The quitters

On the eighth day he reached out to say he was quitting the Bay Street job he’d had with me for a week and a half. “I expected we would be closer, and this would be more fulfilling,” he said. “Like, you know, us going to lunch.”

As it turns out, I don’t do lunch. I do not emote, hand-hold, mentor, coddle or fill in emotional voids. I just work. Serve clients. Hustle. ‘Okay, pal. So long,’ I said. And in came a young woman who saw the empty chair for what it was. Opportunity. A chance. Career.

This is the paleo style of management and crusty prehistoric, anti-woke work ethic that makes moisters hate guys like me. Maybe it’s pity they feel. Sprinkled with envy. Of course they’d like the possessions and money that go along with corporate success, but these days those are secondary goals. More crucial is personal time. Fulfillment. Sitting in the park with your shoes off. Stand-up paddling. Playing with your baby.

Being a relic, I will not pass judgement. I’ll only say my life has found meaning through my work. But that’s me. Lately I’m in dwindling company.

The economy’s being sideswiped by a new mentality towards employment. The Covid years ignited a workplace revolution destined to impact our overall productivity and growth. Maybe even national prosperity and competitiveness. (Those are words not often heard passing the lips of sub-thirtysomethings.)

Here are four trends that worry a grinding Boomer. Maybe they should worry everyone.

First, WFH. I know, I know – millions of people never want to go back to the workplace and yet expect to collect their full wages and benefits. Surveys indicate the work-from-home desire is strongest among the young (under 35) and women. The pandemic sent five million people into their spare bedrooms (and helped ignite an unhealthy housing fetish), and many got hooked. Fast.

Now employers are calling scores of employees back, causing friction and leading to the miserable afflictions described below. Some firms gave up and keep WFH since, in a tight labour market, there’s no choice. Others are opting for a hybrid model. Some will be paying remote workers less to reflect their lower overhead. And – human nature being what it is – you can be confident more promotions and opportunities will flow to those who show up. Out of sight, out of mind. Some stuff never changes. No matter how much you like doing laundry Tuesday at 10:30 am.

Second, back-to-the-cubicle and pandemic angst also engendered what’s called the Great Resignation. More people quit their jobs monthly in the US during 2021 than ever in history. In Canada job vacancies soared 60%. Currently there are more empty positions both here and in the States than workers to fill them. That’s helped fuel wage increases which, in turn, throw more logs on the inflation fire and shove interest rates up.

Did more than a year of CERB cheques, enhanced child care benefits, corporate wage subsidy programs and other government Covid largesse help murder the work ethic? We may never know. But the first public health emergency in more than a hundred years sure messed with a lot of people’s heads, making them reassess the path of their lives. And they quit.

Third, a new thing. Insidious. Spread by TikTok, which Donald Trump tried to crush. It’s a nightmare condition for employers called ‘quiet’ quitting. Employees don’t just resign and trundle off somewhere, they stay employed, collect their pay, but don’t actually give a crap. It’s the new version of work-to-rule in which employment is seen as a necessary invasion of your day in order to get money. Career aspirations are kaput. Advancement’s no goal. Getting a gold star for being a good worker is dismissed. Nobody cares.

Ambition’s not valued. Hustle is dead. Instead, mental health, work-life balance and family time are put at the top of agenda. Naturally people want more money and benefits to survive in a costly world. They just don’t want to work harder to get it. Huh?

Finally, there’s FIRE. The financial-independence-retire-early movement existed before the slimy little pathogen came to disrupt our world, but it’s blossomed more as a result. Lots of people believe they can leave the workforce happily at age 40, for example, or be a Coastal Grannie, if they manage to pull together a portfolio of a million bucks. Then it’s forty or fifty years of frugality, serenity and flexibility punctuated by a side hustle or two when the reality hits that a mill doesn’t cut it. There are apparently copious chickens and garden carrots involved. And while the financial independence part of FIRE is laudable, it’s tough to grasp what the hell anyone does during four continuous decades of wearing sweat pants.

Well, some people wonder if this is a turning point in enlightened human history.

Some look around, seeing only sloth and vanity.

And you?

About the picture: “Long time followers of your blog,” writes Neil. “I got my wife, Julia, addicted to it! Always a pleasure to read with a mixture of common sense delivered with humour and dogs! Sadly we lost our springer Zoe at nearly 15, but a wonderful life of endless energy. They burrow so deeply into our lives as you well understand. Anyways, we would love to share her with your many followers. Zoe in her prime!”

Have a beast to share with the pack? Send it to me at “[email protected]” with a description.  – Garth

269 comments ↓

#1 yvr_lurker on 08.24.22 at 3:04 pm

Good post. However, I do believe that experienced workers or bosses in highly technical areas do need to provide some form of MENTORSHIP to young eager workers to train them correctly and help them succeed. Engineering Co-ops in University are the start, and one can’t expect that someone will be instantaneously be able to handle everything thrown their way. Why no mentorship? However, that being said, the mentee needs to be eager, willing, and able to work hard, learn, and grow in their job.

I don’t pass any judgment on those whose number one aim is not to be a driven workaholic, but rather strive instead for a work-life balance. I don’t run a business where this issue would be important and it is not my business to comment.

#2 Wrk.dover on 08.24.22 at 3:07 pm

No highchair with a flip over tray in the lunch room either!

#3 Pbrasseur on 08.24.22 at 3:09 pm

What I see is a utopia in its phase of decadent conclusion, just before TSHTF…

The stupidest generation in history is in for a rude awakening.

#4 Paddy on 08.24.22 at 3:14 pm

That’s one happy pupster in the photo today. Felix will be ecstatic!

#5 Dave on 08.24.22 at 3:16 pm

Every bank or financial guru has a wild guess on the level of real estate correction?

Garth what is you forecast for 2022 snd 2023?

#6 Parksville Prankster on 08.24.22 at 3:16 pm

Work is Prayer

#7 Calgary WFH'er on 08.24.22 at 3:16 pm

One trend is American software companies are hiring Canadians to fill roles. I suspect it probably has to do with the foreign exchange between our two countries – they get skilled labour for cheaper. So, for me, WFH has nothing to do with “not going to the office” but it results in higher wages and access to more interesting jobs.

#8 Returning Canadian on 08.24.22 at 3:18 pm

Have you considered the role that vaccine mandates may play in the apparent idleness of the Canadian workforce? I will soon be returning to Canada after several years abroad, and I looked into the many jobs available in the part of BC I wish to move to. A surprising number of jobs either require proof of C-19 vaccination or say vague things like “compliance with Public Health decrees is expected”. Some of these jobs are even WFH – no contact with the public or co-workers. My own vaccine status shall remain private, but I have a range of v-status in my family ranging from unvaccinated to ‘I took two shots but no more’ to boosted. And I support the right to make vaccine choices based on one’s own, (custom), evaluation of the risks and benefits. Unless I were desperate, and I am not, I would not take a job that requires, or may in the future require, that I take a shot that I consider not in my best interest, to keep my job. Too bad, some of the jobs sounded interesting. But too bad for the would-be employers too, because I am a hard worker, responsible and high achieving.

#9 RainCityRyan on 08.24.22 at 3:23 pm

Come on Garth, the “quiet quiting” thing isn’t new, there was a whole movie made about it 23 years ago called “Office Space”.

As a general comment on all four of your concerns, remember “you can’t pay anyone enough to care, but for those who do you can pay them so little that they’ll stop.”

#10 TurnerNation on 08.24.22 at 3:23 pm

Did they ask ‘Where are the customer’s blogs’.

Best thing to do is hand the youngster a bottle of 25-year-old whiskey, the weekend copy of Barron’s, a coffee stir stick — for chomping and consternation — and and tell them to bring their best investment ideas by 5pm or it is curtains.

What would Smoking man have said…

——————–

True props to my handful of fans (you know who you are). Of course my posts are mainly tongue-in-cheek if not sardonic in nature. With some predicgtive value.

> First we must dispense with the standard and required salutations in this post-national state:

– My pronouns are He, Him, His, Blog Dog. I may also lift my head for “Hey Buddy”
– I am Cis-gendered, hetro-normative, gender conforming, binary, non-gender fluid, and I present as male.

And ahh…I’ve forgotten what I was going to say…

#11 In Dog We Trust on 08.24.22 at 3:24 pm

me..?? we just sold principle rez and put 1.3 in the bank. went to CIBC and they offered me this 4.25% for 3 month thingy which I took. Original bank saw us removing 1 million of it and said they will give us 4.5% cashable GIC on the entire 1.3… i’m debating but leaning back to original bank’s final offering

#12 Summertime on 08.24.22 at 3:24 pm

I am not getting it.

Not going for lunch with your employees and yet demanding back to the office, while trashing WFH?

What is wrong if the WFH dude is more efficient and refuses to come back full time to the office? He will be fired?

I thought that going back to the office is about interactions, communication.

And it turned out to be the old paleo-micromanagement I will tell you the rules, I am the boss type of mentality.

No?

#13 Big Bucks on 08.24.22 at 3:25 pm

C’mon Garth a mill doesn’t cut it?Maybe not as good as Havarti but a mill is still a sizeable chunk to live on anywhere but Onatriowe

#14 Dragonfly58 on 08.24.22 at 3:25 pm

Never been a cubicle worker. Always very hands on . First a tradesman, Mechanic. Mostly cars , but some Heavy Duty as well. Then 30 years as a heavy plant engineer. A brief gig as a HS Shop teacher along the way. Pitty about all those extra years spent at uni , but late 1980’s / early 1990’s was slow starvation in the teaching game.
Engineer job was mostly good/ engaging / always learning situation. Some down right horrible jobs were all part of the fun. Filthy , dangerous, pull miracles out of your hat situations. The bosses all thought an Engineers magic wand was a standard part of the tool kit.
100% shift work. A 24 -7 work situation. AM’s – PM’s -Graveyards- days off, on an 18 day cycle. Until you have done something like this for a few decades you have no idea of how much this affects your life and health.
It took the first 3 years after retirement for my sleeping to get back to near normal.
Even though I liked the job itself, and the pay was decent, progressing to so-so as contracts never kept pace with inflation over the last 15 years of my time. The damage to my life and health just were not worth it.
Went 3 years early , not really soon enough.
You cubicle people have no idea of what many endure in the shift work world of 24 – 7 operations. No wonder the CIA uses sleep cycle interruption as an interrogation technique.
Then you get to drive home at the end of your shift. Good luck, you and your fellow motorists are going to need it.

#15 Squire on 08.24.22 at 3:26 pm

Get rid of the most Woke person (yes, you know who) and things will change slowly. Also, TikTok should be banned, at least on national security grounds. There are many reasons for that, don’t be lazy, look it up.
And, I’m betting this time next year the attitude towards work and wfh changes when the unemployment rate increases. Welcome to the great reset and manufactured crisis. UBI anyone ?

#16 Condochick on 08.24.22 at 3:30 pm

I agree with much of this column. I also think the issue is likely more prevalent in the public sector, where efficiency was never particularly encouraged or rewarded…and now the employees are milking WFH and the power of their unions for all they’re worth. I know several people who fall into the “quiet quitting” category, but as long as they contribute the minimum required amount of work, they will keep their decent salaries, great benefits and sweet pensions (but god forbid they work a second outside of the 9-5 workday). It’s definitely weird. I started working in the late ’90s when ambition and hard work were still valued. On the other hand, I understand that people want some sort of work-life balance, and working 24/7 is not sustainable or desirable. As my (very successful) spouse says many times, “Nothing worth doing, is easy”.

#17 Prince Polo on 08.24.22 at 3:30 pm

What does your Millennial all-star duo have to say about FIRE’ing for the past few years? You know which ones I’m talking about (made a pathetic blog knockoff and also guest-moderated for a day, which I assume led to very expensive therapy sessions).

#18 Wrk.dover on 08.24.22 at 3:32 pm

#86 Dharma Bum on 08.24.22 at 9:19 am
#66 The Jaguar

Lordy, if we are getting 2M, wonder how much that sh_thole of an airport Pearson is getting?
—————————————————————————————————–

Whatever they get, it could never be enough.

I don’t know what it is about Pearson, but it is definitely one of the the most horribly managed airports I’ve ever experienced.

It is also one of the bleakest and most depressing airports in the developed world.
________________________________

Malton airport wasn’t much from my perspective of flying through there, but the replacement T-1 was way ahead of its time, a circle with with multi-level parking in the middle.

Next, Tampa built a centralized terminal, with each airline remote via an elevated rail system, like octopus arms, which replaced simple wooden open air ramada’s, like a feedlot.

Not to be out done, Atlanta put each airline on a separate subway station, connected to the city system.

Then with models to follow, Toronto tore down T-1 & T-2 during the construction of a bigger version of Dawg knows what, the original Malton?

Yeesh, T-2, a big version of the original post war Malton.

Only in Canada aye? Pity!

I’ve had many nervous half hour rushed walks/jogs between connecting flights in that marvel.

#19 enthalpy on 08.24.22 at 3:33 pm

hustle culture is generally toxic and not a healthy way to live…..

Sure, in a lot of ways it paved the way to where we are today, but its ok to revisit how we do things. Im sure this too, shall pass.

Let the hustlers hustle, but not everyone has to. Nor needs to.

#20 Søren Angst on 08.24.22 at 3:33 pm

Have your cake and eat it (too).

Delirium.

#21 ElGatoNeroYVR on 08.24.22 at 3:33 pm

If could pick a description here it would be ” Natural Selection” . Those that are willing to put in the work ,and there are plenty of them don’t think otherwise , will get ahead, same as before.
I don’t really see anything different in behaviour than before except the fact that now it is out there for all to see due to evolving societal behaviours and the younger generations are simply voicing out loud what the previous ones kept hidden.
And they ,ofcourse expect better than their parents did and are more self / goal oriented.
Just because it wasn’t obvious before ,it doesn’t mean it wasn’t there.
The corporations and SMB’s did a terrible job at encouraging loyalty and rewarding the people that actually make the money ,I think we can all aggree to that onoe point. This is simply the aftermath of extreme capitalism.

#22 Emma Zaun - Greater Fool Unpaid Intern #007 on 08.24.22 at 3:35 pm

Garth, we Amazons have been quietly quitting here for a long time, since you pay us so wonderfully and treat us worse than puppies.

That’s why we greenlight all of the deplorables and their crazy comments directly onto the blog.

#23 Paddy on 08.24.22 at 3:38 pm

“Then it’s forty or fifty years of frugality, serenity and flexibility punctuated by a side hustle or two when the reality hits that a mill doesn’t cut it”……

I’ll probably pull the plug in 4 years…puts me at 43…with close to a Mil….my wife will still work…cause she likes to work…and I will still do jobs…so yes….a Mil does cut it.

#24 john on 08.24.22 at 3:41 pm

Please cheer up Garth. All good things must end…

#25 Uncle Rico on 08.24.22 at 3:43 pm

17 Prince Polo on 08.24.22 at 3:30 pm
What does your Millennial all-star duo have to say about FIRE’ing for the past few years? You know which ones I’m talking about (made a pathetic blog knockoff and also guest-moderated for a day, which I assume led to very expensive therapy sessions).

The biggest question i have for those two is how did he manage to swing her?

#26 JacqueShellacque on 08.24.22 at 3:43 pm

I see your points Garth, but I think it’s hard to generalize. Everyone has an anecdote, but we’re too early into the aftermath of what’s happened, and what’s going to happen hasn’t played out yet. All it takes is a bad recession and all these ‘trends’ that people say they see go out the window.

#27 pizzaguy on 08.24.22 at 3:43 pm

Well, I’m 53 a B&D portfolio. I quit. Goal of 4 months travel / year, winter aways. Allow me 2 cents, perhaps, 3 reasons:

1st. corporate productivity culture. For past +20 yrs I was easily working 50-60 hrs weekly. Until I realize the more hours I work , the less was my hourly rate. Annual salary, no overtime.

2nd. Tax. The higher my bracket the more government forks my pocket. Annual bonus , 3% increase, you name it … anything on top I’d pay near +40% to gov. And yes, I used tax strategy to minimize those.

3rd. Long before COVID Work from home was a reality in company. Add lot of outsourcing teams, bingo, many days I was by myself in a meeting room. That camaraderie I used to experience in the 90’s and 2000’s were gone.

#28 Matt on 08.24.22 at 3:45 pm

Quiet quitting is just acting your wage. Nothing new. The only thing going above and beyond got me at work was more work. No bonus, raise, or promotion. My best bet for career advancement is learning new skills on my own time and jumping ship when a better opportunity arises. The corporate ladder doesn’t exist anymore and finding a new job is the best way to get a pay raise.

#29 NewWest on 08.24.22 at 3:47 pm

My kids are Millennials. All of them probably have less of a “work ethic” than I did, but then I was born poor and it took a lot of effort and luck to rise above and provide them with many advantages I never had.

They lead balanced, happy lives, two of them with really good partners, one happily single. They work hard and give good value for money but none of them have any desire to move up, having seen that for most people that’s a fool’s game. The death of their father at sixty six earlier this year has reinforced that decision.

The ex was an entrepreneur, and a good one. But he neglected his family, his health and his well-being to achieve that end. He didn’t believe in going to the doctor – took time away from work, don’t you know – and by the time he did his cancer was too advanced to treat. He had no relationship with any of his kids, always being at work even when they were small. He had no hobbies, very few friends, and had no intention of ever retiring. He never claimed Canada Pension.

The really sad thing is that the only thing he really left was the business. The kids politely turned down part ownership of it before he died. They had seen what his single-minded devotion to it above everything else did to him and wanted no part of it.

He’s not the only person that I’ve seen this kind of thing happen to. My mum never planned to quit working at her Walmart job. She started off at Woolco in 1968, became the office manager, and was devoted to the job. She would walk to the store in a snowstorm to open up, that kind of employee. Very few benefits, never made more than 10 bucks an hour, but she “liked the people” and they “wouldn’t lay her off”, important for a child of the Depression. She went straight from retail to dementia at the age of 69, then spent the next 6 years slowly fading away. A great work ethic, true, but I don’t want to end up like that. Neither do my kids.

Nope. I’m happy that i am retired now (early, at my kids’ urging in 2020), living where I want, growing tomatoes, taking to my kids every day about gardening, dogs, hiking, books, cooking. I’m glad that we all have well-rounded lives and time to tend to our health and to do all the things that make life really good.

I’ve never wanted to be the person with “I wish I’d worked more” written on her tombstone, and I’m happy that the Mills and Zs are catching on. It’s time for a change in society anyway, and maybe this attitude shift will start it off.

