Faint hope

What we build says much about who we are. What we value. How we approach life.

These days houses are amalgams of OSB fake wood, construction glue, two-by-fours that are actually 1.5-by-3.5s and, if you’re lucky, face brick. This is why when a big summer storm blows through a modern subdivision people end up standing on their front lawns looking at peeled siding, caved roofs, collapsed walls and bats of pink stuffing everywhere.

We build disposable homes. They still cost a million. Few will be there in a century.

I’ve saved a number of old piles of bricks and stones over the years, and all of those structures are still standing and alive. Several farmhouses, a general store, a bank, two inns, a few residences. Our built heritage matters. Just like history – but these days it seems society is intent on wiping both out. Cancel culture has arrived.

But wait. This isn’t going to happen without a fight. At least not in a spec of a place where a line has been drawn between fake wood and pride.

Some days ago I told you about Elgin Hall. The stately, 170-year-old Georgian home was built of yellow brick delivered by oxen and cart to a plot of land granted by Lord Elgin to a United Empire Loyalist family who had fled the revolutionary USA. That was my family. They called the settlement Mount Elgin, and from this spot came the first Member of Parliament for Oxford to the brand new Parliament of Canada in 1867. My great grandfather did that gig, then ran the Welland Canal, helped push the CPR through to Vancouver, where he was president of the board of trade before heading into the north country and meeting his badass end in the Rockies.

Elgin Hall sat in sleepy Mount Elgin, turning out crops, pigs, heifers and gentlemen for decades. My mother was born upstairs during the early days of WW1. My father was taken in as a boarder twenty years later when he was working on a new highway to the north, later called the 401. In 1939 they were married on the front lawn. Kin farmed for another twenty years before Elgin Hall moved into the hands of others.

One day a decade ago Bob called me. “You don’t know me,” he said. “But I bought Elgin Hall.” Turns out he wanted some financial help, so he became a client. He also worked on restoring the place. I gave him a sideboard inherited from my mother that had been made from a giant oak felled on the estate. It belongs there, I told him.

Bob died too soon. Meanwhile the world had become house lusty. Tiny Mount Elgin was designated by questionable politicians as a high-growth area. Suddenly Elgin Hall was surrounded by McMansions and stood in the way of an avaricious developer. He bought it not long ago from Bob’s widow and now plans to demolish it in order to push a roadway between cul-de-sacs.

I offered to buy. Save and restore it. He would not sell. I wrote here about its coming, final days.

But this is not the end. Yet.

Since the blog mention, a local citizens group has created the “Elgin Hall Project.” The ringleader is a retired educator (with the courage to lie in front of a bulldozer) Debbie Kasman who has started a campaign to have the old place designated as a heritage property and thereby spared from certain execution.

Also joining the fray is George Emery, a history prof emeritus at London’s Western University and a scholar/author of 19th Century Ontario politics. With others they have documented the history of the house, reached out to the politicians running the region (who approve subdivisions in places with no schools, doctors or stores), started a social media campaign and now have their eyes set on a key council meeting to take place August 10th. Their ask: that Elgin Hall be immediately recognized as a protected building while a formal application for provincial heritage designation is made.

So, there is hope. Faint, perhaps. But a little light under the door.

Family motivates me, of course. It would give peace to protect this place. But beyond that, people who forget history and let others roughshod over it weaken everyone. Roots matter. Elgin Hall played a wee role in the birthing of our nation. It deserves better than to be roadbed.

Debbie would like your help. No money. Just your voice. Here’s the site. Thank you.

About the picture: “Thanks to you and your awesome team for everything  you do,” write Wyn and Glenn. “This is Copper, our 7 year old Australian Labradoodle. He’s got an incredible personality and loves participating in most everything. He’s been riding on the back of the quad in his  carrier since he was a puppy. Extra long group rides are his favourite – the more people, (especially kids) the more he loves it.  We take our time on the trails, enjoy the scenery and always pack a dog friendly picnic. He’s been an absolute highlight for us and all our friends.  We never take a day with him for granted. “

117 comments ↓

#1 Søren Angst on 07.29.22 at 3:04 pm

One of things that people, without knowing it, like about Rome is its subliminal sense of:

PERMANENCE.

All 2,775 years of it. Or Sassi di Matera where people live in the same homes of their ancestors for the past 9,000 years.

——————-

What you are fighting for Garth.

You need to succeed.

#2 Moose on 07.29.22 at 3:07 pm

Hopefully August 11th you will have some good news !!!

#3 Bob in Hamilton on 07.29.22 at 3:13 pm

It would be nice to see a small part of the old Canada preserved in this day and age…at least something.

#4 Love_The_Cottage on 07.29.22 at 3:14 pm

So Gov’t is bad, we need less red tape, less government and let free markets decide.

Unless it’s something WE believe in, then I need to gov’t to help me.

Not picking a side, just sayin’ it’s tough to have it both ways.

#5 Jim on 07.29.22 at 3:16 pm

From the Vancouver Sun: “the country’s recent outbreaks of both financial and social chaos are igniting more desire to get out. A global investment migration consultancy, Henley & Partners, estimates 10,000 to 13,000 ultra-wealthy residents of China are seeking to pull $48 billion out of the country this year.”

Guess which country is their favourite destination?

#6 Flop… on 07.29.22 at 3:28 pm

Flop Drops.

Yeah, they don’t build them like they used to, but that intentional, natch.

Surrey is going back under the million marker, let’s see what happened to this 75 year old home that’s probably a little bit better than some of the offerings at the bottom.

The details…

18557 60th ave Surrey.

Originally asked 1.49

Just sold for 1.05

So, yeah, mind the gap between ask and received.

They painted this place to last, why else would you put up with Barbie Pink and Smurf Blue, three decades after they went out of fashion…

M48BC

https://www.zealty.ca/mls-R2705869/18557-60-AVENUE-Surrey-BC/

#7 Prince Polo on 07.29.22 at 3:29 pm

The $Million+ mortgages are about as solid as the pathetic houses which they represent.

On the other hand, there’s heart of gold Turner…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eh44QPT1mPE

#8 Hindsight on 07.29.22 at 3:31 pm

History, heritage needs to be protected from ” progress”, much like such old fashioned values as rights and freedoms….eyes wide open Garth, eyes wide open…its a much bigger picture than your willing to see right now…eyes wider please !

#9 Philco on 07.29.22 at 3:33 pm

Sawdust and plastic houses today.
4in PVC pipe $4ft use to be $1.75. Just found 2000ft I piaid $3 ft got lucky.
500 MCM Tech cable is $72 a meter my wholesale cost.
Lumbers down maybe 25%. BUILDING REAL buildings is expensive as hell. Plumbers wanted a redick $8,000 to place 3000sq ft pex heated flooring. I did it my self for $750..AND theirs major gouging out there. .There’s no cutting corners for me.

#10 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.29.22 at 3:38 pm

Even if the vote is “no” to saving the property as is….

Could you buy the “building” and move it to another location nearby donated by the Town, Province or Feds?

#11 The General on 07.29.22 at 3:44 pm

From the Daily Mail- Hanover bans hot water in public buildings, switches off lights on major buildings at night. Germans told to expect higher electricity bills and gas rationing. U.K. energy bills could hit £500 by January. Across Europe street lights shut off, no heated swimming pools allowed. Major manufacturers shutting down, less showering or cold showers.
This is only hurting the little people and private jets are exempted from green energy taxes.
This is far from over, and our so called leaders sure as HELL won’t be the ones freezing and starving!!!! Are you awake yet, pleebs.

#12 Sail Away on 07.29.22 at 3:45 pm

Good for you, Garth, and I hope the mission succeeds.

