Bled out

She looked fine, I thought. “Nope, need a cut,” she said. And Dorothy went to book a hair appointment at the place in DT Toronto where she’s gone for years. It’s busy. Popular. The wait is usually a couple of weeks.

But not now. “I saw his schedule,” she told me. “It was empty. Like completely blank. I’m worried for them.”

It’s not just that hair salons (like other personal service businesses) are at 50% capacity (or closed) in Covid-riddled Ontario. The real issue is more profound. No clients. If you need a glimpse into the reality on the ground at the heart of Canada’s biggest city, look at this picture. I snapped it in the foyer of my 68-story bank tower building at 9 am this morning, on my way upstairs. One dude. And me.

The outfit that runs all the commuter trains into Toronto’s Union Station and which snake throughout the GTA and beyond – serving over eight million people – is in crisis. This week Metrolinx slashed service, dropping it to 47% below levels of October. In fact, ridership is currently down 90% from pre-pandemic days and after a brief rally last summer has collapsed. That happened as the province freaked out over Omicron. “Simply put, there are far fewer customers using GO Transit buses and trains right now as many return to working from home, post-secondary students study online and events are cancelled or attendance is limited,” the agency said.

Ditto with the TTC, the vast network of Toronto subway lines, streetcars, light rail routes and buses. Ridership plunged just before Christmas to the worst-ever levels. Revenue has dried up. The city budget is a disaster. Despite a big property tax hike in 2022, it will take years for this to repair.

Small businesses are, together, the largest employer group in Canada. Nowhere is their agony better viewed than by taking a walk through the PATH, which runs through the bottom of my building. This is a vast web of commercial space – almost four million square feet of it – where 4,600 people worked in 1,200 businesses in the BeforeTimes, generating $1.7 billion in annual sales.

Seventy-five buildings, six subway stations, three major department stores, nine hotels – all connected along 30 kilometers. In 2019 more than 200,000 people a day used this space. At 5 pm it was a struggle to walk against the current of bodies streaming south to the transit hub. But now, empty. Most business are not just closed. They’re gone.

At the heart of the economic carnage is WFH. Just when plans were in full swing to bring people back to the urban core, major employers were told by the government to stand down. In December, Omicron washed over Ontario, Quebec, NS, BC and everywhere else. Health authorities went code red. Politicians followed. The city’s blood supply bled out.

Source: BMO Economics, Canadian Federation of Independent Business

It’s not just Toronto, of course. Look at New York. There 75% of employers put RTW plans on hold. In Ottawa the powerful civil service unions now want remote work – or some version of it – to be permanent. Viruses are here to stay, they say. Nobody should be forced by their employer – even the government of Canada – to sit at a desk outside their home. “Our position is clear and consistent with your prior position: if public service employees have the option to telework, they should telework whenever possible. This will ensure that employees can stay safe and abide by public health directives.”

The feds have responded by saying civil servants can make their own decisions, playing into union plans that employees permanently have the option to work remotely as the government shifts to a hybrid workforce in a new normal. So much for the Sparks Street mall and the Byward Market.

In fact, Omicron and government extremism have not just destroyed mass transit viability, gutted public finances, shuttered small businesses, threatened commercial real estate, hobbled cities and widened income disparity. These things have  also murdered the work ethic. It’s a whole lot easier to commute to your second bedroom than it is to head downtown. It’s cheaper to travel in your slippies than it is to ride the train or gas the car. Human nature being what it is, we opt for convenience over structure, evading supervision, taking the easy path – even when the long-term economic consequences are catastrophic and colleague interaction is kaput. Even when we suspect this may be a career-killer.

But wait. Was it worth it? Did we stop the virus by draining the economy and erasing employee ambition?

Nah, hardly. Governments actually gave up even counting the infected weeks ago. Despite events being closed, restaurants dark and offices closed, the bug raged on. Now the schools have reopened, a tacit admission Omicron will do whatever it wants, but state child care cannot be withheld any longer. Expect more provinces to backtrack this month as reality sets in. The defenses against Covid are to get vaccinated, mask up and use your head. The staying-home-from work part is senseless, when we still mass up in the grocery queue or at the liquor store.

In a few weeks it will be two years since the plague arrived. Did it win?

About the picture: “Many thanks for your blog,” writes Nitin. “Your insight is very interesting and informative. I am sending you a picture of my miniature pinscher, whose name is Karma. She is a great dog and provided endless entertainment. Hope you can use this for one of your posts.”

196 comments ↓

#1 Doug t on 01.19.22 at 3:53 pm

Covid didn’t win – society gave up.

#2 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 3:54 pm

“Most business are not just closed. They’re gone.”

+++

Jobs cremated on the covid fire.
Inflation rising.
Interest rates rising.
And govt employees lording their union job status over their own bosses.

Lets see what kind of cuts start happening when the true fiscal reckoning hits ALL levels of govt in the goolies.
Consumer confidence gutted.

#3 TurnerNation on 01.19.22 at 4:00 pm

Food Supply. We are so close to normalcy guys! Comrades, The supply lines have been cut in this global WW3. It will be a cold winter of bread lines, line ups in the frigid cold outside . Now you know why I call it Kommunist Kanada. Just another day in a Former First World Country.

.Grocery stores are struggling with rising labour and product shortages that could threaten Canada’s food security, experts say. (cp24.com)

.Save On Foods said “as part of our ongoing and increased efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19 in our stores and our communities, we will operate our stores at a maximum 50 per cent occupancy until further notice.” (globalnews.ca)

—- The Internet Consp. Theorists warned us over the big bundle of cash spent on the “voluntary” Isolation Sites built. Manufacturing of consent:

.NATIONAL POST: More than one in four Canadians support jail time for the unvaccinated, poll finds (nationalpost.com)


—- Control over Travel. ALWAYS – in the New System. 5G. Did another Internet Consp. Theory come true?

.”Globe says Air Canada, WestJet ponder 5G safety in U.S.”…two of the biggest cellphone carriers in the United States — Verizon and AT&T — said Tuesday they would temporarily delay switching on some 5G towers near airports, as international airlines began to cancel flights to U.S. destinations. ..Testing by the aviation industry has shown the possibility for interference between C-band signals and instruments that show an aircraft’s distance above the Earth,” (stockwatch.com)

https://insiderpaper.com/major-international-airlines-cancel-us-flights-due-to-5g-rollout/

#4 Doug t on 01.19.22 at 4:00 pm

And I’ve said this before – the impact of the way Media has presented the narrative during the pandemic has had a massive detrimental effect on people – the ways in which we interact and communicate with one another has been dramatically changed for the worse –

#5 dragonfly58 on 01.19.22 at 4:02 pm

Here in the suburban Fraser Valley I don’t see too much of a change from pre pandemic times. Downtown Vancouver may be a different story , but for a couple of decades now I only rarely go there.
Also wife and I take in very few night life events anymore. Older and boring these days I am afraid. So even if there were substantial changes in public social behaviour we might not be aware.

#6 Prince Polo on 01.19.22 at 4:02 pm

70% of us are wealthy land barons, while 30% are social pariahs (aka loser renters). I am confident all the home owners will gladly pay the extra property taxes that are required to fund all the expenditures. Pinch me!

#7 Linda on 01.19.22 at 4:05 pm

Very valid comments. Here in Alberta, Calgary now has a DT office vacancy rate of +33%. I don’t think it has ever been that bad, not even when the NEP led to the epic bust way back when P.E.T was the PM. Public transit was cut back when the virus first surfaced & subsequent waves plus long term WFH has continued to have an impact on service availability. During the recent cold snap 3 LRT stations were shut to public access because they had been occupied by homeless hordes looking for a place to stay warm. Let’s just say that kind of outcome made taking public transit even more of a challenge for regular users. Yes, Calgary does have homeless shelters but I guess the financial impact of Covid has created more demand than there is supply.

#8 Josh in Calgary on 01.19.22 at 4:06 pm

I agree with Garth. Some of the current measures make no sense. They maybe did at one point in this whole mess, but it shows a lack of ability to adjust to the new normal. Some things still make sense like vaccines (highly encouraged but not mandated) and staying at home if you feel sick. But having people stay home from work, when kids can go to school? Testing people who are completely healthy when they arrive home from travel, when sick people at home can’t get tested? It all amounts to closing the door when the horse is already out of the barn.

#9 ogdoad on 01.19.22 at 4:07 pm

What’s harder still is breaking a habit. I’ve heard its mighty cozy working in your skivvies, eating lunch at home, gardening during lunch hours, sharing work space with fostered kittens (instead of smelly, covid ridden, miserable (or annoyingly happy) co-workers who talk incessantly about all the crap they bought then regret their life choices once the high fades.

No wonder people are deciding to reset their career ambitions. I’ve been to T.O. during rush hour, work time, time of work…whatever. One word – Misery. Its written on everyone’s face. Disappears after the first pint, but still.

Did the C-machine win? Did fb, NF, amazon, google, insta, tiktok, algorithms become more powerful? Are people now more inclined to adapt (or be corralled)?

Nah, we’re good.

Og

#10 Daveyboy on 01.19.22 at 4:08 pm

My wife wants to return to work ,and I am tired of making her breakfast lunch and dinner. Everyday just seems to blend into the next with work from home. Her campus has 5 pubs and a variety of restaurants and cafes that she can eat from and support . Drake even shot a music video there! It’s time to go back to work and see people again.

