme ends to improve the bottom line. The pendulum swung so far that now a backlash is natural. Time for the pendulum to swing to the other side.

Having now spent 3 years working away from Canada, with people from around the world, i can confidently say that NO one lives to work as much as North American society. Sure, productive is higher but at what cost? 70% of Americans are on some sort of anti depressants. Suicides , loneliness and divorce rates are through the roof.

All Covid has done is to make people realize that they were trained/brainwashed into filling the pockets of the rich. Time for these wealthy corps to pay more and have people do less. Other side of pendulum baby!

#55 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 3:56 pm

From the archives – a 1970s job application questionnaire for Boomers :

1. Are you a white male?

2. Do you have a pulse?

If you answered YES to both questions…..

CONGRATULATIONS! You are management material!

Need money? No problem, we’ll advance you whatever you need to buy your $25,000 bungalow.

You’ve EARNED IT!

You just lost any tenuous shred of credibility you may have had. You’re done here. – Garth

#56 Namaste on 08.26.22 at 3:57 pm

Thanks for all the work you and your team put into this site.

It feels very broken out there – did the combination of social media, pandemic, toxic politics, economic volatility, access to info, disinformation, conspiracies, generational complainting, etc, etc, make it so hard to be positive about our futures

I hope we can find a happy place over time

#57 Dorsey on 08.26.22 at 4:03 pm

ha! You tell ’em Garth! I’m GenX, and have always endeavoured to take care of myself and family. What we have here, in my opinion, is the product of a decadent society.

People who have truly made it through hard times generally work their tails off the make sure they and their family don’t have to go through them again. Purposeful work is part of a well balanced life.

#58 Diharv on 08.26.22 at 4:05 pm

#11 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 2:30 pm
So typical. Born on third base, thinking you hit a triple.

Whine whine whine. Did you not read a word of post?

#59 Ole Doberman on 08.26.22 at 4:08 pm

Hard to believe Garth even has to mention common sense stuff like this.

Garth btw is Leanne single? ;)

Thanks again for this awesomeness blog.

#60 George McTimm on 08.26.22 at 4:10 pm

I hate to admit it but you are depressingly correct. I’ve long thought the only solution is for people to suffer a bit, perhaps due to a major recession with high unemployment. Then they can learn to appreciate what’s important!

#61 the Jaguar on 08.26.22 at 4:14 pm

@#7 Sail Away on 08.26.22 at 2:25 pm:

“The hardest job I’ve ever had was department management because unproductive members took up way too much time. Until the epiphany: fire them. Everything improved. That’s also management.” +++

Yes, Darling, and sooner or later all the lazy & entitled purveyors of ‘anti work bias” will be reminded that there is no such thing as a free lunch. For those born after 1981, here’s a little reminder of what happens when someone’s ‘bluff’ gets called. You probably missed it at the time as your diapers were being changed:

https://millercenter.org/reagan-vs-air-traffic-controllers

#62 SW on 08.26.22 at 4:17 pm

I work for one of the big banks and have to say 99% of the people and managers I have known have been great. It is also a big part of my social life. I have permanent WFH but going to start going back in part time voluntarily as my bedroom walls where my desk is are starting to close in. I need to have a laugh with people again.

Most of my life I dreamed of retiring but now that I could in 4 or 5 years, meh. I will just drink too much and watch too many old reruns of Cheers. Lol.

#63 The West on 08.26.22 at 4:17 pm

A convergence of long put off social circumstances are slamming into each other. Will the brakes on the locomotives work?

Only time will tell.

You’re a brave man Garth.

#64 Steve on 08.26.22 at 4:18 pm

Great post, Garth! Honest and to the point, as always!

#65 Juve101 on 08.26.22 at 4:19 pm

Garth, you were around when hippies and beatniks were the moisters of the day. What were they like? What did they mature into? Should it be any different for the mills and the Zs as they age?

#66 WorkNerd on 08.26.22 at 4:22 pm

Your post is bang on, thank you for it.

Hard times make strong men,
Strong men make good times,
Good times make weak men,
Weak men make hard times.

I think I know where we are in this cycle.
…oh yeah, substitute “men” for “peoplekind”.

#67 Bobbypoff on 08.26.22 at 4:22 pm

Covid messed up only those who cannot or don’t care to think critically for themselves.

Case in point:

Throughout history, nobody ever trusts gov enough to put their own life in gov hands but look how many got juiced.

And when 1000’s of good professional people ask good questions they were shunned, lost their jobs, had their bank accounts frozen and what did the juiced do to support them?

The blame and lawsuits are already unfolding. They will be massive. But the harm from the juice cannot be undone and is far from over.

The defendants will say we never forced anyone, it’s all informed consent, too bad.

#68 I for one ... on 08.26.22 at 4:22 pm

Think the Millenial Realist just got run over himself. Doofuss …

#69 Felix on 08.26.22 at 4:28 pm

Happy Feline Friday!

Did you know:

Cats have 300 million neurons, while dogs have only 160 million.

The first president of America, George Washington, was the owner of four cats.

#70 Sail Away on 08.26.22 at 4:31 pm

#42 Søren Angst on 08.26.22 at 3:25 pm

Typical know nothing (but think they do) Americani.

———

Careful.

Remember this American pointed out your math error, and instead of owning up, you disappeared for a week?

#71 Habitt on 08.26.22 at 4:34 pm

Very wel said Mr. T

#72 Bezengy on 08.26.22 at 4:35 pm

When I told my father I was about to become a business owner he asked me one question. “do you have the courage to fire someone?” He explained it this way. Firing someone is the best thing you can do for them. You are giving them the chance to find something they’re actually good at. It’s true. I remember firing one nice young guy who wasn’t up to the task at hand, but some time later I had a chance to talk to his new employer who thanked me profusely for referring the guy to him. Best employee he had.

#73 Doug t on 08.26.22 at 4:36 pm

Well we do share the same 99% of our DNA with apes so DUH

#74 XEQT and Chill on 08.26.22 at 4:36 pm

I’m a millennial. Had I been born 10 years later, I think I would’ve been pretty anti-work. But in the last few years, I’ve been promoted and am a supervisor for a small group of technologists and engineers. I got where I was because I tried to contribute to the company. I developed software to automate a lot of our work, helping my company create better products more quickly. I didn’t ask to be promoted. They made a role just for me. They recognized my value. There are contractors building an office just for me since our building ran out of them. I feel grateful, and appreciated. They want to keep me there and keep me happy, because I’ve worked hard over the years to keep our business successful.

In contrast to this, some of the people I supervise simply do not see the point of contributing more than the bare minimum. As a result, they are compensated accordingly. Some complain when they get a weak bonus. Some expect great pay and regular salary increases simply for showing up to a job, even though their work product does not or barely improves over the years. This usually means I end up taking more responsibility and helping improve their work, since it’s my butt if my group’s work sucks. It is hard to find young engineers out there who have drive and ambition to build a career beyond the confines of their job, they simply can’t see that these jobs are huge launch pads if you configure them right.

Being anti-work is lame. Anti-work just means laziness. Nobody is truly anti-work, they just want others to do the work that produces the goods and services they want. People want to have zero responsibilities, stare at their phone/TV, travel, and have other people provide them with food, housing, health care, etc. It’s hypocritical. If you are anti-work, go live in the woods, work for no one, and no one can work for you. Sounds amazing.

#75 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:36 pm

Times and environment are changing, so people are changing with it.

How many jobs pay decent living wages/retirement contributions these days?
If they were the majority why so many people are in debt and life is so expensive?

And if the jobs do not pay living wages why are the employers surprised that there is less integrity and loyalty amongst employees?

#76 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:37 pm

22 percents of the Millenia’s in GTA hope to ever be able to afford a house.

For the rest there is not even hope. And this is not their fault, it is the fault of authorities messing with monetary policies and debt.

So if take away any hope what is left there, the pleasure of professional ‘career’ working for someone with waterfront house in a posh resort, with a farm and 9 cars in the garage while you can’t pay for the rent and a decent meal, god forbid a house and have a family?

Exaggeration = inability to cogently or effectively make a point. – Garth

#77 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:40 pm

We are lucky as a society that people are that complacent and the protests like quiet quitting are mostly peaceful, and yet I think we have not seen anything yet in terms of transformation of life and evolution, revolution of relations between employer and employee.

Employment like marriage is a 2 way street with 2 equal parties. In the case of tight labor market and for quality employee even it is in their favor.

#78 JM on 08.26.22 at 4:40 pm

The truth is Garth and not to sound too opportunistic, it’s quite easy to be successful these days when everyone is so below par. Even something as simple as answering the phone or replying to an email within the hour makes you look a hero. Simple things like punctuality are recognized these days as going upon and beyond the call of duty. In the past, you had to grind a little harder and recognition was based on achieving something real…not just showing up on time.

BTW Garth, I rarely agree with you, but one thing that goes overlooked by the crazy folks like me who hang here is the fact that there is no advertising on your site and that speaks volumes. Thank you.

#79 Doug t on 08.26.22 at 4:41 pm

#55 millenial thingy

Nah – I worked in factories from age 18 to 32 – Hot, dirty, dangerous, deafening factories – I took some photos back in the day of the places I use to work and pull them out to show my son every so often ……he cringes

#80 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:43 pm

GT, I am not sure who is managing the web site but the posting functionality is below ANY standard, I had to break a post into 5 as for unknown reasons a single one was rejected without any meaningful error, I would fire that web developer in a heartbeat.

Maybe we just don’t like you. (BTW, is this the free, 365-day-per-year-of-original-content blog you’re complaining about?) – Garth

#81 WorkNerd on 08.26.22 at 4:43 pm

Hey Sunshowers

“You get what you pay for.

If you really want to know what happened to your vaunted social contract, ask yourself this: What came first? The disappearance of DB pensions, wage stagnation, offshoring, and outsourcing. Or millennials entering the workforce?”

You know what happened? Unions held companies for ransom – were willing to bankrupt them to get what they wanted. The result was cost cutting, off-shoring, outsourcing etc.