I share a similar passion for preserving large expanses of natural wilderness and enjoy working with the preservation societies to ever so sloooowwwwly increase the protected areas. It’s a process.

#13 Søren Angst on 07.29.22 at 3:57 pm

Gas cuts from Russia getting very real.

Cold showers as German city of Hanover reacts to Russian gas crisis
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-62335911

Germany goes coal
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-62234188

They could stand to lower their energy consumption.
https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/per-capita-energy-use?tab=chart&country=CAN~USA~DEU~ITA~FRA~GBR~JPN

Poor Italia this Winter, I don’t know how much more she give.

——————

And then, there’s you 🍁 Canada…the G7 Champion of energy per capita. 2020:

Canada 100,310 kWh/person
Italia 26,936

You are awash in it. Be grateful and try to cut down.

#14 Rizz on 07.29.22 at 3:57 pm

Long time reader, first time commenter. Good luck! Hope you and the team can save Elgin Hall!

#15 The General on 07.29.22 at 3:57 pm

Who in the hell decided it was a good idea to move our manufacturing half a world away and make our economy 70% service? Who benefitted, besides the predator multinational conglomerates like Blackrock, Statestreet and Vanguard? They made their profits, and their minions in the msm went right along with it. Traitors comes to mind.

#16 Ron Murray on 07.29.22 at 3:58 pm

A worthy cause. Good luck with the project.

#17 Shawn on 07.29.22 at 4:03 pm

Great initiative to save Elgin Hall

And the huge difference between this petition and most others is Garth is willing to put up his own money, as well as time and effort.

I hope it succeeds.

#18 Tom on 07.29.22 at 4:07 pm

Re #5: Trudeau has facilitated this by cosying up to wealthy businessmen from China and attending cash for access fundraisers. That’s why we have more immigration than any other G7 nation.

#19 Basil Exposition on 07.29.22 at 4:08 pm

As a retired Fire Chief, my advice is to keep a watch on the property. I’ve witnessed several heritage buildings suffer sudden and devastating fires over the years when developers plans for a property are challenged.
Best of luck to you on a worthy project.

#20 Dave on 07.29.22 at 4:10 pm

Re 15 the General: Thank Clinton for being stupid enough to admit China into the WTO. Manufacturing collapsed in the West and rose correspondingly in Asia.

#21 Shelley on 07.29.22 at 4:14 pm

Signed. Barely finished the paragraph and marched over to the FB page that has the petition.

#22 Shawn on 07.29.22 at 4:16 pm

Globalism?

#15 The General on 07.29.22 at 3:57 pm

Who in the hell decided it was a good idea to move our manufacturing half a world away and make our economy 70% service? Who benefitted, besides the predator multinational conglomerates like Blackrock, Statestreet and Vanguard? They made their profits, and their minions in the msm went right along with it. Traitors comes to mind.

***********************
Freedom and “the invisible hand” decided. Efficiency decided. Every one of us helped decide it when we bought imported manufactured items.

Ask IHDTC, he often marvels at the low cost of tools.

We just bought an electric fan at Walmart for $22 on sale. Three feet high on a stand. It’s hard to imagine how that could be made and shipped to Cape Breton Nova Scotia and sold for $22. In fact it’s an economic marvel.

Imagine if you tried to build that yourself out of components in a well equipped shop. Imagine the hours it would take plus the material costs.

Who benefits? Basically everyone. And note that we have full employment.

One of Walmart’s best slogans is “Lowering the cost of living for people everywhere” And they do that. Their grocery department alone saves money for many millions of people who desperately need the money saved.

All hail capitalism and our relatively free markets.

And how ’bout that stock market today! and this week!

#23 The General on 07.29.22 at 4:17 pm

So keep your heads buried in the sand, Canadians. Keep watching your fake reality shows, including dancing with the stars and national news programs. Reality is a freight train bearing down on the uninformed, ignorant masses, and they won’t know what hit them. Apple corporation installed suicide nets at their Chinese factories, this could be an investment opportunity.

#24 Bob on 07.29.22 at 4:18 pm

Seems like the laneway to the west could be expanded into an access road. Why knock down the house?

#25 Søren Angst on 07.29.22 at 4:19 pm

For the Curious.

James Bond “No Time to Live” Sassi di Matera film location a lot older than 7000 BCE, that just makes it one of oldest continuously inhabited locations on Earth such as Aleppo and Jerusalem.

More to Sassi di Matera than that.

In one of the Sassi de Matera caves a 150,000-year-old hominid skeleton was found, along with Neolithic tools.

As for famous cave paintings “I TURISTI” * think France (17,000 BCE) and Spain (15,000 BCE) are the ticket.

True, but Northwest of Verona there is the Fumane Cave, with cave paintings dated to 35,000 BCE with evidence of habitation (Neanderthal, Homo Sapiens) dating back 90,000 years.

Not far from Sassi di Matera is Altamura. There lies Altamura Man 187,000 to 128,000 years ago, a Neanderthal **.

————–

Been there. Good Italia does not advertise this, we are trampled enough by I TURISTI. Let them go trample Spain and France instead.

* TripAdvisor don’t know sh!t from clay crowd.
** Current descendents are: Matteo Salvini and Silvio Berlusconi – the resemblance is striking.

#26 Søren Angst on 07.29.22 at 4:24 pm

#12 Sail Away

The fact that you hunt means the hunting license money you pay does more for preserving wildlife habitat than the

Save the trees, bees, snails, whales ENVIRONMENTALISTS

will EVER do with their BIG FAT MOUTHS.

https://www.ducks.ca/

Anything else you do over and above that, bonus.

KUDOS to you.

#27 Observer on 07.29.22 at 4:25 pm

#8 Hindsight on 07.29.22 at 3:31 pm
History, heritage needs to be protected from ” progress”, much like such old fashioned values as rights and freedoms….eyes wide open Garth, eyes wide open…its a much bigger picture than your willing to see right now…eyes wider please !

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Oh please, do explain further what your wide eyes see that Garth’s do not. Don’t tease us.

#28 Stone on 07.29.22 at 4:26 pm

If I understand correctly, the house is already surrounded by a subdivision.

What are you really trying to preserve?

People lived a portion of their lives there and then moved on.

They moved on. Can’t you?

I’m in no way a proponent of ugly subdivisions or suburban sprawl. Quite the opposite. Tight urban centres with lots of green space, public transit and walkable neighbourhoods are what I prefer. I just don’t get what you’re trying to accomplish.

It’s like saying Toronto shouldn’t have been developed. You live there and enjoy the amenities Toronto offers. That wouldn’t be possible without development and change.

Trying to keep you from moving there, obviously. – Garth

#29 Chameleon on 07.29.22 at 4:27 pm

#19 Basil Exposition

What you write was my immediate thought as well.

#30 Warren-the-lagging_indicator on 07.29.22 at 4:38 pm

It is a pretty structure with a nice history. I hope it will be saved. Too much beauty being destroyed these days.

#31 SunShowers on 07.29.22 at 4:55 pm

#22 Shawn on 07.29.22 at 4:16 pm
Freedom for whom?
Certainly not for the sweatshop laborers overseas who make these products in inhumane, if not outright deadly work conditions.

And it’s easy enough to marvel at low prices, but maybe you should weigh those low prices against the lower domestic wages we are all paid as a result of outsourcing and offshoring. If Canadian median wage growth continued to grow at the pace it was before the mid 1970s, the median wage would be 50% higher today.

I’m pretty sure we could get a factory built in Canada that pays Canadian wages to get electric fans shipped out to Cape Breton for less than $33.