#11 OriginalAlex on 01.19.22 at 4:09 pm

Sure, and it sucks for the small businesses, but I mean… We will have less commuters now. Paradigm shift. The typesetter didn’t like the numeric press either. Progress is not always positive for all.

#12 Adam on 01.19.22 at 4:14 pm

#1 Doug t on 01.19.22 at 3:53 pm
Covid didn’t win – society gave up.

***

Losing to a respiratory virus was always inevitable it was only hubris and ignorance that made us think we could do anything to stop it. The only reason we kept it up so long was that public health and our governments don’t understand the sunk cost fallacy.

Oh well two prime years of my life down the drain.

#13 alexinvestor on 01.19.22 at 4:17 pm

WFH has really exposed the inefficiency of working from an office. Spending a couple of hours in commute every day just to show up to see someone is starting to seem antiquated.

However, lots of jobs still available … I hear that truck drivers are really raking it these days. Six figures, easily. No need for a fancy college/uni degree.

#14 Cheese on 01.19.22 at 4:19 pm

Meanwhile, I have not missed a single day at the Ottawa General during the entire pandemic. Can I have more money for working in two outbreak wards and in stem cell?

I hate this world, its not worth living in anymore.

#15 Mattl on 01.19.22 at 4:19 pm

WFH may be contributing to economic issues but isn’t at the heart of issue. Those people that used to get their hair cut downtown are now doing it in Mississauga or Barrie. Overall consumer spending was up in 2021 and same store sales that I track were up 19% in December. Just a different group of merchants getting wallet share.

And the biggest issue is this economy was crap going into Covid and was being propped up by cheap rates and stimulus. Consumer spending adjusted for inflation will uncertain, labour costs going up significantly, and free money is about to dry up. Two major banks missed earnings this week, have to believe a sign of more to come. Maybe calls for the roaring 20s were a bit premature?

That said let’s get back to work FFS. Had all my January travel canceled and not sure I will travel until Q2. Time to get back to normal, this strain is just a flu, all the data is there, time to move on.

#16 Accountant on 01.19.22 at 4:19 pm

If we change the the question posed in this post slighty, by asking “did the bug create the mess it was made to do? ” I would say YES.

– We have divided society, vaxed and unvaxed, with rights (expiring if booster not taken) and soon-to-be-without rights
– We have WFH workers who separated from others rely on technology to sustain their lifestyle, idividualistic culture in the making
– We have kids that do not know how to socialize with peers , but know how top turn on gov lessons on laptop
– We have police, government, TTC travel financial industry workers that were taught to follow government mandate, or else get fired
-We have society almost ready and prepared for Universal Basic Income, just follow the guide and click the right button on the screen.

And see the magic happens on your bank account.

I believe the virus enconomy is here to stay for couple more years. There is a reason behind vaccination factories being built in Canada. There is a reason behind 4 more Amazon centre’s being built around GTA.
There is going to be a demand for it. Count on it.

#17 Rook on 01.19.22 at 4:20 pm

With regards to the PATH, one must ask this necessary question:

Did the buildings or storefronts themselves get destroyed? Are they uninhabitable? Or are they merely vacant?

When (if?) we ever open up, I can’t see these places being vacant for long. I’m sure there’s plenty of opportunity for pot shops along the path, for example. When (if?) people return to the Yonge/University/College/Front corridor at some point in the hazy future, coffee shops, tailors, cobblers, soap sellers, bubble tea places, electronic knick-knack stores, and boutique establishments will all be needed, thus return at some point.

It’s just a matter of time, no? I certainly feel bad for the businesses that were forced out of business by policy decisions, but those are the risks you take when you start one (I believe it’s called political or policy risk). And it’s a true shame some had to close. But the structures are still there. So, in three, or five, years’ time, the PATH will be full and busy again, with a whole new crop of new businesses. Or fronts, because, surely, money won’t launder itself.

#18 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 4:22 pm

Truth. Post Omicron peak a female dog.

Last 3 days, new cases in thousands:

UK 70, 94, 108
Italia (not to be outdone) 83, 212, 192

Ireland, Iceland up down as well. Spain just beginning its peak, same story.

Being called the:

O-descent wobble.

https://twitter.com/EricTopol/status/1483852917446610944

So EXPECT IT. Do NOT LOSE HEART Canada when it happens.

It will be over soon enough. Fingers crossed here in Europa.

————————

StatCan inflation out today.

Dec 2021 vs 2020 +4.8%
All of 2021 +3.4%, highest since 1991.

Dec stats
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/220119/dq220119a-eng.htm?HPA=1

2021 review (West vs East)
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-627-m/11-627-m2022004-eng.htm

Gasoline increases outrageous. I don’t drive, no need to Italia with transit options.

If you have to drive in Canada, I would be livid.

#19 Shawn on 01.19.22 at 4:22 pm

Work From Home

Very sad about the impact on certain jobs and businesses.

But if WFH is in fact more efficient (big if) it is here to stay in good measure.

The impact on jobs will not matter anymore than every other efficiency improvement in history.

Who knew this would be the solution to lower fossil fuel use (eliminate commute)?

I added a sunroom office to my house about five years ago. We will see bigger houses and more home offices including additions.

Things will work out as they always do. Humans will still congregate but maybe not so much at work.

#20 Parksville Prankster on 01.19.22 at 4:23 pm

At its root, the virus isn’t about unavoidable transmission, it’s about the very thin cushion that Canada’s health care system has to deal with an uptick in admissions. The bug has exposed the inadequacies in long term care and hospital capabilities, and left elected Canadian officials scrambling to paper over the whole mess. As someone the other day wisely pointed out; In the US, patients are seen as ‘customers’, in Canada, they’re seen as a ‘burden’.

All the media and government had to do was strike the match, people were ripe to buy into a crisis, and the stampede of hoarding toilet paper and WFH had begun.

A person is smart, but people in a group are dumb.

#21 Young Guns WC on 01.19.22 at 4:25 pm

How does sitting in traffic for up to 2 hours a day help economic activity? Also most people I know who work from home end up working longer hours. Your day doesn’t end at 5pm. Co-workers and managers keep having brain farts until mid night. WFH people use their own Internet and office supplies. Large buildings where people work all day in cubicles or travel to attend useless meetings should be gone. I would like to see how much the big banks saved the last two years with most of their workforce working at home. Big numbers I bet.

#22 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 4:25 pm

@#12 Adam
“Oh well two prime years of my life down the drain.”

+++

I knew the virus was going to be a bummer for socializing.
So I worked.
The two most profitable years I’ve ever had.
Crazy busy.

#23 Billy Buoy on 01.19.22 at 4:35 pm

Tomorrow will be the tale of the tape.

After a few down days will the dip buyers (cough) FED be back to shore up the tiny drop?

Me thinks they scare their pals a bit longer. At least til they can all move their money.

#24 Moh on 01.19.22 at 4:36 pm

People here crying and complaining that they lost two of their useless lives. Now you know how it feels when you are from a country that is at war and everyday is a new struggle. Maybe now you can think of the people living in bad situations like Afghanistan or Somalia! Canadian’s need to smarten up and stop the complaining. Everyone is fat here and lives much better than most countries in the world yet we have the biggest whiners!

#25 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 4:37 pm

The Djokovic Soap Opera.

OK. So this AM CET I read that Lacoste is considering pulling sponsorship:

Djokovic lâché par son principal sponsor ?
https://sports.orange.fr/tennis/atp/article/djokovic-lache-par-son-principal-sponsor-exclu-CNT000001IJ4AU.html

More in depth Italian article:
https://www.fanpage.it/sport/tennis/il-silenzio-imbarazzato-degli-sponsor-di-djokovic-rischia-una-voragine-da-26-milioni-di-euro/

USD 30M/year. Lacoste 9M of that.

Later today CET, MIRACLE OF MIRACLES it is revealed that Mr. Novax Djokovic has been ON THE SLY funding a Covid-19 cure company:

https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sports/djokovic-buys-80-danish-biotech-developing-covid-19-treatment-ceo-2022-01-19/?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=twitter

Twitter says he invested today or very recently.

QuantBioRes boss, entrepreneur “Ivan Loncarevic” says Djokovic invested in 2020 BUT would not disclose the amount.

———————–

Either Djokovic speaks from both sides of his mouth or is a detestable, repellent person worried he will lose his income and will do, say anything to prevent that.

#26 BC Doc on 01.19.22 at 4:39 pm

WFH gave pharmaceutical companies time to develop, test, and mass produce two highly effective mRNA vaccines with which a three dose series keeps old people out of the morgue and middle aged folks off ventilators and out of the ICU and CV wards. My wife and I haven’t had the luxury of WFH– we’ve both been working in the trenches through the pandemic. With the seemingly lethal omicron variant now ripping through most of North America, I am optimistic we will be through this soon, most of us a bit battered but still standing. First a few more weeks of pain while we hope our chronically underfunded and understaffed hospitals teeter. Courage.

#27 Squire on 01.19.22 at 4:39 pm

Let it rip. Nothing is stopping Omicron and even vaccines are barely slowing it down. In fact, the latest research shows the boosters are likely of little use. See for yourself what Israel says.
We have to accept the situation, change our approach and proceed with caution. Life has to move forward and there are risks either way.