#30 Bdwy on 08.24.22 at 3:48 pm

These are troubling trends indeed.

We pulled the plug at 55. 1m liquid. Few more in RE. Rent from bsmt only income

Glorious. Finally time to really enjoy the oceanfront cabin. Travel to warm plac nov to march. Leaves a few months in the city/country in spring and fall.
Personally not employed since 1999 and i seem to get busier each year.

The whales arent gonnna watch themselves and the crabs need catching. I put a reclining lawnchair on a paddle board and have a sailing dinghy that both are calling for many hours of my time . Reading this blog takes time. Markets are open daily. I need to go to gibsons today for gas, drinks and kibble.
Swamped.

And please another 5deg of global warming so the boating season extends a month on either end.

Plenty of pleasure boats passing by constantly with 5000 litre diesel tanks so there is hope.

https://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/editorial-features/hodor-the-worlds-largest-toybox–41623
This bad boy was out last week. 16000 litre fill up for a support ship.

#31 KuatoLives on 08.24.22 at 3:49 pm

There’s the other group, those who quiet quit across 2 jobs. 350k a year sure as hell beats 100, especially when most of that goes into a corporate account. I’m still working my butt off, but mediocre for me is like full steam for most people. I could probably handle a 3rd job if I wasn’t an alcoholic.

#32 Tim on 08.24.22 at 3:51 pm

As one of ‘those’ people who FIREd at 40, I didn’t do it not to work. I actually like working just not full time so what’s wrong with wanting more time for life than work? I currently work part time at a library now. I’m happier now even if I may not be ‘retired’. There is nothing wrong with wanting to work less as long as you understand the tradeoff. I personally didn’t feel much of my ‘hard work’ years resulted in much appreciate from my employer so I get the idea of doing less at work. I did ‘enough’ for years and still had good performance reviews proving working harder isn’t always the way. Working smarter for what works for you might be.

#33 Give a mortgage to anyone on 08.24.22 at 3:51 pm

Garth,
With all due respect, you never had to juggle a career and raising a family. I remember staying up all night with a collicky baby and being unsure how I would survive at work the next day. I remember leaving work at 5 PM and hoping there were no traffic jams so I could get to my kids’ daycare before it closed.

I have no idea how a young couple could raise kids nowadays in Toronto or Vancouver. I hope you can cut some slack for workers with young kids.

#34 Stone on 08.24.22 at 3:52 pm

And while the financial independence part of FIRE is laudable, it’s tough to grasp what the hell anyone does during four continuous decades of wearing sweat pants.

———

Garth, how long of a time period have you not worked? A day? A week? 2 weeks?

Not all FIRE folk retire just with a million bucks. They also don’t just homestead and feed chickens. That’s a bit stereotypical and beneath you. You’re focussing on the lean FIRE crowd when you make those type of statements only. You’re smart and as a result, I’d think you better than using dinky clickbait.

Have you never taken an extended period of time away from work and just explored how it felt and that maybe it was…ok?

I worked till 44. Up to the executive level. As much as I could have continued, I knew that the time had come to move on and do something else. That’s all.

And now, I have no boss on my ass. I can focus on my own projects on my own arbitrary timelines. An unstructured life is actually quite fun once you adjust to it. All while my B&D churns out divies and supports my lifestyle.

Please don’t tell me you advocate people have a B&D of $5 million and be 65 before retiring? That would be a waste of a good life.

You only have one run at it. Enjoy as much variety as you can, no?

Do you need to emote on it?

#35 Yorkville Renter on 08.24.22 at 3:56 pm

I think there is some truth to this, but the people I work with in tech are all go-getters and my employees WANT to come in daily.

guess I’m lucky!

#36 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 3:58 pm

times are a changin’.
for the better, imo.

#37 Former Trudeau Fan on 08.24.22 at 3:58 pm

What is the use you work hard when the Bank of Canada can make the elites richer and richer, while the working class becomes poorer and poorer?

This is the elevator pitch of Pierre Poilievre, ironically, a conservative whose party cut taxes for the wealthy.

I used to vote for Liberals back in 2015, but as house prices became abysmal, and I witnessed Toronto Police telling a homeless woman to suicide herself, it made me realize that BOTH political parties serve the rich.

Eat the rich. With ketchup and marmalade.

#38 Government Shill on 08.24.22 at 3:59 pm

“Am I out of touch? No, it’s the children who are wrong.”

#39 Franco on 08.24.22 at 4:01 pm

Not going to last, eventually jobs will be scarce and people will be begging for work, no one gives money out for free forever.

#40 Challenge on 08.24.22 at 4:02 pm

As I drive around in Mississauga at 2 pm today, I cannot understand all the traffic. As I go into Costco and Walmart, the parking lot is jam packed. Are these the people “ working from Home? ” I retired 2 years ago, worked full time without a break and never had time to go shopping until after work or weekends. I highly suspect that many people , that are getting paid full wages, are not truly working their full paid hours, but out there grocery shopping, running errands and milking their employers. I am sure there are a number of hard working people, enslaved to their desks , working from home. But, as I look at my neighbourhood at the people that I know that are “working from home”, cutting their grass, grocery shopping during work hours, sunning themselves, etc, it is pretty sad. So, as an employer, why not hire someone from overseas who will work hard for less pay? It is happening now and if this work ethic here continues, it will increase exponentially. Matter of time.

#41 the Jaguar on 08.24.22 at 4:03 pm

“To whom much is given, much will be required”. It’s biblical, I think. But many don’t understand its relevance in their lives. It’s the key to a meaningful life, but today most are too busy scrolling their phones to see what Harry Styles wore to the latest vapid gala.

Everything is being reduced to the lowest level of complexity so peeps can be ‘entertained’ instead of’ inspired’. Every film release is a flic about super heroes, medieval dungeons and dragon slayers or something animated from Disney to park the kids in front of so the parents can enjoy their ‘vape’.

A dismaying slide into a cultural wasteland. It’s like a carnival. Next let’s all get on the “Debt Ride” because everything goes and nothing matters.

When Garth says ‘ my life has found meaning through my work’, I’m pretty sure it’s partly because he is fully aware of the opportunity he was given. Opportunity and fairness doesn’t always show up to be counted everywhere in this world. I imagine he well understood what the term “Step Up” meant, and observe how all the readers of this free blog have benefited.

When covid stopped the world I wanted to understand how previous generations had endured and overcome hardship during the Spanish Flu. In a time when there were no antibiotics, never mind a world wide effort that produced the vaccines that helped save the world in less than 12 months.

I began to read about the times before the Great War, WWII, and what it was like in between. “The People of the Abyss’, ‘Down and Out in Paris and London’, ‘The Road to Wigan Pier’. All eyeopening. I also knew some family stories as one does when your tribe arrived in Alberta in the mid 1880’s and endured the great depression.

The problem with giving people too much is that it breeds entitlement, and it doesn’t prepare them for hardship. Lazy thinking settles in, then along comes laziness in general.

Yes, Garth..’CERB cheques, enhanced child care benefits, corporate wage subsidy programs and other government Covid largesse’ did help murder the work ethic. But it was already well on it’s way. But there are still some ‘outliers’ roaming the planet. That dog Zoe understood the concept.

.

#42 Doug t on 08.24.22 at 4:03 pm

The West has become lazy – the young are chasing Namaste clouds, hitting the bong, microdosing and generally saying MEH to hard work – I don’t blame them but reality is a b*tch – sometimes life is no pain no gain

#43 TurnerNation on 08.24.22 at 4:03 pm

Sorry Boss cannot come back to the office. We are on the cusp of Wave 8, and shot 5 (or is it 6?) not to mention the Global Monkeypox Outbreak. Not gonna happen.
Signed, WFH4EVER.

————
— How’s the ‘hospital capacity’ looking these days? March 2020, Global WW3, kicked off the greatest theft of resources since the GFC.

Twitter: Blacklock’s Reporter @mindingottawa
Canadian aid for Ukraine passes $3.1 billion in five months including loans, grants and subsidies, @MelanieJoly reports to Parliament. https://blacklocks.ca/ukraine-aid-now-up-to-3b/

—— Why this remains a Second World Country. The Left. This is why we cannot have the nice things.

.Environmental groups raise concerns about proposed Calgary-to-Banff passenger train (theglobeandmail.com)

“The National Post reports in its Wednesday edition that despite an embattled Europe clamouring for natural gas, Canada cannot sell it to them. The Post’s Tristin Hopper writes that at current prices exporting liquid natural gas could do good things for Canada’s gross domestic product…. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau panned the idea, saying there has “never been a strong business case” for moving Canadian LNG to Europe. The problem for Canada is that there is no infrastructure. There is not a single LNG export terminal in Canada. © 2022 Canjex Publishing Ltd.

#44 brian on 08.24.22 at 4:06 pm

#23 Paddy on 08.24.22 at 3:38 pm

I’ll probably pull the plug in 4 years…puts me at 43…with close to a Mil….my wife will still work…cause she likes to work…and I will still do jobs…so yes….a Mil does cut it.

————-
Similarly I’ll pull the plug in 7-8 years.. put me at mid 40s. The wife will continue for a bit more due to her work pension.

Garth, you need to take some blame for this. Your famous duo put the thought in my head and your blog gave me the means to execute it.

#45 Flop… on 08.24.22 at 4:06 pm

Hey Garth, just sent you a tasty photo of some of the damage to public property I witness every day.

If the question is does anyone care anymore, I would have to say no…

M48BC

Got it. Disgusting. – Garth

#46 Cash is King on 08.24.22 at 4:09 pm

BUY IN AMERICA. RENT IN CANADA.

#47 Chris on 08.24.22 at 4:09 pm

QQ is not about being lazy. Think of it this way, you are hired for a role and it pays $50k a year. Your direct manager quits, bosses ask you to pick up some of their tasks which they paid the manager $60k a year to do. They offer you nothing in return. If you want to move ahead in the same company you would probably not say anything and do the extra work, hoping for a promotion down the road.

The QQ (which is a really bad term) says if you paid my manager more to do that role and now you expect me to do some of that role, I should be compensated otherwise I am perfectly happy just doing what you hired me to do. In the true sense of the phrase you are still doing your job and doing it well, but not going above and beyond for a potential benefit later. You want to be compensated now.

I think so many times, people have seen their extra work go unrewarded and now just want to do the job they were hired to do, within the regular work hours.

If that is such a bad thing, I have a proposition for you. I will let your team manage my portfolio but I only want to pay .25% per year. Consider the extra .75% (or more depending on your fee structure) as exposure. You might get more business from my friends if you do a great job and I recommend them to you.

#48 JSS on 08.24.22 at 4:09 pm

I remember applying for a lot of internal promotions. I’d get called for interviews. After the job was filled, I asked for feedback as to why I didn’t get the job. I was always told “interview was good, but we just chose the other person”. What feedback. So after a dozen of these responses, I gave up. So I figure it’s just best to quietly come to work, sit in the cubicle, warm the chair, send emails, and leave at the end of the work day. All pensionable time. Seems like the employer likes employees who just come to work, shut up and do the job, and don’t keep asking for career growth, and promotional opportunities.

It’s a two-way street. The employers have jerked around the employees too. For decades. Hire employees, lay them off, freeze wages, increase wages, cut wages, reduce benefits…They’re no saints either.

#49 active on 08.24.22 at 4:09 pm

says the guy who has always said TIME is the most precious thing we have in life….so yah, each to their own on how they want to spend that time … stop judging people on how they want to work and live, it’s childish and beneath you, or so i thought.

My time is best spent being productive, which I stated. Stop judging. – Garth

#50 Old gringo on 08.24.22 at 4:11 pm

Great post oh bearded one.
It’s becoming an entitlement society that really borders on socialism.
Government needs to whack 50% of the useless workers, bring back capital punishment and get serious about reducing the budget !
We really need a leader with steel balls to do this.
We also need a lot of luck

#51 Bipolar on 08.24.22 at 4:11 pm

I always thought of work as a privilege. When I was unable to work even more so. Held responsible professional jobs. When I was unable to hold these type of jobs I pumped gas a an ESSO station. I know others like me who also have done the same type of thing due to mental house challenges. I was grateful for the gas pumping job. Found out the people at these stations work a lot harder than I thought. I always buy my gas at ESSO now.

#52 cmccullo on 08.24.22 at 4:12 pm

Looking around – I think we are in recovery. Let’s get through the next few months and we’ll start to see a clearer picture. A lot of people made awkward choices over the last couple years, and they’re going to need to regroup. And if what I’ve seen is accurate – reconsider their status a dog owners. From my experience w Gen Z – they aren’t dumb, but they do benefit from more coaching than most Gen X/Boomers can even imagine. They completely missed the “school of hard knocks” and nothing replaced it. Maybe pair them up with a less senior person who can make sure they aren’t failing to thrive. They’re not putting it on just to annoy, although it might be more comforting if they were.

#53 Inequity on 08.24.22 at 4:16 pm

#10 TurnerNation

…You forgot transslender. (someone who identifies as being in good shape)

#54 Gb on 08.24.22 at 4:17 pm

One trip to Costco on a Tuesday at 10:30 AM is enough to inform…..no one is actually “working” from home it seems.

But aside from the WFH crowd, what perplexes me most is…if people have truly “walked away from work”….how on earth are they affording it?

No one has answered that question for me.

Anyone?

#55 Squire on 08.24.22 at 4:22 pm

#54 Gb on 08.24.22 at 4:17 pm
————————————
credeeeet

#56 Sail Away on 08.24.22 at 4:25 pm

Nothing wrong with FIRE-ing. Those who do it are financially savvy, which is a skill unto itself, and lots of them, Mrmoneymustache for a well-known one, have useful strategies that can be adopted.

However, it’s even better to reach FIRE capacity + implement the Buffett, Musk, and… what the heck… Turner method, where you create your own position with a steady stream of cash while also providing all the connection, autonomy and influence needed for personal satisfaction.

I got a kick out of Malcolm Gladwell’s piece on NN Taleb, where Taleb’s analyst team is chillaxin’ in the office, working and playing on random things while steadily bleeding funds and waiting for the Black Swan to hit and deliver life-changing wealth; which, spoiler alert… happened. Taleb’s descriptors: Financial analyst and…. philosopher. Why not?

#57 Triple Martinis on 08.24.22 at 4:26 pm

$1M gets the job done nicely if a person is willing to live in a LCOL country and stay flexible. Many fantastic options exist like Argentina. Pulling even $3000 a month out of that $1M gets you a high end lifestyle, top quality private medical care and the freedom to be ambitious and productive with your interests. Life is short, live intentionally.

#58 NOSTRADAMUS on 08.24.22 at 4:29 pm

TOILET SEAT.
Our generation created the internet, with the sum total of all human knowledge available from your toilet seat. What young people choose to do with that knowledge is up to them.
New point. And the three men I admire the most. The Father, Son and the Holy Ghost, they caught the last train to the coast, The day the music died.
New point. I got called pretty today! Well actually the full statement was, You’re pretty annoying, but I only focus on positive things. Steady lads , hold the line.

#59 Waystar Royco Shareholder on 08.24.22 at 4:30 pm

I’m a Gen Xer and grew up with very hard working Italian parents, Very frugal and worked hard no matter what the job was. These values were passed down to me

However, it’s pretty easy to see why so many are ‘quiet quitting’. It can be pretty discouraging working your ass off with little to no recognition. Most people wonder if all the hard work is work it.

Employer loyalty is dead. You may give 110% at work, but you position can be eliminated instantly if the company needs to lower headcount. Nobody’s job is safe. All those late nights and great ideas start to look pretty meaningless when you get a surprise meeting with HR followed by an escort to the parking lot

#60 Inequity on 08.24.22 at 4:31 pm

#28 Matt

That has been my experience too, 100%.
Employee wages have not kept pace for decades.

The only raises I’ve gotten over the last 15 years have come from finding a new job.

#61 The Limited Sage on 08.24.22 at 4:32 pm

How many of these people you rag on grew up watching their parents work for Nortel, Zellers, Target and/or Sears before they didn’t?

#62 At 54 on 08.24.22 at 4:35 pm

At 54

Organized crime. OnlyFans. TikTok donations.

Now is a great time to be beautiful and a bad time to be ugly.

#63 ChrisW on 08.24.22 at 4:41 pm

this is a great post, I am a PhD 30s something working in Tech – and I can tell you, getting anything done now is harder than it was a year ago. People don’t want to work, they won’t respond to urgent emails at 5:02pm, because they have ‘Boundaries’ and my god, if you hurt someones feelings for giving them anything less than a gold star, you are in for it. It’s not good. We spend more time prasing people for the little work they do, than working -it can’t last.

#64 Mattl on 08.24.22 at 4:43 pm

I’m not a big fan of stereotyping whole generations. I have some under 30s that would do laps around anyone, any generation. In fact, I haven’t had issues with younger folks on my staff at all.

I also have staff into their 3rd decade of work, still kicking ass.

No one cares about going for lunch, we all work remote and get stuff done.

So I won’t get involved in the generation wars, I just look for talent when building my team. If someone quit on me after a week, that’s on me and my process.

#65 Leftover on 08.24.22 at 4:44 pm

The people in my life all seem to work; my kids, the people I’ve given contracts to, friends who’ve started businesses. I’m coasting now but it’s been a long road with several curves, nothing to prove.

Certainly some kinks out there though. Plenty of anecdotes about “staff shortages” causing all kinds of mayhem. Can’t blame stressed health care workers who head for the exit or boomers cashing in their homes to put their feet up a bit early. And I think there’s still some government cash left in the sponge allowing folks to slack off for now; maybe not later.

There have always been lazy versus motivated people. Where do you think, “inequality” comes from?

And which ones do you think complain the most?

#66 Guy in Calgary on 08.24.22 at 4:46 pm

I think having people in the office is great but the social interactions, lunches, bonding etc. are a huge part of the benefit and appeal.

What’s the point of making someone come to the office if there is no team interaction, culture or fun? May as well just WFH.

#67 1255 on 08.24.22 at 4:51 pm

Sounds like you live to work.

You should work to live instead.

#68 Sail Away on 08.24.22 at 4:55 pm

Zoe was a beauty, Neil! Springers are fantastic dogs.

#69 Sparky on 08.24.22 at 4:57 pm

I don’t know where it will end up, but I think the changes are structural and what we used to know about the working world has begun to change forever.

#70 OK, Doomer on 08.24.22 at 4:59 pm

I see this as a massive win for next-gen Boomerism.