#32 Re-Cowtown on 07.29.22 at 4:59 pm

I’m a fan of saving/restoring old buildings. Sometimes it’s just not all about the benjamins.

Having said that, I’m still puzzled by Calgary Stampede Parade Marshall Kevin Costner saying that one thing he liked about Calgary was the architecture.

I’m still not sure if he was serious or it was a Babylon Bee moment.

#33 islander on 07.29.22 at 5:03 pm

https://thechildrenremembered.ca/school-histories/mount-elgin/

Ach, the “good old days”…

The Mount Elgin residential school was located in Muncey, 20 miles southwest of London, Ontario, not Mt. Elgin. Ten seconds of research would tell you that. – Garth

#34 The General on 07.29.22 at 5:10 pm

I realize this is an investment blog and all, but Garth has more integrity in his pinkie finger, than the current federal government combined. What happens in Europe will effect us too. For instance, Pat McDonagh, the head of fast food chain Supermac’s, warned the public that Ireland may face food shortages over the coming winter. And that individuals should be looking to stock up on non perishable foods. He also put GREAT emphasis on difficulties to do with fertilizer in the country, the lack of which has the danger of HALVING farmer’s crop yields.
And our Lieberal Government is moving to limit fertilizer use??? J.T. completes P.E.T. master plan. And I quote P.E.T. here: Why should I sell your wheat?

#35 Leon Smuk on 07.29.22 at 5:19 pm

A lot of merit to what you’re saying here, there are some truly stunning old structures. Sounds like this might be one. Then there are some that have been so neglected so long there’s not much to be saved. 24 Sussex probably belongs in the later group for instance.

#36 earthboundmisfit on 07.29.22 at 5:34 pm

Best wishes for the success of your efforts.

#37 Victor Llearna on 07.29.22 at 5:37 pm

DELETED

#38 Stone on 07.29.22 at 5:42 pm

#28 Stone on 07.29.22 at 4:26 pm
If I understand correctly, the house is already surrounded by a subdivision.

What are you really trying to preserve?

People lived a portion of their lives there and then moved on.

They moved on. Can’t you?

I’m in no way a proponent of ugly subdivisions or suburban sprawl. Quite the opposite. Tight urban centres with lots of green space, public transit and walkable neighbourhoods are what I prefer. I just don’t get what you’re trying to accomplish.

It’s like saying Toronto shouldn’t have been developed. You live there and enjoy the amenities Toronto offers. That wouldn’t be possible without development and change.

Trying to keep you from moving there, obviously. – Garth

———

Then an excellent job you have done. I applaud you.

#39 Flop… on 07.29.22 at 5:47 pm

Saw this story the other day.

“Couple who couldn’t afford house in UK buy entire village in France.

It is made up of six cottages, two barns and a paddock, plus a two-storey workshop, cider press and communal bread oven.”

Yeah, sounds idyllic, but no mention of space for an ice cream factory.

What are they gonna do, eat cake…

M48BC

https://metro.co.uk/2022/07/27/couple-from-tunbridge-wells-buy-an-entire-village-in-france-17075394/amp/

#40 ElGatoNeroYVR on 07.29.22 at 5:58 pm

#5 Jim on 07.29.22 at 3:16 pm
============
According to Youtube and Soth China Morning Post it is called “runology ” and top preffered destinations in order are Singapore , US ,Canada / Australia . They also outline the challenges of taking money out of China now that very few non-residents want the yuan (RMB) .
I doubt it will cause too much of an issue here in the Lower Mainland. Thereˋs enough previous buyers looking to cash out of the 5-10 mil houses to cause much of a domino effect.
If anything stay tuned for the Honk Kong exit though again Singapore is the preffered destination followed by Vietnam.

#41 To the point. on 07.29.22 at 6:00 pm

I wish Elgin Hall well. Such a shame that the heritage-lovers turned to the deceptively free convenience of Facebook to organize.

#42 Unpinned on 07.29.22 at 6:14 pm

It’s convenient for public policy to forget history and bulldoze over Canadiana and previous generation’s contributions and values especially today in the “WOKE” framework which dismisses any challenges to their new religeon.

#43 espressobob on 07.29.22 at 6:17 pm

Cyling past the old Honest Eds and Mirvish village area at Bloor and Bathurst, and seeing what’s replacing the past, really breaks my heart. This sort of thing is happening everywhere. It’s called change.

Newer generations don’t give a damn about history since they live in the present and look to their future. Who are some of us old timers to judge? We’re looking into the rear view mirror.

It sucks getting old.

#44 AM in MN on 07.29.22 at 6:21 pm

Garth,

Haven’t sent a post since you deleted the last one, and I don’t expect you’ll post this one, but I felled compelled to send you a note about today’s post.

You regularly denigrate anyone who feels that the history and foundations the country was built on are being lost. Especially if they joined the truckers to complain about lost freedoms and the move towards globalist control.

You complain about the lost history of the country when someone tears down your flag or wants to tear down this building, but bury your head in the sand with regard to what’s being taught in schools about the history of the nation.

You can’t have it both ways.

I have plenty of examples of stories to make me lament the future, here are two;

My sister married into the family in Vancouver that descended from BT Rogers, who built Rogers Sugar, with help from RB Angus of the Bank of Montreal. RB had married his niece Isabella and they had 7 children. They were born in a house near the beach on Davie St. that’s still standing, but now a restaurant called Hy’s mansion.

They avoided the inheritance curse by one generation in that their 7th child had enough business sense to carry on the enterprise. They were part of the cluster of families that built Vancouver out of the wilderness of the late 1800’s into the City it is today.

Today they are all denigrated in the schools as racists and colonialists. My sister had a daughter in public school, pre-covid, who, as the ONLY white kid in the class, had to sit through lectures about how her ancestors stole everything you now see from the natives. They almost make the moral argument for tearing it all down. No one ever argues the point that if the City and civilization they built was so bad, why does the whole world seem to want to move there?

#2, I was born in the NWT in ’67 in a 4 bed hospital run by the Grey Nuns of Montreal. Those women gave their whole lives to serving the natives up north with free health care. One was 93 and still living there, having nothing to go back to in Quebec since leaving when she was in her ’20’s.

Natives came on their dog sleds from many miles away when they had sick women or children, they knew they’d be looked after. As thanks for a lifetime of service, the PM spits on their legacy and some of the old churches they built got burned down.

My parents were up there because my Dad got a job as a teacher in a residential high school. One Christmas when they were shutting things down and sending the kids back to their villages for a few weeks, they had a 14 yr. old girl who didn’t want to leave. It turned out that she would have to have sex with her uncle and didn’t want to. That is/was their culture and it had been upended. It’s better now that the native girls just run away and end up on the streets of the cities.

We are going through a cultural revolution with regard to the true history of how we got here, and I can’t see how this all ends well.

Hope they at least save your building.

The anti-vaccine truckers are selfish cowards fighting only for their freedom to be anti-social and enjoy social freedoms. You can’t have it both ways. – Garth

#45 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.29.22 at 6:39 pm

#69 TurnerNation on 07.29.22 at 11:04 am
75th? Slow day.

ZOMG, F was ahead of his time!

Our rulers taking back to the Stone Ages or 3rd world country status. For the “Climate”.
We will be squatting in the fetid dirt streets shovelling gruel into our pie holes by hand. Anyone know how to dig a latrine?
—————-
A little racist, aren’t ye.
I’ve been to Indian and African restaurants.
Eating with your fingers is pretty normal.
Some fancy, smancy Western restaurants are introducing finger happy menus.
I think about 2 billion Asians are using chop sticks, and about 2 billion Indians and Afrikans use their fingers.
And 400 million North Americans are eating their Burgers, Chicken Wings and fries with their hands.
What’s the big deal?
But, The Italians are food snops.
Once I saw one eating a banana with a fork and knife.
Probably was Dolce Vita.