Unions are good until they get greedy. Consider your chicken might be the egg.

#82 The real Kip (Ret) on 08.26.22 at 4:44 pm

I’m quiet quitting this blog. Only commenting the absolute minimu…

#83 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:49 pm

Exaggeration = inability to cogently or effectively make a point. – Garth

It sounds like that, but it is actually a real case.

#84 Diamond Dog on 08.26.22 at 4:52 pm

Have some time constraints… still have some field work to tend to for the next week… but wanted to comment quickly on this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0bHgx41zvk

Mester (one of the 7 on the Fed board of governors, Republican) is saying the Fed may have to raise rates above 4% and keep it there for a duration. This would mean that Larry Summers in coming out and saying that “neutral” is at 4 to 4.5%.

There is also QT to factor in at $60 billion a month. This will reduce neutral somewhat, but to what percentage (maybe a half point), I can’t say but it is a form of tightening credit. The Fed will have to suck money out of the supply to address inflation. Let’s also be clear, they have no other choice but to address inflation. Turkey for example, is learning the hard way why that is so.

What does this mean to Canadians? It means the U.S. dollar will stay buoyant until inflation comes down. Commodities will likely stay inflated regardless of the strength of the dollar or a world recession however with O & G, metals and Ag commodities until next fall (think persistent La Nina). Just look no further than supply.

This also means that if one is floating variable, that prime loans @ the big six banks will be at 5.2% come the next BoC rate hike as Garth has suggested a week or so ago. This prime rate will go higher. We know what this means for those floating variable loans.

So, does it make sense to lock in at 5% (if you can)? It does. It takes out the uncertainty of risk. We will see prime rates above 5% for at least a year. But, we may see the prime rate below 5% for the next 4 years following but it’s not a lock.

The risk of uncertainties come by way of supply. What happens if oil skyrockets to $150? Or gas above $10? Or metals soar, look at LME inventories for example, all base metals are near or at all time lows removed from Iron. Sure, the war in Europe cold abate at some point. La Nina will pass. But for the next year inflation will persist and the prices of commodities could continue to remain strong.

In other words, there is an argument to be made to find a 5 year term @ 5% but the window is closing fast.

#85 Rick Danger on 08.26.22 at 4:53 pm

This is the best thing I’ve read today. I’m gonna be paraphrasing excerpts from this blog post for weeks to come (over zoom / teams of course) sigh.

#86 Matthew on 08.26.22 at 4:53 pm

I read somewhere that the most frequent job for women is cleaning lady and for men it’s trucker.

#87 Summertime on 08.26.22 at 4:53 pm

Maybe we just don’t like you.

No worries, I normally have this effect.

#88 Emma Zaun - Greater Fool Unpaid Intern #007 on 08.26.22 at 4:54 pm

The Amazons are quiet quitting again today.

Hope you enjoy all the ridiculous posts that we are green-lighting through today – we’re just too busy to do any more screening right now. Facebook is too much fun!

#89 NomadGeezer on 08.26.22 at 4:54 pm

This bluenoser is off to Van tomorrow for the rest of the year.

#90 KLNR on 08.26.22 at 4:59 pm

eesh, now even garth’s tone is you’re with me or against me. What the heck happened to nuance lol?

#91 Gary Seven on 08.26.22 at 4:59 pm

DELETED (Anti-immigration)

#92 wallflower on 08.26.22 at 5:01 pm

#80 Summertime

Never thought I would ever articulate this:
Summertime,
Go away
Never return
You are ugly
You are decrepit
Who might want you around?

#93 MaybeItsNotSoBad on 08.26.22 at 5:08 pm

Just an anecdote, but I stopped for a burger at the Harvey’s in New Minas yesterday afternoon. It was busy. And I was impressed with how hard and how efficiently all the staff were working at their (probably) minimum wage jobs. The young woman taking orders and assembling the burgers was friendly, polite, and attentive. The young guy at the grill (which was visible to all the customers standing in line) was careful with each order, and was doing an incredible job of orchestrating orders to completion. Everyone was moving, everyone was communicating, everyone was working their buns off. And they were doing it cheerfully and with evident pride.

I came out of there a little more hopeful than when I went in. Seems to me that if a company is having a hard time getting productivity out of their staff or can’t seem to hire the right people, they’d do well to talk to the manager at Harvey’s in New Minas.

#94 Cash is King on 08.26.22 at 5:09 pm

Accumulate your money. Live as cheaply as possible. When everything crashes decide if you are buying or will just continue renting. Move in with family whatever you can do to save money will help you in the long run. It is okay being rich. Try it you will like it. Rent your way to wealth.

#95 Slav on 08.26.22 at 5:12 pm

I talked to a realtor who told me that here in BC foreigners and non Canadian citizens are rushing into real estate because of the foreigners ban in January

#96 COVID did that, and COVID=Govt. It's simple the veil has fallen on 08.26.22 at 5:14 pm

First, the anti-work bias is staggering. In comment after comment posters talked about workplace injustice, uncaring managers, disloyal corps, scant recognition and the massive waste of time that having a job represents. Since major employers are, if anything, far more aware of employee gratification (and retention) than ever before we have to conclude the workplace has not changed, but the workers sure as hell have.

#97 Schadenfreude on 08.26.22 at 5:16 pm

GT, I have a bit of time to comment as I am the sole proprietor of my home based business I started prior to the GCPC (great covid pandemic crisis…sarc)

You hit the nail perfectly on the matter of the changing evolution of work. I can write a book as to what made me decide to give up the traditional method of going to work for someone else. For myself, it was simply that I could not listen anymore to the MBA grads that were walking off the street straight into managerial positions at the age of 30 believing the non-sense of the Ivy league schools brainwashing these kids that they were to be the business and community leaders of the future with bright futures and job prospects, blah,blah,blah.

Meanwhile they entered their low wage Band E managerial positions with devasting effects onto the experienced work force.

I even knew of some phys-ed and arts teachers getting their online MBA certificates and when I asked if it actually helped them with their teaching skills, they responded that they simply wanted the higher union wage for their best 5 years. Wow!

On a side note, would you ever consider doing a post on the actual meaning of “Governor Tiff Macklem announced plans to reorganize the Bank of Canada’s governance structure by bringing in outsiders to its main policy-making council, on a shorter-term basis.”

As opposed to what? The Russian caviar eating and Champagne drinking INSIDERS?… that have been telling the minimum wage hard working new immigrants on the bonuses of the trickle down effect?

Paging Pierre Poilievre, Pierre Poilievre! Your assistance is needed at 234 Wellington St to assist in finding the qualified candidates for the position of the new Governor of the Bank of Canada.

https://www.macleans.ca/economy/business/flaherty-and-boc-working-on-a-list-of-candidates-to-fill-banks-top-job/

#98 Adam on 08.26.22 at 5:18 pm

With this change you speak of also comes a change in how these individuals see others and perceive them. For instance, in the past, a young Garth Turner may be walking down the street, crisp New York Times in his hand and a starbucks in the other. Maybe driving a BMW. A man would walk by and think to himself “Wow, that guy has got it all figured out. Lucky dude. I wish I was him”. But now… this generation sees folks like that, they pity them. They will think to themselves “Poor guy, headed off the office so he can make money to pay for that BMW. Meanwhile I am headed to the beach to party!”. It’s all part of the “Work light, live light” motto of this generation.

To be honest, it stems from more than a lack of motivation. It’s not so simple. Things just don’t cost as much these days. Garth, when you were a young man, how much did a dining room set cost? Furniture? China set? Television? Computer? I remember in the late 80’s, a big TV cost about $500 (a lot more in today’s dollars), computers cost $5000, a dining room set might cost $3000, on and on. Clothing cost way more. Everything cost more. Now a days kids can pick up a 75″ flat screen for $350, a sofa at ikea for $200, and some cheap clothing from wherever. Everything is cheap on amazon. No more going to “The Bay” and buying a frying pan for $100. On and on it goes. People are happy to spend hours on the internet (which costs $50 a month) instead of spending $50 for one single night out at the movies or going to a hockey game or whatever. Entertainment is cheaper now. Food? Don’t even get me started. How much did a large pizza cost in 1985 Garth? Probably more than it costs now, even before factoring inflation in.

Bottom line… there’s too much money in the world and this is why inflation HAS to happen. Anyone who thinks inflation is going to die down is nuts. Meanwhile Biden is paying off student loan debt etc. The money printers are working hard. Why would anyone work harder than they have to? The ethic hasn’t changed, it’s just the game has gotten easier.

#99 Caffeine Monkey on 08.26.22 at 5:18 pm

Very hawkish note from the Fed today. Your friendly neighbourhood Realtor who has been assuring you that interest rate hikes will soon taper then reverse is wrong. Go figure!

#100 DON on 08.26.22 at 5:19 pm

#95 Slav on 08.26.22 at 5:12 pm
I talked to a realtor who told me that here in BC foreigners and non Canadian citizens are rushing into real estate because of the foreigners ban in January

*******
Was the realtor hooked up to a lie detector?

#101 SunShowers on 08.26.22 at 5:28 pm

#81 WorkNerd on 08.26.22 at 4:43 pm

Sorry, but unless you work 10+ hours a day 6 days a week with no vacation or days off except December 25th in a hazardous workplace with no safety standards and you have a teenage son at home dying of black lung, you’re not in any position to criticize unions after they put an end to all that, despite the capitalist class’ best efforts.

#102 The Best Of Times Is Ending on 08.26.22 at 5:31 pm

There is a cohort of adults living in an imagined world, with the mental maturity of children. Supported by parents and Government they may never grow up, and develop a sense of purpose.

Socialism creates mediocrity. Canada is reaping the rewards of decades of school indoctrinating socialism in the classrooms. Parents haven’t provided balance to the narrative. Both parents and school boards have failed two generations.

The best of times is ending. Socialism has changed everything.