Onward and upward comrades

#28 Dave on 01.19.22 at 4:42 pm

Virus gonna virus.

The best thing anyone can do is ensure they’re metabolically healthy and switch off the ‘news’.

#29 pete from st. cesaire on 01.19.22 at 4:43 pm

From the UK newspaper The SUN: BORIS Johnson today announced Plan B WILL be completely scrapped from next Wednesday.

Hated vaccine passports will be dumped along with the guidance to work from home and requirement to wear face masks indoors.

The PM said: “The Cabinet concluded that because of the extraordinary booster campaign, together with the way the public have responded to the Plan B measures, we can return to Plan A in England, and allow Plan B regulations to expire.”

As The Sun revealed earlier today, masks in classrooms will be dropped tomorrow and scrapped entirely in schools on January 26.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mexico dropped all health requirements for travelers.
The Czech republic dropped the charade today too.

It’s about time to follow suit here as well.

How long can Legault hold on when 500,000 Quebecers return after a winter of living in peace in Florida to a Quebec full of restrictions.

It’s time for the lawsuits to commence.

#30 Barb on 01.19.22 at 4:43 pm

Did Dorothy’s favourite little bookstore in Lunenburg open again?

#31 rosie on 01.19.22 at 4:44 pm

Hindsight is 20/20 here. The Governments were damned if they did or damned if they didn’t respond as was expected. This was a kind of war. Did we win. Too soon to say, it’s not really over yet. If you’re still alive and healthy then I guess you did win. When the all clear finally sounds then a return to normal will happen quickly. New opportunities will create new businesses and new ways of doing things. These new ventures may not happen in the big centres. They all cost too much, are expensive to get to and, by the sounds of it, will not be missed by many anyway.

#32 Ballingsford on 01.19.22 at 4:48 pm

Less commuters is probably a great help to fight climate change.

#33 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 4:50 pm

@#21 Young Guns
“I would like to see how much the big banks saved the last two years with most of their workforce working at home. Big numbers I bet.”

++++

Nah,
The kids got half the work done while texting, gaming and talking to other friends.
It all evens out.

Unless they fell down the stairs and sued the company for a WCB claim.

https://yro.slashdot.org/story/21/12/09/211237/fall-on-walk-from-bed-to-desk-is-workplace-accident-german-court-rules

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/air-canada-employee-who-fell-on-stairs-while-headed-to-kitchen-from-her-home-office-eligible-for-compensation-judge

It’s tough working from home.
I never know what color of pj’s to wear…

#34 Ronaldo on 01.19.22 at 4:52 pm

#22 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 4:25 pm
@#12 Adam
“Oh well two prime years of my life down the drain.”

+++

I knew the virus was going to be a bummer for socializing.
So I worked.
The two most profitable years I’ve ever had.
Crazy busy.
————————————————————
But you must have had a lot of ‘ups and downs’.

#35 Franco on 01.19.22 at 4:54 pm

We need a better way to deal with the sick COVID patients without losing the health care system. Someone has to make some tough decisions, I for one do not believe that this is over and we have no idea what the next variant will be like.

#36 DR on 01.19.22 at 4:55 pm

RECESSION coming to your town soon.

#37 Ben on 01.19.22 at 4:58 pm

Finally some common sense.

Impossible to stop a highly contagious respiratory virus.

The “fringe” scientist and doctors of the Great Barrington Declaration were right.

I would have thought Lockdown would have worked better.

It didn’t. We were wrong. Unfortunately.

Lets admit it, learn from our mistakes and move forward.

#38 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:03 pm

#10 Daveyboy on 01.19.22 at 4:08 pm
My wife wants to return to work ,and I am tired of making her breakfast lunch and dinner. Everyday just seems to blend into the next with work from home. Her campus has 5 pubs and a variety of restaurants and cafes that she can eat from and support . Drake even shot a music video there! It’s time to go back to work and see people again.
—————-
I’ve got the same feeling.
What does not help is, that we’d have one of the worst winters on memory.
Double up on Vitamin D.
And scroll by CEFs depressing posts.
My daughter just came out of quarantine.
Back playing hockey.
As they say: “The darkest hour is always just before the dawn.”

#39 Sheesh on 01.19.22 at 5:04 pm

#25 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 4:37 pm

Re: novax jokovid

https://www.quantbiores.com/

100% pure grift. “Quantum” medicine. Nonsense about healing with energy and vibration, but dressed up to sound sciency and plausible. They’ll sell their overpriced non-treatment to the gullible. Mercola will probably sell it on his website as the covid cure “they” don’t want you to know about.

Sounds like a good fit for mr antivax.

#40 cramar on 01.19.22 at 5:08 pm

Nope we didn’t win! And the war is not over. But the next hammer is going to fall this year. It’s called interest rates.

I heard today one financial expert is forecasting 7 rate increases for the BoC starting next week. If that is true, even if the virus is irrelevant 5 years from now, the people renewing their million-dollar WFH mortgages are going to get hammered.

Then there is likely permanent inflation going forward. Average people are financially strapped now. What are the going to do in the coming years?

#41 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:09 pm

#19 sorry Angst

Gasoline increases outrageous. I don’t drive, no need to Italia with transit options.

If you have to drive in Canada, I would be livid.
——————
“Nobody “has” to drive.
Only taxes and death are unavoidable.
If you choose to drive, don’t whine.

#42 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 5:10 pm

RE: It will be over soon enough. Fingers crossed here in Europa.
-Me

So of course I did not like OMI numbers of the last few days here in Italia and the UK.

So what did I do?

I went all TWITTER HIVE on Italia’s Health Minister Speranza and its Civil Protection Agency (+ their counterparts in my Region of FVG just to go full carpet bomb) accusing them ALL of rigging the numbers to prolong the restrictions.

[received a whack of new followers for that – not my intention, I Tweet for myself and no one else]

——————-

BUT GARTH, NATURE HAS A SYNCHRONICITY TO HER and when I see this Covid-19 and Spawn animation of peak cases vs. time:

https://twitter.com/theosanderson/status/1480600931364442114

I say:

STAY HOME IN JULY 2022. *

* Peaks:

Jan –> Jul –> Jan –> ???

And ya, I blamed Minister Speranza and the Civil Protection Agency for that to.

[more new followers]

#43 SunShowers on 01.19.22 at 5:11 pm

“These things have also murdered the work ethic.”

Covid murdered the work ethic the same way that antibiotics murdered limb amputations.

I know I’m sounding like a broken record here with these statistics, but approximately half of Canadians hate their jobs, and another quarter are ambivalent and just going through the motions.

Do you think these people WANT to spend their own money to commute up to an hour each way per day (unpaid) to do something they hate?

Of course not. They do it because they have to. The entire concept of “work ethic” is a misnomer these days. I think you’ll find that most people will work pretty darn hard if it’s the only thing standing between them and the breadline. What they want is irrelevant; work is a matter of needs, not wants, for the majority of people.

Because that’s all modern employment really is. A capitalist exercising feudal control over their personal fiefdom, relying on the disgusting imbalance of bargaining power between themselves and the serfs, who must either submit to the capitalist’s will in order to survive, or engage in that same identical relationship with a different capitalist, hoping it will be somehow better.

Bosses complaining about not being able to “supervise” their workers (among other complaints) if they’re at home is rich. It’s like medieval monarchs whining about a peasant revolt. As if it’s not enough for these feudal lords to have near complete control of their peasantry for at least half of their waking hours, they have to be sure they aren’t keeping an extra bushel of wheat for themselves to feed their family. These people have become so addicted to absolute power, even the slightest diminishment is unacceptable.

You want to see REAL work ethic? You won’t unless people are doing work they WANT to do. You want the number of people doing jobs they want to go above ~25%? You need to free them. Give them the power to refuse. The bare necessities of life (food, shelter, education, healthcare) need to be divorced from employment.

No more inequality of bargaining power, no more coercion. This will be a truly free market. If you think a market can be free when one party is compelled to transact on pain of death with another party who is under no such compulsion, then you need to take a look at your definition of “free.”

#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm

Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

#45 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm

#103 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 9:52 am
Anyone been to a grocery store lately?

The fresh produce sections are emptying out.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/securing-the-supply-chain-or-breaking-it-clash-over-trucker-vaccine-mandate-grows

I give the brainless weasels in the PMO’s office about 7 more days before they back peddle real fast on the Trucker Covid rules.

Long term strategic thinking isn’t in the politically correct vocabulary.

But, you can be sure, it won’t be our fearless leader standing on the podium admitting he was wrong.

It’ll be some other lackey spewing generalities about “synergies” and “empowerment” that will take the hit..

When are the Conservatives going to get a new leader?
We need another election to get these incompetent’s out of office….. before we have to start eating dogs… like the Venezuelans.
—————
Just came back from Costco.
No shortage of anything.
As for eating dogs:
Big Hot Dog plus pop for 1:50 at Costco.
Best deal in town.

#46 Omicron Kenobi on 01.19.22 at 5:13 pm

Welcome to my world. The Omicron Universe.

I am in charge now.

For eternity.

#47 The real Kip (Ret) on 01.19.22 at 5:19 pm

#24 Moh on 01.19.22 at 4:36 pm
“People here crying and complaining that they lost two of their useless lives. Now you know how it feels when you are from a country that is at war and everyday is a new struggle. Maybe now you can think of the people living in bad situations like Afghanistan or Somalia! Canadian’s need to smarten up and stop the complaining. Everyone is fat here and lives much better than most countries in the world yet we have the biggest whiners!”