#46 michael on 07.29.22 at 6:42 pm

One problem Garth. I was hoping the link takes me to a petition I could sign, instead it seem to be a Facebook page. Sorry but I can’t even leave a message there unless I have a Facebook account which I’m not willing to do even for such a great cause as I always had and will hate Facebook, what it stands for and how it destroys our future generation.

#47 Stephen Dedalus on 07.29.22 at 6:43 pm

Go Garth, Go!

Unleash the kraken.

Let them fear the lancet of your art.

#48 bill on 07.29.22 at 6:46 pm

Great story. Hopefully a happy ending. nice if you to give back the headboard.

#49 I can see clearly now on 07.29.22 at 6:48 pm

7:27:2022
#38 Scott in Gibsons
Just for fun… if the WEF is predicting that in seven years you and I and Garth will own nothing then there is a lot of wealth destruction required in a relatively short time politicians around the world are implementing policies that look very familiar to WEF goals and destroying the wealth of the 99% in the process.  Might just be a coincidence unless the WEF has been penetrating “ze cabinets”.

Are you related to Pat or Tamara? Or just too long in Gibsons?  – Garth

—-
Actually Gibsons is the perfect place to say what Scott meant. 

Far enough from the Ottawa swamp and close enough to look up and see the contrails of CAN FORCE 1 doing round trips from Ottawa to Tofino.

Same contrails that flew over western Canada (i.e. Kamloops) a while back, and most recently the cherry picking excursion)

Chaos in airports
Upheaval in schools
Havoc in health care system
Inflation
Housing Bust

It’s easy to gain a clear objective of government policy from afar.

#50 baloney Sandwitch on 07.29.22 at 6:49 pm

What do you plan to do with the Manor garth? Another outpost for your financial services empire? Air B&B for the refugees from hogtown?

#51 've got angst in my pants on 07.29.22 at 6:51 pm

28 Stone on 07.29.22 at 4:26 pm
If I understand correctly, the house is already surrounded by a subdivision.

What are you really trying to preserve?

Trying to keep you from moving there, obviously. – Garth/

//////////////// don’t worry Garth he is a lowly renter.

#52 Maggie the Teck Writer on 07.29.22 at 6:56 pm

I agree with your comments from the bottom of my heart. Although my father was an architect who revered the Bauhaus, I would never choose a new building if I could have an old one instead. Although the Bauhaus and its adherents are now part of architectural tradition and I suppose count as old…

Thank you for sharing something of your family history. It’s clear that you’re very different from those in the steerage who would go anywhere for a full trough.

#53 inflation is rampant on 07.29.22 at 6:58 pm

wasn’t Lord Elgin the one who stole all those artifacts from Athens? no, wait, your Lord Elgin was his son.

ya. history is important.

#54 NOSTRADAMUS on 07.29.22 at 7:04 pm

9.0 EARTHQUAKE DISTURBANCE.
Having a share or unit move down .50 cents to .15 cents. $50.00 dollars, down to $15.00 dollars or even $500.00 dollars down to $150.00 dollars is “NOT” the same as moving down from $500,000.00 down to $250.000.00 dollars. One is considered play money and not life altering. The other is real money and a 9.0 earthquake disturbance that can destroy a persons ability to cope. Psychologically it is the difference between night and day. I think a lot of people have been living on fault lines and now the ground is starting to shake and making some really scary noises. This brings to mind a Kevin O’Leary quote “The key to a happy life… especially when you are young is to stay out of debt.” Steady Lads, hold the line.

#55 millmech on 07.29.22 at 7:09 pm

Another Crypto exchange goes down today

#56 Figmund Sreud on 07.29.22 at 7:15 pm

Debbie would like your help.
_________________________

Done! Now, … working on gathering ten (10) more supporters ( … two already in a bag!)

F.S.

#57 ogdoad on 07.29.22 at 7:15 pm

Wonderful style of building.

Alas, being sentimental these days is reserved mostly for movie directors and pot smokers…og forbid our leaders. How much is the land underneath worth?

Its too bad we DIE and take with us history, values, $$ and hugs. And in my case, abs and looks. Too bad us firsties value progress and innovation (Full. dis. in my mind, innovation is necessary but without a solid value system 90% of people want just the next George Foreman Grill…instead of calculus for their kids…).

Too bad drugs, alcohol and nicotine don’t make us smarter. Maybe we’d care if a 180 yo building got torn down.

But, as a whole, if its housing we need?

Og

#58 Steven Rowlandson on 07.29.22 at 7:29 pm

“We build disposable homes. They still cost a million. Few will be there in a century.”
To paraphrase Churchill.
“Never in the history of Canada have so many paid so much for so little. Never!”

#59 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.29.22 at 7:39 pm

@#45 Purile Ponzie
“But, The Italians are food snops.
Once I saw one eating a banana with a fork and knife.”

+++
They have nothing on Vulcans and bread sticks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXJ_1uG40iE

#60 Felix on 07.29.22 at 7:39 pm

Happy Feline Friday!

Did you know:

In Holland’s embassy in Moscow, Russia, the staff noticed that the two Siamese cats kept meowing and clawing at the walls of the building. Their owners finally investigated, thinking they would find mice. Instead, they discovered microphones hidden by Russian spies. The cats heard the microphones when they turned on. Instead of alerting the Russians that they found said microphones, they simply staged conversations about delays in work orders and suddenly problems were fixed much quicker!

Cats will help defeat Putin, too.

#61 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.29.22 at 7:41 pm

#25 Dolce Vita

As for famous cave paintings “I TURISTI” * think France (17,000 BCE) and Spain (15,000 BCE) are the ticket.
True, but Northwest of Verona there is the Fumane Cave, with cave paintings dated to 35,000 BCE with evidence of habitation (Neanderthal dating back 90,000 years.*

* Current descendents are: Matteo Salvini and Silvio Berlusconi – the resemblance is striking.
———————————
Haha,
Good Scoop, Dolce.
But don’t be modest.
You fit right in.

#62 Steven Rowlandson on 07.29.22 at 7:45 pm

DELETED (Anti-vaccine)

#63 Quintilian on 07.29.22 at 7:49 pm

Wish I could help you in a more meaningful way Garth.
But here is how Bugsy dealt with a similar situation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=479gF8rc0r8&ab_channel=Tomandjerryfan001

#64 Flop… on 07.29.22 at 7:55 pm

#112 TurnerNation on 07.28.22 at 8:31 am

FLOP you are like this construction comedian.

https://www.youtube.com/c/CarmenCiricillo
—–

//////////////////////////////////////////

Hey TN, Gee, I haven’t felt this much pressure to perform since my wedding night.

I’ve finally had a chance to look at your video, sometimes trying to be productive in my government job gets in the way of taxpayers trying to waste their money.

Um, do you think tonight’s post will finally make someone choose the blog handle of Restoration Nation?

Out of the two guys in the first video, I’m definitely more of a meathead like the guy from the 80s, except I don’t smoke, maybe just once at band camp.

The modern guy, yeah, definitely don’t move my hands in circles like that, except for the one time I was in Siwa Oasis in Egypt, and I was trying to explain to the pharmacist that I had explosive diarrhea…

M48BC

#65 Grunt on 07.29.22 at 7:57 pm

Tut tut Garth. It isn’t Simcoe Day. It’s a civic holiday. Stop being so focused on an obsolete and irrelevant past.