#103 Reality is stark on 08.26.22 at 5:31 pm

You can’t borrow your way to prosperity.
Don’t fight the Fed and when blood is running in the streets you can start investing again.
A dead cat bounce is a dead cat bounce is a dead cat bounce.
Once you start hearing stories of folks committing suicide because they got in over their heads that is when you begin recommitting cash. The banks aren’t boosting provisions for a joke.
We aren’t there yet, we aren’t even close.
They won’t be able to engineer a soft landing either.
We have too much debt and the government never bothered to cut costs.
We hire grifters to run the joint.

#104 Who set your target on 08.26.22 at 5:34 pm

#21 Captain Uppa on 08.26.22 at 2:58 pm

However, I will just say this about WFH.

I have a deliverable that needs to be produced on time and in a quality fashion. I consistently meet this target – in fact, I never have missed it.

If your target was manipulated to take 1h of a should be 8h day, then you’re not doing as well as you suggest and walking the dog or hitting the gym would go unnoticed. Are you sure your throttle is right. Lol.

#105 Mattl on 08.26.22 at 5:36 pm

Lots of us in steerage talked about the long tail affects of Covid and the lockdowns that came. The restriction were draconian and if you said that here you were banned or blasted.

Well here we are , you pay people to stay home, that the government “has this”, tell that that the workplace is dangerous…..and they may just believe you.

So here we are. Don’t blame the kids, the adults failed us.

#106 Armpit on 08.26.22 at 5:37 pm

if you haven’t watched it…. here is a movie for you this weekend, Garth. Idiocracy 2006. Everything you wrote was filmed in this movie. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/

#107 earthboundmisfit on 08.26.22 at 5:39 pm

So, what you’re saying is “the harder you work, the luckier you’ll get”. Funny how that works, eh?
Good piece today Mr. T. Thanks.

#108 Linda on 08.26.22 at 5:41 pm

Aww. RIP Pepper – give her partner in crime Barley extra pets:)

Garth, you cite that ‘major employers are, if anything, far more aware of employee gratification (and retention) than ever before’. I do not in any way argue that employers are aware of it. However, being aware that employees seek gratification in no way means that the employer will be able or even willing to provide it. A spoken or written policy promising a benefit or perk that is never actually used is worse than simply stating up front that no such benefit or perk will be forthcoming. At least then the employee(s) know where they stand & no one then can say they were misled about what they might receive.

#109 Tryhner on 08.26.22 at 5:43 pm

” Work at something, or risk being nothing.”-Garth.

As an existential nihilist, being nothing is what I strive for.

#110 Victor Llearna on 08.26.22 at 5:49 pm

Interesting that family doctor is mentioned. One thing I learned from the pandemic (I already suspected this) is that doctors ‘quietly quit’ ‘caring’ for patients to become nothing more than pushers for the pharma industry.
For example blood pressure , The industry sets the benchmarks for when blood pressure pills need to be prescribed and doctors blindly follow it without considering other ‘healthier’ options without side effects. Not to mention the threshold for which these pills are necessary keeps getting lower, otherwise how could pharma companies show revenue increases each year. As you all know, without projected profit/revenue increases stock price suffers. So they do whatever it takes to sell their stuff.

#111 Westopia on 08.26.22 at 5:51 pm

Words of advice for the Mils: Start your own business under Trudeau’s oppressive regime? No way. T’s libs have all but destroyed opportunity for small biz owners in this country. Maybe in a few sectors like Garth’s financial services, opportunity still exists. But if your passionate about gardening, baking, cooking, farming, manufacturing…. etc. etc. forget about it. Sell your soul and go for the few remaining golden pensions – federal workers, teachers, maybe some municiple. You’ll mindlessly punch a clock for twenty five years, but you’ll be off work at 5:01 each day and be much happier with a nation of taxpayers funding your indexed annual six figure retirement pension into your golden years.

#112 epic bear on 08.26.22 at 5:56 pm

Energy secretary calls on US refiners to limit exports ahead of hurricane season

https://thehill.com/policy/3617315-energy-secretary-calls-on-us-refiners-to-limit-exports-ahead-of-hurricane-season/

when your leaders are clowns, expect a circus.

our countries are run by idiots

next they will try and limit the export of gasoline and diesel ..

the result…

shortages in North America. collapse in Europe.

the bear market is only beginning.

#113 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 5:56 pm

@#51 Millenial Realist
BANNED
++

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rX7wtNOkuHo

#114 Andino on 08.26.22 at 5:58 pm

I felt compelled to share a few lines regarding today’s blog post. My wife works in education at a local Middle School in BC. She often mentions that she notices a generalized lack of resilience on most of the students, meaning that, if they find something that is particularly challenging or difficult which requires an extra effort (a task, a lesson, etc.) they just give up very easily rather than try to figure out/solve the issue.

The main issue here is resilience (or lack of it) which is becoming endemic these days for whatever reason that may be. Overall life in Canada is still very easy compared to most other places in the world so when I read here some comments that the shift of the newer generations to not caring about working anymore is because how hard it is to get ahead these days shows how different the perception of hardship is in our privileged society, again, compared to most other places in the word.

In my mind, in times of hardship is when I have to step up my game to get ahead and prosper, but that requires effort and a good deal of discipline, but of course the easiest thing to do is just give up and lay the blame on anyone/anything else but yourself.

#115 Lawless on 08.26.22 at 6:11 pm

By all means, continue to stir that pot. I enjoy it. What rankles me about your perspective is that you seem so bothered by the difference of perspective. Almost as if it’s a “this is how I did it and you should have to do it the same way” perspective. But values shift. Largely because of different lived experiences; different economic realities. What you value is not necessarily what the next generation values. Where your generation might be after security, mine is more focused on happiness and experiences. Focusing on either one can certainly have a negative effect on the other. And you’re absolutely right that work can mean many things – I don’t think it’s that my generation wants to stop work, but I think they are more interested in working on their own terms. Why that should be offensive to anyone i do not understand.

And let’s be clear on one thing, whether the elder generation wants to admit it or not, North American boomers continue to benefit from being the wealthiest generations by virtue of their year of birth. And this distinguishes you from some of the generations that follow: graduating with historic levels of debt, historically high housing costs, delayed entry to the work force, and incomes that have generally stagnated since the 90s. All of this creates a very different perspective than what you came of age with. Where something basic that your generation took for granted like owning a home is not a reality for so many. But we don’t whinge about it. We just go after the things that are actually attainable for us. Lived experiences. And we seek to live our best lives. And yes, we seek to hack a system that no longer works for us, whether that be with FIRE and living frugally or otherwise. Just my two cents. You certainly don’t have to agree with me. But that in itself is a beautiful thing.

#116 Andrew on 08.26.22 at 6:18 pm

An enlightening study from RAND gave weight to the notion that unabated, trickle-down capitalism has been an utter failure:
https://www.rand.org/pubs/working_papers/WRA516-1.html

A system that continues to funnel wealth from the majority of the population up to the 1% is unsustainable, and the cracks are widening with each passing year.

As I said in a comment on your prior article, don’t be shocked when a neglected labour force reneges on its workplace commitments. Garbage in, garbage out!

#117 NOSTRADAMUS on 08.26.22 at 6:20 pm

MEMORIES LAST FOR ETERNITY!
Sorry, you are not going to live forever. I have talked to many people over the years, who if given the opportunity to do, “A DO OVER” would jump at the chance, like in a New York Minute to redo their life over again. Why? the answer is regret for the things they did or didn’t do. It all boils down to fear, fear of the unknown. The only way to get rid of fear of doing something, is to go out and do it. Pushing through fear is less frightening than living with the underlying fear that comes from a feeling of helplessness. Too many people go straight from their job to dementia, with no good times for family or friends in-between. In the final analysis it’s all about the memories you create. For all the people who hate their job, their employer, etc, on and on, I will sign off with a toast I give when the opportunity presents itself. “Never regret the people who come into your life. FOR, The good people will bring you happiness. The bad people will bring you experiences. The worst people will bring you lessons that will last for a lifetime. And, The very best people will bring you memories that will last for eternity.” So when you look around, remember the very best people and the memories that will live forever. Are you not entertained???

#118 Barry on 08.26.22 at 6:22 pm

Eh #49
I was not long out of Univ – had a student loan, young family, a bus/home mortgage. Interest went to low 20% then when came down to 16% we were happy and were told it wouldn’t be going much lower. My family worked tirelessly to pay the interest. Survived and have a great retirement. Hard work, education an common sense rule.

#119 Joseph R. on 08.26.22 at 6:25 pm

“Canada is reaping the rewards of decades of school indoctrination socialism in the classrooms. ”

What indoctrination?

Have you ever help your children, if you have any, do math problems? Learning math, science , literature is socialism? Hell, they even learn to read Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations. Adam Smith is socialism?

#120 Serge on 08.26.22 at 6:28 pm

Ok boomer.

#121 not a gov apparatchick on 08.26.22 at 6:36 pm

“Running for public office and trying to get elected is work. None of those involve income, just expenses. I know. Volunteers work. Poets work. Parenting is work. Even dogs and horses work. Work means purpose –”
————————————————————-
And maybe just maybe, the political class and big govt implants need to go back to their roots and forget working for themselves but return to being productive citizens with a penchant in politics to assure stability withing their communities. If it can be done with volunteers, part-time municipal councilor positions, it can be done by draining the federal swamp creatures from Ottawa.

#122 Guy in Calgaryhost mee on 08.26.22 at 6:39 pm

Technology is changing rapidly the way we work and interact. It will only continue to improve and become larger parts of our lives. Love it or hate it, it is what it is. When the real talent wants to WFH, employers seeking that top talent will let them.

As clients adopt zoom/teams whatever, working from home becomes more logical.

I enjoy being in the office but having the flexibility to occasionally work from home (especially with kids) has been a game changer. Get more hours back in your life without sacrificing productivity. Holding a position completely against work from home is simply being out of touch.

#123 Roial1 on 08.26.22 at 6:51 pm

Well, ask yourself if you’d like your family doctor to quietly quit and stop caring about your sick kid at 5:01 pm. What if all the teachers, cops, nurses, power workers, oncologists and farmers just stopped caring about others?