Well said and I’m sorry that successive misguided governments in Canada have chosen to bring war to your country.

#48 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 5:23 pm

#25 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 4:37 pm

Either Djokovic speaks from both sides of his mouth or is a detestable, repellent person worried he will lose his income and will do, say anything to prevent that.

——–

Chill, bro. He’s just a tennis player. A darn good one.

Save your venom for something that matters. Like Tilley-hat wearing tourists. Or people who correct your errors.

#49 February 1st is Freedom Day on 01.19.22 at 5:23 pm

It has been decided that February 1st is COVID Freedom Day. As Free People, we formally absolve all levels of government in any and all further responsibility. Thanks for your service.

We got this one. Time to get on with life.

#50 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:24 pm

Oh boy, a busy night ahead for Garth. AH, COVID and the COVID-induced market crash, we return to the topics that brought me here two years ago.

First, for those who continue to stupidly claim that COVID is “just a typical flu”. Careful excess deaths analysis shows that the actual numbers dead are two to four times higher, globally. Varies by country. But, the range is from about 10 million dead to 22 million. 1/3 that of the 1918 pandemic, but 10 times the worst flu outbreaks since then.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00104-8

My comments on Garth’s blog post today. Overall I agree that it’s time to start opening back up and supporting our local businesses.

Garth: Expect more provinces to backtrack this month as reality sets in.

By “reality” you are referring to the imminent plunge of Omicron cases as the wave plays itself out, right?

Garth: The defenses against Covid are to get vaccinated, mask up and use your head.

Absolutely. Being vaccinated like Sail Away, of vaccinated and boosted gives one many times better chance at avoiding a serious infection. N95s if you can find them. Chances of transmission go way down if all parties are wearing N95s. I was miffed when I had to take off my N95 and put on a surgical mask in Emerg when I was there for the ribs.

The staying-home-from work part is senseless, when we still mass up in the grocery queue or at the liquor store.

That is not correct because these are not comparable. First, any reduction in exposure is good because exposure isn’t binary. Second, for the workers in liquor stores and grocery the situation isn’t great. For folks visiting, the time spent in those places is small. 10min tops liquor, 30 min grocery (and how else were you going to get food?). At your workplace — 8 hours in a cubicle farm sharing air with snorfling Sam on the other side of the partition. Fine, until someone brings in the virus, then you all have it.

#51 Nonplused on 01.19.22 at 5:28 pm

And yet oil prices continue to march higher. And it’s not just in Canada where we have these ridiculous and useless carbon taxes.

Something is afoot that is bigger than covid. And no, it isn’t Russia. Let’s hope it isn’t peak oil. Although resource scarcity could explain a whole bunch of things including this ridiculous attempt to run a 24/7 power grid on solar panels and pinwheels, which plainly doesn’t work. It is a sign of desperation. Nuclear must not work either because if CO2 emissions are the concern they are made out to be then nuclear should be an obvious consideration, but only a few countries like China seem to think that is the case.

If you reframe world events as having a basis in resource competition, much of recent history makes more sense. Probably the last 300 years worth, but I bet it stretches back further than that. All the way to the Roman and Greek empires I suspect.

(Note: Contrary to popular belief, “peak oil” does not occur when the world runs out of oil, which it probably never will. It occurs when oil becomes too expensive to extract to power an energy dependent economy. Energy, like all economic inputs, must be affordable and yield more economic benefits from its use than it costs to produce. In the case of energy, the economic benefits must be on the order of 20 times higher than the cost to produce or there isn’t enough energy left over after production to power things like health care, education, and fly-away vacations. This is what drives peak oil. The cost to produce oil from shale, deep sea, and oil sands is just getting too expensive.)

#52 Classical Liberal Millennial on 01.19.22 at 5:31 pm

Did it win?

It depends on what the goal was this entire time.

#53 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 5:34 pm

#26 BC Doc

I agree Canada Healthcare system underfunded.

Before the Pandemic Canada rated in the #30’s Worldwide, marginally ahead of the USA.

Italia #2 after France (year before the pandemic, Italia was #1 – one reason I moved to Italia from Canada as a retiree).

I shudder to think what would have happened to Canada if Covid-19 (the original) had hit Canada first. Add to that, the WHO in early 2020 said that Covid-19 was not very transmissible. Lucky Italia.

Even though Italia is seeing one hell of an Omicron peak, post peak, it’s healthcare system in no danger of being overwhelmed by a long country mile, ALL Covid beds:

ICU = 1688 occupied out of 9530 nationwide
Hospital = 19500 occupied out of 65302 nationwide

And still testing at high rates:

1.2 million today (Italia has not given up on testing).

PCR testing still free here, no line-ups. Results in a few hours.

——————–

Like many countries, Canada is going to have look in the mirror and come up with a new way of tackling its healthcare with a NATIONAL STRATEGY in the case of another Pandemic.

13 healthcare cats…12 too many to herd in Canada.

And, more $$$ needed. Clearly with PPE, ventilator, etc. shortages. Paying exorbitant amounts for vax from offshore.

Without health, a person has nothing.

#54 Ful Lee Vaxxed on 01.19.22 at 5:35 pm

‘The defenses against Covid are to get vaccinated, mask up and use your head’…well Garth, 1 out 3 ..can’t be right all the time

#55 dragonfly58 on 01.19.22 at 5:39 pm

Funny thing that truck drivers are doing well. During the last decade of my job I every now and then got the opportunity to chat with drivers making deliveries to my employer while they were being unloaded. Almost universally they complain about how no one was making ends meet in the trucking game. Although most had been owner operators previously , they were just lower wage, transport company employed drivers now.
The owner operators one by one failed due to ever upward operating costs and stagnant freight rates. Some blamed the willing to work cheap, immigrant drivers. But even the guy from India within the last 5 years, up the road from me complains that many days he might as well keep his truck parked between fuel and general wear and tear.
Have things turned around that much in the trucking game?

#56 Søren Angst on 01.19.22 at 5:39 pm

#48 Sail Away

Not my venom.

MSM’s.

Venom saved for the Annuity Math challenged, like you.

Now go hug your bird gun like a good little boy.

#57 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:40 pm

#118 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 3:21 pm

Ah, Jordan Peterson, eloquent as ever, with a treatise and call to action. Jag, Vlad gets a positive mention as well.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/other/jordan-peterson-why-i-am-no-longer-a-tenured-professor-at-the-university-of-toronto/ar-AASWdwp?ocid=msedgntp

That’s a pretty long-winded way for a retiring quack to own up to his obsolescence. But, the NP needs to sell papers, so he has a platform.

That Putin quote is a doozy. Good job JP for siding with:

a guy who compares gender non-conformity to COVID and leads a country where same-sex couple’s rights are dwindling by the day including not recognizing same-sex marriage in a violation of international human rights. I guess that’s woke to JP? Sure hope his star continues to rise. Perhaps even to the level of The Post Millennial one day.

#58 WTF on 01.19.22 at 5:44 pm

Based on GT’s reporting on the ground there appears to be a lot of empty commercial buildings in most DT Cores.

If we additionally take into account the innumerable Fed Govt Public Works buildings (in many cases prime RE)

Convert them to residential. Poof! new housing stock of varying ages/functions.

While their at it, take to opportunity to right size govt payrolls….say cut 25% (given the debt/deficit its a comin anyhoo, early retirement, voluntary severance should do the trick) I know. Dream on.

The remaining employees can continue to “work” in their jammies.

Everybody happy,

Your Welcome

#59 Mattl on 01.19.22 at 5:48 pm

I guess I have a hard time seeing WFH as this big catastrophe when we spent the last 50 years offshoring our manufacturing output.

No one really cared about these high paying jobs in the suburbs, but it’s a tragedy that Rob or Gina now works from their basement in Barrie instead of a cubicle downtown?

Companies have had enough time to properly gauge productivity for new work from homers. If the WFH cohort is truly delivering 50% of what they were pre-COVID, these companies will force them back. I mean shouldn’t this complete lack of work ethic have shown up in corp profits the past two years?

#60 Nick on 01.19.22 at 5:49 pm

.
Everyone please buy a home in Lower Brainland before it doubles again in 3 years. Buy buy!!

#61 fred B on 01.19.22 at 5:50 pm

Work from home got really old starting mid last year.

One day just blends into the next.

It is a very existential experience for me.

Not experiential.

I have a deeper understanding of people with mental illness .

It is almost like a never ending dream, one day blends into the next.

I can now relate to Phil the reporter’s waking up every morning exactly the same in groundhog day.

#62 Good joke now Novax Joke of vic on 01.19.22 at 5:52 pm

We can all easily point out the problems, solutions not so readily available. Every level of government has made lots of mistakes in this but the biggest share of the blame belongs to the fools who refuse to get vaccinated. Not that if they were it would have completely ended it but it would have made it easier. Less strain on the healthcare system, I mean when the people who make it work are getting taken out by Covid at the same time it’s at an all time high something has to give.

#63 Penny Henny on 01.19.22 at 5:52 pm

#22 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 4:25 pm
@#12 Adam
“Oh well two prime years of my life down the drain.”

+++

I knew the virus was going to be a bummer for socializing.
So I worked.
The two most profitable years I’ve ever had.
Crazy busy.