#66 Observer on 07.29.22 at 8:00 pm

For in the same way that walks through Britain’s forests are now being prescribed as an effective way to help counteract anxiety and stress, so the conservation trusts and charities of the heritage industry are starting to promote the power of ruins and historic buildings to improve mental wellbeing.

“It is a common theme we get back from all our stayers,” said historian Caroline Standford, of Landmark, a charity that rescues, restores and then rents out significant historic buildings. “So many say how much calmer they feel.

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2019/sep/21/historic-houses-improve-wellbeing

#67 Flop… on 07.29.22 at 8:10 pm

Now I understand why people are always telling me that Bitcoin is in the dumps…

M48BC

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$MUCHO$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

“Inside quest to find $168MILLION worth of Bitcoin in dump after hard drive accidentally thrown away

A Welsh man has developed a multi-million dollar plan to recover a binned hard drive with 8,000 Bitcoin tokens stashed on it.

The hard drive was accidentally tossed in 2013 and its owner believes it is sitting beneath a mountain of trash in a landfill.”

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/19328374/inside-quest-to-find-millions-worth-of-bitcoin/

#68 Observer on 07.29.22 at 8:10 pm

“Biophilia” is the attachment of humans to living structures, and it combines two distinct components. The first is the healing effect from intimate contact with living biological forms—for example, looking out a window onto plant and human life or being in urban spaces that optimize encounters with other people. The second requires our structures to mimic the mathematical processes that generate biological forms, including fractal scaling (that is, dimensions repeating all the way down to the smallest details) and the organization of complexity that produces ornamentation.

Older buildings and urban fabric evolved through daily human use as dictated by human biology. This goes a long way toward explaining why humans build in the first place. For millennia, our living and urban spaces gave us positive physical and psychological feedback that made us wish to use them. Today they bring us out into the street and make us walk for pleasure. Design variety expresses a culture’s creativity and innovation, with ornamentation serving a biological need akin to physical nourishment from air, water, and food.

But this fundamental truth is difficult to communicate today, following a century-old ideological prejudice against ornament. Architectural culture repeats mindless slogans condemning ornament—even after neuroscience experiments reveal its relevance to human health. The loss of ornament that accompanies demolishing old buildings is part of the cultural eradication of ornament from artifacts, textiles, and everyday utensils that follows elite-adopted Bauhaus-inspired trends.

Conservation aims to preserve the diversity of life and existing ecosystems. All life is interconnected, so the survival of the human species depends on saving the natural ecosystems in which we are embedded. The same thinking applied to preservation calls for saving the older buildings that human beings connect with through biophilia. Significantly, this has nothing to do directly with their “historic” status.

For generations prior to the industrial-modernist age, buildings—from vernacular houses to religious and civic monuments—provided healthy feedback to their users, contributing to an environment that induced well-being and promoted healing. This therapeutic effect has been measured through preliminary neuroscience studies and is spurring a new direction in research.

https://forum.savingplaces.org/blogs/special-contributor/2017/10/24/neuroscience-and-preservation-measuring-the-healing-properties-of-places

#69 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.29.22 at 8:14 pm

@#63 Qunty’s Quantifiable Queries

If they can move a Lighthouse.
They can move Elgin Hall.

https://www.nps.gov/caha/learn/historyculture/movingthelighthouse.htm

#70 Fact Checker Fred on 07.29.22 at 8:20 pm

Sorry to disagree about the quality af homes built today versus years ago. There is something called a building code. Vastly improved since days of old.
Sure, my 1993 vynyl sided house will be scattered all over the city in the event of a tornado, but I will be safe in the basement, with my poured concrete walls.
The circa 1900 brownstone I grew up in had lots of issues. There was a stream running through the basement in springtime. The floors were rotting on the addition someone added. The wiring? I hope it’s been redone since we moved. It had a horse barn out back and a huge lawn, but I prefer my new, energy efficient, vynyl clad house thanks.

#71 Wrk.dover on 07.29.22 at 8:26 pm

#46 michael on 07.29.22 at 6:42 pm
One problem Garth. I was hoping the link takes me to a petition I could sign, instead it seem to be a Facebook page.
____________________________

Therefore, I won’t be clicking either. Shame!

Heritage fans don’t face time. (what ever that is)

#72 Cici on 07.29.22 at 8:28 pm

Loving tonight’s post. So on point, and such an important message coming straight at us from a true sage.

Hope Debbie and the gang succeeds at this very worthwhile effort.

If you all do need financial help, perhaps you can contact that Jane?/Janet? (sorry, too lazy to look up her proper name) woman from the other night and ask her to mortgage that $9-million property she doesn’t want to let go of and front you the cash? In this economy, after all, it’s all about the leverage ;-)

#73 Dragonfly58 on 07.29.22 at 8:30 pm

Best of luck with the preservation Garth. So much of Canada’s historic architecture has already been lost.
I lived in Kerrisdale in the 1980’s . It was criminal. A very nice 1910 – 1930’s house would sell. Torn down at once and replaced with ” upscale ” stucco and pillars. The new owners usually had bags of money and not one shred of interest in the previous culture. Brought that little slice of Hong Kong with them along with their luggage. Saw it happen 100 or more times. Now I feel uneasy just visiting my old neighborhood.

#74 Stone on 07.29.22 at 8:32 pm

#51 ‘ve got angst in my pants on 07.29.22 at 6:51 pm
28 Stone on 07.29.22 at 4:26 pm
If I understand correctly, the house is already surrounded by a subdivision.

What are you really trying to preserve?

Trying to keep you from moving there, obviously. – Garth/

//////////////// don’t worry Garth he is a lowly renter.

———

Correct. Don’t forget to include that the lowly renter has a nicely padded B&D portfolio and early retired, slave to no one. This lowly renter values appreciating assets that pay out succulent dividends and other distributions, not depreciating liabilities that suck the life out of homeowners.

#75 Heath on 07.29.22 at 8:35 pm

Wishing you success in preserving this stately piece of your families history Garth. It’s so maddening to me when I go into the local building supply and see how much woodwork is made from this glued together sawdust board. Twenty years ago my wife and I purchased what we thought was a decent quality, set of kitchen cupboards only to realize our folly a few short years later hinges coming loose, swelling around doors and drawers due to moisture from humidity. Sadly it’s become the norm that we consumer’s settle for such inferior material and are all too ready to tear down these beautiful heritage buildings.

#76 Observer on 07.29.22 at 8:35 pm

The anti-vaccine truckers are selfish cowards fighting only for their freedom to be anti-social and enjoy social freedoms. You can’t have it both ways. – Garth

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Indeed. Should be obvious, but apparently it is not.

#77 TurnerNation on 07.29.22 at 8:36 pm

#11 The General on 07.29.22 at 3:44 pm

^ Yup the is back to the stone age. Cause Science you know . Trust the Science.

— As posted in Q2 2020, seen on another blog. What has changed since then??

““We’re in an experiment. We’re now getting a glimpse of what a high tech, low carbon, limited mobility civilization looks like. The technocrats must be loving this – they’re going to have so much data to analyze after the experiment is over. Other major interest groups will use this experiment to further their agendas””

#78 TurnerNation on 07.29.22 at 8:39 pm

Re Healthcare. It’s like #stayhome #staysafe was training.

If you leave home now better not get sick or injured.