HA! we don’t have to ask. It is a FACT! HERE IN b.c.

#124 Schadenfreude on 08.26.22 at 6:58 pm

#111 Westopia – Six figure govt pension schemes…

Not too sure how long that might continue unless Canada is innovating for a bold future but with the libtards and that arts teacher?

#125 yvr_lurker on 08.26.22 at 7:00 pm

It is not my place to make sweeping comments evaluating and being disappointed in how my fellow citizens see their relation with their work. It is not my concern and is their own personal responsibility. Don’t work hard, have little money, and no family backstopping your bad decisions, then perhaps you make a different decision when you are ultimately become tired of living in a van. It’s all up to you. If you have inherited lots of $$$ and choose to take off 5 years to travel, or be a poet, and not contributing to GDP by working 80 hrs a week starting a business, then good for you. I don’t care. Your choice.

I don’t lie awake at night contemplating the demise of our society due to lack of work ethic, or a decreasing GDP, or our whether our global economic standing will decrease or increase a few points in a world ranking. Not my worry. Moreover, I don’t worry at all whether there will be enough people in our country who do have initiative, ambition, and the ability to create interesting new opportunities. There will always be people who aspire to create something big, and this drive is largely an internal one (and not externally motivated).

#126 Man of the cloth on 08.26.22 at 7:04 pm

One of your best Garthfield.

And yes, sitting back enjoying a gar and a glass of vino, after working my tail off for 35 years.

Try it.

#127 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 7:06 pm

Totally off subject here Garth.
Have you seen Leslyn Lewis’s latest email to potential financial contributors?

She’s mentioning United Nations, World Health Authority, etc Conspiracies about Vaccines, money, banks, etc etc etc.
My God.
How were these Conservative Party candidates vetted?

#128 Ronaldo on 08.26.22 at 7:08 pm

#41 SunShowers on 08.26.22 at 3:24 pm
There is no such thing as “quiet quitting.”
It’s called Acting Your Wage.

If I call up a restaurant and order a medium 2 topping pizza, and I’m not given a large 4 topping pizza for the same price in accordance with some misplaced expectation of mine vis a vis a social contract, is that restaurant “quiet quitting” me?

You get what you pay for.

If you really want to know what happened to your vaunted social contract, ask yourself this: What came first? The disappearance of DB pensions, wage stagnation, offshoring, and outsourcing. Or millennials entering the workforce?

Just wanna make sure you put the blame in the right place, because I sure as heck am not busting my butt holding up my end of a deal that the capitalist class (who are disproportionately boomers, sorry to say) welshed on before I was even born.
===================================
This post reminded me of a joke my boss at a northern hotel I worked for as a teenager back in the early 60s told me. It went like this:

A young man comes into the hotel looking for a job. The young man asks “what does the job pay?” The manager says, “we’ll pay you what you’re worth.” The young man replies, “no way I’m going to work for those kind of wages.” And that was 60 years ago. And that makes me one of those terrible boomers.

#129 Phylis on 08.26.22 at 7:12 pm

Let me summarize. I’m special. What have we done?

#130 Sunny South on 08.26.22 at 7:12 pm

And now back to the financial news portion of this finance blog. Powell says pedal to the metal on interest rates going forward with 3.75-4% by early 2023. Markets react accordingly with DJ down 1000 and Nasdaq down approx. 4%.
Respectfully Ryan L., a rebound back to January levels seems unlikely given today’s news.
Sincerely hope they’re wrong about testing new lows over the next six months as I’m planning on travelling back to the Med in the spring because as Mark Twain said, travel is fatal to bigotry, prejudice and narrow mindedness. Three things far too prevalent in today’s world. Safe night to you all. Thanks Mr T. for your ongoing thoughts and wisdom.

#131 Spell checker on 08.26.22 at 7:13 pm

Can you at the very least provide a spell checker on your comments section for your blog dogs using proper Vanilla Javascript and HTML. It’s not a huge expense, no?

#132 ogdoad on 08.26.22 at 7:15 pm

Great post!

Great PR!

Og

#133 jess on 08.26.22 at 7:16 pm

powell: …”there will be pain and that they won’t stop and can’t stop hiking until inflation moves a lot lower,”
======
dark money groups – funded Donald’s ego so he could have a title ” president” and do nada but push conspiracy theories.

” The Federalist Society Gala in 2019 featured Sen. McConnell bragging about capturing the Court and how “we have flipped the 2nd Circuit, the 3rd Circuit, and we will flip the 11th Circuit.” 45 He proclaimed that blocking Garland’s confirmation in 2016 was the most important decision of his life. And, in a foreshadowing of his efforts to push Barrett onto the Court despite the impending election, he told the Federalist Society crowd that his new motto was: “leave no vacancy behind.
“November 16, 2010 when Salon published an article by Justin Elliott naming Seid as the likely source of money for a widely-distributed race-baiting film released just weeks before the presidential election of 2008, where the radical right was hoping to defeat presidential candidate Barack Obama by pushing conspiracy theories that he wasn’t born in the U.S. and was a Muslim”
60 newspapers refused to accept the DVD for distribution,

https://wallstreetonparade.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Testimony-of-Lisa-Graves-on-Dark-Money-Corrupting-the-Courts-March-10-2021.pdf

https://medium.com/@acaalim/new-evidence-suggests-chicago-billionaire-closely-allied-with-the-koch-brothers-and-implicated-2abc9bcbd102

…”billionaire named Barre Seid decided last year to donate his electronics manufacturing company, Tripp Lite, to a nonprofit tied to the radical right called Marble Freedom Trust. After the transfer of ownership to the nonprofit, Tripp Lite was then sold to the Dublin, Ireland based power management company, Eaton, thus avoiding capital gains taxes on the sale. This handed the nonprofit a cool $1.65 billion in tax free money from the sale of the business. In other words, the U.S. taxpayer is subsidizing the radical right’s ability to trash democracy in the U.S.”

#134 oops on 08.26.22 at 7:25 pm

#86 Matthew on 08.26.22 at 4:53 pm

Yep. Fox News. I read the same one.

#135 ritenote on 08.26.22 at 7:26 pm

Wow. Just wow. At the risk of sounding like your biggest sycophant of all time, I’ll just say, your words today tasted better than the biggest bowl of pralines and cream with chocolate fudge sauce on top! Thank you thank you thank you Garth Turner…

#136 Sail Away on 08.26.22 at 7:33 pm

#117 NOSTRADAMUS on 08.26.22 at 6:20 pm

I have talked to many people over the years, who if given the opportunity to do, “A DO OVER” would jump at the chance, like in a New York Minute to redo their life over again. Why? the answer is regret for the things they did or didn’t do.

———

Wow, really? Not me. There is no chance I’d choose a ‘do-over’.

It’s doing the really hard things that lead to success. For me, they are done, they were hard, and I don’t want to do them again. True difficulty doesn’t actually build resilience, it creates a willingness to accept the easy route. It’s damage that never completely heals.

This can be seen with past contestants taking a second try at the show ‘Alone’. When the going gets tough, the ‘second-timers’ fully understand that it will keep getting worse and worse… so they quit.

Being the last one standing can yield big rewards. It can also be the same experience you never want to repeat.

#137 Ronaldo on 08.26.22 at 7:34 pm

#55 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 3:56 pm

You just lost any tenuous shred of credibility you may have had. You’re done here. – Garth
—————————————————————-
Long overdue. Don’t know how you put up with this dude for so long. Must have been quite a handful for his parents.

#138 Steven Rowlandson on 08.26.22 at 7:38 pm

Here is a poem by Rudyard Kipling that is relevant to our time.
It might even be prophetic.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gods_of_the_Copybook_Headings

#139 Hans on 08.26.22 at 7:39 pm

Not an millennial here… but the fact that employers complain about employees doing their job (and that’s it) is revealing. We want you to live and breathe work. If the realization that this wasn’t the ideal came from our covid experience, then it’s probably the best thing that came out of the pandemic. Society waking up to the fact that capitalism isn’t the only consideration in life is a good thing. Sure, we will have to get used to the idea that minimum wage shouldn’t mean permanent poverty and that will make things cost more… but it also means less poverty. Maybe I’m wrong but I think Canada would be a better place as a result.

#140 True, true but houses cost 10 times more on 08.26.22 at 7:45 pm

To be honest, it stems from more than a lack of motivation. It’s not so simple. Things just don’t cost as much these days. Garth, when you were a young man, how much did a dining room set cost? Furniture? China set? Television? Computer? I remember in the late 80’s, a big TV cost about $500 (a lot more in today’s dollars), computers cost $5000, a dining room set might cost $3000, on and on. Clothing cost way more. Everything cost more. Now a days kids can pick up a 75″ flat screen for $350, a sofa at ikea for $200, and some cheap clothing from wherever. Everything is cheap on amazon. No more going to “The Bay” and buying a frying pan for $100. On and on it goes. People are happy to spend hours on the internet (which costs $50 a month) instead of spending $50 for one single night out at the movies or going to a hockey game or whatever. Entertainment is cheaper now. Food? Don’t even get me started. How much did a large pizza cost in 1985 Garth? Probably more than it costs now, even before factoring inflation in.