//////////////

Think of how many were forced not to work.

#64 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:53 pm

#51 Nonplused on 01.19.22 at 5:28 pm

And yet oil prices continue to march higher. And it’s not just in Canada where we have these ridiculous and useless carbon taxes.

in July, 2020 ARKKs Cathie Wood predicted peak oil prices as the $135 seen in 2008 which is… interesting. She saw it on its way to $12 but did acknowledge that variability and supply constraints could alter the course.

On an inflation adjusted basis, $85 oil is extremely cheap in the history of the material. Bad for climate change as world is projected to reach then exceed pre-COVID oil consumption soon, if it hasn’t already.

#65 Kirk on 01.19.22 at 5:54 pm

WFH has made me a better employee and my employer knows it.

I am better able to react promptly to urgent issues as I’m not commuting. Plus, I am more willing to attend to those issues after hours (though I get paid OT) then I would be working from the office. Once I left, I was done. Don’t bother calling me – in fact, that is strictly forbidden.

But now, I’ll gladly hop down to the computer when an urgent issue arises – this has made my employer very happy with WFH.

Sorry to the people suffering because of WFH, but it’s working for me and my company.

#66 Shawn on 01.19.22 at 5:58 pm

Whiners abound

Moh at 24 said about Canada:

Everyone is fat here and lives much better than most countries in the world yet we have the biggest whiners!

**************
So true! We live in the best of times and complain like it’s the worst of times.

#67 COVID Barber on 01.19.22 at 6:00 pm

See how hard it is to get a haircut?

Call me, everybody, and I’ll do yours for under $5000.

GUARANTEED!

#68 Penny Henny on 01.19.22 at 6:04 pm

#50 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:24 pm
Oh boy, a busy night ahead for Garth. AH, COVID and the COVID-induced market crash, we return to the topics that brought me here two years ago.
/////////////////

Has it only been two years?
It seems much longer :(

#69 Shawn on 01.19.22 at 6:10 pm

Thank you hospital workers

#14 Cheese on 01.19.22 at 4:19 pm
Meanwhile, I have not missed a single day at the Ottawa General during the entire pandemic. Can I have more money for working in two outbreak wards and in stem cell?

I hate this world, its not worth living in anymore.

***************************
Please accept my personal sincere thanks. My BIL got a bone marrow transplant at Ottawa General this past year and much follow up treatment. Not possible without you and those in your field. You can be proud of your contributions.

#70 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 6:17 pm

I’m quite pleased with the political climate in the USA these days. The vast majority of Americans are centrist, and when any politician strays too far from that, the support evaporates.

It’s encouraging to see the system working properly in a bipartisan way, addressing the merits of issues rather than blindly supporting a party initiative.

#71 Love_The_Cottage on 01.19.22 at 6:18 pm

#45 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
—————
Just came back from Costco.
No shortage of anything.
——–
Yeah, seems like some are looking long and hard for shortages because it matches their predetermined beliefs. My local store has 18 kinds of bread instead of the usual 20. Explain to people in 75% of the world that is a shortage. Please.

#72 Faron on 01.19.22 at 6:30 pm

#68 Penny Henny on 01.19.22 at 6:04 pm

#50 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:24 pm
Oh boy, a busy night ahead for Garth. AH, COVID and the COVID-induced market crash, we return to the topics that brought me here two years ago.
/////////////////

Has it only been two years?
It seems much longer :(

Hey, so I’ll be setting up my tent in your Prefrontal Cortex, I apologize if I jab you with a pole and you smell burnt toast. I’m equipped to stay here for ~forever.

#73 cmj on 01.19.22 at 6:30 pm

#14 & #69
I too can’t thank you enough for working in the medical field. In 2002 I had a bone marrow transplant and would not have made it without the medical staff at VGH.
Yes, it is very strenuous times right now. I don’t know how you do it….But I do know that as tired and fed up as you might be, you are still professional and saving lives. Those who aren’t vaccinated and those who take careless risks are selfish and need to grow up. This pandemic will be a thing of the past once we ALL pull together for something more important than just ourselves

#74 Brunett43 on 01.19.22 at 6:36 pm

The way the government structured the lockdowns were a total mess. While the big box stores got away with restrictions, there’s no reason smaller businesses and personal care services need to shut down completely. Putting some restrictions on them would have kept them in business. Panic blocked out critical thinking, unfortunately. While most people were beginning to look shabby and dishevelled, I had to chuckle because I’ve been cutting my own hair (long) for over 30yrs, I do my own manicures & pedicures and I groom my own pets. Mostly because it saves me a lot of money. I’m also very good at it.

When I do have to go shopping I now double mask, I’m boosted, I carry hand sanitizer with me. It sort of feels like everyone else has cooties, but I do what I must not just for myself, but for the good of society. But I still believe we are nowhere near the end of this, it’s life altering, get use to this new normal, and please do your part.

#75 All lies and manipulated u decide on 01.19.22 at 6:37 pm

#4 Doug t
===============
Yes the media is worse then the disease. They promote fear and are utilized by Mr. T2 as leverage to shift policy and controls. Way too many sheeple out there.

Garth I thought you would like this. I did.
https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/currencies/black-swan-nassim-taleb-bitcoin-crypto-disease-worthless-speculative-bubble-2022-1

#76 IHCTD9 on 01.19.22 at 6:38 pm

#24 Moh on 01.19.22 at 4:36 pm
People here crying and complaining that they lost two of their useless lives. Now you know how it feels when you are from a country that is at war and everyday is a new struggle. Maybe now you can think of the people living in bad situations like Afghanistan or Somalia! Canadian’s need to smarten up and stop the complaining. Everyone is fat here and lives much better than most countries in the world yet we have the biggest whiners!
——

Heh, I think you’re forgetting where you live homie. I’d say a solid fraction of Canadians either escaped from a dump country / banana republic themselves, or are direct descendants of those who fled war torn Western and Eastern Europe. Canada is chock-full of folks who escaped one hell hole or another over the last 100 years. My parents and grandparents left Europe post WW2 where the death toll exceeded the entire modern day populations of Afghanistan and Somalia put together.

I’d be hard-pressed to find a Canuck my age of Western European decent who hasn’t lost at least one grandpa or great uncle in WW2…

#77 I don’t know on 01.19.22 at 6:39 pm

I sense some frustration in today’s post. That’s normal, and everyone’s feeling it.

Know this: no society on earth has beat covid. If the economy stays too open, there is human suffering. If the society is shut down to prevent transmission, freedoms are limited and there is economic damage.

The last sentence is apt. Personal responsibility is becoming more important than ever.

#78 WFH Will Be FOREVER on 01.19.22 at 6:42 pm

Garth, maybe your building can be converted to a Salvation Army Thrift Store?

#79 I'mshort_corpdebt on 01.19.22 at 6:48 pm

If the cretins in the capital would of simply run for the hills and let the masses fend for themselves – just as the powers that be did during the plaque in the 1300’s, we would have come out of this better off.

My predictions – Trudeau gone before next election

Max Bernier does a comeback!

#80 Nonplused on 01.19.22 at 6:48 pm

#41 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:09 pm
#19 sorry Angst

Gasoline increases outrageous. I don’t drive, no need to Italia with transit options.

If you have to drive in Canada, I would be livid.
——————
“Nobody “has” to drive.
Only taxes and death are unavoidable.
If you choose to drive, don’t whine.

———————————-

PP, I find your comment dismissive and unrealistic. Are we only to complain about death and taxes? And much of the cost of driving is in the taxes.

Anyway, what is happening at the grocery store is highly related to what is happening at the gas pump. But I suppose since eating is not on your list of things one is entitled to complain about I shall not be permitted to complain about that either.

I look forward to the day we achieve the PP utopia where there is nothing in life but death and taxes, and thus nothing to complain about. It sounds even better than socialism/communism!

#81 Stoph on 01.19.22 at 6:49 pm

@#43 SunShowers on 01.19.22 at 5:11 pm

I’ll agree that wages on offer suck. One way around this on an individual level is to learn to make do with less, save, and invest. It’s critical to avoid getting trapped with loads of debt/bills. However, as we’ve seen too many people’s financial decisions and knowledge are poor – which are precisely things that Garth tries to improve with this blog.

The other way is to start your own business, that way you’re in charge. This however is a tough road, and judging by people’s actions, they would rather stick it out at a job they may hate, exchanging their time for money, rather than being the boss themselves.

Lastly, society needs people to do ‘crappy’ jobs. Someone’s got to work the assembly line, drive truck, fill out the paper work or whatever. And if the job isn’t needed, perhaps it should be gotten rid of. I don’t know a way around this. We could pay people even more to do ‘crappy’ jobs, but the market already prices a job’s satisfaction into to pay. From what I’ve seen ‘interesting’ or ‘fun’ jobs pay less, at least to start, until the point where you can leverage your expertise.

#82 Cheese on 01.19.22 at 6:50 pm

#73 cmj

thanks very much, but I am just doing infection control in the renovations and system upgrades, the real heroes are the nurses and doctors working there, they are great people.