—-
From the Killing us Softly Dept. Another day in a Former First World Country.
I posted here back in Q2 2020 that every system designed to protect us has been turned against us.
Some say the push is toward private for-profit care. The big global corps would love this.
One crisis at a time.
Hop a cab to the US if you want to be looked at and live…

.Ontario: ICU at Bowmanville Hospital temporarily closed as nurses union warns of long weekend staffing issues (cp24.com)

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/titanic-staffing-crisis-leaving-at-least-14-ontario-hospital-units-shut-down-ahead-of-long-weekend-1.6006460
“‘Titanic’ staffing crisis leaving at least 14 Ontario hospital units shut down ahead of long weekend”

https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/hospital-ae-nhs-crisis-bolton-24598472
Waits of ’40+ hours for a bed’ and scarce spaces in hospitals are unfolding at one of the region’s A&E departments.

#79 TheDood on 07.29.22 at 8:48 pm

Maybe someone should pay that Developer a visit, and in the immortal words of Fred Shero, ‘arrive in I’ll humour’.

#80 espressobob on 07.29.22 at 9:14 pm

The legacy you leave behind will have a greater impact than ones ego no one cares about. Narcissism is a disease that frankly is what got our civilization into trouble in the first place.

Worshiping the past should be questioned.

#81 Omh on 07.29.22 at 9:27 pm

What a wonderful article for those of us through-out Canada that have seen so much history eroded over the past 10 yrs.
In my neighborhood within one block they have knocked down over 15 70 to 80 yr old pine trees; perfectly healthy, countless old growth 2×4 or 2×6 could have been milled only to end up in the landfill. It housed so many bird species and obnoxious squirrel nests. They were a pleasure to watch and now we have numerous squeezed in houses that are not even sold but yet have flooded due to rain storms and inadequate drainage system. Poor people that will buy these pieces of crap in the future. This is our reality!!

I hope Debbie receives the support she needs..

#82 Stone on 07.29.22 at 9:33 pm

#73 Dragonfly58 on 07.29.22 at 8:30 pm
Best of luck with the preservation Garth. So much of Canada’s historic architecture has already been lost.
I lived in Kerrisdale in the 1980’s . It was criminal. A very nice 1910 – 1930’s house would sell. Torn down at once and replaced with ” upscale ” stucco and pillars. The new owners usually had bags of money and not one shred of interest in the previous culture. Brought that little slice of Hong Kong with them along with their luggage. Saw it happen 100 or more times. Now I feel uneasy just visiting my old neighborhood.

———

Yes, blatant racism makes me uneasy as well.

I’m always pleased when newcomers arrive and push the racists out. It’s really nice when that part of Canadian culture gets squashed.

#83 Another country falls… on 07.29.22 at 9:35 pm

More global news…

https://www.ipsnews.net/2022/07/fear-returns-argentina-brink/

#84 Dr V on 07.29.22 at 10:38 pm

What’s “facebook”?

#85 Dragonfly58 on 07.29.22 at 10:50 pm

I have worked alongside immigrants from several different Countries, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oz. And had no problem getting along with 90% or better of them. Post retirement, some remain friends to this day.
I only judge them by their actions, not by their skin or accent. I dislike people from any country who destroy Canadian history, architecture , heritage buildings regardless of where they are from.
In the 1980’s / early 1990’s , on the West Side of Vancouver it is a simple fact the overwhelming majority were from HK.
They all wanted to live in the best parts of town, and quickly proceded to destroy much of what made it special.
Actions, not surface appearance.

#86 Nora Lenderby on 07.29.22 at 11:06 pm

Yes; a pal had bought a new upscale house in Ottawa, and a pileated woodpecker took a liking to it. It carved a large hole in the stucco and underlying foam. Quite a mess.

On your preservation job, I wish you well. We had a similar little local difficulty with the old local collegiate/high school. The school had been moved to the next village and the high school (3 stories, classic 1926 brick built, basically sound) was in danger of demolition. There are hardly any old public buildings apart from 1890s churches in this area.

Fortunately the local council saved it, rebuilt it as a municipal office, library, clinic and community centre. It cost a fortune (for round here) but it was so worth it.

You won’t know what you’ve lost ’til it’s gone.

#87 The Woosh on 07.29.22 at 11:22 pm

#79 TheDood on 07.29.22 at 8:48 pm
Maybe someone should pay that Developer a visit, and in the immortal words of Fred Shero, ‘arrive in I’ll humour’.

——————————————

Well, that was extremely immature and ill thought out. I’m surprised it wasn’t zapped out into the ether. That train of thought only works until you do something that for some reason offends someone else and they pay you a visit. My thoughts are you wouldn’t like it so why wish that on someone else?

The property was purchased by the developer by someone who decided to sell it to them. No one forced them. That’s how life goes. Garth wanted to buy it and the developer said no. It’s their property…their choice. Sometimes you win some and other times you don’t.

Suddenly, out of the blue, everyone who was disinterested is now interested because they perceive Garth was offended he couldn’t get the piece of property he wanted. Let’s start a petition to make the developer miserable and jump through hoops until they break and sell the property to Garth. Sorry to break it to everyone, you all know what’s going to happen. That house, beautiful as it is, will be “accidentally” destroyed and the developer will continue to do what they planned. On the plus side for the developer, the added free publicity will help in selling the remaining building lots.

#88 45north on 07.29.22 at 11:26 pm

Mount Elgin, Oxford County

found it!

https://sis.agr.gc.ca/cansis/publications/surveys/on/on28/index.html

click on the MAP to download the jpg.

find Ingersoll, then follow the Canadian Pacific line south. Mount Elgin is just to the east of the line. latitude 43° 56’, longitude 80 ° 44’

#89 Seth Allen on 07.29.22 at 11:35 pm

I grew up in Mt Elgin and lived just across the street from that house. Always heard lots of stories from a friend of mine that lived there about the old historical stuff they would find in the house what they would do renovation projects. It will be a sad day if that place ever gets torn down.

#90 The Woosh on 07.29.22 at 11:38 pm

#86 Nora Lenderby on 07.29.22 at 11:06 pm
Yes; a pal had bought a new upscale house in Ottawa, and a pileated woodpecker took a liking to it. It carved a large hole in the stucco and underlying foam. Quite a mess.

On your preservation job, I wish you well. We had a similar little local difficulty with the old local collegiate/high school. The school had been moved to the next village and the high school (3 stories, classic 1926 brick built, basically sound) was in danger of demolition. There are hardly any old public buildings apart from 1890s churches in this area.

Fortunately the local council saved it, rebuilt it as a municipal office, library, clinic and community centre. It cost a fortune (for round here) but it was so worth it.

You won’t know what you’ve lost ’til it’s gone.

——————————————

Let’s do some editing…

The local council saved it, and the local taxpayers footed the bill whether they liked it or not. It cost a fortune (for round here) and many from the local council were turfed at the next election for exceeding their mandate and not being good fiduciary agents.

You won’t know what you’ve lost ’til it’s gone. So true!

#91 Joel on 07.30.22 at 12:01 am

I wish we in Canada designated more buildings and old homes with heritage status, or worked with the existing structures to renovate, restore and keep them standing.
Good luck saving this old home, I really hope it can be saved and preserved.

#92 Mid on 07.30.22 at 12:02 am

#21 Shelley/ Garth
I don’t do Facebook so couldn’t sign. But if they use change.org, then anyone can sign—would reach more people.

#93 DJ on 07.30.22 at 12:09 am

There is an old red brick house in Mt. Elgin on hwy 19 south that has also been sold to a developer. There are very few very old homes left in the village. They should, perhaps be preserved. This is a community rich in heritage. Most wouldn’t know it. Too many want their new, ‘status’ house.

#94 Get Lost Garth on 07.30.22 at 1:35 am

No one cares about your ancestors or that old house. You are just an egotistical bitter old man who thinks the world revolves around you. Quite frankly your negative position on the heroic Freedom Fighters and our dictatorial Federal Government is equally disgusting. This country is going down the crapper because of people like you.