######

With Russia and China efect all these staples will slowly cost more year after after year and housing will deflate in the west. If u think China is now fighting COVID, I have a bridge to sell u…

Factor in the cost of energy and in 10 years it’s going to feel like 80s again

This cycle is ending and a new season is starting and USA, EU, CA, NZ, AU, UK ARE AT THE RECEIVING END….LMAO

Mind you, the West had the fortune of being run by a generation of [email protected] and inept politicians that have only aggravated the pain..lool

#141 truefacts on 08.26.22 at 7:52 pm

Garth,
Incentives get people to work (often money, but some other reasons). That’s why communisim doesn’t work.
Governments tax/spend too much. So for many, “Why bother?”
This should offer you some insight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgpTWxDh2XA

#142 Ronaldo on 08.26.22 at 7:54 pm

#61 the Jaguar on 08.26.22 at 4:14 pm
@#7 Sail Away on 08.26.22 at 2:25 pm:

“The hardest job I’ve ever had was department management because unproductive members took up way too much time. Until the epiphany: fire them. Everything improved. That’s also management.” +++

Yes, Darling, and sooner or later all the lazy & entitled purveyors of ‘anti work bias” will be reminded that there is no such thing as a free lunch. For those born after 1981, here’s a little reminder of what happens when someone’s ‘bluff’ gets called. You probably missed it at the time as your diapers were being changed:

https://millercenter.org/reagan-vs-air-traffic-controllers
————————————————————–

I remember that so well. I bet you remember this one as well not long after. We need more leaders like this.

https://digitalarchive.tpl.ca/objects/242745/strike-is-over-a-smiling-bc-premier-bill-bennett-and-thou

#143 KLNR on 08.26.22 at 7:54 pm

@#117 NOSTRADAMUS on 08.26.22 at 6:20 pm
MEMORIES LAST FOR ETERNITY!
Sorry, you are not going to live forever. I have talked to many people over the years, who if given the opportunity to do, “A DO OVER” would jump at the chance, like in a New York Minute to redo their life over again. Why? the answer is regret for the things they did or didn’t do. It all boils down to fear, fear of the unknown. The only way to get rid of fear of doing something, is to go out and do it. Pushing through fear is less frightening than living with the underlying fear that comes from a feeling of helplessness. Too many people go straight from their job to dementia, with no good times for family or friends in-between. In the final analysis it’s all about the memories you create. For all the people who hate their job, their employer, etc, on and on, I will sign off with a toast I give when the opportunity presents itself. “Never regret the people who come into your life. FOR, The good people will bring you happiness. The bad people will bring you experiences. The worst people will bring you lessons that will last for a lifetime. And, The very best people will bring you memories that will last for eternity.” So when you look around, remember the very best people and the memories that will live forever. Are you not entertained???

death is the great equalizer.

If grinding out 60+ hours a week at the office is your thing then have at ‘er.

Live and let live.

#144 yvr_lurker on 08.26.22 at 7:56 pm

#53

Oh Garth, our ageless wonder…quit being so dramatic!

At the end of the day, life is all about the choices we make ….if you want to work until you die, GO FOR IT!

If a millenial wants to retire at 35 with 2M liquid – GO FOR IT!

we as a society judge way too often and it’s pathetic…live your life, let others live theirs, and stop thinking you know better.
——–

Yup. And with the caveat that you need to own your decisions, both good and bad. Those with $$$ or social status (whether earned or acquired) should not believe that they have some elevated moral status or extra privilege to make subtle value-judgments on others who don’t share their worldview. Those with zero social status or $$ should not assume that everyone with status has gained in through dubious means….

Live and let live… and frankly, we are all not in it together… everyone has their own aspirations and we should not seek to obtain some “collective” mindset…

#145 billr on 08.26.22 at 7:57 pm

Garth,

You probably won’t see this, but after reading your blog all these years I had to respond to this post. THANK YOU so much for all your advice and guidance over the years. We are balanced, diversified and say ‘bring it on’ to whatever comes next.

I’m 52 years old and leading a software startup (that I created) on the prairies through it’s growth phase.

I read your post today and wanted to shout HECK YA! Others can slough off and hate work, but some of us need to lead, create jobs & opportunities, pay taxes, help Canada level up, and keep this thing moving forward.

Please keep up the blog, it’s appreciated!

#146 KLNR on 08.26.22 at 8:06 pm

@#127 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 7:06 pm
Totally off subject here Garth.
Have you seen Leslyn Lewis’s latest email to potential financial contributors?

She’s mentioning United Nations, World Health Authority, etc Conspiracies about Vaccines, money, banks, etc etc etc.
My God.
How were these Conservative Party candidates vetted?

leslyn lewis is one of the biggest whack job socons out there right now.
And unfortunately the MP for my area.

#147 Father's Daughter on 08.26.22 at 8:08 pm

#78 JM on 08.26.22 at 4:40 pm
The truth is Garth and not to sound too opportunistic, it’s quite easy to be successful these days when everyone is so below par. Even something as simple as answering the phone or replying to an email within the hour makes you look a hero. Simple things like punctuality are recognized these days as going upon and beyond the call of duty. In the past, you had to grind a little harder and recognition was based on achieving something real…not just showing up on time.

—————————————————————–

I now find myself feeling shocked or “wowed” whenever someone competently provides a service, or like you said, answers the phone. I’ve gotten so used to bad service and workers everywhere that when someone just…does their job…it seems amazing. For example just had a house built, what a disaster. It’s like everything that done was the first time that anyone had ever done it. The drywaller (one of those wow moments, he was good, and showed up) told us that soon his wages will be as a high as a doctor, because the shortage of competent construction workers and tradespeople is so dire that he can charge whatever he wants and he’ll still be booked two years out.

#148 RETIRED/FIRE MILL on 08.26.22 at 8:10 pm

“ Don’t sacrifice everything so your kids can be great. Be great yourself.” what if I just want to be a GREAT PARENT?

“ To build one you might need to bow, scrape, eat crap along the way, be overworked at times, underpaid often and repeatedly prove your worth to lesser beings. Too proud to do that?” I would do that (eat crap, etc) if there was really no other option. I have never been unemployed. I have however switched jobs quite often without remorse for the reasons you just listed ( bow, scrape, eat crap along the way, be overworked at times, underpaid often and repeatedly prove your worth to lesser beings). There is no need to eat crap. That’s a myth.

“ don’t trash others (like Boomers) to justify your own choices.” Good advice. You should try it sometime.

“ At age 60 I earned all of the national professional designations required to be a fiduciary and investment advisor, and built this from zero. Imagine what you can do starting at 30.” I guess these uni professors are wrong then: “ Talent vs Luck: the role of randomness in success and failure”. https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.07068

Disclosure: I am a “retired” millennial of the FIRE crowd. I had to find IT jobs after uni to make a living. These jobs were not my calling. Now that I am “retired” and I have no boss but my wife, I dedicate my life to Theoretical physics research, raising my child and loving my wife. What better legacy that family and a ton of useful (hopefully) research?

(Being fluent in math I know our money will almost certainly outlast me and my wife)

#149 45north on 08.26.22 at 8:11 pm

who is Canadian Millennial?

I think he is Screwed Canadian Millennial (check the IP address). He has invented a downtrodden class and has taken on the persona. Here’s my post from February 11, 2018:

Screwed Canadian Millennial: there’s nothing “funky” about Guelph. Austin, Texas is funky.

I’ve never been to Austin, but I’ve heard it is. But aren’t you out-of-character? I mean someone who’s been to Austin Texas, Portland Oregon and Venice Beach doesn’t fit my image of the screwed Canadian millennial.

Guelph is just another Grade A Canadian shithole.

again out-of-character. I don’t mean to pry but where did your grand parents come from? My image of the screwed Canadian millennial has grand parents that lived in Guelph or some such place – lazy summers that never ended, grand ma took you out for ice cream.

#150 Linda on 08.26.22 at 8:25 pm

#110 ‘Victor’ – patients need to take the step of ensuring they receive the best care. This begins with the patient not blindly accepting the ‘easy’ pill solution but instead questioning the provider about alternatives. In other words, taking responsibility for their health. Which means doing the hard work. While I am no advocate of the pill dispenser method of health care, I would argue that the main reason doctors almost always recommend a drug regime is because their patients don’t want to put in the hard work of regaining their health without the use of drugs. Like actually sticking to a diet – not a fad, just actually eating healthy food instead of junk food. Actually exercising, rather than buying a machine then using it to dry laundry on. Thing is, it might be years before the end result is achieved. It is the absurd belief that decades of abuse can be reversed in just a few days by the use of some ‘magic’ drug that allows those big pharma companies to continue to thrive.

#151 Well said on 08.26.22 at 8:46 pm

I completely agree with this post. Very well said!

#152 Johnny on 08.26.22 at 8:49 pm

Leslyn Lewis is right. Sad to see so many ready to call her names, yet not debunk any of her points. Thinly veiled racism it seems.

#153 april on 08.26.22 at 8:52 pm

#95 – You sure your not a realtor….

#154 Ken From BC on 08.26.22 at 9:09 pm

The harder I work, the luckier I get. Weird.

#155 PBrasseur on 08.26.22 at 9:21 pm

Don’t sweat it Garth, it’s like that in a very tight labour market. I know because I’m a software engineer and it was like that during the dot com bubble, companies were bending over backwards to attract and retain employees, you wouldn’t believe the people that got hired then, we use to make jokes about it.

When the bubble popped things changed drastically, all of a sudden you had to be committed and good at your job to keep it. In other words back to reality and normal life…

Same thing will happen here.

#156 baloney Sandwitch on 08.26.22 at 9:31 pm

mmm. maybe the truth is somewhere in the middle i.e. between a high achieving boomer like Garth and the average slacker Millennial.

#157 Lumber on 08.26.22 at 9:40 pm

Author Jane Jacobs nailed it back in her 2004 book ‘Dark Age Ahead.’ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Age_Ahead
It’s a book that’s stuck with me, and I’ve been watching each pillar of society she identified way back then decay, and fall….

#158 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.26.22 at 9:42 pm

Knock on Wood.
It seems this year the wildfire season in BC will be a non-event.
Probably due to the wet Spring which saturated the ground.
Compared to last year that means about 500 Mill will go towards much needed programs, such as providing services for the homeless and addicts.
(Just joking, FURZ)

#159 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 9:43 pm

@#146 KLNR
“leslyn lewis is one of the biggest whack job socons out there right now.
And unfortunately the MP for my area.”

+++
I guess it could be worse.
Trudeau could be your MP and demand you give up your legally obtained ….socks.

#160 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.26.22 at 9:50 pm

In many countries, baksheesh is required before any service is rendered.
Canada ain’t so bad.

#161 Phylis on 08.26.22 at 9:59 pm

#51 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 3:50 pm
BANNED
Xxxxxxx
It was only a matter of time.