Clearing out the deadwood so my properly raised, polite, well taught, well educated and hardworking progeny have room to run?

They’re going to do very well, thank you. The WFH slackers? meh…

#71 Woo Young Woo on 08.24.22 at 5:02 pm

I work for a big 6 bank (blue one). I tell my therapist I hate working but I tell my work self that i am lucky to have what many would call a decent reasonably well paying job. When i think of continuing to 65 i just tell myself wouldn’t it be lucky to have that sort of job security.

Woo Young-woo. (Whether it’s read straight or flipped. Kayak, deed, rotator, noon, racecar, Woo Young-woo).

#72 Kurt on 08.24.22 at 5:11 pm

“Some look around, seeing only sloth and vanity.

And you?”

I see an astonishingly complicated and intractable mess.

One: Our economy has become dependent on highly-educated and experienced specialists in STEM. Developing this kind of expertise takes high (if not total) commitment. These folks generally aren’t fully productive in their crafts until they are in their thirties. These folks can’t afford the time to have children (at least if they aren’t going to farm it out.)

Two: the folks who don’t have the natural talent to do that kind of work haven’t had a real raise in 4 decades. Further, thanks to everything from competition from the above folks to stupid government policies to people trying to give meaning to their life through buying stuff, they can’t afford to have children either.

We are in a state of reproductive failure, and for millennia family has given structure to our lives. It’s slipping away, and with it the motivation to achieve.

Of course, this is a ridiculously over-simplified version of my thesis, but I maintain that laying flat (in China) and quiet quitting are just surface manifestations of much deeper and wickedly intractable problems.

There are 8 billion people in the world, up from 2.5 billion when I was born. Not enough for you? – Garth

#73 PeterfromCalgary on 08.24.22 at 5:13 pm

Boomers had the summer of love, Woodstock, and LSD. Now kids are experimenting with WFH.

That is a bit of downgrade.

#74 Sail Away on 08.24.22 at 5:15 pm

The neighbour kid ran up to me yesterday and asked, ‘How old are you?’

I said, ’50. How old are you?’

He yelled ‘6!’ and ran off.

We left it at that.

#75 ogdoad on 08.24.22 at 5:16 pm

Com’on, G. There are many ways to make FIRE work…it takes imagination (sorry to all those I just confused). Who wants to work just to fill a house full of crap you don’t need…or buy a tesla just to say you have a tesla? Or ’cause you can? Its crap, sorry. Its manufactured BS…so is cubicle, middle class work…manufactured BS for prospects of growth. Why grow up thinking we need a house and a garage…for what? First world needs more growth to survive? Is that it? This, is the first world curse *og*

The best day I ever had was when I realized that I never had to suck up to anyone ever again, no boss, no competitive colleagues, no one signing my paycheck (or not being a boss…too lonely)….oh, and I didn’t need a tesla. It was as close to freedom that I will probably ever get…and once you suckle the dew from that fruit?…life can change…(one of my hugs has a similar effect…just saying..)

Og

#76 Odif on 08.24.22 at 5:17 pm

I find it quite ironic that I managed to save up a comfortable amount to be retired already just by following Garth’s advice over the years, yet Garth seems to despise the idea of early retirement.

I’m not a lazy person, and I think most people on the FIRE movement want their freedom, as its a huge mental strain to have your financial well being tied to your employer. I continue to work because I managed to get a job that I love, but the irony is that I would not be able to take risks / get a better job without having the financial security in the first place.

Garth, I think you are looking at this from another angle (not necessarily wrong), but you are at a different stage in your career and life. It’s great that you chose to remain working even past retirement, but shouldn’t we strive for a society that is so advanced and productive to the point where people can choose to work?

Instead, we get people that are disabled / too sick to work and are opting for assisted suicide instead. This is entirely off topic to this thread to begin with, but I’d love to see us moving towards more prosperity that is not tied to your ability (or desire) to work.

I said financial independence is laudable. Retiring early to do zip is not. – Garth

#77 Søren Angst on 08.24.22 at 5:19 pm

Neil.

Had a Springer too. Black and white. Called him Rocky. Pheasant hunting. All around pal. What a nose he had. He’d slobber anyone to death out of pure love. Smart as a whip.

Miss him so much as you probably miss Zoe.

Great photo and thanks for bringing back some fond memories.

#78 Victor Llearna on 08.24.22 at 5:20 pm

Quiet quitting is just newly invented term for what many worker have been doing for decades.
In companies that have little advancement opportunities for non diversity hires and the job is salaried with no overtime pay, why would you not “quiet quit” or do what was previously know as: ‘Slacking Off’, ‘not giving a crap’, ‘wasting time’, ‘putting in time and nothing more’ etc etc.

#79 Senator Bluto on 08.24.22 at 5:24 pm

DELETED (Conspiracy nut)

#80 Stone on 08.24.22 at 5:25 pm

#63 ChrisW on 08.24.22 at 4:41 pm
this is a great post, I am a PhD 30s something working in Tech – and I can tell you, getting anything done now is harder than it was a year ago. People don’t want to work, they won’t respond to urgent emails at 5:02pm, because they have ‘Boundaries’ and my god, if you hurt someones feelings for giving them anything less than a gold star, you are in for it. It’s not good. We spend more time prasing people for the little work they do, than working -it can’t last.

———

Wow. You’re a PhD? Amazing!

I’m a person.

Do you start all your work emails with “I am a PhD”? I would ignore you too if you did. Did your PhD not teach you how to interact and draw others into your wonderful sphere of influence?

Also, sending urgent emails at 5:02 pm? Did you not learn anything about time management and when people are at their most productive?

You won’t last.

#81 Søren Angst on 08.24.22 at 5:27 pm

Some here write justifying the very actions Garth is not enamoured of.

He writes at the start, all the more power to you, and thus bears no ill will.

The end game here is that he ponders what this will do to Cdn productivity and the future wealth generation ability of the country. He hypothesizes that this will not end well for Canada if enough do the very things he outlines.

I agree.

Good to read other Comments here from the Kids that still abide by the “old” ways.

There is hope and it is always last to die.

#82 @J on 08.24.22 at 5:28 pm

Today’s topic dovetails with an interesting NY Times podcast I listened to today on how employers are using tech in an attempt to monitor and measure employee productivity.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/24/podcasts/the-daily/workplace-surveillance-productivity-tracking.html

Their claim is that the workplace is mostly transactional now, and that human elements of work such as deep relationships and devotion have eroded.

I know of folks who have become jaded. They see loyalty as a one way street now where they put in their best effort for certain company projects, but are then discarded during a future round of layoffs. They say fool me once… but don’t fool me twice.

For me, I’m predisposed to working in bursts where I attempt to push my own boundaries and achieve something more than the status quo. Sometimes a company I’m working for benefits from this approach, but I find that I also eventually benefit in some way.

#83 Caffeine Monkey on 08.24.22 at 5:33 pm

Wanting to spend time with family instead of being at work. Ha! What a bunch of pathetic wimps.

Me, I’m a big believer in the Japanese phenomenon of Karoshi: literally “overwork death”. My aspiration is to work so hard that my body shuts down and I collapse face down onto the half-eaten ham sandwich on my desk. My family, who I’ve not eaten dinner or taken a vacation with in years, will suffer no emotional toll. Instead, they will rejoice at the trust fund that I’ve left behind for them. A glorious life!

#84 Old Boot on 08.24.22 at 5:34 pm

Ah but Garth, you’ve over-looked the full impact of the Quiet Quiter phenomenon.

Bloated, top-heavy government employers love the employee who never complains about the lack of work ethic amongst their ranks, nonsensical funding of DEI positions, or about the sloppy, negligent anti-worker environment that permits their workers to be threatened and abused.(I’m looking at you, Healthcare).

Checked-out workers won’t draw attention to themselves by demanding better from their co-workers and managers. Much more dangerous to the careers of incompetent managers is the Type A, workaholic, highly competent employee who thinks for themself.

Kinda like when you worked for Stephen Harper.

#85 Habitt on 08.24.22 at 5:43 pm

65 Workover spot on thanks

#86 Tom from Mississauga on 08.24.22 at 5:46 pm

Professional Boomers taking their 40 years of work experience and retiring while being replaced by a small disengaged cohort of Gen Z is the #1 reason for inflation. Rate hikes won’t fix this.

#87 Ronaldo on 08.24.22 at 5:47 pm

#78 Victor Llearna on 08.24.22 at 5:20 pm
Quiet quitting is just newly invented term for what many worker have been doing for decades.
In companies that have little advancement opportunities for non diversity hires and the job is salaried with no overtime pay, why would you not “quiet quit” or do what was previously know as: ‘Slacking Off’, ‘not giving a crap’, ‘wasting time’, ‘putting in time and nothing more’ etc etc.
—————————————————————
Because you owe it to the person who has taken the initiative, the risk, and the resourses necessary to provide you with a job. If you are one of those that has no initiative, which it seems, then why would anyone hire you? Congrats to Garth on this issue. Too many out there seem to think the world owes them a living. What we need is a good hard recession to teach these loafers a lesson.

#88 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.24.22 at 5:50 pm

@#74 Sail Away
“I said, ’50. How old are you?’”
+++
I had a 4 year old kid ask me that one day and I answered,
” I’m as ollllld as dirt!”

The kid loved it.
A few weeks later I asked the kid in a large gathering of adults….. ,” How old am I?”

“As olllld as dirt!”

The parents were horrified.

I gave the kid a High Five.

#89 Devil Anse on 08.24.22 at 5:53 pm

#59 Waystar Royco Shareholder on 08.24.22 at 4:30 pm
———————————

Totally agree. Even Lisa Laflamme wasn’t safe. Treated like dirt.

Lived a similar experience myself, never went back to the corporate world. It’s broken and toxic.

#90 Reality is stark on 08.24.22 at 5:56 pm

Sorry.
But here is the reality.
The domestic population matters little. They don’t breed.
Just keep them doped up while they try to figure out what gender they are.
We can hire an army of 150 IQ workers with Masters and PHD’s from India that will work 60 hours a week for good pay. They are the future and their kids are usually well adjusted.
That is your real competition, don’t you dare forget it.
They aren’t here in the charity business. You’ll be working for them and finding out.

#91 IHCTD9 on 08.24.22 at 5:59 pm

Ahh, despite being a Gen X, really I’m a Boomer. Best Boss I ever had was an @sshole. Didn’t matter, he paid a good wage, good benefits, great pension deal, and kept the company alive despite some questionable tactics. Sure he cheated on his wife constantly and was a pompous prick, but I had real world explicitly defined reasons to work for him. He sold the company, and 2 years later it was bankrupt. He held up his end of the deal, I held up mine. It was good while it lasted. No lunch dates required.

WFH? It’s the future for many – eventually, IMHO. Only makes sense if you use a wide enough angle lens to gauge the future of economic efficiency and globalization. But it only works if the wages for the WFH employee drop significantly. And if remote work does represent our future, they will. 25% at least, maybe more. If so, many employees and employers could win big. That is how efficiency turns into progress and prosperity blossoms. This is long overdue with education, Covid laid bare just how easy it really is to educate online. Of course, a crapload of civil servants would take a front kick if anyone ever admitted to this, so low cost, high quality education for the masses will remain an uphill battle – at least in Canada. Globally, economic efficiency represents lowering high wage earners, and raising low wage earners. It’s already been happening for years, and it’s going to keep on happening if we expect to move forward.

They key for expanding WFH is lower costs for the employer, the potential is obvious and significant. It won’t happen en-masse until the hopeful remote employees realize a solid pay cut is part of the package. A legally enforceable contract stipulates 6 elements. One of them is “mutual consideration” – both parties have to benefit. There is a win available here, and for many jobs today plus more going forward, I believe employees will slowly admit the math can work in their favour, even after a pay cut. The need for companies to remain competitive will push the trend from there.

#92 Audrey on 08.24.22 at 6:00 pm

Its been a hot minute but this post speaks to me. I might be a millennial with a outsourcing addiction but why can’t personal life and work merge into one happy day?
I do believe that the hustle lifestyle is going away for many and no one brags about working 70 hours anymore (because no one is impressed by it) but why do we need to put barriers around our daily life and protect it from the big bad work?
I just took a 3-month maternity leave and that sent shock waves… apparently it’s only acceptable to do 12 or 18 months now. People were placing bets on my return to work date. I’m not trying to undo a century of the feminist movement but that seems a bit backwards to me. What happened to doing it all? Why do we need to compartmentalize everything? Why can’t we like our life and work blended and at peace with each other? I’m not saying that work/life balance is fake news but damm, looking at a report at 9PM once the kids are asleep shouldn’t kill anyone. I also know many people that are in the FIRE/stay at home parents and retirees – they end up giving themselves random (non-paying) little BS jobs to keep themselves busy. Sharing Facebook memes is VERY important to do their part in society – OK?

Also, quiet quitting has been around and its part of human nature (have you ever met a gvt employee with 4 years left before their pension kicks in? Its a sad sight)…. but now its trending and has momentum. Looks like some people might need to roll their sleeves and start mentoring their employees for retention and to instill some work ethics / passion into the mix.

#93 Pylot Project on 08.24.22 at 6:00 pm

“Currently there are more empty positions both here and in the States than workers to fill them.”

I keep seeing similar notes posted all over the place. I’d like to see real data somewhere, anywhere, of what exactly those “positions” are that can’t be filled. I bet mostly in the service industry?

“It’s a nightmare condition for employers called ‘quiet’ quitting.”

Back in the day, we Gen-Xers called them Slackers. It’s not new. Just insidious.

#94 Cheese on 08.24.22 at 6:03 pm

There are those of us with an extremely strong work ethic, never miss a day, work very well with coworkers, commute to work daily during the entirety of the pandemic…

but still only make $20/hr

#95 Paul on 08.24.22 at 6:04 pm

#51 Bipolar on 08.24.22 at 4:11 pm
I always thought of work as a privilege. When I was unable to work even more so. Held responsible professional jobs. When I was unable to hold these type of jobs I pumped gas a an ESSO station. I know others like me who also have done the same type of thing due to mental house challenges. I was grateful for the gas pumping job. Found out the people at these stations work a lot harder than I thought. I always buy my gas at ESSO now.
————————————
The crazy thing is you are still pumping it, we’ve come a long way baby!

#96 Borden Renter on 08.24.22 at 6:12 pm

“Ambition’s not valued. Hustle is dead. Instead, mental health, work-life balance and family time are put at the top of agenda. Naturally people want more money and benefits to survive in a costly world. They just don’t want to work harder to get it. Huh?”

These values were ‘truer’ in past decades, but the ROI on those values has shrunk massively for a growing portion of the population. Especially with so many sectors devastated by globalism.

It turns out that working people harder for less pay, all while the dollar they earn loses value, to buy inflated basic goods, for a company that would just as easily replace them at the drop of a hat for cheaper labour, makes them re-evaluate what’s important to them in life. Turns out it wasn’t work. Enough people have done the mental math and just shrugged.

I guess once people get a year long break from commuting two hours a day to spend 8 hours or more in a glass and concrete box in the sky, sending needless e-mails, attending pointless meetings; they realized the drudgery for what it is. Now this isn’t every job mind you, but it makes up a bulk of them. Just look at the growing dependency on anti-depressants among the older working age folks as time goes on, it’s not shrinking.

I’ll keep plugging away because I lack the requisite numbers in my accounts to retire at 38, but I’ll be damned to sacrifice myself to people who hate me.

#97 The Gold Standard on 08.24.22 at 6:13 pm

Get a load of this realtor the “news” interviewed recently.

He hits all the buttons:

Home ownership is a “dream” and a “milestone”.

“Many young buyers who are educated about the market feel that home ownership is a worthwhile investment.”

“They’ve seen friends, family, colleagues get into the market, and often really build their financial base based on owning a home. Number two: It’s also, I think, a part of the Canadian dream”

Younger millennials’ parents are also willing to help, as they want to see their kids succeed.

https://vancouver.citynews.ca/2022/08/24/greater-vancouver-real-estate-millennials/

#98 Broader Mind on 08.24.22 at 6:18 pm

I would suggest that a prompt return of the old work ethic would follow a reasonable rise in interest rates.Free money has created all kinds of problems . The boom in crypto, stock, and real estate all stem from a large disrespect for the value of money re rates. Gobs of money and ponies freely distributed during Covid will need to be returned before things normalize. Will the central banks do it , probably not.

#99 Ronaldo on 08.24.22 at 6:21 pm

#96 Borden Renter

I’ll keep plugging away because I lack the requisite numbers in my accounts to retire at 38, but I’ll be damned to sacrifice myself to people who hate me.
—————————————————————–
If things are so bad, why do you stay? Why do they hate you?

#100 baloney Sandwitch on 08.24.22 at 6:26 pm

This WFH stuff is bull shit. Let us get back to moaning about RE and the bear market and talking stocks?

Apartment REITs are getting attractive again, some even below pandemic lows and half of tangible book value. The interest rate hikes have sent the REITs crashing while rents are soaring. Wonderful opportunity.

#101 Ronaldo on 08.24.22 at 6:27 pm

#94 Cheese on 08.24.22 at 6:03 pm
There are those of us with an extremely strong work ethic, never miss a day, work very well with coworkers, commute to work daily during the entirety of the pandemic…

but still only make $20/hr
————————————————————–
So are you thinking that you should receive a bonus for showing up for work?

#102 Left GTA on 08.24.22 at 6:27 pm

Well at 49 just before the pandemic hubby was packaged out from his stressful software engineering job. The travel was making him miserable so the timing was great for us. We had an idea a couple of years before that this may be coming so we sold the GTA house when Garth was writing a lot about that and moved to KW area. We love it here. Stuffed his RRSPS and TFSA’s. When covid happened my Dad was sick and the hospital care was just not enough so I took him home and took care of him. Quit my nursing job where I worked 22yrs. Commuted my pension. So about 6 months later Dad made a great recovery. I was officially retired. Well I am starting a new job in September. Staying home was nice. But I miss the workplace environment. Also being retired and still paying for one teenager and one adult kid is expensive. We spent more money than we had expected but that is ok. So I bought myself a little midlife crisis car and off to work I will go soon. Part time thou so still hope to have the best of both worlds. Praying they won’t run me ragged at the new hospital… time will tell. I hope to be able to do some travel next year we will see. I figure freedom 55 is a better age to fully retire I am just not there yet. Kids have to be more independent too…

#103 red falcon on 08.24.22 at 6:30 pm

FIRE is good, but to go back for side hustles and extra income suggests only one thing… you didn’t structure or made enough income to cover your future needs and expenses. Ergo, relying on MPT-related products like ETF’s and mutual funds will not cut it in the long run. Your money can’t, on average, outlast you, simply because that’s how MPT is… just an average of stuff, so you can’t go broke, but you certainly can’t do greater than average either… the irony of ironies.