#95 systems on 07.30.22 at 1:42 am

“I’ve saved a number of old piles of bricks and stones over the years, and all of those structures are still standing and alive. “- hey that’s nice that you have a fun hobby of preserving old buildings, but the rest of us do not have the luxury of coming from old stock families so we make do with OSB and pink insulation.
Also, old brick and stone buildings may still be standing but doesn’t mean they’re up to spec on hvac, plumbing, electrical, seismic loads, fire protection.. i guess Notre Dame has been forgotten

#96 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.30.22 at 1:47 am

@#70 Fat Fred
” but I prefer my new, energy efficient, vynyl clad house thanks.”
+++
I don’t believe “energy efficiency” was the issue.
It was “staying power”.
Your vinyl ( not vynyl) straw house has the lasting power of a Canadian Liberal MP in a Russian attack in Ukraine.
Poop in the basement then crocodile tears for the media.
Anywho.
Building codes be damned.
My great great grandfather built a house out of wood in eastern Canada that still stands today.
“Energy efficient? Fuggeddaboutit. 150 years ago he needed shelter.
Built to last ?
Absolutely.
Its survived 150 years of Canadian winters, hurricanes, fires…..you name it.
Still standing…. long after the vinyl, anonymous, boring cookie cutter crap that every suburban neighbourhood has succumbed to ……falls to dust….

What Garth is doing is a legacy to our Canadian history.
Sadly, a history that is increasingly mocked, ridiculed and forgotten.

#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.30.22 at 2:03 am

@#86 Nora
“Yes; a pal had bought a new upscale house in Ottawa, and a pileated woodpecker took a liking to it. It carved a large hole in the stucco and underlying foam. Quite a mess.”
+++++
It takes a few days for a Pileated woodpecker to really get going.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj2QlOgFm9M

Had the same problem in our neighbourhood many years ago.
I watched the industrious little bastard jackhammer trees, telephone poles, and deck posts into unsafe vertical death traps.
Sometimes they are looking for food.
Other times it is just about the noise to attract a mate.

Then he focused his attention on our abode…..
Damn.
How does one get rid of a beautiful, protected species that is hell bent on pecking its way through inches of wood per day without resorting to the tried and true….Canadian Tire “Pellet Gun resolution”????
Well.
I noticed that the evil Pileated Satan ALWAYS pecked at the same spot.
My non lethal solution?
Jalapeno peppers.
The impressive male Pileated Woodpecker would come to the same spot and hammer away.
Smeared fresh cut jalapeno peppers on that spot……
Voila!
He moved to a different deck post.
More jalapeno.
No more wood pecker.

#98 Faron on 07.30.22 at 2:49 am

An excellent podcast on why housing is expensive in North America and what can be done about it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/19/opinion/ezra-klein-podcast-jenny-schuetz.html

IHCTD9’s bloviating is, uh, off the mark.

#99 Bad Gas on 07.30.22 at 6:03 am

We’re seeing the idiotic climate mania beggar nations like Canada. Germany is deglobalizing rapidly. They outsourced everything they need. Not only that but the tire out the roots of infrastructure so that energy and food can’t be replaced without great cost. This should be a teaching moment Trudeau refuses to learn. Our energy destruction is horrific given that the German model is unfolding in our faces.

Trudeau cutting farmers production based on nothing except globalization unsound untested hypothetical models developed by climate crazies. We’re looking at chaos this winter in Germany and Europe generally while WEF thralls blindly goose step towards oblivion. The future is nihilism, the suicide society that Comes next.

So why can’t we step in and save EU citizens from freezing and starving? Because we allowed our feckless leadership to deny the energy to people whose existence depends on it.

#100 under the radar on 07.30.22 at 6:21 am

Why would the developer refuse money for something that gets bulldozed. ? Does the developer have plans for it? Good luck Garth.

#101 Shawn on 07.30.22 at 7:00 am

Talk is Cheap

To most of the people commenting for or against saving the building:

Talk is cheap, buying and saving old buildings is not.

Only Garth and none of the others appear to be willing to “put their money where their mouth is” as we used to say.

The internet is great for everyone to mouth off but sacrifice nothing on every issue imaginable.

Those of you who do support causes with money and most especially volunteers are to be congratulated. Those who ONLY “mouth” off on the internet are not.

#102 Bitcoin Bro on 07.30.22 at 9:03 am

Great story. Here’s hoping the right thing happens and Elgin Hall is protected and preserved!

#103 Dharma Bum on 07.30.22 at 9:53 am

#75 Heath

Twenty years ago my wife and I purchased what we thought was a decent quality, set of kitchen cupboards only to realize our folly a few short years later hinges coming loose, swelling around doors and drawers due to moisture from humidity.
——————————————————————————————————–

100 years ago, twenty years ago, yesterday, or today.

You get what you pay for.

The problem is that quality is expensive.

Technology has provided the means to manufacture substitute products for less up front cost, allowing to masses to acquire goods that would otherwise be completely unaffordable to them if they were manufactured the “old fashioned” way.

The kitchen fell apart because it was cheaply made to begin with. If you spent more, and specified the products you wanted (panel type, materials, hardware, etc.), it could have easily lasted another twenty plus years.

Particle board is cheaper than plywood which is cheaper than solid lumber.

Drywall is cheaper than plaster and lath.

OSB is cheaper than plywood and solid wood.

PEX is cheaper than copper.

Brick veneer is cheaper than stone blocks.

Asphalt shingles are cheaper than a metal roof.

Sure, if one could afford to, they could build their abode using 100% premium materials, and have a place that will last 2000 years.

Meh.

Personally, I just used 2×6’s instead of 2×4’s.

ZIP system wall sheathing all around covered with stone.

Should outlast me.

#104 ww1 on 07.30.22 at 9:54 am

Link to the actual petition. No Facebook involved.
https://chng.it/22jfYWHXhb

#105 Cici on 07.30.22 at 9:55 am

Throwing the “racist” accusation around is very easy, but very disingenuous when the guy was only lamenting unwelcome changes to the visible landscape of the country he grew up in. Doesn’t mean he is against those people, just to the changes that some of them are or have been making to the architectural heritage. Sorry but not sorry, disliking certain types of architecture does NOT make one a racist.

Also, I think the whole entire world benefits from having unique and distinct cultures that make them special and reflect their unique history. That doesn’t mean that nothing at all can change, but that certain pillars and centres are protected to preserve the identity and uniqueness of the original communities and founders. Instead of “out with the past, in with the new” how about “respect and protect the past, and also bring in some new.”

For instance, if Canadians all of a sudden became so rich that they could buy up the entire European continent and knock down all those centuries old structures to replace them with particle board mansions, stucco albatrosses, hugely ugly and mostly disposable condo towers and crappy townhouses, what do you think would happen? The answer is the tourist industry there would all but die and definitely suck, and almost everyone in the world would have to drink beer instead of wine because the Canadian newcomers would probably pave over all the vineyards too.

If the entire world looked the same, everyone spoke the same language and had the exact same mindset, there’d be nothing to learn, share or discover. There would be no reason to travel, explore or indulge. The result would be a homogeneous nightmare.

#106 Kevin on 07.30.22 at 10:00 am

Good luck on the old homestead, I live in lunenburg and old things are near and dear.
I have been thinking about all the real estate talk and im not so much of a believer in the “dont invest idea”. Im not so sure that FOMO is dead and if the recession is mild then the real estate market could explode into the “we missed the first boom we better get in on the next one” type of thinking. Canadians are very one sided when it comes to real estate.
Another part of this is the population explosion around the world, and everybody wants to get out of wherever they already are. The Canadian Maritimes still have a big target on them for people looking for a simpler life. Ocean front or view, is always at a premium and is even going to get higher. It actually could be a buying opportunity to buy ocean front, with idea to build that, once in a lifetime getaway for your present family and future generations. The price of ocean front is never going down with the world population rising like it is nowadays. There is so much money out there that spending a million bucks to some is like buying a Tims to most of us. So are we in the ” Get in while you still have a chance” times.