#162 Coopoiler on 08.26.22 at 10:00 pm

WOW. I really like this post

#163 fishman on 08.26.22 at 10:01 pm

So how’d you like to be a Uke or Russian moisture right now. If they got a job they got their head down & do not want to be laid off. If their going to school their studying hard. If their living at home their putting up the pickles & sauerkraut with babushka. Working the garden & stocking the root cellar with turnips,cabbages & potatoes. Any spare time is “volunteer” community service expanding & stocking & modernizing the massive underground cities & bunkers left over from the cold war. They all got their pills allright. Iodine pills. Going to bed every night with a fear in their belly.

#164 DDR Kampfgruppen Rosa Luxemburg on 08.26.22 at 10:03 pm

Why in our workplace do we all have to jump & skip for a double-digit yield for Wall Street? Like nothing else in life matters.

#165 Observer on 08.26.22 at 10:05 pm

@#127 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.26.22 at 7:06 pm
Totally off subject here Garth.
Have you seen Leslyn Lewis’s latest email to potential financial contributors?

She’s mentioning United Nations, World Health Authority, etc Conspiracies about Vaccines, money, banks, etc etc etc.
My God.
How were these Conservative Party candidates vetted?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Are you starting to see – even just a tad – why voting Conservative is a bad move despite your disdain for Trudeau? It’s not just PP we need to be afraid of. The Conservative party is Republican light. And you know how that ends.

#166 The Daily Dirt Nap on 08.26.22 at 10:25 pm

In my line of work you need to play politics and stay off the radar.

If you have an opinion, you’re fired. My annual performance reviews went up once I found a secluded office to sleep in. Stay off the radar and collect a cheque.

I also used to work with a guy who could sleep while sitting up straight in his office chair.

#167 Observer on 08.26.22 at 10:25 pm

Further to my prior comment, there has been and continues to be a huge propaganda effort to discredit and attack the Liberal party.

The alternative(Conservative party) in its current state is much worse. This is why their game is not to focus on highlighting their strengths, but rather to attack their opponent’s weaknesses and sow disinformation into the mix. People fall for it.

#168 BC Renovator on 08.26.22 at 10:34 pm

Ive noticed the same.
I own and operate a Construction Business, its a F ton of work, but pays ok. Last few years I’ve noticed a big change in young Staffs attitude. A lot of it boils down to the same- Cost of Living. They are pissed about RE costs and now rents.
“what’s the point, I’ll never be able to afford anything” Not healthy.
Biggest Country on the planet with all resources needed to Build; and we have housing Crisis. A Constructed Housing Crisis, very sad.
Where I live (Squamish, BC) we have a Mayor who regularly spews how Houses are bad for the environment, yet lives in one herself. Politicians are to blame through and through

#169 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.26.22 at 10:41 pm

In the extreme, The mindset of an Employer and an Employee are opposite.
One wants to have the most for the least.
The other wants to give the least for the most.
The trick is to have them meet in the middle.
That’s what makes a successful company.

#170 Nonplused on 08.26.22 at 11:13 pm

I’m sorry I’m so late today, I had things to do (some of which could be considered work). But I’ll just repeat the gist of what I said two days ago:

Who cares what the lazies do? Just don’t be one of them.

Just yesterday I was driving with my 16 y.o. son, and the conversation turned timely to this discussion. He was, head full of reddit zombie ideas, lamenting about the minimum wage not being sufficient to raise a family.

Now I left aside the fact that if the minimum wage does go to $15/hour and 2 people are working full time the “family income” will be around $64,000 a year, which ain’t that bad. Instead I hit him with this:

“Why do you care about the minimum wage? Are you planning to work at Starbucks your whole life after you get your degree? The minimum wage isn’t something you should aspire to. It is there to protect the vulnerable, it was never meant as a union type salary bargaining tool. If you are still working for minimum wage after you are done university, you did something wrong.”

I know, I’m an a$$hole, especially when it comes to parenting. My advice seems quite selfish. But the fact of the matter is a little drive and gumption on the individual level adds up to bigger things on the family, community, and society level. Adam Smith was right. Everyone acting more or less in their own best interest (while respecting the law and common morality) leads to economic optimization. Nothing else does. Nothing else can. Everything else has been tried. Sometimes the failures were quite heartbreaking. Nothing has caused more unnecessary suffering or outright killed more people than socialism outside of war.

So the wise will get up early, get to work, and bust their butt. Don’t spend any time worrying about the naysayers or what they are saying or thinking, lest you accidentally become like they are.

Of course the major problem we face as a democracy is that the lazy naysayers can vote. This is why even the US founding fathers thought democracy couldn’t last, and formed a republic instead. In a democracy, eventually the public discovers they can vote themselves “free” goodies from the government. But somebody has to produce those goodies. If no one works, that doesn’t happen.

So remember folks, “dance like nobody is watching”. And work like nobody else cares what you do. Because they really don’t.

#171 Kato on 08.26.22 at 11:15 pm

#51 Millennial Realist on 08.26.22 at 3:50 pm
BANNED
———————-

About time. Theoretically they and I share a generation. But just because I couldn’t afford to buy the farm I grew up on doesn’t make me feel the need to sulk the rest of my life (and bray about it in a blog comments section). If all you bring to the party is rudeness and ageism, you won’t be invited to many parties.

#172 Daveyboy on 08.26.22 at 11:25 pm

I love lazy people, more work for me!

#173 Observer on 08.26.22 at 11:38 pm

You are up late Garth.

#174 Jane24 on 08.26.22 at 11:45 pm

You want a good GP service? Let me tell you about our little town in Southern Italy, population 4500. First it has it’s own ambulance and paramedic station staffed 24/7. But the best bit is the GP service.

Said GP runs both a traditional morning and evening set office/surgery where if you want to see him you just turn up on the day. If too many neighbors in the waiting room already you just go to the bar next door and have a coffee. His receptionist will come and tell you when it is your turn. In the afternoon he does home visits.

Last year my hubby had a funny turn at a local restaurant about 9pm. GP was called and was there in 10 mins with his little black bag. After checking hubby over he said to just go home and rest. We were legally tourists but no bill. His pleasure.

Compare that with Canadian and British health services today, both of which are shocking. Yet another reason other than very low retirement income taxes that we are thinking of a move to Portugal or Italy for retirement.

#175 Overheardyou on 08.26.22 at 11:59 pm

A quick browse of /antiwork reddit and you’ll see what excuses they come up with.

Also I guarantee none of them have the courage to start their own company since they don’t see things from the other side

#176 Ken From BC on 08.27.22 at 12:09 am

A corollary to my previous post: You make your own luck. It’s out there, you just have to work for it.

#177 Stoph on 08.27.22 at 12:33 am

#141 truefacts on 08.26.22 at 7:52 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgpTWxDh2XA

—————

Good one. I expect that even our dear friend SunShowers agrees with Poilievre’s point that income is taxed too high.

This is another reason why it’s important to invest.

It’s also the reason for why being frugal is necessary to get ahead.

#178 AM in MN on 08.27.22 at 12:42 am

#111 Westopia on 08.26.22 at 5:51 pm

Words of advice for the Mils: Start your own business under Trudeau’s oppressive regime? No way. T’s libs have all but destroyed opportunity for small biz owners in this country.
——————————————————-

Not true, you just need to learn how to play the game.

You can write off significant amounts of otherwise personal expenses, even more if you do business outside the country.

Sell the first company you build and take about $850k off the table capital gains tax free, once in your lifetime. Invest that and control your own pension.

Govt. workers expecting to be living well for 30+ years on pension will find themselves wondering what happened when the demographic disaster kicks in, and they don’t have any control over their money.

#179 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.27.22 at 12:46 am

#170 Nonplussed
Of course the major problem we face as a democracy is that the lazy naysayers can vote. This is why even the US founding fathers thought democracy couldn’t last, and formed a republic instead. In a democracy, eventually the public discovers they can vote themselves “free” goodies from the government. But somebody has to produce those goodies. If no one works, that doesn’t happen.
—————————
Not sure if it matters if you call it democracy or republic.
The communist former East Germany called itself DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik)

#180 Mike on 08.27.22 at 12:53 am

Garth you could not have stated today’s situation any better. You were bang on with what is wrong with the younger work force today. Thank you for stating what us boomers have been wanting to say for a long time. We worked our butts off to have what we have today. No one gave us handouts. So yes, if these millys or gen x , or whatever they are called today, want what the boomer’s have; go and work for it just like we did.

#181 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.27.22 at 1:02 am

Canadian Beaver Pelts for freezing Germans

https://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/cartoon-des-tages-fotostrecke-142907.html#bild-4572a8f0-f841-4047-a835-b694942d6166

#182 Hairhead on 08.27.22 at 2:07 am

Garth, have read you for five years. Your perspective, your advice, and your generosity of putting so much work in for so many people who go on to disrespect you is admirable. If I were earlier in my career your (incredible, FREE) advice would have been great for me. And even at 65, much of your advice still applies.

And I agree with you about 85% of the time, which is a damn good average, since I’m a highly socially liberal guy.

But there’s still that 15% . . . . and it’s your assumption that your Boss should be your God and that you’d better accept every blow, every tub of crap, and every cheat or theft your employer plays with your paycheque with your head bowed, like a good serf. Since you have been self-directed and self-employed most of your life, I have always found it odd that you have this attitude.

One poster above said the following with a sneer, ” In comment after comment posters talked about workplace injustice, uncaring managers, disloyal corps, scant recognition and the massive waste of time that having a job represents . . . ”

This implies that one should accept workplace injustice, that one should not expect managers to be care about their employees, that workers should give loyalty to disloyal employers, and should be satisfied with a lack of recognition (and the greater financial rewards that come with recognition).

I have left several jobs over my career because I spoke up and took action in regards to the issues above; and each time I got a better job with more pay and greater autonomy. It is possible to be a good and productive worker, and I am, and not to tolerate abuse.

#183 DJT on 08.27.22 at 3:43 am

After watching how our government operates people are realizing the system is rigged and want nothing to do with it.