#83 Penny Henny on 01.19.22 at 6:52 pm

#72 Faron on 01.19.22 at 6:30 pm
#68 Penny Henny on 01.19.22 at 6:04 pm

#50 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:24 pm
Oh boy, a busy night ahead for Garth. AH, COVID and the COVID-induced market crash, we return to the topics that brought me here two years ago.
/////////////////

Has it only been two years?
It seems much longer :(

Hey, so I’ll be setting up my tent in your Prefrontal Cortex, I apologize if I jab you with a pole and you smell burnt toast. I’m equipped to stay here for ~forever.
//////
Forever. You’re just like herpes, how appropriate.

#84 Steven on 01.19.22 at 6:53 pm

I would tend to disagree with the issues you raise Garth. While I will certainly acknowledge the pain felt by some small businesses, other business has flourished. How do you reconcile gangbusters employment with the hardship described? I think that like most things, those who adapted have thrived and others did not. There are new industries that are flourishing in part to the new reality, creating jobs that never existed before. I know horses were displeased when cars came to exist, but can’t stop progress for the sake of status quo. Will there be adjustments that need to occur? Absolutely. But only the privileged could live in places where commutes were short / nonexistent… while others engaged in the value destroying activity of the daily commute. Now, I where I do agree is what new normal looks like for social interaction.

#85 Yorkville Renter on 01.19.22 at 7:01 pm

44 Sam

Just wait until the guy from Bangalore does your job for half what you make… careful what you wish for… especially in roles where your contribution to Org culture is zero.

#86 IHCTD9 on 01.19.22 at 7:01 pm

#69 Shawn on 01.19.22 at 6:10 pm
Thank you hospital workers

#14 Cheese on 01.19.22 at 4:19 pm
Meanwhile, I have not missed a single day at the Ottawa General during the entire pandemic. Can I have more money for working in two outbreak wards and in stem cell?

I hate this world, its not worth living in anymore.

***************************
Please accept my personal sincere thanks. My BIL got a bone marrow transplant at Ottawa General this past year and much follow up treatment. Not possible without you and those in your field. You can be proud of your contributions.
————-

There ya go Cheese! Life ain’t all bad, it’s more or less what you make of it. I got a lotta respect for a working Man/Woman grinding it out. You can take pride in it if you want to. Maybe you just need to break out that Ardbeg again for a round or two.

#87 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 7:01 pm

@#41 Pontificating Ponzius Prattle.

““Nobody “has” to drive.”

++++
Says the retired accountant.

I guess the food got to the supermarket by itself?
The Amazon delivery packages floated in?
The buses fix themselves?
The buses clean themselves?
The police walk a beat?
Firemen ride horses to the alarm?
Tradesmen carry all their tools and materials on the Skytrain?

Please stop pontificating.
Best to be thought a fool rather than remove all doubt.

#88 sean on 01.19.22 at 7:04 pm

re: #12 Adam on 01.19.22 at 4:14 pm

Losing to a respiratory virus was always inevitable it was only hubris and ignorance that made us think we could do anything to stop it.

————-

The original virus was more dangerous but less transmissible; more recent versions are less dangerous but more transmissible. My understanding is that this is quite a typical evolution for new pathogens since they have every interest in spreading but no interest in killing their hosts (who would otherwise be walking around infecting others).

Also, we now have (imperfect) vaccines which seem to reduce overall COVID severity.

Given these facts, a robust early response followed by gradual relaxation of isolation efforts seems like a pretty reasonable approach. I think its arguable that we should have opened up earlier given the risk/benefit trade off against economic damage.

What if the next bug to come along is something like airborne Ebola with a ~60% mortality rate, or more likely a transmissible H5N1 bird flu with a 30% mortality rate? Do we just throw up our hands and say “oh, it’s a respiratory virus” and give up?

I have no idea where this specific virus came from, but hearing about “gain of function” virus experiments makes me think that these should be outlawed with a verifiable control regime ASAP. The pinnacle of hubris/ignorance/arrogance is messing around with viruses that have been evolving for ~3 billion years and thinking that we can keep them bottled up in a lab.

#89 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 7:04 pm

@#43 Rainshowers

Stop typing and get back to the salt mine where all workers are equal.

#90 Nonplused on 01.19.22 at 7:08 pm

#64 Faron on 01.19.22 at 5:53 pm

“On an inflation adjusted basis, $85 oil is extremely cheap in the history of the material.”

That may be true, but it doesn’t help me manage my credit limit when I go to fill up any.

I suppose by that logic we should stop complaining so much about house prices also. Outside of YVR and YYZ, they really aren’t that bad on an inflation adjusted basis.

Heck anything in the CPI is still the same price it always was on an inflation adjusted basis! What the heck is this CPI good for anyway? Except wages of course. Wages always seem to lag, especially after tax.

From a pseudo-economic perspective I find inflation adjusting energy prices somewhat disingenuous. As the major input into the cost of everything (besides labor, but arguments can be made there too), energy prices are inflation. The world runs on energy. Nothing that we mine, make, grow, or transport is done without it. Heck due to the pervasiveness of computers we can’t even think without it. Save love, of course. Love is still free. Unless it is the love of money.

And yes there is the climate thing. I don’t think we disagree that reducing CO2 emissions would be a good thing. So far as I can tell our major disagreement is as to what would work most effectively to do so, with me in the nuclear camp and you in the renewable camp (wind and solar). We probably also disagree as to the urgency but that is a question of scale not vector. And it wouldn’t hurt my feelings to see nuclear deployed faster than anyone can imaging, as that is where I think we have to go anyway. Who ever complains when their plane arrives early?

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 7:10 pm

@#45 Ponzies Processed Putrefaction plus Pop

“As for eating dogs:
Big Hot Dog plus pop for 1:50 at Costco.
Best deal in town.”

++++

You EAT that salted, injected, mysterymeat garbage?
I thought your were smarter than that.

#92 david on 01.19.22 at 7:15 pm

At least we can blame the unvaccinated

#93 Faron on 01.19.22 at 7:17 pm

#70 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 6:17 pm

I’m quite pleased with the political climate in the USA these days

As is Putin. More common ground!

#94 DON on 01.19.22 at 7:18 pm

Fishman

“Pattern recognition development is one of the few endeavours where oldsters have a fighting chance against the youngsters.”

*********

Yep….pattern recognition via experience and life long observation of human nature.

Chess is a great game to learn.

#95 Willem on 01.19.22 at 7:20 pm

England Ends All COVID Passports, Mask Mandates, Work Restrictions! Does Boris know something that our navel gazing politicians and health authorities do not?!
Based on case/hospitalization trends, we will be there in about a month. Hopefully our masters will unlock the door and let us out of our cages!

#96 under the radar on 01.19.22 at 7:20 pm

Biden says he believes Putin will invade. Maybe a minor incursion. Sounds like a green light to me . Oh, and the devastating sanctions that Uncle Joe will impose. Sure he will, until Putin turns the gas off. Europe will indeed be cold this winter.

#97 Sunshowers on 01.19.22 at 7:22 pm

#70 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 6:17 pm

“I’m quite pleased with the political climate in the USA these days. The vast majority of Americans are centrist”

Depends how you define centrist, what’s your yardstick?
80% of Americans want paid sick and maternity leave, yet they don’t have it.

70% of Americans want government run healthcare, yet they don’t have it.

#98 Scott on 01.19.22 at 7:23 pm

@ When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

Data shows loyalty is foolish and costs the average worker significantly. People leave jobs for a better job and/or better pay. More people are starting to realize this and the compounding difference of a few % (some times more) in gains from each career move adds up a huge difference in career earnings.

Anecdotally I worked multiple jobs (in my younger more foolish days) where I felt a sense or loyalty/duty to the point that I would do whatever needed to be done to keep the operation running, changing hours last minute, skipping lunch, doing other peoples jobs, etc. After about ten years in the work force I finally learned that I was just enabling employers to take advantage of their work force. I now realize the old vet who I thought was lazy for only doing his own job and working the hours he was scheduled was trying to hold the line so they would staff accordingly. Made it hard when there were young and naïve keeners like me who were willing to do whatever was needed.

There are certain jobs (like mine) where years of service with a union offer significant reason to stick around, so people do.

If loyalty starts to be more worthwhile rather than changing jobs, people will start being loyal like the good ol days. Money talks

#99 KLNR on 01.19.22 at 7:30 pm

@#24 Moh on 01.19.22 at 4:36 pm
People here crying and complaining that they lost two of their useless lives. Now you know how it feels when you are from a country that is at war and everyday is a new struggle. Maybe now you can think of the people living in bad situations like Afghanistan or Somalia! Canadian’s need to smarten up and stop the complaining. Everyone is fat here and lives much better than most countries in the world yet we have the biggest whiners!

no doubt you’ve won the lottery if you were born in Canada. We have an abundance of first world problems here though.

#100 KLNR on 01.19.22 at 7:33 pm

@#71 Love_The_Cottage on 01.19.22 at 6:18 pm
#45 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
—————
Just came back from Costco.
No shortage of anything.
——–
Yeah, seems like some are looking long and hard for shortages because it matches their predetermined beliefs. My local store has 18 kinds of bread instead of the usual 20. Explain to people in 75% of the world that is a shortage. Please.

Some shortages are happening in rural and hard to reach areas of Canada. The media would have you believe we’re all going to starve, it’s their way.

#101 TurnerNation on 01.19.22 at 7:47 pm

Cargojet – CJT.TO popped $30 possibly on the Trucker bad news. Modal madness.