What I would suggest is to review why ETF’s and their elk are not known for providing growing income. Buy your own TULF dividend growth stocks (google it), buy them at reasonable prices, hold them for the long term, and PRO$PER! that’s all, you can paddle your own boat with confidence. I’m doing that now, and nothing in the financial world can stop me (paraphrased by the keke catz)!

#104 Inflation Time on 08.24.22 at 6:30 pm

It not that these people are not ambitious, they see the landscape of never being able to own a house in Toronto if they are not in the top 5% of occupations, this right there takes away a major ambition for most people in life, after they surmise this is not possible, then then turn towards other goals like travel, doing work you like, work environment and other things. What used to be possible on a general labourer’s wage takes a general surgeon or law firm partner salary. Take away that home ownership dream and most work ambition goes away for a lot of young people.

#105 Ronaldo on 08.24.22 at 6:32 pm

#93 Pylot Project on 08.24.22 at 6:00 pm

Back in the day, we Gen-Xers called them Slackers. It’s not new. Just insidious.
————————————————————–
You’d probably enjoy this book.

https://www.amazon.ca/Doing-Nothing-History-Loungers-Slackers-ebook/dp/B003GY0KS4

#106 Toronto_CA on 08.24.22 at 6:33 pm

Heh. Glad to see our amazing host getting a bit of shit in the comments. This is a bit of Okay Boomer about it.

WFH is not the enemy. Hybrid working is great for anyone who was able to do their roles from home for 2 years of pandemic.

Quiet Quitting?
I would be fine with an employee who did not aspire to do more than required. It’s called a Steady Eddie (or Steady Susan, whatever is woke). They’re good to have as opposed to the climbers who will quit when you can’t give them a promotion because there’s no room at the next level.

The kids are alright.

#107 Nonplused on 08.24.22 at 6:41 pm

Who cares what the lazy people aren’t doing? Just don’t be one of them.

They say you are the average of your 5 best friends. So take a look and see who you are. If you like what you see, good. If not, why are you hanging out with those bums?

As they say on the island, “whenever possible, hang around the lucky”. Why? Well, luck does rub off. Mostly because you can observe what they are doing to make their own luck. Hard work and smarts are 99% of it. Stupid lazy people end up surprisingly unlucky. Don’t let it get on you.

#108 Jason on 08.24.22 at 6:41 pm

I think the piece you’re missing Garth, is that the vast, vast majority of jobs are just jobs. The only reason people have those jobs is to pay the bills. Their passions lie in pursuits that they can’t make a living at.

#109 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.24.22 at 6:45 pm

@#89 Devils Anse
“Lived a similar experience myself, never went back to the corporate world. It’s broken and toxic.”
+++
Yep.
And working in a govt managerial position is ten times worse.
When all the competant people have retired and the kiddies have to look at each other in the next Human Resources blame session…..
Maybe they’ll figure it out.

I wonder if the German Chancellor was thrilled at the tour of the “Promised Hydrogen” location in Newfoundland when all he really wanted was LNG NOW for this Winter.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/possibly-one-of-the-greatest-missed-opportunities-in-canadian-history

Our Manic Prime Minister…more interested in what socks he wears to a presser than selling billions in LNG to Europe.

Trudeau.
Truly an Embarrassment of the Rich.

#110 Quintilian on 08.24.22 at 6:47 pm

I have not seen hard data as to exactly what demographic is the bulk of the ”quiet quitters” / great resignation, and admittingly I am biased, and lean toward a negative view of boomers.

But I think it’s mainly the lazy curmudgeons, who think they have ascended to the summit of success by winning the real estate lottery.

Most of them have hated working because they have been stoned into a stupor and lacked the creativity and initiative to take chances at doing something meaningful with their lives.

So now these proud owners will spend the rest of their lives, boasting and bragging to each other across the picket fences from their respective castles, hail to the little boomer kings.

Boomer-the most despicable, arrogant, indolent, personification of “sloth and vanity”.

#111 MDQ on 08.24.22 at 6:51 pm

> I’ll only say my life has found meaning through my work.

That makes sense, since you don’t have family; I used to work 80 hours per week until I had a kid. Most of us realize at that point that working is just another component in life; not the main and only focus.

> The Covid years ignited a workplace revolution
I think thats an exaggeration, mainly from the media. There are lots of young, motivated individuals; just hire those and get rid of the rest.

The job market will self correct itself.

#112 Shawn on 08.24.22 at 6:53 pm

Necessity is the mother of invention they say.

And necessity is also the mother of the work ethic.

A lot of people who find they don’t HAVE to work will indeed not work. No surprise.

#113 Kurt on 08.24.22 at 6:56 pm

“There are 8 billion people in the world, up from 2.5 billion when I was born. Not enough for you? – Garth”

Thank you for responding to my comment, without my inviting it! Nowhere did I say that we as a planet need more people – that’s all you. Replacement birth rate is a shade over two children per woman (accident, illness, and sexual orientation account for the excess, discounting lifestyle choices) – an astonishing number of women in Canada have one or no children. It is quite possible for family to give meaning to our lives without natural growth; if a person believes that we should be aiming for strongly negative growth, that person should also strongly oppose the Canadian government’s immigration targets as adding more people to one of the most resource-intensive communities in the world does nothing for fixing the world’s over-population problem.

Let me put this a different way: zoo keepers know that their animals are happy when they start breeding. Canadians aren’t breeding. While humans are complicated enough that it is possible that they are not breeding because of some other reason (see the sexual restrictions for the Shakers), it is very likely that Canadians as a whole are not happy. This has all kinds of knock-on effects, one of which is that many people stop caring about work. You can probably think of other population-level effects of people not being generally happy.

Don’t get me wrong – my work defines me and it bugs me to see people slacking or hear about the (possibly apocryphal) tales of chronically underworked government employees. That does not mean I should ignore systemic effects of our current economy.

If our people are not reproducing, what does it say about us and the world we have created? And, disregarding transitional difficulties with “not enough taxpayers”, what is the end game? Do we shrink our population to the point where there are no longer enough talented people to do the high-end work required to keep our civilization going and just collapse back into hunting, gathering and subsistence agriculture? I know that this is of mainly academic interest because we’ll all be dead for generations before that happens, but considering the question sheds light on the present.

#114 chalkie on 08.24.22 at 7:00 pm

I disagree that you can run of and retire at 40 or 45 years old with a million bucks on a 4 or 5 percent GIC interest rate. Let’s take a look at this for a moment, you get your 5% interest on a 4- or 5-year term, but now your whole million dollars is locked in, so how do you eat over these few years while you wait to collect your 5 % at the end of your 5-year term, your money is no longer liquid, you might as well say, you are broke for 5 years.
By the way, Mr. Trudeau will have his hand out just waiting for your 5-year term to be up, because you are now cashing your $250,000 gains in the one calendar year on your T4, as they say, no free rides. If your investment is liquid with the interest, dividend or bonus being paid monthly, then you have a different story, $50,000 interest a year with much lower taxes on the overall.

#115 yvr_lurker on 08.24.22 at 7:01 pm

#33
raising a family. I remember staying up all night with a collicky baby and being unsure how I would survive at work the next day. I remember leaving work at 5 PM and hoping there were no traffic jams so I could get to my kids’ daycare before it closed.

I have no idea how a young couple could raise kids nowadays in Toronto or Vancouver. I hope you can cut some slack for workers with young kids.
——–

Bingo. Hit the nail on the head. With needing a dual career couple to afford living in most major and now even some minor cities in Canada to afford a “basic” lifestyle, it all becomes a juggling act to balance work and parental responsibilities/daycare etc. It is unreasonable to expect those with younger families to be plugged into their jobs answering calls/emails after the workday, while one prays they can get to pick up their kids before the daycare closes.

Everyone has biases and blindspots that influence how they see the world. For those who have never had the experience with kids and doing the juggling act (I do, but well over a decade ago), they don’t understand the challenges involved with dual career couples and kids. These people lament the Gov’t aiming to reduce childcare expenses and helpful child Tax benefits as being wasteful and not universal. I am happy with the Gov’t helping in this way.

My blindspot is with regards to increasing the subsidies offered to seniors. My view is that if you have been on this planet and able to work for 45 years and have not done even a passable job in saving for your retirement, don’t come around asking for vast improvements from Gov’t subsidies. Sorry, but not a major priority….give the next generation a chance to do better…

#116 Ljp on 08.24.22 at 7:08 pm

Hey Garth,

I have a son who just finished his first year of management at Western and has spent his summer in lake Louise working 50+ hrs a week in banquets. After taxes he clears just north of $5k a month. He does so well because he works extra hrs and gives extra effort so his tips reflect that. Except for one other kid, all his high school friends and new university friends are not working this summer! How are they surviving? Don’t these parents understand that they are not helping their children by giving them no responsibility??? We pay our son’s tuition and board but he is responsible for all his other expenses throughout the year, so he works hard in the summer. This isn’t a new thing for him either. He started working as a grocery stock boy the summer after grade 8 and has worked every summer since (he also had a business replacing iPhone screens back then too). If you hire summer interns let me know and I’ll send him to your company’s website to apply for next year. He wants a career in finance so why not learn from the best.

#117 Kootenay Dave on 08.24.22 at 7:12 pm

During the 2.5 years of WFH, numerous companies have seen record profits coupled with a headcount that is actually static or decreasing. Back of the napkin, does this not suggest increased productivity? I’m still waiting to see some concrete facts vs rhetoric on WFH being less productive. I’ve even heard of numerous companies offering a voluntary retirement option to get rid of some the paleo dead weight… it’s amazing how many take it, must’ve been quietly quit for years and/or overwhelmed by the pace of technological change. Time for the ambitious within younger generations to take the reigns (and there are many… note your colleagues article from about a month back) and embrace how much opportunity there is out there… and heaven forbid if they dare do it from home, oh the humanity!!!

#118 Moose 7612 on 08.24.22 at 7:13 pm

I can’t wait to work for you!….Brewskis and martoonies for lunch! Party on Garth!

#119 Unpinned on 08.24.22 at 7:17 pm

In Calgary, Alberta and most of Alberta many office settings and some retail and service settings are hanging on to the mask mandate and the hand sanitizer. We are now more than two years into this health pandamic which is no longer a pandemic but it is hard to pin the blame on for the health mandates which serve no purpose and are mostly theatre or for show. After two years of cancelling your life and normal activities you develop a mindset of …oh well, why bother to go to work? Why bother to go to the dentist? Why bother to go to the spa? The public and workers have morphed into a reclusive society as there is still messaging from government and media to hold onto the “let’s cancel everything just to be safe.”

#120 TheDood on 08.24.22 at 7:23 pm

It’s a nightmare condition for employers called ‘quiet’ quitting. Employees don’t just resign and trundle off somewhere, they stay employed, collect their pay, but don’t actually give a crap. It’s the new version of work-to-rule in which employment is seen as a necessary invasion of your day in order to get money. Career aspirations are kaput. Advancement’s no goal. Getting a gold star for being a good worker is dismissed. Nobody cares.

Ambition’s not valued. Hustle is dead. Instead, mental health, work-life balance and family time are put at the top of agenda. Naturally people want more money and benefits to survive in a costly world. They just don’t want to work harder to get it. Huh?
__________________________

LOL! ‘Insidious’. Love it!

Quiet quitting is simply avoiding giving up one’s free time to the company for free (IE evenings and weekends). If the salary is based on a 40 hour work week and the work can’t be completed in that time frame, expectations need to be lowered, or it’s a question of competence/incompetence.

Hustlers are always rewarded eventually. I think going forward there will be more and more who will not work one second past their 8 hour shift, no matter the expectation. And even if paid for it, it’s still a choice – is the money offered worth staying for?

#121 A01 on 08.24.22 at 7:27 pm

Most people who FIRE still opt to do work they find meaningful. People who have that much drive and discipline just don’t sit around all day doing nothing. It’s about you being in control of your time

#122 Marco on 08.24.22 at 7:28 pm

If work ethic is dead, corporate America killed it. Anyone who can’t see that is incredibly out of touch with what’s been happening to employees in the job market over the last thirty years. Wages stagnant for decades, cavernous wealth gap between the working class and the capitalist class, workers treated like a disposable commodity (more profitable this way, you see). When the game is rigged, why should they play?

Also, quiet quitting? About time. Quiet Firing’s been going on for a loooooong time now

#123 Tony on 08.24.22 at 7:35 pm

My brother is retiring at the end of this month and my other brother retired in June this year. Both at age 60.

#124 TheDood on 08.24.22 at 7:35 pm

#104 Inflation Time on 08.24.22 at 6:30 pm
It not that these people are not ambitious, they see the landscape of never being able to own a house in Toronto if they are not in the top 5% of occupations, this right there takes away a major ambition for most people in life, after they surmise this is not possible, then then turn towards other goals like travel, doing work you like, work environment and other things. What used to be possible on a general labourer’s wage takes a general surgeon or law firm partner salary. Take away that home ownership dream and most work ambition goes away for a lot of young people.
______________________

So sad that a life’s dream or ambition is home ownership – in Toronto no less. My opinion is just that – my opinion. I didn’t give a flying rats ass about home ownership until I did a whole bunch of other things first, travel, harley, party my ass off, live and work overseas, etc. Was fortunate and lucky to earn tax free US for many years. I took risks/chances/leaps of faith, and have had no regrets – except moving back to Canada.

#125 No pants on 08.24.22 at 7:41 pm

“it’s tough to grasp what the hell anyone does during four continuous decades of wearing sweat pants.”

What a lack of imagination. I for one plan on sampling the list below fully:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_whisky_brands

(No pants will make it to the end)

#126 oops on 08.24.22 at 7:50 pm

#107 Nonplused on 08.24.22 at 6:41 pm

You failed the obligatory ethics class, i guess?

#127 fishman on 08.24.22 at 8:12 pm

I had enough moolah & cash flow at 42 to retire. So I did. Then proceeded to fall apart like a cheap suit. I’d taken myself out of the game. I was ignored. Just another retired bored schmuck hanging around the dock & coffee shop. That didn’t last. Same as Garth, we want to be recognized & valued by our peers. Its our egos, so what. Better than being a nobody.
As far as the moisters? They do a lot of drugs, play a lot of video games & spend a lot of time on cell phones. The dope nowadays is way stronger. Except for the crystal meth because the precursor chemicals needed aren’t around But the pot now is paralyzing, crack instead of cocaine, fentanal instead of heroin,yikes! They take a lot pills at raves & clubs (especially girls) which I think is like the old MDMA. I’m suspicious they don’t have the precursor chemicals & it gets kicked up a notch with ?. They’ll find out how hard it is to kick a nasty little drug habit. I never graduated to video games, Facebook, instagram, tik tok or twitter. This silly blog is addictive enough.
My mentors were WW2 vets. They were happy to have a good steady well paying job. Its only in later years that I understood of all the things I learned from them, it was there attitude & habits towards safe working protocols. They had seen enough to know prevention was the better part of valour. Starting at 17, mining, high lead logging, offshore commercial fishing & construction going on five decades. One compo claim on my watch. A deckhand slipped & broke a few ribs. By osmosis or whatever they taught me to pay attention & be safe.
What I see from the moisters is distraction. Like they have to multitask. How can they work with music plugged in their ears? And always glancing at their phones! No peripheral vision. Thinking ahead is some kind of mysticism.
Us captains were always on the lookout for crew. Sailors are switching boats, gf troubles, can’t stand another crewman, always quitting. We used to say never hire anybody thats been in jail or on welfare for more than two years. They couldn’t focus,couldn’t concentrate. They had been ruined. I don’t think its sloth or vanity causing this “work crisis”, though they are manifestations. The’ve picked up bad habits from the internet & social media & mentors & teachers. Good habits die easy, bad habits die hard.

#128 Lee on 08.24.22 at 8:12 pm

Another variable that is contributing to resignations is long covid.

#129 GW on 08.24.22 at 8:18 pm

Another excellent post!

Like many, I started young and worked hard, soldiered on, and “paid my dues” for over two decades in an often gruelling and thankless career field. Eventually, I burned out and my health suffered the consequences. This led to the difficult decision to “retire” early. This was only possible because I had done the sorts of things Mr. Turner preaches here regularly. That which was described by Thomas Stanley and William Danko in “The Millionaire Next Door”.

So I guess you could say that I, unintentionally, achieved FIRE. Though I feel like I still have much to learn and so much more to give. Our identity is so attached to “what we do” that it has been a challenging transition, to say the least.

I believe that having meaningful, gainful employment is important for well being. Not having such can be disastrous for communities, as a whole.

For those out there striving for FIRE, what will you do once you’ve achieved it?

#130 right to work on 08.24.22 at 8:19 pm

The cooperation profit came not only from employees work but also from their families emotional suffering that include divorces.
Will returning to the office signal a rise in workplace affairs?
https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/workplace-affairs-ashley-madison-will-returning-to-office-signal-rise-015414667.html

#131 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.24.22 at 8:30 pm

@#110 Quinty’s Questionable Quantifying.
“Boomer-the most despicable, arrogant, indolent, personification of “sloth and vanity”.”

+++
Tis a shame you will never experience the “sloth and vanity”….poor Quinty…..but just keep staring over the fence barking, snarling and drooling in jealousy.
:)

#132 Wrk.dover on 08.24.22 at 8:35 pm

I was reflecting on my post earlier indicating how I was a ‘jet setter’ before commercial jets, and I realized fully for the 1st time; my father didn’t wad his earnings into an account to leave his three spawn a trust to be Trudeau clones!

He spent all the money showing us how to live!

Here, there and everywhere. Not the same bunk every night, week, month, year, decade.

I’m glad that is what my wife wants even more so.

#133 Andrew on 08.24.22 at 8:41 pm

Stagnating wages lead to stagnating effort. What a shocker.