#184 earthboundmisfit on 08.27.22 at 6:30 am

@KLNR

Re: Leslyn Lewis: Couldn’t agree more. I’ve often wondered if she’s ever set foot in a constituency office … or if she could even find Haldimand-Norfolk on a map. Nuttier than squirrel turd, that one.

#185 Time for a survey? on 08.27.22 at 6:58 am

Great topic Garth, thank you.

May I suggest that you do one of your surveys on the subject.

Cheers

#186 maxx on 08.27.22 at 8:10 am

@ #2
Automation and AI will take care of the rats.

Commerce will always survive and thrive. Not so sure about those convinced that the world cannot do without them.

#187 Sail Away on 08.27.22 at 8:26 am

Yow, chilly morning. Is summer done? Let’s go examine the mountaintop.

#188 DonCarlos on 08.27.22 at 8:31 am

@DaveyBoy – exactly! I’ve never worked harder, been happier, made more money, paid off more debt, had more super cool experiences and quality family time, than right now. Working extra contracts and commanding huge rates because the work I do is hard and the barrier to entry is high and so no one wants to do it.

There is hope for the future Garth, though maybe hope looks a little different now than it once did. My son has begun a trade apprenticeship at 16. My other son and I talk about real estate investment at the bottom of the cycle. They both understand the value of a dollar, and of partnerships and networking. As a family, we do not promote the belief that we are the unconditional bank of mom and dad, rather, that successful families will be families who work together and support one another.

Many of their friends, disenchanted at their parents’ stories of living in corporate hell, are looking at trades and starting their own businesses, which are both sorely needed. I believe our current high school cohort will bring about the next great generation of entrepreneurs and tradespeople. They know they don’t have it easy, but instead of lamenting that fact they’re rolling up their sleeves. We just have to not get in their way.

#189 ogdoad on 08.27.22 at 8:55 am

What if you achieve all the goals you set out to achieve at a relatively young age? House, Car, sig. Other, wealth, health? You know, regular, first world manufactured goals. Why continue with menial, middle class, for pay, work? Structure and meaning is just another way of saying ‘I have no imagination’…sorry. Snuggles!!

Personally, now I work to have fun, stay healthy and experience new things – and I’ve earned it. I don’t need legacy nor am I scared of being nothing…I’m floating on a rock in space…alive, that’s a lot, right?

Anywho, there seems to be a lot of stigma on this topic.

I’ll get right on developing a new hug…this ones going to be a doozy

Og

#190 Wrk.dover on 08.27.22 at 8:58 am

Top notch journalism Garth!

Reminds me of the quality in news papers pre-web.

You are the best ‘old school’, school left!

#191 the Jaguar on 08.27.22 at 9:26 am

He’s got the full front page of the National Post this morning:

Quebec’s Legault Revolution.
HE REALIGNED THE PROVINCE BY CHOOSING AGGRESSIVE NATIONALISM OVER SEPARATISM. NOW, THE ONE-TIME ENTREPRENEUR SEEMS UNBEATABLE
“A government that acts fast and deals with consequences later, but always with the defence of “middle Quebec” in mind.
Whether banning religious symbols for certain public-sector jobs or defending the French language with stricter laws, the CAQ has proven to be unapologetic. The government enacts changes that appeal to the majority of Quebecers, even if it infringes on religious and linguistic minorities.” ++++

Enacting changes that appeal to the majority of constituents….Revolutionary indeed. A lesson in that statement for all the hand wringing, fence sitting political wannabees…………
Wish he was ours.

#192 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.27.22 at 9:47 am

@#179 Ponzies’ Puns
“The communist former East Germany called itself DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik)”

+++
Sigh.
It was one of the rare times the Germans were actually joking.

++++
@#181 Ponzies Prussian Puns
The cartoon is a serious comment on Trudeaus inability to fathom an impending international crisis but proving his impeccable fashion sense.

And yet you continue to vote Liberal…..
Sad, so sad.

#193 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.27.22 at 9:57 am

@#124 Jane 24
“You want a good GP service? Let me tell you about our little town in Southern Italy, population 4500. First it has it’s own ambulance and paramedic station staffed 24/7. But the best bit is the GP service.”

+++
Nice!
Perhaps the new Leader of Italy ( voting day Sept 24…. So many 24’s in this comment.) will also make the “trains run on time”.

Yes folks Ms. Giorgia Meloni the next Prime Minister of Italy.
Ironically, she is in charge of the The Brothers of Italy Party.
An Avowed Ultra Right Wing Nationalist and admitted admirer of Benito Mussolini, Ms Meloni’s first mission will be to stop the dreaded immigration.
As the river Po dries up.
Then those pesky trains will run on time.
Stay tuned.

#194 Observer and earthbound... on 08.27.22 at 10:40 am

DELETED

#195 Natalie M on 08.27.22 at 11:00 am

Everyone needs to be responsible for self and that includes providing for themselves, taking responsibility for their well being. Stop blaming and get moving. There are so many ways in any age to get ahead. We choose what we spend our money on. The best thing I ever read financially was ‘the latte factor’ and this not so pathetic blog. The best thing I ever experienced was being kicked my life. And I have thrived even so because the greatest movement of the 20th century called the 12 steps taught self responsibility. And I got an education and I learned to pay off debt awhile saving. This young generation can do it too. Entitlement is not an excuse. I encourage you all who are upset by Garth’s posts to look for the gold nuggets and learn.

#196 Dharma Bum on 08.27.22 at 11:10 am

#138 Steven Rowlandson

Here is a poem by Rudyard Kipling that is relevant to our time.
——————————————————————————————————-

Thank you for that! Very apropos.

At what point will people come to the realization that the cosmos is in a constant state of flux – ever changing – and that this change is circular?

The situation we currently find ourselves in is just another phase of the never ending morphing spectrum of the space-time continuum trajectory.

It’s rare when the stars align. Yet, every so often, as the big wheel keeps on turning, they actually do. Then, for a time, everything seems to “click”. Life seems good.

Recency bias makes us think that the way things are now is the way they will stay. We are not that smart. Semi-sophisticated apes, barely. So, we shouldn’t be that hard on ourselves. Life is mostly luck-of -the-draw in terms of the timing as to what phase of the big never ending cycle we were born into, who gave birth to us, where we were born, and the ability to avoid random pitfalls along the way.

Today’s so called “boomers” (post war babies) were indeed relatively lucky, economically speaking, especially if they were born into the up and coming prosperity momentum of the developed western world (USA, Canada, western Europe, etc.).

No question that opportunities abounded, and that there was a pretty decent piece of the pie to be had by anyone that was willing to work at almost any level. There was a whole range of affordability for a wide variety of material goods. There was less of a massive gap between haves and have nots. It was more of a spectrum on which the majority could settle in on as the “middle class”. You could do “alright” and find a fair degree of contentment with your lot.

Today, not so much. We’ve wrung that cloth almost dry. It is definitely more difficult to “make it” than it was 50 years ago.

The economic conflict between generations exists because one cohort is close to exiting the planet living in luxury, while the half-generation behind them are going through life totally screwed out of everything (the worst timing evvvvver), and the generation just starting out will witness the finality of this latest transition as they live through the epic wave of technological changes coming during the next 50 -60 years (AI, automation, Neuralink, etc.). Could be great. Could be a horror show. Who knows?

Sooner or later, however, another generation will be born into that sweet spot of serendipitous timing, and they will live a hundred years or so in great prosperity, with everything just working out fine along the way. Eventually, they too will be hated by the generations that follow because of their random luck timing, and it’s not fair.

True. It’s not fair. It’s random.

Could be worse.

Has been worse.

Will be worse.

Then it will be better.

Whatever era you’re born into (war, pandemic, economic boom time, economic depression, technological boom, environmental disaster, social justice freaks running things, etc.) is not within your control.

People gotta play the hand they’re dealt.

Some do it better than others. Some are smarter than others. Some are just plain lucky.

Either way, there ain’t no free lunch. Dues gotta be paid.

#197 Pylot Project on 08.27.22 at 11:13 am

This is a comment thread from LinkedIn on this subject. Made me LOL and choke on my coffee.

===

Comment: I think the phrase ‘quiet quitting’ should be replaced with ‘minimal expectations’ which is what is really going on here. I agree if someone ‘quits’ then sure they need to leave, chase their passion instead etc. I think this phrase is really misleading to what the actual situation is, hence a lot of different opinions and assumptions on what is really happening.

Response: Maybe that will become the new buzz word on resumes – “successfully met minimum expectations throughout employment.”

#198 mattbg on 08.27.22 at 11:25 am

This is the type of thing you’d hope that absolutely every parent was drilling into to their kids at some point.

And I’d add: no matter what we did, don’t blame your parents for anything that you can’t do. Raw talent helps a lot, but a lot of great things are just done by having perseverance through the tedium when many other people would have given up.

It’s amazing that anti-workers can’t appreciate that everything they take for granted in their lives was made possible by someone that may not have loved their jobs all the time, but stuck with something through the downturns and long plateaus to make it happen.

Full disclosure: I am not a boomer.

#199 Linda on 08.27.22 at 11:35 am

#188 ‘Don’ – going into the trades is what I’d recommend for young folks today. Ironically, the trades were what parents discouraged their children from getting into – it was all ‘get a university degree, live the good life’ when I was growing up. A high number of low paid employment positions are filled with university graduates, many of whom have more than one degree. Meanwhile, many of the kids who went into those much despised ‘blue collar’ trades are rocking it financially! All the work they could possibly want, generally at wages well in excess of minimum – look at the rates for ‘apprentice’ electricians, plumbers, carpenters, millwrights etc. to understand what I’m talking about. And once they have their ticket/certification? The sky is literally the limit.

Story a coworker told me. Doctor she knew locked himself out of the house. Called a locksmith, who turned up, had the door open in seconds & handed the doctor his invoice for $200. Doctor says to locksmith ‘$200? That is more than I make an hour!’. Locksmith replies ‘Not my fault you chose the wrong profession’.