— Shocking footage of food shortages in ON, NB. Just another day in a Former First World Country. Public health right?
And just in time for “indoor dining” to resume in ON Feb 1st. War on Small Business.

https://twitter.com/ChickenGate/status/1483932947208151046
https://twitter.com/ChickenGate/status/1483932704357945354
https://twitter.com/can_unity/status/1483932670883155972
https://twitter.com/ChickenGate/status/1483924239556218880

Say is there a reason we’ve been trained/prepared so well on “Essential” and “Non-Essential” goods?
Comrade is your ration card in order?


— ALL our leaders are on board with this global plan. The stragglers were fired last January under the guise of “Holiday travel”. It’s happening – and fast.

“Fruit and veggie shortages are making a comeback at grocery stores with Canada’s trucker vaccine mandates adding to supply chain”
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-19/fruit-and-veggie-outages-in-canada-get-worse-with-trucker-shortages

#102 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 7:48 pm

#97 Sunshowers on 01.19.22 at 7:22 pm
#70 Sail Away on 01.19.22 at 6:17 pm

“I’m quite pleased with the political climate in the USA these days. The vast majority of Americans are centrist”

———

Depends how you define centrist, what’s your yardstick?

80% of Americans want paid sick and maternity leave, yet they don’t have it.

70% of Americans want government run healthcare, yet they don’t have it.

———

84% of statistics are made up on the spot.

#103 Renters lost, sorry on 01.19.22 at 7:55 pm

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

When you drop your arrogance, you might learn about perspective taking.

#104 Kirk on 01.19.22 at 8:02 pm

“When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty.” – Garth

To be fair, you have always cited ample employment choice and easy career mobility as a pro of renting vs. buying a home.

#105 Unpinned on 01.19.22 at 8:05 pm

Every year there are thousands of auto accidents…we don’t close down all the traffic in Canada. Every year there are train wrecks in Canada and we don’t stop all the rails from running. Every year people drown in lakes and rivers and on the ocean…we don’t stop swimming or boating. Every year there are fires above ground…but we don’t start living in caves or underground. Wake up Woke.

#106 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 8:07 pm

@#82 Cheese
“thanks very much, but I am just doing infection control in the renovations and system upgrades,”

+++

Don’t sell yourself short.
A janitor at NASA once answered when asked what he did there, “I’m helping to put a man on the moon.”
And he was right.

#107 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 8:17 pm

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 7:10 pm
@#45 Ponzies Processed Putrefaction plus Pop

“As for eating dogs:
Big Hot Dog plus pop for 1:50 at Costco.
Best deal in town.”

++++

You EAT that salted, injected, mysterymeat garbage?
I thought your were smarter than that.
—————–
Did I say I’m eating them?
This is just a public service announcement for those posters like you who are complaining about food inflation.

#108 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 8:20 pm

#100 KLNR on 01.19.22 at 7:33 pm
@#71 Love_The_Cottage on 01.19.22 at 6:18 pm
#45 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
—————
Just came back from Costco.
No shortage of anything.
——–
Yeah, seems like some are looking long and hard for shortages because it matches their predetermined beliefs. My local store has 18 kinds of bread instead of the usual 20. Explain to people in 75% of the world that is a shortage. Please.

Some shortages are happening in rural and hard to reach areas of Canada. The media would have you believe we’re all going to starve, it’s their way.
—————
Just like CEF who seems to revel in other people’s misery.

#109 When Will They Raise Rates? on 01.19.22 at 8:25 pm

The defenses against Covid are to get vaccinated,

Actually, since December 24th, you are more likely to contract covid-19 if you are vaccinated according to Ontario government’s own published statistics.

The best defence is to eliminate all human contact until the current wave ebbs, or simply go about yoir life and contract it, obtaining natural robust and wide ranging immunity in the process.

#110 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 8:25 pm

The CocaCola opened again today, 2 months ahead of expectations.
Thanks to all the hard working workers (public and private) who made this happen.

#111 Big Bucks on 01.19.22 at 8:40 pm

Maybe 60% of the downtown workers will return and with inflation how many will support the restaurants like before?The economy is in for one hell of a rough ride.Higher rates will eventually hit housing prices too and make people feel poorer.The booming 20’s?Not likely.

#112 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 8:46 pm

@#96 Radar
“Sure he will, until Putin turns the gas off. Europe will indeed be cold this winter.”

++++

Putin only cares about Putin.
He has raped Russia for at least 20 years and pocketed billions. Possibly hundreds of billions….

https://www.celebritynetworth.com/articles/billionaire-news/is-vladimir-putin-secretly-the-richest-person-in-the-world/

The Russian population is seething under his rule and no matter how many journalists, politicians and former Oligarchs he has jailed or assassinated ( poisoning seems to be a peculiar Russian trait )…..he still can’t step down.

He’s in a gilded cage and this “show” of invading the Ukraine over imagined slights from the West is, ultimately, the last straw.

No one wants a war but there’s nothing like a good , low level skirmish to get the populations minds off how bad Putin really is.

We’ll have to see if the Europeans are willing to fight for the Ukraine.

Putin travels to China to meet with Xi next week and most experts believe if Russia is going to invade…they better do it before their tanks get bogged down in the muck of Spring.
Will China take advantage of this and move on Taiwan?
The generals would love to and the “Thucydides Trap ” calls for an eventual invasion.
Why not now?

The next 8 weeks will tell or its probably off….until Summer.

#113 Jason on 01.19.22 at 8:47 pm

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

I work in tech. When I came to Canada in 2013, my first salary here was 55k. Now I work as a contractor and recently signed for a 1 year contract for $100/hr. That’s around 200k/year.
If I would be loyal and have stayed at my first company now I would have made around 85-90k a year.
So why would I be loyal to a company if it is not loyal to its employees?

#114 Ryan on 01.19.22 at 8:53 pm

Garth’s takes are so weird. He’s riled up about WFH and the core being empty but yet is on board with restrictions and vax mandates? “Safety” or freedom, make the call.

I fully agree with him here, though. We eviscerated work ethic, human interaction at work is gone, and businesses in urban centres are on life support.

In contrast, however, anyone who wants a vaccine has had the opportunity. The others have decided against it. So it’s time to live boys and girls.

Restrictions, vaccine mandates and CBC/state media’s addiction to fear-porn-derived advertising dwarfs Omicron’s in terms of negative impact.

We’re sacrificing the lives of the young to pretend we care about the old and vulnerable. Mask wearing is more performative virtue signalling at this point than it is a barrier to transmission.

(Writing this from Florida, I’m sorry for anyone that’s in Canada right now. Grab your pitchforks is my only advice)

#115 DON on 01.19.22 at 8:58 pm

Other than the first couple of months it never really slowed down in terms of business in my area. No doubt some have been impacted. It is busier where I live and when I need to hit the highway and travel to work or something else during rush hour its not a traffic jam at the moment. Less travel less emissions…more time in your own community supporting local business. Downtown cores have been hit the hardest hopefully they migrate to where the herd settles. Two years WFH has become sensible and benefical in some/many individual circumstances. Lower smog levels brought back the deep blue colour in our sky, they were getting hazzy pre virus. We will find out sooner or later.

In nutty land, PM Boris Johnson under calls for him to step down for the matter of attending Partays has now cancelled all COVOID restrictions in a bid to retain His Position and return to normal.

The two Ronnies would have had a field day with the confused messy haired school boy of a fellow.

Way off topic but…I’d pay to see a cage match between Mr. Johnson and Mr. PUTIN. Hell, I’d settle for a chess game, just for the play by play banter. Have a British Football announcer or Mr. Trump call the game. ha ha ha

#116 Cowtown Cowboy on 01.19.22 at 9:00 pm

Jeezus, everyone should just get the virus already, whole family got it a few weeks ago, everyone is fine, more or less typical head cold, there is nothing any government can do to stop it and thinking they can is idiotic, christ we’re still having outbreaks in old folks homes after 2yrs…should tell you everything you need to know about government competency.

Maybe start focusing on a healthier population and start banning fast food and processed food and fructose among others..this is a pandemic of the old, sick and obese

#117 T-Man on 01.19.22 at 9:04 pm

This infantile excuse for a government is run by a failed drama teacher, a journalist, and an environmental crusader who resembles Charley Manson. We get what we deserve.

#118 Some Guy on 01.19.22 at 9:30 pm

The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all coronaviruses is estimated to have existed as recently as 8000 BCE, although some models place the common ancestor as far back as 55 million years or more, implying long term coevolution with bat and avian species.

Maybe we should just lock down for 56 million years. To flatten the curve.

#119 T-Man on 01.19.22 at 9:35 pm

W.E.F. leader Claus Schwab: You’ll own nothing and be happy? This was planned. COVID=CONTROL

#120 SW on 01.19.22 at 9:38 pm

#112 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 8:46 pm
@#96 Radar
“Sure he will, until Putin turns the gas off. Europe will indeed be cold this winter.”
++++
Putin only cares about Putin.
He has raped Russia for at least 20 years and pocketed billions. Possibly hundreds of billions….
———
Well, what wasn’t mentioned in all the press coverage is that Mr. Putin has now invaded Belarus, successfully.

Perhaps that was his intention all along. Shore up that idiot Lukashenko and prevent another “colour revolution” there?

This might not really be about the Ukraine at all. Lots of sabre rattling by everyone though.