#134 crossbordershopper on 08.24.22 at 8:42 pm

i was totally ahead of my time, i figured this thing out in high school. that work was irrelevant. i saw the guy down the street scam the workers comp due to his back situation, even though he was chopping wood in the back. I didnt know anything about life. I can list hundreds of people who went to work every day and accumulated nothing, every single day they went to work and after all the issues in there life, divorce, job loss, addiction, illness etc. they end up with close to nothing.
if most people end up with nothing after so much work , its no surprise that other people have figured out that they simply work as little as possible for as much of a benefit. i learned that concept in high school.
so today, while most of you went to work, i drove with the family to port dover, had lunch, bummed around, a little shopping and came home. Mid week, mid summer fill your day with nothing which is the cornerstone of my life. so if some people get personal joy out of working then who am i to judge.
all i know is that my daughter at 16 has the same work ethic as her old man, but in her case she will have enough money where she really can do nothing all her life, where i struggled until i finally could say . im done.
that i can buy as an argument, where you struggle for your kids, to a point of course. but working for self gratification, some people are easily satisfied i guess. you want me to give you my time for money, no man, i dont need your blackmail money to interrupt my life. Time is all i got, and its not for sale at any price. Its mine.

#135 Laura Eriksson on 08.24.22 at 8:46 pm

Of course it’s mostly women under 35, that’s the mom age. The amount of time they spend commuting is terrible. It’s a double commute to to school/daycare and plus to work, not to mention the dangers of driving sleep deprived from being up with kids at night. Women have more accidents (and are more prone to be injured as well due to cars being designed for men). Women can literally get all their work done in half as much time by working from home. Then there’s all the fossil fuels saved, daycare costs saved, clothing/hair/nails, etc. So much more efficient use of time and energy. I’m actually a bit surprised that as someone who professes to care about this planet you think that people should use wasteful energy (and time) just to work with different walls.

#136 Tony on 08.24.22 at 8:46 pm

One thing I could never figure out is people with a fortune who think working to get a maximum pension is the only thing that matters when it comes to working? I never did ask my cousin Catherine why she even works at all? She said she’s retiring in 4 years at age 50 to get a bigger pension. Her husband still works but no one knows why except I guess to assure he’ll inherit a fortune from his father as an only child. Like comparing pennies to thousand dollar bills pension money to yearly earnings.

#137 Phylis on 08.24.22 at 9:00 pm

He actually chimed into the comments? Nothing like burning a bridge eh? Yikes.

#138 cramp on 08.24.22 at 9:01 pm

Ironically, I have heard in the last month from three separate people in different provinces about one universal theme. PEOPLE TODAY DON’T HAVE ANY WORK ETHIC! People are hired and quit after a short period of time. People want to be paid highly, but don’t want to work hard for it.

I can see a great reckoning coming.

#139 McSteve on 08.24.22 at 9:02 pm

I’m a hard worker…very good at my profession but a wage slave. Work cannot compete with watching my kids grow, play hockey and being a present father.

#140 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 9:10 pm

I prefer smart work over hard.
And celebrating a job well done.
I found it’s contagious.

#141 DON on 08.24.22 at 9:12 pm

@#92 Audrey

“I’m not saying that work/life balance is fake news but damm, looking at a report at 9PM once the kids are asleep shouldn’t kill anyone.”

**************

You might have a perfect child right now (who sleeps through the night). For the first say ten years you are on call and struggle to get your own stuff done at any moment. As they get older it just gets busier. I get it you will make it work, cause you have to. I remember coming home after a busy day to a sick household and a uni paper due the next morning. I had a sick 3 year old in my lap with a laptop on the table getting it done. Having kids is like running a marathon every day and it never seems to end just gets different. Rewarding yes, but not a cake walk and so very unpredictable at times.

#142 Work and Tumble on 08.24.22 at 9:15 pm

I walked away from my job this year, I am 57 next month.
I worked in sales and was payed commission (the amount of money a salesperson earns based on the number of sales they have made.)
No salary, No hourly pay, No holiday pay. Not to worry I was a hard worker and was compensated very well each month, have a nice home and comfortable life style.

The company has now replaced positions like mine with Customer Service Team and there is no incentive for hard work no commission or up sells to make a extra buck” just a crap office job with bad benefits and no Freedom 57.

#143 DON on 08.24.22 at 9:20 pm

#36 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 3:58 pm
times are a changin’.
for the better, imo.

**********
Agreed.

The WFH technology is there so make use of it and reduce the traffic grid lock, less accidents etc. We graduated from the horse a cart to automobiles. Why not progress. Not every thing needs to be done face to face. Balance is always key.

#144 Steven Rowlandson on 08.24.22 at 9:21 pm

Never have so many worked so hard for so long for so little only to find it wiser to give up and take it easy. Never!

#145 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.24.22 at 9:27 pm

@#138 cramp
“I can see a great reckoning coming.”

+++
Yep.
Recession tends to be the great equalizer….unl;ess you’re a greedy, rich Boomer with 2 gas guzzlin SUV’s in the garage and a big fat diesel yacht at the marina….
Ta hell with the environment….we’re gonna party “til the Sun zoomin’ in”…..right Quinty?

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiT99_g6uD5AhUFIX0KHTQ9AoEQtwJ6BAhyEAI&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DEfK-WX2pa8c&usg=AOvVaw08VaaaBS7Nxf6Gd8PZw6_z

#146 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 9:32 pm

@#129 GW on 08.24.22 at 8:18 pm

For those out there striving for FIRE, what will you do once you’ve achieved it?

Whatever I want.
On my own terms.

#147 Stroller on 08.24.22 at 9:37 pm

Well, if we we’re discussing the fruits of labor under a leftist thuggery it may be well to recall:

-1867 the Russian serfs are emancipated
-“what? we’re not slaves? we directly receive the fruit of our labor?”
-1867-1920 the serfs roll with it. Add fertilizer. Double yields. Buy a pig. Buy 3 pigs! Buy a cow!
-1920 everyone who owns a cow is shot by Stalin for being a bloodsucker of the Russian revolution.

In many, many ways Stalin was less of a thug than Justin.

#148 Tony on 08.24.22 at 9:38 pm

Re: #114 chalkie on 08.24.22 at 7:00 pm

You don’t have to compound the interest so a 5 year GIC on a million dollars will pay $50,000 each year for the 5 year term.

#149 DON on 08.24.22 at 9:39 pm

#139 McSteve on 08.24.22 at 9:02 pm
I’m a hard worker…very good at my profession but a wage slave. Work cannot compete with watching my kids grow, play hockey and being a present father.

*******
That’s a big 10 4 good buddy.

A pallative care nurse wrote a book on death bed regrets and spending more time with family and friends doing the simple stuff was #1 on people’s list. The other day I let my pre teens have a swearing fest in car ( mom was at home ). We had a ball and shared a moment of sorts. It still makes me chuckle.

We’re here for a good time…not a long time.

#150 Dan on 08.24.22 at 9:44 pm

Well …..my 2 bit anecdote, I quit in 1999 at the ripe old age of 40, and haven’t looked back. I found lots to do in retirement, so boredom has never been a factor. The portfolios have done well since 1999, having almost quadrupled since then, so money has never been a worry. So why did I retire so early you might ask? In 1998, I retired all real estate debt that I had, such that rental income plus job income meant a tax rate somewhere between 50-60%. Since I didn’t want to work for the government, the most sensible thing to do was drop the day job which was subject to the highest tax rate. My tax rate dropped immediately by about 25%. Moral of the story? Careful how aggressively you tax citizens, us fools will only tolerate so much confiscatory behavior.

#151 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 9:45 pm

@#110 Quintilian on 08.24.22 at 6:47 pm
I have not seen hard data as to exactly what demographic is the bulk of the ”quiet quitters” / great resignation, and admittingly I am biased, and lean toward a negative view of boomers.

But I think it’s mainly the lazy curmudgeons, who think they have ascended to the summit of success by winning the real estate lottery.

Most of them have hated working because they have been stoned into a stupor and lacked the creativity and initiative to take chances at doing something meaningful with their lives.

So now these proud owners will spend the rest of their lives, boasting and bragging to each other across the picket fences from their respective castles, hail to the little boomer kings.

Boomer-the most despicable, arrogant, indolent, personification of “sloth and vanity”.

wow, the ageism going both ways coupled with the over the top generalizations is epic tonight.
a real low point for this comments section.

#152 Katherine on 08.24.22 at 9:46 pm

https://www.cp24.com/news/four-day-work-week-trial-at-toronto-tech-company-led-to-unanticipated-result-ceo-says-1.6040493

Interesting results after 8-week trial. It’s not rocket science that employees need and want to feel empowered and don’t like to be micromanaged. And they can be just as productive at home as in the office.

#153 Al on 08.24.22 at 9:47 pm

“Career aspirations are over”, because everything is too expensive, in any case you can afford a single detached house for your family, every year it will only become more expensive

#154 DON on 08.24.22 at 9:54 pm

#64 Mattl on 08.24.22 at 4:43 pm
I’m not a big fan of stereotyping whole generations. I have some under 30s that would do laps around anyone, any generation. In fact, I haven’t had issues with younger folks on my staff at all.

I also have staff into their 3rd decade of work, still kicking ass.

No one cares about going for lunch, we all work remote and get stuff done.

So I won’t get involved in the generation wars, I just look for talent when building my team. If someone quit on me after a week, that’s on me and my process.

******
Fully agree! Good post.

#155 Summertime on 08.24.22 at 9:56 pm

Working from the office is mostly about control.
WFH face to face over internet is not a lack of communication.

Good luck in getting quality staff with no flexibility.

Expecting integrity and people to work their behind off for compensation that will not give them appropriate decent living is delusional.

The exodus of the old work-ethic generations will fix it/the delusion/ with the young people going all for quiet quitting.

Who can blame them? The hands-off authorities are championing it in first place.

One must be idiot not to have a self preservation instinct.

You can’t have idiots with no self preservation instinct and high productivity as they won’t be able to reproduce.

Example: birth rates in Canada with the endless good news about the ‘economic’ recovery while cost of essentials have skyrocketed.

Herd culling time folks, herd culling time.

#156 Robbie on 08.24.22 at 10:01 pm

My 6th degree karate sensei has a saying, “Show up, shut up, suck it up!” It has served me well in my continuing years in karate as well as in life. Perhaps more people should listen to his wisdom.

#157 Bitcoin Bro on 08.24.22 at 10:04 pm

I think some of Garth’s observations are valid. The culture of what you could say “softness” towards work has grown in recent years . What is sometimes called “woke” (I hate that term). COVID is a factor for sure.

At the same time … mean wages have been stagnant for decades. The cost of living sucks, wealth inequality has been rising for a long time now. A six figure job doesn’t get you very far in the suburbs, let alone the big cities. The data is clear. All covered by this pathetic blog for years now.

When you consider this, I can understand why big chunks of the the >40 crowd have a cynical attitude towards work.

#158 Drew on 08.24.22 at 10:07 pm

What do you do for 4 decades? Whatever interests you. Run for office, start a newspaper (or a blog these days I guess), Buy an ice cream shop, buy an old bank and reno it, start a financial management company, write some books. There are lots of options

None of which involve retirement. – Garth

#159 Chameleon on 08.24.22 at 10:11 pm

“The Covid years ignited a workplace revolution destined to impact our overall productivity and growth.”

I don’t think so Garth.

I think the Covid years have reminded people that life is not endless. Time runs out. Could run out tomorrow. Perhaps this was an intended goal of the whole thing by our leaders, considering the level of panic and fear imposed upon the masses.

People who have looked at this question have indeed started to wonder if spending so much of their non-sleep hours in pointless dead-end jobs plus 2 hours to get to and from each day is worth it.

Let us not kid ourselves: Corporate jobs are soul killers. HR departments are filled with…well, HR types. Quarter to quarter…look, no one is doing it because they love it. They do it because they have to. I sometimes go downtown to watch you people do your thing, enslaved in giant glass prisons doing it all for just one simple reason: money. Oh sure, try to tell me there is anything else than money driving it on this blog about money and finances.

Perhaps the reminder that life is finite also made some ask if our work defining our lives as well? Should it? Must it?

Am I my work, or am I something else?
You’ve already noted that your life has meaning through your work.

I wonder if there is only one way, or if there are more than one to get through life?

Also, do you know if it was God who made money or if it was humans?

And why are seniors in their last years of their lives deprived of it to cover their needs? Is there a shortage?

#160 Stealth on 08.24.22 at 10:12 pm

Hmmm, so what the blog implies is that people with high work ethic , productive, who hustle and show up will easily beat most others who don’t in almost all aspects because they will get there faster due to expending more energy faster towards the goal.

Thanks.

#161 Summertime on 08.24.22 at 10:12 pm

DELETED (profanity)

#162 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 10:18 pm

#156 Robbie on 08.24.22 at 10:01 pm
My 6th degree karate sensei has a saying, “Show up, shut up, suck it up!” It has served me well in my continuing years in karate as well as in life. Perhaps more people should listen to his wisdom.
———————
That may work for karate and the Military.
But the modern workforce needs workers who are thinking on their feet, are creative and question the status quo.
If you want a robot, order one from Japan.

#163 GW on 08.24.22 at 10:19 pm

#146 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 9:32 pm

@#129 GW on 08.24.22 at 8:18 pm

For those out there striving for FIRE, what will you do once you’ve achieved it?

Whatever I want.
On my own terms.
___________

I expected such a comment. You say that, but what does it mean?? Nothing really.

I recall saying the same thing to a colleague who asked me the proverbial “what will you do?”, to which I answered “what ever I want”. And I have done just that, I’ve kept busy in all sorts of manners. The point I was making, and I see others have made here, is that meaningful work can give you something other than money.

I asked what those striving for FIRE will do once they’ve achieved it, as one who has. The answer’s not so simple.

#164 Amanda on 08.24.22 at 10:19 pm

Garth, you sometimes come off as a cranky old man. When you have young kids, but also want to work, you want it to be worth it. As in, work hard and have meaningful conversation with your coworkers. Especially when you’re tired from your second job of raising a family. If I’m putting in so much time with my employer, is it such a stretch to ask to WFH one day a week so I can walk my kids to school instead of commuting two hours?

Also, mentorship is important- what you see as an annoyance by going out for lunch with your employee, he might have used that opportunity to ask you questions relating to that job. I know that I go for coffees with my manager to get out of the office with no interruptions, and pick his brain.

#165 IHCTD9 on 08.24.22 at 10:24 pm

I’ll bet generational wealth transfer plays into some of the stuff going on out there. I look at the Mils around the office, all making local (unremarkable) wages, living a regular life – and the majority of them are going to inherit Millions. Farms and businesses that all hit their stride during the Boomer era and prospered. None of these dudes will likely become business owners or farmers when the time comes, it’ll all be sold for a pile o cash.

There’s a certain security in that scenario.

#166 dosouth on 08.24.22 at 10:38 pm

Wow…..nailed it. I too still find work fulfilling and challenging, not a dirty word or an ancient idealistic view.

Thank you for this post.

#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm

Germany’s gas storage facilities are more than 80% full.

https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-08-23/german-gas-storage-80-full-progresses-despite-russian-cuts

Putin is losing his natural gas war. Europe will make it through the coming winter. After that, kremlin’s fascists can say good-bye to their largest source of revenues.

#168 Stone on 08.24.22 at 10:47 pm

On the eighth day he reached out to say he was quitting the Bay Street job he’d had with me for a week and a half. “I expected we would be closer, and this would be more fulfilling,” he said. “Like, you know, us going to lunch.”

As it turns out, I don’t do lunch. I do not emote, hand-hold, mentor, coddle or fill in emotional voids. I just work. Serve clients. Hustle. ‘Okay, pal. So long,’ I said. And in came a young woman who saw the empty chair for what it was. Opportunity. A chance. Career.

———

I took a moment to think about this further.

It took him 8 days to figure that your organization and managerial style were not a good fit.

He didn’t waste his time, yours or that of the organization. He got to the point and was decisive. And took action.

Most people take +/- 40 years of their life and are not able to achieve what this guy did in 8 days. And then gripe about how they hate their job. And their lives.

It took a month, three sessions and much of my time to select this worker, plus the efforts of many colleagues internally to prepare for his entry. Employment is a two-way street. – Garth

#169 Sail Away on 08.24.22 at 10:56 pm

#159 Chameleon on 08.24.22 at 10:11 pm

Am I my work, or am I something else?
You’ve already noted that your life has meaning through your work.

I wonder if there is only one way, or if there are more than one to get through life?

———–

Work is 25 km of upland bird hunting, as well as sailing across oceans, building a house, landscaping, running a company, maintaining good relationships and volunteering in humanitarian organizations.

It’s all work. Some pays, some doesn’t. Give it all full effort. Always remember you are in control of your future.

#170 Lawless on 08.24.22 at 11:00 pm

A few quick thoughts. As an owner of a business, you certainly can’t expect an employee to care nearly as much as you do. It’s your business. If you work harder, you make more money. Cause. Effect. If your employee works hard, they get vague promises of future promotion, or maybe they just become too valuable where they are. So hard work and determination can get you nowhere, taken for granted, overworked. Employees often need a bit more than a simple paycheque to be satisfied with their work.

And the fantastic thing about the coming generations is that many prioritize what makes them happy over money. While I’m not entirely confident in saying that I wouldn’t get bored over a 40 retirement stretch, I don’t see coming in to the office to take shit from my boss all day for most of those years as filling that void in any meaningful way. If you’ve managed to get the means to retire early, why the hell not? While you’ve got your health and the ability to do whatever you want. If you decide that you really miss work, head on back. But the idea that you need work until retirement age? It may work for some, so fill your boots, but don’t suppose that you know what it is that all people are seeking from their lives. I do find it very curious that so many of the work until 65 folks try to foist their beliefs on this on others. I’ve read studies that suggest ALL the value you get from work can be had in 10 hours a week. The 40 hour workweek until you’re 65 is a recent social construct and it is not sacrosanct.

Just to be absolutely blunt, $2 million bucks is plenty to retire on at 40 or 50 or 60. Heck, you could probably do it on a cool million. Is it a life of luxury? Probably not unless you relocate to a lower cost spot. But it is enough.

#171 Observer on 08.24.22 at 11:15 pm

#110 Quintilian on 08.24.22 at 6:47 pm

Boomer-the most despicable, arrogant, indolent, personification of “sloth and vanity”.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
So shouldn’t we come up with a different word to mean “someone born between the arbitrarily chosen years of approximately 1947 to 1964”?
Otherwise decent people not meeting your criteria to be deemed “Boomer”, yet born between 1947 and 1964 are going to take “Boomer” as an expression of hate.

You didn’t mean to disparage ALL people born during that time period. Did you? Because that would make you a bigot.