#107 Living in a Post-Science World on 07.30.22 at 10:07 am

It’s interesting how our elites eagerly accept flawed data as long as it supports the preferred narrative:

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/07/29/live-corrupted-climate-stations/

If it supports the elite-narrative, it’s climate science.

If it doesn’t it’s cancelled, villified, shunned and ridiculed.

I wonder how long the elites denial can last? The Mayan elite managed to hang on for a couple of hundred years. The internet will probably expedite the process.

#108 jess on 07.30.22 at 10:15 am

0 Fact Checker Fred on 07.29.22 at 8:20 pm

how about recycled plastic fused by steam and compression apparently stronger than concrete blocks
https://www.byfusion.com/byblock/

#109 Stone on 07.30.22 at 10:25 am

#85 Dragonfly58 on 07.29.22 at 10:50 pm
I have worked alongside immigrants from several different Countries, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oz. And had no problem getting along with 90% or better of them. Post retirement, some remain friends to this day.
I only judge them by their actions, not by their skin or accent. I dislike people from any country who destroy Canadian history, architecture , heritage buildings regardless of where they are from.
In the 1980’s / early 1990’s , on the West Side of Vancouver it is a simple fact the overwhelming majority were from HK.
They all wanted to live in the best parts of town, and quickly proceded to destroy much of what made it special.
Actions, not surface appearance.

———

I understand you want to whitewash your prior racist comment. Please don’t take the rest of us for idiots. We know what you are.

I also judge people by their actions. This was your action.

“The new owners usually had bags of money and not one shred of interest in the previous culture. Brought that little slice of Hong Kong with them along with their luggage. Saw it happen 100 or more times. Now I feel uneasy just visiting my old neighborhood.”

Please define “slice of Hong Kong”. Why are you uneasy visiting your old neighbourhood? Is it now crime ridden and dirty?

What’s different between somebody who buys a property and wants to personalize it with a new coat of paint, rearranging the garden or, simply tearing down the old crapbox to install a new crapbox?

Not racist are you?

Not envious either? Coveting what others have?

You make me feel “uneasy”. Your “little slice” of Canada is not welcome.

#110 Observer on 07.30.22 at 10:31 am

#94 Get Lost Garth on 07.30.22 at 1:35 am
No one cares about your ancestors or that old house. You are just an egotistical bitter old man who thinks the world revolves around you. Quite frankly your negative position on the heroic Freedom Fighters and our dictatorial Federal Government is equally disgusting. This country is going down the crapper because of people like you.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Actually, the so-called “Freedom fighters” fighting their imaginations in one of the most free countries in the world are the source of a lot of “crapper” and a threat to our democracy. Get a life.

#111 Dharma Bum on 07.30.22 at 10:32 am

#97 Crowdedflatulencearoma

Gotta love the Jalapeno!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvnXI-86b6Q

#112 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.30.22 at 11:17 am

@#111 Dharma
Ahh the Trailer park Boys.
Classic.
They filmed their first season in the Trailer park just up the road from where I used to live.
The owners of the Trailer Park had no idea what the show was about ( nor did anyone else for that matter).
Once the show was aired the the owners were horrified by the language and the subject matter and refused to let them film there again.
They moved to another park and the rest was history.
Several friends became unnamed extras in a few of the show.
They said the actors were all great bunch of guys.

#113 Quintilian on 07.30.22 at 11:24 am

#106 Kevin on 07.30.22 at 10:00 am
“There is so much money out there that spending a million bucks to some is like buying a Tims to most of us. So are we in the ” Get in while you still have a chance” times.”

Sure Kevin, is that why Canadians are on the hook for 2 trillion dollars in DEBT for real estate?

The bubble has been pumped up fools taking on debt, not wealthy people to whom a million bucks is spare change.
Tick Tock, Tick Tock

#114 Dragonfly58 on 07.30.22 at 11:27 am

One more little thing Stone. You seem to think it is only Old Stock Canadians that can be racist. Like I previously mentioned I have worked along side a good number of immigrants. ( over 50% of the workforce at my employer }. And for over 30 years at my last employer.
Once you spend months and years with them you realize quite a few of them have brought the attitudes along from the old country. At times racist, and often sexist. But most of all very class prejudiced.
The way they treat people from the same home country that happen to come from a lower strata of the home pecking order is at times quite shocking.
Several times I had to have private conversations with immigrant individuals that here in Canada that sort of disrespect of your percieved social inferiors just didn’t fly in Canada.
Also sexism and homophobia { often the Middle Eastern and Eastern European immigrants } that made you think more of a Southern U.S. trailer park than well educated , professional immigrants. But there it was , in plain view.
I am a pretty liberal Canadian, { socially, not the party } so posibly a bit more sensitive to this sort of thing than some old stock Canadians. But some of the things I saw over the decades was quite an eye opener regarding how much baggage some of these immigrants bring with them.

#115 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.30.22 at 11:30 am

@#94 Get Lost
“Freedom fighters”?
Spare me.
The biggest trip they ever took was the trip to Ottawa.
A bunch of self righteous sheep following loud mouthed braying idiots.
I can’t stand Trudeau but I loathe these internet informed intelligensia even more.
The nearest they even got to a book was at the local tattoo parlour reviewing pictures of the “art” they would have permanently stamped into their skin.
Judging from the interviews.
Perhaps their money would be better invested in a visit to a dentist.

#116 Senator Bluto on 07.30.22 at 12:31 pm

#115 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.30.22 at 11:30 am
@#94 Get Lost
“Freedom fighters”?
Spare me.
The biggest trip they ever took was the trip to Ottawa.
A bunch of self righteous sheep following loud mouthed braying idiots.
I can’t stand Trudeau but I loathe these internet informed intelligensia even more.
The nearest they even got to a book was at the local tattoo parlour reviewing pictures of the “art” they would have permanently stamped into their skin.
Judging from the interviews.
Perhaps their money would be better invested in a visit to a dentist.
++++++++++++++++++++++

A messenger attack means that the message is solid, as the message itself was not attacked. Key failure in communication.

The problem was that the protestors were wildly more successful than they expected and didn’t know how to handle the attention they received.

I certainly don’t agree with how it devolved into a goat show, but Trudeau could have taken any one of 250 off ramps and (literal off-ramps on the highway to Ottawa) and shut things down.

Despite 250 opportunities to slow things down and get control, Trudeau failed. He failed as hard as could be. He made the mess. He face-planted. It was his yard-sale.

Blaming protests that got out of hand on the protestors misses a key point: Trudeau had ample opportunity to de-escalate but he chose to further enflame the situation by insulting the protestors.

And then when he realized how hard he failed, he still blamed the protestors and invoked the War Measures Act. Another massive fail.

It is really difficult to understate the damage done by the out of touch PM.

But if you didn’t like the truckers, wait until the farmers start rolling into Ottawa with their tractors to protest Trudeau’s War on Nitrogen fertilizers.

#117 Tony on 07.30.22 at 6:39 pm

Re: #5 Jim on 07.29.22 at 3:16 pm

The opposite will happen with contagion spreading from China to Ontario and British Columbia Canada, New Zealand, Australia and the west coast of America. This is the more likely scenario as foreign holdings will be liquidated to cover losses in China.