#200 TalkingPie on 08.27.22 at 11:36 am

I don’t think anyone will argue against the virtue of being useful to society. The question is: what is being useful?

In the last 100 years, it was all about turning resources into finished goods. Nowadays we’re arguably doing too much of that, especially with the world’s population constantly growing and technology allowing a resources burn that was unheard of 150 years ago. So if there are folks who want to produce and consume less, is that so bad?

In post-war North America, the promise was that if you worked hard you would prosper; nowadays you have much of Canada where an average salary won’t get you a shoebox to live in. And while there are still plenty of small and medium business owners who work hard, take risks, and treat their employees like the integral part of the business that they are, try working for the average publicly owned company.

My employer was making record profits for years up to the pandemic. Despite this, wages were moving backwards compared to inflation and cost-cutting was wearing away at working conditions. As soon as COVID hit, they laid off roughly 75% of their workforce to save money. They received government aid but refused to give a dime of it to the employees, despite having billions with a B in liquidity. They then tried to buy up a major competitor, and when that didn’t work out, felt it was a great time to give bonuses to their top executives for their excellent handling of the situation. The CEO got $600k, more than 10 years’ salary of many of the laid off workers. Now that business has come raging back, they have a worker shortage, yet refuse to adjust salaries or reward employees for working short-handed, and in fact lie about inflation to avoid even giving a contractually-mandated cost of living adjustment. So you tell me: what loyalty do these workers owe a company who operates this way?

I saw my dad work himself into a heart attack to make money to send his kids to private schools – something I don’t feel was nearly worth the money. There was no real shortage of money (Dad was mortgage free by his mid-40s), but we didn’t have a particularly enjoyable home life, least of all my father, who didn’t take the time or money to do anything for himself. I didn’t see him relaxed or happy until after he retired in his 60s. I’m watching my brother do the same thing now to afford a $3.5 million dollar house in Oakville with nearly no backyard.

If I can consume a bit less, use a bit more of my life for pursuits that I and my family enjoy, enrich the top 0.1% a little less, and feel more free, I won’t lose a second’s sleep worrying about the GDP. After all, our prime minister gets paid nearly half a million a year for that, and even he doesn’t feel he needs to worry about it.

#201 jess on 08.27.22 at 11:40 am

usa -https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/PSAVERT

====================
In this digital age of trackers …

How much is really spent on corporate subsidies? More TRANSPARENCY on these numbers. Better accounting to the hidden cost of subsidies Google search /uber taxpayer subsidies Grants and loans, tax evasion /offshore 3b. offshore =260b? informative read (The Entreprenial state maryanne massicaccto)

What about the environmental liabilities oil and gas (abandoned wells ) Is this responsible – leaving this to the public purse?

According to this report in 2019 the federal government and the four largest provinces in Canada collectively spend about $29 billion a year on business subsidies — delivered through the tax system, spending programs or through government business enterprise. Who is counting /who benefits ?

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/sunday/the-sunday-edition-for-may-26-2019-1.5146999/government-subsidies-for-business-are-greater-than-canada-s-entire-defence-budget-1.5148266

========
Checking Corporate Welfare
Phrase popularized by federal NDP Leader David Lewis during the 1972 Federal Election
https://parli.ca/corporate-welfare-bums/
===========
We’re a national policy resource center that promotes corporate and government accountability in economic development.

Discover How Much the Public
is Subsidizing One of the Largest Retailers

Subsidies Awarded to Amazon: at least $4.86 Billion and Counting!
https://goodjobsfirst.org/amazon-tracker/

=====
onem
amazon getting into primary health clinics . guess the covid zoom thing /telehealth app…didn’t work out so what is needed is humans+tech.

shoppers turning into clinics?

#202 DON on 08.27.22 at 12:03 pm

#196 Dharma Bum on 08.27.22 at 11:10 am

Good post!

#203 DON on 08.27.22 at 12:08 pm

#193 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.27.22 at 9:57 am
@#124 Jane 24
“You want a good GP service? Let me tell you about our little town in Southern Italy, population 4500. First it has it’s own ambulance and paramedic station staffed 24/7. But the best bit is the GP service.”

+++
Nice!
Perhaps the new Leader of Italy ( voting day Sept 24…. So many 24’s in this comment.) will also make the “trains run on time”.

Yes folks Ms. Giorgia Meloni the next Prime Minister of Italy.
Ironically, she is in charge of the The Brothers of Italy Party.
An Avowed Ultra Right Wing Nationalist and admitted admirer of Benito Mussolini, Ms Meloni’s first mission will be to stop the dreaded immigration.
As the river Po dries up.
Then those pesky trains will run on time.
Stay tuned.

***********
Just looking at her picture…one can see the hidden nut bar. With all the people landing on the beaches gotta wonder if she will gain momentum. Would have to ask those on the ground. Soren?

#204 jess on 08.27.22 at 12:51 pm

The Guise of Religious Liberty SUNLIGHT

..”Liberty Counsel, an evangelical Christian nonprofit that provided a brief cited by the Supreme Court in its decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, has been hacked, revealing a 25-gigabyte internal database that contains nearly seven years’ worth of donor records. The hacker, who identifies with the Anonymous movement, released the data on the hacktivist site Enlace Hacktivista, and the transparency collective Distributed Denial of Secrets is providing it to journalists who request access.

“Noticing a worrying trend of far-right and anti-abortion activists aligning themselves with the evangelical Christian movement, hiding their funding sources behind laws that allow church ministries to keep their donations secret,” the hacker wrote in a press release, “we decided to bring about some much-needed radical transparency.”

In addition to fighting abortion, Liberty Counsel — a Southern Poverty Law Center-designated hate group — has focused its legal efforts on challenging LGBTQ+ rights and vaccine mandates in the name of religious freedom. Because it is registered with the IRS as an “association of churches,” Liberty Counsel is not required to file a public tax return, meaning that its finances are largely shielded from the scrutiny applied to other tax-exempt organizations.”

Apart from Liberty Counsel’s data, the hack includes another 425 gigabytes of records from dozens of Christian organizations that used the same customer relationship management software, many of them mission agencies aimed at converting humanity to Christianity.

https://theintercept.com/2022/08/25/liberty-counsel-data-breach/

#205 David Mel on 08.27.22 at 12:58 pm

This is not a generational issue, it’s individual. Let’s be clear, no work means down the road it’s living in some rundown apartment or tent city, Hastings and Main, Vancouver. All individual choice.

#206 George S on 08.27.22 at 3:08 pm

I am a boomer and have a hard time understanding what all the fuss is about from the later generations. What I have seen over the years is that anybody, regardless of when they are born all the way up to millennials and whatever comes after have a good living and a nice life similar to what I had if they are born with a good brain and have decent parent(s) (and even if the parents aren’t horrible, I guess as long as they don’t do any lasting psychological damage).
Something that has affected people badly over the years is the change from unskilled labour jobs such as cleaning and low skill manufacturing jobs that were able to provide a reasonable living to intellectually disabled people to services like that being either automated or provided by contract with various temp style agencies that pay part time minimum wage without benefits.

Millenials that I know that that have good brains and ambition and have gotten advanced university degrees of various types are all making a very good living, way beyond what I was making at the same age. They were able to make $25k per summer at their summer jobs and completed their education with money in the bank. They all have really nice homes in a nice location. They don’t complain at all, not a peep.
If you don’t have a good brain, regardless of when you are born, you are screwed. And it can be as simple as having a good innate business sense. You are born with it and it is very difficult to learn. I know one person who has essentially no education and is literate but barely. He has a good business sense and even though he only farmed two quarters of land (a very small farm) he bought big equipment, dealt with his crops first and then went and seeded and harvested for people. He made a very good living and a lot of years made more money off his employers’ land than they did. He and his wife worked hard, really hard but they lived well and went on holidays with their family and enjoyed their life.
I think that on social media and in the media in general, complaining people are over represented so that we start thinking that everyone must be in a badly screwed position. What I have noticed is that people that are happily working away at satisfying jobs, living in nice houses in a good neighbourhood don’t bother with social media or almost even anything to do with the internet. They are too busy enjoying their lives.

AND
#106 Armpit on 08.26.22 at 5:37 pm
if you haven’t watched it…. here is a movie for you this weekend, Garth. Idiocracy 2006. Everything you wrote was filmed in this movie. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/

Idiocracy happened virtually overnight in a late 2016 in the US and is still continuing. (not in 500 years like in the movie)

#207 Pete on 08.27.22 at 4:30 pm

Holy moly. Mr. T didn’t hold back. Going to bookmark this and read it for daily motivational juice. I was laid off and “relaxed” for few months before starting to lose my mind. Lesson learned, not doing anything is quickest way to go crazy. Currently putting in 12-14 hours a day at work (temporary overload) and feels great and boss appreciates it.

#208 GCR1968 on 08.27.22 at 7:01 pm

Great post. Fantastic old school tune up on what matters, and what it takes to succeed. Thanks Garth.

#209 mark on 08.27.22 at 8:46 pm

I think what’s telling is the howling is coming from office environments.

Garth bells it at the end

“Well, ask yourself if you’d like your family doctor to quietly quit and stop caring about your sick kid at 5:01 pm. What if all the teachers, cops, nurses, power workers, oncologists and farmers just stopped caring about others?”

People aren’t clock watching at those jobs because while they might find them exhausting, they lose track of time doing them and find meaning in them.

No matter the number of fuzeball tables, free donuts or casual fridays, office exhaustion is a different beast. It’s not the relative ease of the work, I suspect it’s often the pointlessness of it.

Having spent a decent amount of time being both “unskilled and “skilled” being a janitor is still my favourite job.

#210 Tom in Rossland on 08.29.22 at 12:25 pm

Yes on many points Big Man G. I had worked in the forestry and history for quite a while. Tree Planting. My oh my have we ever seen a change in work ethic and a sentiment of entitlement.
We move camps a number of times a season. Where are the volunteer planters to come help with setup? In their E-Z chair with a beer by their tents and campers.