#172 Mick McClean on 08.24.22 at 11:19 pm

Hope Garth’s wrong about people going back to the office since the drive home from the Beach on the DVP today at 4:30 was akin to pre-pandemic levels. Meanwhile the Crosstown major intersections mid-town after 10 years are still a nightmare awaiting returning commuters come September. Will be returning to work despite being retired for 3 years as inflation is eating up my savings and I don’t see myself being solvent after 5 years.

#173 A J on 08.24.22 at 11:26 pm

Trust me, Garth. My whole office “quiet quit” before the pandemic even started. There just wasn’t a catchy moniker to help define it.

#174 Samuel Lowry on 08.24.22 at 11:28 pm

Garth,

How long before these “insidious” quiet quitters become corporate 5th columnists, trying to bring the system down from within?

#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 11:37 pm

#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm
Germany’s gas storage facilities are more than 80% full.

https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-08-23/german-gas-storage-80-full-progresses-despite-russian-cuts

Putin is losing his natural gas war. Europe will make it through the coming winter. After that, kremlin’s fascists can say good-bye to their largest source of revenues.
————————
Yeah,
The Germans are savers.
As for Putin, I think his eyes are now on the East.
China and India mostly.
But we’ll see.

#176 A J on 08.24.22 at 11:50 pm

#113 Kurt

Stop fashioning your whole personality around Elon Musk’s tweets.

#177 David on 08.24.22 at 11:57 pm

I don’t get the whole concept of being retired. The way we live our life is a good 50/50 split where I work at most 6 hours a day with enough time for hobbies and kids activities and wife is a part time professor. We do well, could do much better but just don’t see the need. You make more you pay more taxes, might as well enjoy our years of good health now and not plan to spend the money when we are unable to really do or enjoy much of it

#178 Cash is King on 08.24.22 at 11:59 pm

Lots of BSers on here today.
You can spot them 1000 miles away.
Fact is the only money they have is their CPP coming in

#179 Dr V on 08.25.22 at 12:02 am

Some great comments today from so many posters sharing their own life and work experiences. Most would describe me as intense, and best to leave me to work off excess steam by other pursuits, even if on company
time.

171 Observer

Yes, I am sure the term “boomer” really became popular during the mid 2000s when we had a real estate “boom” and a stock market “boom”, which generally positively
affected those who were in middle age. I did see it used however, in a context such that it really described
anyone who was riding the wave, regardless of age.

#180 SoggyShorts on 08.25.22 at 12:05 am

#13 Big Bucks on 08.24.22 at 3:25 pm
C’mon Garth a mill doesn’t cut it?Maybe not as good as Havarti but a mill is still a sizeable chunk to live on anywhere but Onatriowe

#44 brian on 08.24.22 at 4:06 pm
#23 Paddy on 08.24.22 at 3:38 pm


I’ll probably pull the plug in 4 years…puts me at 43…with close to a Mil….my wife will still work…cause she likes to work…and I will still do jobs…so yes….a Mil does cut it.

————-
Similarly I’ll pull the plug in 7-8 years.. put me at mid 40s.

***********************
How are you calculating that one million is enough?
That amount has historically given out about 3.5% safe withdrawal rate which is 35K, and hardly enough to give a good life in Canada. It’s basically minimum wage.
Be really honest about how much money you will spend each year and x30 is what you need to have invested in order to have a historically safe retirement.

#181 Cowtown Cowboy on 08.25.22 at 12:13 am

#74 Sail Away on 08.24.22 at 5:15 pm
The neighbour kid ran up to me yesterday and asked, ‘How old are you?’

I said, ’50. How old are you?’

He yelled ‘6!’ and ran off.

We left it at that.

Charlie, you don’t look a day over 49!

#182 SoggyShorts on 08.25.22 at 12:15 am

#47 Chris on 08.24.22 at 4:09 pm
QQ is not about being lazy. Think of it this way, you are hired for a role and it pays $50k a year. Your direct manager quits, bosses ask you to pick up some of their tasks which they paid the manager $60k a year to do. They offer you nothing in return. If you want to move ahead in the same company you would probably not say anything and do the extra work, hoping for a promotion down the road.
***************
Sitting quietly and getting dumped on is never going to be a winning strategy.

The part in bold is where you fail. Sometimes it seems like an entire generation lacks the ability to sell themselves or negotiate.

“We need you to take on more tasks because [reasons]”

-“I’d like to have a discussion about my role in the company: As my experience has increased I’ve been able to incorporate more tasks into my day-to-day making me a more profitable employee. As an example when [Dave] retired I was able to take on the majority of his tasks saving the company 60k per year blah blah blah”

Buisness owners for the most part aren’t stupid. They can do math and see that one employee making 80K is better than 2 making 50K each if doing the same tasks.
but
It’s up to the employee to
1. Show that they are worth as much or more than 2 “50k quiet quitters”
2. Have a serious discussion about it with their employer.

If those fail then you can take your sales pitch to the competition.

#183 The Woosh on 08.25.22 at 12:17 am

It took a month, three sessions and much of my time to select this worker, plus the efforts of many colleagues internally to prepare for his entry. Employment is a two-way street. – Garth

—————————————

Wow…a “worker”. That’s all I’ve ever aspired to be…said…no one!

#184 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.25.22 at 12:26 am

“Quiet Quitters”
That’s not a new phenomena.
If you have an employee who used to be energetic and outspoken, but lately is quiet and subdued, they are probably thinking about quitting.
If you value them, better talk to them.

#185 Investx on 08.25.22 at 12:38 am

The Entitled Generation

#186 SoggyShorts on 08.25.22 at 12:39 am

#146 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 9:32 pm
@#129 GW on 08.24.22 at 8:18 pm

For those out there striving for FIRE, what will you do once you’ve achieved it?
*************************
Personally, the plan was to start with a crapload of travel, so maybe retiring at 40 in 2020 wasn’t the perfect plan…

Our second plan was to do the Eurorail Pass thing on the 20th anniversary of the last time I did it (private 1st class berths this time, since I’m not a backpacker anymore)
It turns out that 2021 wasn’t a great year to plan that for either…

Now I’ve finally made it overseas and am able to enjoy the pool/beach life for a while. As “vacation mode” settles down I plan to work on many projects I never had time for. I’m already taking language lessons and have put time into a few writings I didn’t have time for while working. Motorbike trips and just generally touring around will keep us busy for years, and if boredom ever strikes there are plenty of opportunities to start a no-pressure business here.

#187 Beavis on 08.25.22 at 12:43 am

#9 RainCityRyan on 08.24.22 at 3:23 pm

Come on Garth, the “quiet quiting” thing isn’t new, there was a whole movie made about it 23 years ago called “Office Space”.

_____________

I watch Office Space every couple of years. The first 30 minutes of the movie describes the office culture today. Our office has 100 people and follow the 80/20 rule. 20 people do 80% of the work. The rest spend their money at Starbucks.

Two quotes from Office Space that I love:

“That’s my only real motivation is not to be hassled, that and the fear of losing my job. But you know, Bob, that will only make someone work just hard enough not to get fired.”

“I don’t like my job and I don’t think I’m gonna go anymore.”

#188 Jane24 on 08.25.22 at 12:44 am

Garth, life has changed since you and I were 25. I was a young working mother in TO battling to get to daycare in a blizzard. It was awful, you have no idea of how women suffered in that old hard-working world. I remember praying that God would give me a terrible cold so I could spend a few days in bed and I got lucky. How sad is that! What a terrible life!

Now I am 68 and hubby is 71 and friends and family all around us are dying or have life-limiting illness. So yes retire or semi-retire as soon as you can. I have never been busier or had more fulfilling days than I do now. I know that you have no family Garth so probably need to fill your days in more but our children and grandchildren are a joy and I want to be with them. Lots of trips to Denmark, Vietnam and Kent.

With state pensions coming in you can live a great life on the fabled 1 million in assets as a top-up. We do. Very few folk statistically get to their 90th birthday anyway. If you collect up 5 million, why? Who will inherit it? Why are old people like me on this blog still so focused on making money rather than spending it? Do you think you take it with you?

On another topic you know I have been updating you all on the new Italian retirement scheme where you pay 7% of world wide income in tax and anyone from any country can move there. It gets even sweeter. If you are willing to move to Sardinia then the Italian govt will pay £15,000 in a grant to help with your house purchase costs. What’s not to like!

#189 Hoodie Smile on 08.25.22 at 12:48 am

Garth, you’re describing the new movement ‘slacker’ culture. Huge new “lifestyle” on TikTok. Huge in Gen Z ( who want to be called Alpha and be first instead of last) and of which FIRE is a big part of. Already big big in China. Slackers have been spoiled by free money and governments so WOKE that nothings as self satisfying as ‘ The Basement Practice Cult of Onan’. Look at our PM, a ‘Prime’ example. Next, lethargy so constipated that feeding tubes will be installed into gaming chairs.

#190 IHCTD9 on 08.25.22 at 12:51 am

#168 Stone on 08.24.22 at 10:47 pm

I took a moment to think about this further.

It took him 8 days to figure that your organization and managerial style were not a good fit.

He didn’t waste his time, yours or that of the organization. He got to the point and was decisive. And took action.

Most people take +/- 40 years of their life and are not able to achieve what this guy did in 8 days. And then gripe about how they hate their job. And their lives
———-

8 days to make that kind of call ain’t near long enough. When I first started my career job, I spent 2 *years* wondering if was for me. After that, I got the hang of it. Almost 30 years later, I am still working in the same industry doing very similar work, and it’s all turned out great.

I can’t even decide what used truck to buy in 8 days. Buddy here had exactly ZIP figured out after a week and a half, Garth dodged a bullet.

#191 Bubu on 08.25.22 at 12:59 am

Hahaha… on my side is the other way… if they keep me working from home ( I do 14h a day now) I’ll quit… when I went to the office, it was 9 to 5, ok 6 sometimes but not crazy likely now… I have meetings at 5am as part of the “cheap” labour is in India…

#192 Faron on 08.25.22 at 12:59 am

#151 KLNR on 08.24.22 at 9:45 pm

@#110 Quintilian on 08.24.22 at 6:47 pm

wow, the ageism going both ways coupled with the over the top generalizations is epic tonight.
a real low point for this comments section.

Even worse than yesterday’s battle of the rabble? LOL.

Also, you are surprised by the ageism and over-the-top generalizations? You should know by now that crotchety punditry based on shallow/internet-gleaned knowledge is de rigueur in these parts.

#193 chrisW on 08.25.22 at 1:05 am

#80 Stone on 08.24.22 at 5:25 pm
———

Wow. You’re a PhD? Amazing!

I’m a person.

Do you start all your work emails with “I am a PhD”? I would ignore you too if you did. Did your PhD not teach you how to interact and draw others into your wonderful sphere of influence?

Also, sending urgent emails at 5:02 pm? Did you not learn anything about time management and when people are at their most productive?

You won’t last.

I don’t know how to reply on these things, usually don’t waste time arguing in comment sections of blog posts.

I am a PhD holder, do you have one? they are very hard to get – take a long time, super long hours, lot’s of failure.

Yup, urgent emails at 5:02pm, sometimes even 8pm – all hours even.

My PhD was very focused on the subject matter, are you not aware that many scientists and engineers aren’t super socially savy?

so to answer your questions 1) Did your PhD not teach you how to interact and draw others into your wonderful sphere of influence? – nope it didn’t 2) Do you start all your work emails with “I am a PhD”? – also nope, but it is in my email signature 3) I believe different people are their most productive at different times of the day – could be wrong though, that ain’t what my PhD is in.

Keep it real Stone!

#194 Jon B on 08.25.22 at 1:08 am

What Garth is describing is in my view a techtonic shift in how people regard personal success in life. For those of us who experienced the realities of the work world of the 20th century, we all knew job success was strongly attached to personal success which was strongly attached to happiness and fulfillment often manifesting in the acquisition of material goods. I believe this linkage is no more. I see evidence that young people have been convinced that virtuous thinking combined with reliance on government services plays a key role in people’s aspirations in their jobs and careers. Government dependence just doesn’t have the negative connotations it did for Gen X on up. I say the slacker, don’t give a crap attitude is here to stay and employers had better get creative.

#195 IHCTD9 on 08.25.22 at 1:22 am

#110 Quintilian on 08.24.22 at 6:47 pm

But I think it’s mainly the lazy curmudgeons, who think they have ascended to the summit of success by winning the real estate lottery.
———-

Boomers love folks who blame the BOC instead of fiscal policy. I do too! I might even vote for Trudeau next election since my RE value is taking a front kick lately. Nothing better for pumping up the price of my house than a government hell-bent on making housing affordable. I got every Realtor in the country, AND the Prime Minister of Canada all working for me for free!

#196 Cristian on 08.25.22 at 2:57 am

“it’s tough to grasp what the hell anyone does during four continuous decades of wearing sweat pants”

I used to have a colleague 20 years ago (when I was around 40) who was saying that he will continue working for as long as he can because being retired was like “being in God’s waiting room”. He didn’t have a life other than work and he was in a panic whenever he had time off.
I remember feeling sorry for him at the time – a man with nothing to fill his life other than work.
Now I’m in my 60s and I still feel sorry for him and for you too, Garth.
I have worked for almost 35 years, I have often liked my work (physician), but work was never my only purpose to live and I always had plenty of hobbies or things that I just liked to do beside work.
“What the hell anyone does” consists of things like raising my daughters, playing chess, going to the gym daily, walking anywhere between 5 and 10 km a day, reading or just staying on a bench in the park or under an umbrella on the beach here in Porto where we now live and just look around and enjoy everything that is around me and life itself.
So, yeah, I don’t understand and I feel sorry for people like my ex-colleague and you.
And imagine, I’m a boomer, not a “moister”…

#197 Tom from Mississauga on 08.25.22 at 3:05 am

There are 8 billion people in the world, up from 2.5 billion when I was born. Not enough for you? – Garth

On the farm kids are free labour, you have as many as possible, in town, kids are expensive furniture, you have fewer. Boomers and Silent G left the farm to take a job in town (The Auto Pact) fast forward 60 years and we’re low on workers. In developing countries joining globalization later (China) skipped the suburb and went right to high rise condo and had zero kids. Modern medicine extended life span so there’s 8 billion. Globalization and demographics are globally collapsing at the same time, that’s why economists are all over the map, we don’t have an economic for this. We’re going to to try the Boomers in the workforce lots of demand rate hikes system 1st, that’s not what’s happening but let’s see.

#198 J. Lebowski on 08.25.22 at 3:10 am

Garth,

Don’t like to do lunches together, prefer to sit in my cubicle and down white Russians with the headphones on. I hope you don’t mind that I wear a housecoat and slippers to the office each day and like to be referred to as the Dude. What time should I come for the interview tomorrow Sir?

#199 Carlyle on 08.25.22 at 3:54 am

As you said Garth, employment is a two way street. I worked doing customer service for a Fintech that literally trained our offshore replacements (Telus International) in front of us.

I never quiet quit but I knew what was coming. Alot of corporate companies that’s just how it is — they might have good salaries, great benefits, proper severance — but they don’t care about you and will axe you in a heart beat if they can hire offshore for a quarter of the cost.

This has lead to a cynicism of some workers towards their employers. You might be there a year or two or even three if lucky but it’s not because they care. You can’t count on longevity and therefore have to have a mercenary attitude. Mills hate this, boomers never had to deal with it — ironically gen X is the best equipped generation to handle this mercenary style of work transactions.

#200 Axehead on 08.25.22 at 4:57 am

8 billion people can all fit in one state (Texas) in one country if they all lived like they do in New York. There is lots of room for more people on this large, blessed, abundant planet called earth. So no, there’s not enough for me.

#201 Silent Watchtower on 08.25.22 at 5:08 am

There were plenty of unfilled jobs for slaves in Egypt.

No disposable income kills motivation.

“Feudal. Look it up. “A way of structuring society around relationships that were derived from the holding of land in exchange for service or labor.” This was how folks did it in medieval Europe – subjugating themselves to real estate, determining social status based on property ownership, with serfs spending their lives in the service of dirt. It seems the combination of Covid, central bankers and cowardly politicians has dished up the past. And soon we’ll have a mechanism making the generational transfer of land-based wealth even more efficient. …
The parents are paid to loan. The kids get taxless growth and a free down payment. Real estate inflates more. And the poor immigrant family reaching for social parity, trying to afford a home on mere wages, slides further into the trap.”

Source : https://archive.ph/GfPGp#selection-227.0-227.552

#202 Overheardyou on 08.25.22 at 6:42 am

Quitters never prosper

#203 Prince Polo on 08.25.22 at 6:43 am

Finally, there’s FIRE. The financial-independence-retire-early movement existed before the slimy little pathogen came to disrupt our world, but it’s blossomed more as a result. Lots of people believe they can leave the workforce happily at age 40, for example, or be a Coastal Grannie, if they manage to pull together a portfolio of a million bucks. Then it’s forty or fifty years of frugality, serenity and flexibility punctuated by a side hustle or two when the reality hits that a mill doesn’t cut it. There are apparently copious chickens and garden carrots involved. And while the financial independence part of FIRE is laudable, it’s tough to grasp what the hell anyone does during four continuous decades of wearing sweat pants.

Aren’t there any FIRE aspirers out there that want to do something productive in their “retirement” years? Maybe moderating this blog could scare them straight!

#204 Dharma Bum on 08.25.22 at 7:43 am

I thought that I invented “quiet quitting”. Hmmmm….WHO KNEW?!!

#110 Quintillian

Boomer-the most despicable, arrogant, indolent, personification of “sloth and vanity”.
———————————————————————————————————-

Who me? I resemble that remark!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uM1MlQ0S64

#205 Ontario's Left Coast on 08.25.22 at 8:02 am

Great post, Garth. So true and had me laughing as usual. Many thanks!

#206 Dharma Bum on 08.25.22 at 8:03 am

#134 Crossbordershopper

Time is all i got, and its not for sale at any price. Its mine.
———————————————————————————————————

That’s because you EARNED it brother. You and me, both.

When you work your butt off for most of your life to provide for yourself and your family, and one day you awake to the realization that – HEY! – I made it through this gauntlet intact, and I didn’t squander everything along the way, and I actually now have enough to survive without subjecting myself to the daily ritual of the rat race, then congratulations!

It’s a little different when an entitled snot-nosed moister who hasn’t paid their dues or done their time earning, providing, grinding, and sacrificing, decides it’s time to pack it in at 35 years old. Fine – if they managed to earn a few million somehow.

Otherwise, shut up and get back to work.

Someone’s gotta fund my CPP.

#207 C M on 08.25.22 at 8:04 am

My reward for hard work (and performing duties outside of my job description) is more work, less flexibility with PTO requests, stress and a decline in health.

When I work to rule, and the job functions above and beyond no longer happen and disfunction sets in, clients start noticing a drop in service and leave.

The reward for that is additional staff getting hired to redistribute the workload.

One of these rewards has benefitted me greatly.

#208 Bethany on 08.25.22 at 8:18 am

Another way to “quiet quit” is to just make a conscious decision to not let work stress affect you anymore. Do the work, but unattach from the drama. WFH gave me the much-needed physical distance from certain office colleagues who had caused me great stress over the years. Yes bumping into someone in the hallway can lead to “spontaneous collaboration”, but it can also be a stressful event if the person has seniority over you and intimidates you into taking on work for their incompetent direct reports so they can keep looking good to senior management and hire more incompetent direct reports – this happened to me a lot. Now? Two and a half years later? I roll out of bed, put on a clean shirt and log into my calls. I am totally present, focused and relaxed. I don’t hold onto the stress the way I used to because there is a barrier between me and the old corporate world…When 5pm arrives I close my laptop, pour a drink, make dinner and spend the evening with my husband. I no longer wake up in the middle of the night worrying about something that happened at work, or what I should have said in that meeting etc…I should mention that the other BIG reason my life has changed since WFH started is because last summer I achieved financial independence, after seven years of reading this blog and investing diligently in index funds (thank you Garth!). I’m still employed, but my job is no longer my main income stream. Now that my investments can technically cover my monthly bills, my relationship with work has changed because I’m no longer a slave to it. And those stressful office bullies? They’re stomping around their tiny million dollar condos just dying to get back into the office so they can have their old lives back by forcing people to sit through all-day team-building workshops. They’re still freaking out on conference calls, sending the odd email asking me to “take on this additional challenge”, but I just…can’t…hear them…;)

#209 Sail Away on 08.25.22 at 8:26 am

#181 Cowtown Cowboy on 08.25.22 at 12:13 am

Charlie, you don’t look a day over 49!

——–

Aw, thanks. Heading out for a first-light mountain run this morning to keep it that way.

The dogs, as usual, have become aware of the event through telepathy and are busy orbiting.

#210 Jenn on 08.25.22 at 8:33 am

I think in a world where wages have been largely stagnant, and where people have been asked to do more with less, hard work hasn’t been translating to career success and promotions with ample pay to make it all feel worth it. Those people, if they choose to just do the job they were hired for, and they disallow employers from filling their plates with more work for no extra compensation… well, I kinda get it.
Logically, who wants to give more effort if they’re not going to get anything out of it? If an employer demonstrates there will be rewards for this sort of thing, then wonderful. Have at it. But many don’t do this. Many just exploit their employees. So in the latter situation, work-to-rule makes good sense. If you’re not going to get anywhere and finding another job is too much of a hassle, then at least you can have some boundaries.
Good workplaces reward hard work with results. Work-to-rule in such places as that would be foolish.

#211 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.25.22 at 8:35 am

@#188 Jane twoFour

I’m very disappointed.
You neglected to remind all us loser Canadians about how stupid we are for living here.
And no mention of your fabulously wealthy lifestyle with two homes and a search for a third in Spain or Portugal.
I guess the Chateau in France you were looking at purchasing is out?
Sad. So sad.

#212 Prince Polo on 08.25.22 at 8:37 am

#83 Bezengy on 08.24.22 at 7:40 am
TFSAs …. but there is no mercy for accidental over contributions.
—————
That cost me over $1k. I blame the bank but it doesn’t matter, like the lady said, no mercy.
If someone withdrew $80k from their TFSA and redeposited it in Jan the fine would be 1 percent x 12 months, roughly 10k. Ouch!

I was under the impression that any TFSA withdrawals can be added back in the following year. Thus, redepositing it back in the subsequent January should be $0 fine.

What is the penalty for not heeding Garth’s previous teachings? The peanut gallery will decide!

#213 crowdedelevatorfartz on 08.25.22 at 8:41 am

@#193 chrisW PhD
Judging from the essay presented….
One would assume it’s not a PhD in ….English Grammar?

#214 Brett in Calgary on 08.25.22 at 8:50 am

Well done Tom, finally somebody hits the nail. Demographics move so slowly they can be ignored until an inflection point is reached, like now. Check out the work of Peter Zeihan as he describes this in depth, but essentially the demographics of much of the world have shifted into unfavorable territory for economic growth.

It’s tempting to blame those ‘damn lazy kids’ until you realize there just aren’t that many kids. I believe the stats are something like 3:1.5 retiring Boomers to workforce joining Zoomers. Could that explain the falling labor participation rate? I think so.

Another stat courtesy of Elon, Japan (leading the curve of course) had a larger market for adult diapers, than babies diapers, 10 years ago! Ten. When do we cross that threshold? Perhaps the ratio of adult/baby diapers can be a sort of leading economic indicator.

The only two things that can keep poor demographics from leveling our economy are automation/robotics and debt. What about immigration? We do not import enough new people yet to make up the difference.

————————————–
#197 Tom from Mississauga on 08.25.22 at 3:05 am
There are 8 billion people in the world, up from 2.5 billion when I was born. Not enough for you? – Garth

On the farm kids are free labour, you have as many as possible, in town, kids are expensive furniture, you have fewer. Boomers and Silent G left the farm to take a job in town (The Auto Pact) fast forward 60 years and we’re low on workers. In developing countries joining globalization later (China) skipped the suburb and went right to high rise condo and had zero kids. Modern medicine extended life span so there’s 8 billion. Globalization and demographics are globally collapsing at the same time, that’s why economists are all over the map, we don’t have an economic for this. We’re going to to try the Boomers in the workforce lots of demand rate hikes system 1st, that’s not what’s happening but let’s see.

#215 mitzerboyakaQueencitykidd on 08.25.22 at 9:15 am

Great analysis Garth
The post world war recovery work ethic has been destroyed by covid, free money and wfh
The wokesters and their feelings about earning change during another hungry World War time

The pendulum of life always swings back-and-forth

#216 MH on 08.25.22 at 9:15 am

How is doing your job and fulfilling your role at work ‘quitting?’ I don’t get paid overtime, so why would I sacrifice my physical and mental health, family, and overall life for a job that doesn’t reward that? I show up on time, do my work efficiently, leave on time. If employers want more, they have to pay more. We’re just saying ‘no’ to being exploited by The Man.

#217 Natalie McGrath on 08.25.22 at 9:19 am

I have been fortunate enough to have found your blog and it has saved me financial ruin. At 53 I am a hybrid model of what you speak of above except I work extremely hard, I am a remote worker in IT, I am giving up the benefits for less hours and more pay, and I am burned out picking up the load of those FIRE people you refer to. I almost walked away from my job because of the triple workload I carried while covering for lazy people. I believe in mentorship only if the person wants to learn and cares about doing a good job. I believe there is a balance possible but the entitlement has to go. I appreciate your perspective Garth and even though you are tough I would rather have you as a coworker than a lot of other people!

I dream of the day when I can say no more mortgage and live footloose and fancy free but it comes at quite a price.

#218 B on 08.25.22 at 9:25 am

Mid 30s professional here. I see lots of ambition among my peers, ambition to make a difference and improve the world.

Corporate ladder climbing is seen as a hollow and fruitless endeavour. We have observed countless instances of our parents getting screwed out of pensions, being laid off etc. all in the name of cost cutting, despite many of these employer companies posting record profits. In other words, the promise of a reward in exchange for hard work has been broken, and we aren’t interested in playing by those rules again.

#219 Stone on 08.25.22 at 9:31 am

DELETED (You are no longer a guest with commenting privileges on this site)

#220 SunShowers on 08.25.22 at 9:38 am

You’re god dang right I’d rather be playing with my baby than busting my ass making other people rich. How is this not a no-brainer?

#221 Powder_hound86 on 08.25.22 at 9:47 am

It’s not hard to see why people no longer give a crap.

Decades of real wages decreasing and productivity increasing, the pendulum is bound to swing back.

Why should the average worker go above and beyond? So they can get. 0.5% raise at the end of the year instead of 0.1%? Either way they are still moving backwards in respect to inflation.

What a great motivator! You can work your ass off and take a pay cut a a reward.

#222 the Jaguar on 08.25.22 at 9:52 am

Snippet: (Darn those consumers. They just won’t give up their SUV’s and other toys….)

Oil markets have avoided the apocalyptic scenarios energy analysts were warning of just six months ago, when a 1970s-style shock seemed unavoidable as rampantly rising post-pandemic demand met the possibility of new supply disruption.

It was trading at US$99.72 a barrel on Wednesday, down more than 28 per cent since this year’s high near US$140, struck in the days after Russia invaded Ukraine in February.

Today’s price is softening not because supply is ample, but because soaring inflation and increasing interest rates are giving rise to fears of recession, especially in Europe.

America’s stock release program ends by November, and the emergency stash will have to be replenished. In December, Europe and the United Kingdom are due to ban insurance for vessels carrying Russia’s crude, a move that may sharply reduce Russian exports in a way sanctions so far have not.

Less fossil-fuel supply from producers might sound like good news for the climate. But not if it induces a price shock such as that facing Europe with gas, forcing governments to subsidize consumption.

Plus, consumers show little sign of ditching oil in the short term. Global demand is forecast to hit the pre-pandemic level again this year and then romp higher again in 2023.

#223 tbone on 08.25.22 at 10:00 am

When i started my last job i thought i wouldnt be staying very long. Ended up sticking around for 30 years.

Now im retired and quite useless as most of my other boomer friends , but i like it .

#224 Linda on 08.25.22 at 10:09 am

Zoe looks like she led a very happy life:)

The pandemic did change things. Many people decided that they would rather go homeless than return to the daily grind. OK, maybe not actually homeless, but willing to accept a much less consumer led lifestyle than continue to work. Here is the thing. The emperor’s new clothes have proven to be illusion. You have many folks who have been busting their butts thinking that the rewards for doing so – higher pay, promotion, the ability to buy all the shiny toys etc. – would soon fall into their laps. Instead they learned that nepotism is alive & well, that working really hard almost always gets more work dumped on you – the ‘reward’ for working hard, that you are effectively a cog in the wheel & if you dropped dead the main complaint would be why hasn’t maintenance taken care of that terrible smell coming from your cubicle. Plus curse you, now there is all that paperwork to be dealt with.

As for ‘quiet quitting’ – seriously? Employers have been so clueless that they haven’t been aware that they have employees who have been drones for decades? Hence the solution of dumping the work said drones aren’t doing on the one hard worker they’ve got? Actual example: out for breakfast. Asked for milk for my coffee. Waitress chose to tell me that the creamers on the table were all I needed. When I used all of them – I like lots of milk in my coffee – & made another request for milk she brought some, but then ‘forgot’ to refill the coffee cup. Then stood, with her equally hard working co-workers looking at their phones, socializing etc. Then expected a tip….. because, you know, the experience of having her in my life was so special. Lets just say, not cut out to be doing the job. Or any job, given the attitude. I’ve been back to said restaurant post Covid & the waitress I had second time around was prompt, pleasant, polite, hard working & worth the tip she earned. Miss ‘I’m so special’ was no longer around. Probably at home expecting JT would soon be sending her UBI so she could live the way she deserved.

#225 millmech on 08.25.22 at 10:18 am

Equinor and Fortum look to be a go for this winter, Equinor already has had stellar returns and Fortum can only go up.

#226 Shawn on 08.25.22 at 10:24 am

Big Inflation Turning Point?? (Deflation?)

So Dollar Tree just announced lower profits ahead because they are lowering prices due to increased price competition.

That’s big news. It could be a bit of a turning point.

It means that dollar store customers are shopping around. Competition is working its magic.

Many people have more money than time and have not been shopping around aggressively.

All consumers can be foot soldiers in the war against inflation. But there is no draft or conscription. I’m going to try to do my part although I am not fanatical and never bother to look for coupons. I do buy the groceries that I see are on sale and try to use the discount grocery stores at least sometimes. I use the Presidents Choice app for their “offers” as well as the Canadian Tire Triangle app. Do your part or don’t bother complaining.

#227 Chameleon on 08.25.22 at 10:44 am

#169 Sail Away

It’s all work. Some pays, some doesn’t. Give it all full effort. Always remember you are in control of your future.

—-

Moments (comments) like this are perhaps an opportunity for quick reflection.

What is the definition of work?

Well, turns out that like many words in the English language, there are a few definition. First one that comes up is: activity involving mental or physical effort done in order to achieve a purpose or result.

I think that’s a good catchall. As you note Sail Away, it doesn’t have to be for monetary reward.

Turns out just pondering the meaning of life is work.

Perhaps the word “work” has been hijacked as substitute for slavery by the corporate machine? After all, what is exhausting labour with restricted freedom?

Recently I’ve been working on a problem. Will money we’re working for and saving have any meaning in a few years with all this debt? Is there any guarantee or is the house of cards unraveling perhaps?

Imagine if there was no money? What would have to motivate people then?

I watched Vanilla Sky a few weeks back. What a great quote in that movie that I overlooked on first viewing.

“What’s the answer to 99 out of 100 questions?”

Money.

…and isn’t that THE problem?

#228 Dogman01 on 08.25.22 at 10:48 am

The “Wests” six killer apps for prosperity.

https://www.pbs.org/wnet/civilization-west-and-rest/killer-apps/

• Competition. European decentralization fostered the growth of political and economic competition, birthing the nation-state and the rise of capitalism. …
• Science.
• Property Ownership.
• Modern Medicine.
• Consumerism.
• Work Ethic.

Scratch the last one going forward.

#229 Wrk.dover on 08.25.22 at 10:51 am

Fire here. Today’s ‘hobby’ is board sand a car door, same door as yesterday. Like Karate kid, wax on wax off, except it is 320 grit paper on 1977 desert baked paint.

Front fenders are done. Gonna be a $10,000 labor paint job for me, when the rest of the car gets involved. Bought the car for $100 in 1993, still playing catch up. Fire is busy.

And a barrel chest and the abs of our host!

#230 Re-Cowtown on 08.25.22 at 10:58 am

If you like being warm in winter, just thank someone in the Canadian oilpatch. Germans won’t have that luxury.

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2022/08/25/winter-of-discontent-germany-to-implement-energy-rationing-amid-fears-of-gas-riots/

#231 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.25.22 at 10:59 am

#109 FURZ
I wonder if the German Chancellor was thrilled at the tour of the “Promised Hydrogen” location in Newfoundland when all he really wanted was LNG NOW for this Winter.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/possibly-one-of-the-greatest-missed-opportunities-in-canadian-history

Our Manic Prime Minister…more interested in what socks he wears to a presser than selling billions in LNG to Europe.

Trudeau.
Truly an Embarrassment of the Rich.
—————————-
Talking about embarrassment:
Better be careful.
Hydrogen IS what the Germans want.
They are big on it.
They just put the world’s first hydrogen powered passenger train on the tracks.

#232 Yukon Elvis on 08.25.22 at 11:05 am

#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 11:37 pm
#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm
Germany’s gas storage facilities are more than 80% full.

https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-08-23/german-gas-storage-80-full-progresses-despite-russian-cuts

Putin is losing his natural gas war. Europe will make it through the coming winter. After that, kremlin’s fascists can say good-bye to their largest source of revenues.
————————
Yeah,
The Germans are savers.
As for Putin, I think his eyes are now on the East.
China and India mostly.
But we’ll see.
++++++++++++++
There are no gas pipelines going to India or China. The European market will not forgive and forget. Putin is screwed.

#233 Adrian on 08.25.22 at 11:18 am

I’d say take a dose of your own sage advice Garth. Every generation despairs the one that comes after it. . . . It’s not different this time.

The kids will be OK.

#234 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.25.22 at 11:20 am

#218 B on 08.25.22 at 9:25 am
Mid 30s professional here. I see lots of ambition among my peers, ambition to make a difference and improve the world.

Corporate ladder climbing is seen as a hollow and fruitless endeavour. We have observed countless instances of our parents getting screwed out of pensions, being laid off etc. all in the name of cost cutting, despite many of these employer companies posting record profits. In other words, the promise of a reward in exchange for hard work has been broken, and we aren’t interested in playing by those rules again.
——————
Yeah
And Bezos and his billionaire buddies frolicking in space and laughing at their employees is not helping things.

#235 BillinBC on 08.25.22 at 11:23 am

229 comments and ONLY ONE from Faron. What a wonderful world

#236 Quintilian on 08.25.22 at 11:26 am

#226 Shawn on 08.25.22 at 10:24 am

“So Dollar Tree just announced lower profits ahead because they are lowering prices due to increased price competition.”

Sure Shawn, the Dollar Tree crowd is going to tame inflation.

Those types of consumers are insignificant, they have very little purchasing power, and as such, have no measurable impact on companies with pricing power.

Yes, the price of a dollar dish rack will come down 2 cents.

Steaks, fuel, pharmaceuticals, transportation, etc, etc ,and other essentials have a long way to go.

Not sure if you have any credibility, after all, you are a Canadian Tire Share holder right?

#237 Mr S on 08.25.22 at 11:31 am

Garth, I’m a huge fan, I come here every day, and I try to absorb your lessons. I rent, invest in a B&D portfolio, and one day, if my assets become large enough I will come knocking on your door. I actually am pretty productive at my job and am roughly in the top 5-10% of income earners in Canada.

However, I have to say that this post is pretty tone deaf.

The incentives for a business owner, especially in an investment firm are vastly different from the people who work for you, and workers in general. You literally own the mode of production in your workplace, and, as such, reap the lion’s share of the benefits of that production when it is profitable. Most workers are salaried, a fixed cost, and as such, even if they produce something outstanding for your firm, they do not get a percentage share of the increase in value in your company. They get straight salary and potentially a 10% bonus and a 5% raise.

This is literally the 1% not sharing equitably and being surprised that the people you aren’t sharing with don’t want to play solely according to your rules.

Still really like you and will read you every day.

Everyone is free to start a business, take the risk and enjoy the rewards (or losses). My employees have salaries, benefits and pension plans, plus severance payments if things go south. I have none of those. No complaints, but don’t lecture me on what you do not fully grasp. – Garth

#238 VanIslander on 08.25.22 at 11:32 am

In my youthful days I had a high paying trades job but was on call, shift work, long hours, few days off for 4 to 6 months at a time, then the inevitable layoff for a few months until new contracts rolled in.

Was great for awhile, catch up on sleep, collect EI, sleep in etc, but once the savings ran out and EI barely paid the mortgage things got stale real quick.

Not sure how these quiet quitters plan on eeking out a financial existence and pay the huge mortgages they are carrying these days. Maybe signs of a larger real estate crash coming then we’re thinking. 1982 was something to see.

#239 Re-Cowtown on 08.25.22 at 11:36 am

I wonder if anyone in Trudeau’s cabinet can do the math to figure out what a truly awful idea shipping Hydrogen to Germany is.

Germans only need:

1. Seawater

2. Nuclear power

And they have both, so they can make as much hydrogen as they want, no shipping needed.

I wonder if anyone smarter than a fifth grader is a Trudeau advisor, because it sure looks like he’s hell bent on wanting to haul coal to Newcastle.

Until Trudeau announces Gen IV nuclear power plants for Canada he’s part of the climate problem.

#240 James on 08.25.22 at 11:40 am

Quiet quitting…..?

Sounds great!

Sail Away and crowdedelelvatorfartz, how ’bout you two bros just quietly quit from this blog comments section?

Awesome solution!

#241 DON on 08.25.22 at 11:49 am

#232 Yukon Elvis on 08.25.22 at 11:05 am
#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 11:37 pm
#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm
Germany’s gas storage facilities are more than 80% full.

https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-08-23/german-gas-storage-80-full-progresses-despite-russian-cuts

Putin is losing his natural gas war. Europe will make it through the coming winter. After that, kremlin’s fascists can say good-bye to their largest source of revenues.
————————
Yeah,
The Germans are savers.
As for Putin, I think his eyes are now on the East.
China and India mostly.
But we’ll see.
++++++++++++++
There are no gas pipelines going to India or China. The European market will not forgive and forget. Putin is screwed.

********
What about the ‘Siberia Power pipeline’
from Russia to China that started pumping natural gas in 2019?

#242 NJ on 08.25.22 at 11:54 am

I feel like the only people who would be against the pro work-life balance idea, are people who genuinely are not happy with their home-life.

Let’s face it. We all go to work to make a pay cheque so we can pay our bills, have some left over to enjoy and save for the day we call it quits. Why would you not want a better balance of this NOW? Less time at work, more vacation, free time, less stress from work…The only answer could be that you dislike your outside-of-work time, and you view your job as your identity. Both of which are sad and unhealthy… It’s not the 1940’s anymore. We should not need to work 80 hours a week for any reason.

#243 NJ on 08.25.22 at 12:00 pm

Less time working/stressing over work = more time to spend on the things YOU want to do.

You claim we can spend time on hobbies now…Let’s face it. When you have kids, a job with a 1hr commute, it leaves very little time/energy for yourself.

Adapt to the times, Garth…or you and your boomer pals will be left in the dust! I’m sure you viewed your fathers’ era work ethic/style as archaic? (assuming it was a tough/manual labour/long hour/low pay)

Leave me in the dust? In your dreams. – Garth

#244 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.25.22 at 12:02 pm

#239 Re-Cowtown on 08.25.22 at 11:36 am
I wonder if anyone in Trudeau’s cabinet can do the math to figure out what a truly awful idea shipping Hydrogen to Germany is.

Germans only need:

1. Seawater

2. Nuclear power

And they have both, so they can make as much hydrogen as they want, no shipping needed.

I wonder if anyone smarter than a fifth grader is a Trudeau advisor, because it sure looks like he’s hell bent on wanting to haul coal to Newcastle.

Until Trudeau announces Gen IV nuclear power plants for Canada he’s part of the climate problem.
——————————
It’s the German Chancellor who came to Canada to talk Hydrogen, not the other way around.
But Scholz, I guess, is an idiot, too.
And BTW, Germany is phasing out the few nuclear power plants they have.
They just may keep them working a little longer due to the gas shortage issue.

#245 yvr_lurker on 08.25.22 at 12:03 pm

After reading many of these posts, I am feeling really grateful for being in a job I generally really enjoy (and am good at) and that is creative with nobody breathing down my neck all the time. Long hours, but that’s okay

That being said, if I did not have a kid I would scale back for sure as there would be no need to go over the top saving $$$ for the next generation. My general consumer needs are very few, and without a kid there would be no need to retire with a 2M+ portfolio. Could easily live on lots less.

#246 Sail Away on 08.25.22 at 12:03 pm

The haters were right all along. Tesla went from 900 to 300 overnight.

#247 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.25.22 at 12:11 pm

#243 NJ on 08.25.22 at 12:00 pm
Less time working/stressing over work = more time to spend on the things YOU want to do.

You claim we can spend time on hobbies now…Let’s face it. When you have kids, a job with a 1hr commute, it leaves very little time/energy for yourself.

Adapt to the times, Garth…or you and your boomer pals will be left in the dust! I’m sure you viewed your fathers’ era work ethic/style as archaic? (assuming it was a tough/manual labour/long hour/low pay)

Leave me in the dust? In your dreams. – Garth
——————————-
Haha.
All we are is dust in the Wind.
Great post and comments today.
Now let’s all go for a beer.

#248 Shawn on 08.25.22 at 12:12 pm

Quintillian triggered by reports of a price drop on anything

#236 Quintilian on 08.25.22 at 11:26 am
#226 Shawn on 08.25.22 at 10:24 am

“So Dollar Tree just announced lower profits ahead because they are lowering prices due to increased price competition.”

Sure Shawn, the Dollar Tree crowd is going to tame inflation.

Those types of consumers are insignificant, they have very little purchasing power, and as such, have no measurable impact on companies with pricing power.

Yes, the price of a dollar dish rack will come down 2 cents.

Steaks, fuel, pharmaceuticals, transportation, etc, etc ,and other essentials have a long way to go.

Not sure if you have any credibility, after all, you are a Canadian Tire Share holder right?

***********************************
Yes I have credibility here based on over a decade of writing truthfully here. Regulars know that. Am I biased at times? Of course, as is everyone.

You are right that companies with pricing power are less susceptible to customers shopping around. You want lululemon pants you gotta pay the price there. But even there you can choose other brands or hold off purchasing.

I directed my comment to all consumers to do their part in shopping around. What is your solution?

Not sure why you feel the need to insult dollarama shoppers. I respect them. In fact I must remind myself to check out their stores once in a while myself. Why buy a $8.99 Birthday card at Shoppers when you can get a decent one for $2.00 at Dollarama?

I currently own a few shares in Dollarama and have greatly respected their business and management since I first looked at it in detail on January 10 2012 at a split-adjusted price of $7.25. Today its $81.31.

Yes, I currently own shares in Canadian Tire and have held shares most of the time since I first looked at it in detail on February 4th 2000 at $22.90. Today it is $165.56 (The CTC.A shares). I keep a spreadsheet with the original dates and prices.

Both of these retailers are great Canadian success stories and have been very well managed.

By the way, what is your credibility? As I recall you are a resident complainer and doomsayer and full time whiner. What good does that do you or the audience here?

#249 Yukon Elvis on 08.25.22 at 12:16 pm

#241 DON on 08.25.22 at 11:49 am
#232 Yukon Elvis on 08.25.22 at 11:05 am
#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 11:37 pm
#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm
Germany’s gas storage facilities are more than 80% full.

https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2022-08-23/german-gas-storage-80-full-progresses-despite-russian-cuts

Putin is losing his natural gas war. Europe will make it through the coming winter. After that, kremlin’s fascists can say good-bye to their largest source of revenues.
————————
Yeah,
The Germans are savers.
As for Putin, I think his eyes are now on the East.
China and India mostly.
But we’ll see.
++++++++++++++
There are no gas pipelines going to India or China. The European market will not forgive and forget. Putin is screwed.

********
What about the ‘Siberia Power pipeline’
from Russia to China that started pumping natural gas in 2019?
++++++++++++++++
Nowhere near the gas fields that supply Europe.

#250 epic bear on 08.25.22 at 12:32 pm

my daughters figured out how the banking system works.

they have some paper play money. $5, $10, $20 and $100 bills.

when they need more, they come to the photocopier and print what they want.

7 and 9 years old. banking explained.

and you wonder why people are fed up with the system?

#251 IHCTD9 on 08.25.22 at 12:33 pm

#245 yvr_lurker on 08.25.22 at 12:03 pm

That being said, if I did not have a kid I would scale back for sure as there would be no need to go over the top saving $$$ for the next generation. My general consumer needs are very few, and without a kid there would be no need to retire with a 2M+ portfolio. Could easily live on lots less.
___

Even with kids, you won’t need 2 Mil – the kiddies eventually leave. You don’t really need to pass on 7 figs to them if you don’t want to.

#252 Don Guillermo on 08.25.22 at 12:59 pm

#239 Re-Cowtown on 08.25.22 at 11:36 am
I wonder if anyone in Trudeau’s cabinet can do the math to figure out what a truly awful idea shipping Hydrogen to Germany is.

Germans only need:

1. Seawater

2. Nuclear power

And they have both, so they can make as much hydrogen as they want, no shipping needed.

I wonder if anyone smarter than a fifth grader is a Trudeau advisor, because it sure looks like he’s hell bent on wanting to haul coal to Newcastle.

Until Trudeau announces Gen IV nuclear power plants for Canada he’s part of the climate problem.
*******
No worries. The hydrogen will be delivered to Germany right after the billions of trees are planted and the budgets balance themselves.

As for jobs the QQ’s leave behind, there’ll be plenty of eager new immigrants to snap up the good ones. The QQ’s can return to the workforce later and serve up the fries and lattes.

#253 Diamond Dog on 08.25.22 at 1:04 pm

#246 Sail Away on 08.25.22 at 12:03 pm

3 to 1 split.

#254 Michael in-north-york on 08.25.22 at 1:05 pm

#241 DON on 08.25.22 at 11:49 am

********
What about the ‘Siberia Power pipeline’
from Russia to China that started pumping natural gas in 2019?

===

Peanuts, compared to what Russia used to sell to Europe.

All Russia’s main oil and gas fields are located in the north-west of Siberia, many thousands km away from China. No pipelines cover that gap.

That Siberia Power pipeline is connected to minor gas fields in the east.

And, Putin had no foresight to build LNG production plants in advance. If he tries to build them now, that will take a decade, and his cronies will steal 70% of the funding.

#255 Stoph on 08.25.22 at 1:23 pm

Seems to me that there’s a disconnect between people’s expectations/wants and reality. Sometimes its people that need to change and other times reality is just messed up.

Eight days isn’t nearly enough time to figure out if a company is for you. It sounds like he left for another job, but I suspect that things won’t be any different there. He also expected to find meaning in a job after 8 days… he seems to be way out of touch with reality. Meaning is derived from the journey.

Mentorship is a big want of millennials these days. I’ve come to realize that it’s something that needs to be earned, and it is also something the employer should give once its been earned. Mentorship also means different things to different people. Some people may think it means being shown how to do every task they are asked to do – this is unreasonable. In a professional job you’re expected to be able to figure out how to do your job – that’s why you got hired.

#256 Wondering... on 08.25.22 at 1:26 pm

Wonder if that fly-by-employee dipped into models, algorithms and saved the customer list on a USB key.

#257 Brian on 08.25.22 at 1:31 pm

#232 Yukon Elvis
There are no gas pipelines going to India or China. The European market will not forgive and forget. Putin is screwed.

Russia supplies gas to Northern China since 2019

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/exclusive-russia-china-agree-30-year-gas-deal-using-new-pipeline-source-2022-02-04/

#258 Audrey on 08.25.22 at 1:44 pm

#141 DON on 08.24.22 at 9:12 pm
_______________________________________________________

Appreciate the response and we also have a 7 year old (+ newborn) so rough nights and long days are ongoing. I do love my family but also love my career – why do we have to pick one? A supportive spouse and family members make a BIG difference as well.

#259 Quintilian on 08.25.22 at 1:59 pm

#248 Shawn on 08.25.22 at 12:12 pm

“Both of these retailers are great Canadian success stories and have been very well managed.”

Going forward both of those companies will make it to the list of permanent laggards.

Canadian Tire especially unless they become a full fledged finance company.

#260 Diamond Dog on 08.25.22 at 2:13 pm

#232 Yukon Elvis on 08.25.22 at 11:05 am
#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 08.24.22 at 11:37 pm
#167 Michael in-north-york on 08.24.22 at 10:41 pm
#241 DON on 08.25.22 at 11:49 am

Correct you are, Don.

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/exclusive-russia-china-agree-30-year-gas-deal-using-new-pipeline-source-2022-02-04/

Russia is sending 38 bcf of gas now and is expanding pipe to deliver 48 bcf by 2025.

Ponzius is also correct with Russia’s eyes on China and India as new markets for their exports/imports. I mean, who else? Russia has alienated most everyone else. Who’s to say Soviet Russia won’t alienate China or India in 10 to 30 years? (presuming civilization lasts that long)

Russia is devolving, there is no other better way to put it. Take for example, Russia’s nationalizing of it’s assets. How is Russia going to keep it’s jets in the air when the engine parts to keep them running are from the west? 2/3rd’s of the jet planes in Russia were leased from the west. How is Russia going to keep these planes running, just build new ones? With their economy and brain drain?

https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/commodities/russia-ukraine-vladimir-putin-oil-natural-gas-shell-mitsui-mitsubishi-2022-7

Does Russia at present have the technical know how to keep Sakhalin-2 running? Taking a further look at the tech associated with Saakhalin 2 and where it came from:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakhalin-II

Do readers think Russia has the tech know how to keep this project evolving and robust? It’s 5 world class projects condensed into one in a challenging Arctic environment, providing 4% of the world’s supply of LNG, built through foreign investment. Shell says it best:

https://www.shell.com/about-us/major-projects/sakhalin/sakhalin-an-overview.html

Aviation, nat gas, just 2 examples of many. The moves that Russia has made this year, the sheer number of bridges they’ve burned, the war brain drain, the inflated unrealistic value they’ve put on their own tech and manufacturing abilities… this modern day example of hubris is as good as any that defines it.

Point is, Europe needs to look for new suppliers of gas and LNG for no other better reason than Russia becoming too unstable to supply it themselves in the years to come. Sure, China could come to the rescue… in time. And what does that look like, how does that relationship work. Cheap Asian commodities and help to secure future cheap Asian commodities, everything in Russia made in China, how will that fly in mother Russia. Russia I will remind, turns on their neighbors, it’s what they do.

Economic disruption, brain drain, dependency on China, Russia is devolving. There’s no other better way to put this and yet, the Soviets would be the first to say “it looks good”. It’s akin to being shipwrecked on an island and developing conversations with an inflated basketball or doll to keep from descending into madness, a backdrop distraction narrative disguising a devolving nation suffering poverty effects from it’s choice to descend into conflict and war.

Europe needs to consume less energy, produce more, find new suppliers, new forms of energy, they have no choice now. There’s a different Russia these days and from every angle simply put, it’s not a good look.

#261 DJT on 08.25.22 at 2:44 pm

Its the age old game, employers pretend to pay and employees pretend to work.

Who is not getting paid to work? – Garth

#262 yvr_lurkers on 08.25.22 at 2:53 pm

Who is not getting paid to work? – Garth
———

There is a non-zero set of such people. How about unpaid interns running around for months hoping that their unpaid job will turn into a paid one if the bosses see fit. I am hoping that this awful practice that was in vogue in lean times is now rare given that there are so many open positions.

#263 yvr_lurker on 08.25.22 at 2:57 pm

#251 Even with kids, you won’t need 2 Mil – the kiddies eventually leave. You don’t really need to pass on 7 figs to them if you don’t want to.
——————
Thankfully I enjoy my job and can keep going. However, I do have the mentality of many immigrants who come to Canada to seek a better life for their kids.. am an economic immigrant so to speak, and the idea is that their life will be way easier than my early life was… and having resources is one key aspect of it….

#264 NJ on 08.25.22 at 3:01 pm

Talk to any highly successful person…billionaires…that level. What is the most valuable asset? Our time.

If I can have as much of it to myself as I can, I’m all over that. If you want to grunt it out 70hrs a week to stack your cash up, go for it! I’ll be at the cottage with my family enjoying a beer :)

#265 Jess on 08.25.22 at 3:29 pm

Since it hasn’t been mentioned in the context of murdering work ethic, I’ll mention this…

Canadian family law and “spousal support”.

For any young person reading this:

Cohabitation agreement, cohabitation agreement, and just to be sure…cohabitation agreement.

Your future self is most certainly welcome!

#266 TMac on 08.25.22 at 3:43 pm

“Career aspirations are kaput. Advancement’s no goal. Getting a gold star for being a good worker is dismissed. Nobody cares.”
Perhaps its the destruction of pensions, benefits, and employee incentives to stay long term with any company coming to roost?

#267 Barzy on 08.26.22 at 9:16 am

Look at our Leadership! They encouraging our 30 somethings with there extreme policies that socialism is the way to utopia. News flash ITS NOT.

#268 milly on 08.26.22 at 12:18 pm

As a millenial, this quiet quitting is because people feel the game is rigged. All in my circle are professionals (STEM) but no matter how much you make, housing is out of reach, and if you do manage to stretch to get it you are too poor to start a family or really live.

Employers are short staffed and expect you to pick up the slack and meet unreasonable deadlines. And even if you do kill yourself to “help out”, you get pushback on any raise request, which you know won’t be enough to even meet inflation… which is eating away at any disposable income you had left. It’s leaving people wondering why they try so hard, the carrot is truly gone. My once ambitious circle are all deflated, and are starting to think (or realize?) hard work doesn’t really pay off anymore.

It’s basically feeling hopeless right now, even if you are a higher income earner (so I can’t imagine what the average feels like!). my 2 cents anyways.

#269 Your Insane on 08.26.22 at 1:42 pm

Young people are beginning to realize that their government is corrupt to the core. You need a family income of 320K per year to own a home in Vancouver. And close to that to own a home is armpit Hamilton. Why is the average family income not 320K per year?

The government is corrupt to the core. Mass migration with no plans to build any near enough housing to accommodate the influx. Zero interest rate policy for 20 years.

Why are existing anti-trust laws being used to break up the 2 or 3 companies that provide 100% of the food in Canada? Loblaws is an evil empire. Just look at the stock price. Break it up!

This has utterly destroyed the standard of living in Canada. Im amazed young people show up at work at all.