#121 RichardTO on 01.19.22 at 9:44 pm

Nature won in the end.

The virus eluded modern medicine and all of the countermeasures society could muster and it was the nearly miraculous molecular machinery of our immune system that allowed the vast majority of people to survive.

#122 Doug t on 01.19.22 at 9:48 pm

#116 cotton

Yup

#123 Bronze Bullet on 01.19.22 at 9:49 pm

Let’s not underestimate the persistence and stupidity of the sheeple.

When something does hit the market, as many as 50 buyers swoop in to compete for it which pushes prices through the roof.

https://ca.movies.yahoo.com/movies/editors-edition-real-estate-market-170808314.html

Statistics reported ‘inflation’ of 4. 8% is a complete joke.

It sounds more like 12-15 % minimum to me as housing alone that accounts for 50 % of household expenses increased by 25 %.

What increased by only 4.8 % last year? The empty space in T2’s head? Is there anything at all besides empty space in it?

China just started their QE and decreased their rates.
Next level of currency wars. To stay competitive we need to keep our rates down while the inflation roars.
Rates range bound at 1.5 % max. Maybe 2 % (hardly achievable). Inflation of 15 %, reported at 5%. We will keep lying about it. Houses on their way to 2,3,5 millions guaranteed.

The biggest accelerated uber stagflation ever.

Quality of life and consumptions flushed down the toilet. We have seen nothing of energy and food prices yet. Construction and repair prices through the roof.

Services declining as evident from the article. Restaurants are doomed. You can’t have the economy shut down and monetary expansion without super inflation.

What is interesting is how much longer will the naive stupid sheeple take it and comply. Believing that rates will rise significantly in such environment as to match or even partially compensate the inflation borders with insanity specially after 12 years of average 1 % rates.

With housing increasing 3-5 fold.

#124 Doug t on 01.19.22 at 9:53 pm

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

Well I can say after decades of work that “loyalty” was a one way street

#125 yvr_lurker on 01.19.22 at 9:54 pm

My 17 year old tested positive on Sunday. Was zonked the past 3 days, but today is much better. My wife and I have an appointment for a booster on Saturday. All is good at this stage and likely we are asymptomatic (feel a little strange), but frankly who the hell knows. We are all going to be exposed to this omicron eventually. I am starting to have the sense that we just need to let it rip and be done with it. However, I do realize the burden on the hospitals and the nurses dealing with those (random, mostly unvaccinated) people who get super sick. School is trucking along and from what I see there are no concessions in high school for those who get sick….Trying to help my kid keep up with school has been challenging, as we are now in home schooling mode….

#126 mike from mtl on 01.19.22 at 9:54 pm

Gee ya think?

After two (2) years of beating everyone’s brains in to be with exactly the same result just now realising just how stupid all this is?

Nobody has this thing ‘under control’, either delaying the inventible or lying the same result remains – nature will always find a way. Problem is locally we still are under an official delusion that it’s still March 2020.

As stated public transport, hospitality, restaurants, office cube farms are in big trouble here. The supreme leaders have declared everyone to be unclean, so as usual the free market was forced to find an alternative solution. Two (2) years later that solution preforms better than ever so why even entertain going backwards?

Again, my own employer (along with many others) has basically thrown in the towel and 9-5 WFW is over. Blame the provinces, Feds, media but fact is once forced to find a solution there’s no going backwards.

#127 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 9:56 pm

#112 CEF
The Russian population is seething under his rule and no matter how many journalists, politicians and former Oligarchs he has jailed or assassinated ( poisoning seems to be a peculiar Russian trait )…..he still can’t step down.
———————
Don’t get me wrong.
I’m not a Putin apologist.
But that utter nonsense garbage that you write must be straightened out.
(Poisoning seems to be a peculiar Russian trait, what the hell?).
Putin is actually quite liked in Russia.
They like a strong man, who stands up to the rest of the world.

#128 Bronze Bullet on 01.19.22 at 10:07 pm

In the above link:
100-200 visitors per open house, 20-40 offers, a house in Kitchener (! ) jumping from 700 k to 1.6 mil in 18 months.

And ‘inflation’ is sub 5 %. Realtors speak more about 40 % increase in house prices, official number is 26.6 %. And realtors complain as there is no inventory for sale as sellers anticipate even higher prices.

Witnessing in real time the quick and fast, irreversible destruction of savings, currencies and living standards.

This has been building for many years, decades and is now quickly unravelling.

#129 tiger1960 on 01.19.22 at 10:10 pm

Hey happy new year Garth!
Why New York?
Why not Florida?

#130 Stealth on 01.19.22 at 10:14 pm

Thank you.

Why can’t interest rates fall again?

Based on this post things are not so hot that they need to be cooled by rate hike.

Is everyone pretty much convinced that they must rise, meaning all experts agree?

Oh,oh… that means….

#131 Cici on 01.19.22 at 10:21 pm

Don’t despair, Garth.

I think the virus will become somewhat manageable within the next year, and WFH should progressively start to lose it’s allure within the next two. Some will remain at home, but they’ll probably pay for it in some way or another in the long run.

I just can’t see any reason why we would derail the economy any more than necessary by allowing offices, commercial space, tourism and public transit to be gutted once the hospitals are no longer under siege and governments at all levels are desperately in need of extra revenues.

When cities do come back, there will be some great investment opportunities for those with guts, determination and deep pockets!

#132 Faron on 01.19.22 at 10:35 pm

#127 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.19.22 at 9:56 pm
#112 CEF

Ponz, Ponz, Ponz. Are you implying that the widely documented cases of poisoning of Putin’s adversaries are fabricated? Or are you engaging in a whattaboutism of some kind?

And it’s pretty easy to be popular when y he controls virtually the entirety of the media landscape in Russia. Being surprised that Putin is “popular” in Russia is identical to being surprised that Trump is popular with Fox News viewers.

Poisoning:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB111282082770699984

https://abcnews.go.com/International/navalny-long-history-russian-poisonings/story?id=72579648

Sure, western media, but you ain’t gonna see this stuff on Russia Today.

#133 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.19.22 at 10:48 pm

@#127 Poisonous Ponzies Pals.

“(Poisoning seems to be a peculiar Russian trait, what the hell?).”

+++

Ponzies memory is slipping…. so sad.

Cheap Costco Hotdogs and pop will have that cumulative effect on the brain.

Does Navalny ring a bell?
Its only been 2 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoning_of_Alexei_Navalny

Or how about former KGB agent Skirpal and his daughters poisoning in England… causing an international incident in 2018?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/britain-charges-russians-novichok-poisoning-skripals-1.4810813

Or the ex KGB agent Litvinenko that was killed in England using a uniquely Russian invention…..Plutonium in his tea in 2006?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoning_of_Alexander_Litvinenko#:~:text=A%20business%20partner%20of%20Andrey%20Lugovoy.&text=The%20Times%20stated%20that%20the,before%20going%20to%20the%20bar.

Or the Bulgarian secret agents working for the KGB that killed a dissident in London in 1978

https://www.theguardian.com/world/from-the-archive-blog/2020/sep/09/georgi-markov-killed-poisoned-umbrella-london-1978

Apparently the Russians have perfected assassination by poisoning over the decades.
They became especially adept at killing enemies of the State with Heart Attack inducing chemicals ( aka poison) to make the deaths a little less suspicious.

Yes Ponzie.
Russians love poisoning their enemies.
It’s a shame you’re too stubborn to admit when you’re wrong ( which is , unfortunately for me…a lot of the time)…

I hear macaroni and cheese is really cheap at Ikea….you should check it out.
Just dont get food poisoning

:)

#134 Vanreal on 01.19.22 at 11:01 pm

Downtown Vancouver seems very busy. Lots of traffic. Lots of people.

#135 DON on 01.19.22 at 11:03 pm

#20 Parksville Prankster on 01.19.22 at 4:23 pm

A person is smart, but people in a group are dumb.

********
That should be on a bumper sticker or a t-shirt.

#136 meslippey on 01.19.22 at 11:06 pm

#13alexinvestor on 01.19.22 at 4:17 pm

WFH has really exposed the inefficiency of working from an office. Spending a couple of hours in commute every day just to show up to see someone is starting to seem antiquated.

However, lots of jobs still available … I hear that truck drivers are really raking it these days. Six figures, easily. No need for a fancy college/uni degree.
—————
In the 80s before trucking was deregulated 100k for a driver was doable if you worked overtime.
40 years later same wage and they say there is a shortage of drivers Hmmm….. we don’t know how to find more drivers.

#137 PastThePeak on 01.19.22 at 11:16 pm

DELETED

#138 The Woosh on 01.19.22 at 11:33 pm

#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

———————————————

That was really petty of you Garth. It’s your blog, do what you like but Sam deserves an apology.

Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

#139 Blobby on 01.19.22 at 11:41 pm

Was downtown on Broadway Vancouver today. Normally I hate it around here (WAAY too busy), today at 3pm, I had the entire sidewalk to myself, didnt pass a single body.

Doesnt this create a catch 22?

We have storming inflation – requiring higher rates

But and impending recession due to business shutting down due to no-one being around, etc – requiring rates to drop to simulate?

Which one wins?

How would that work?

#140 Greg on 01.20.22 at 12:10 am

Boris announced his retreat. Covid and it’s minions lost!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KQKhcLRO3o

#141 Half Full on 01.20.22 at 12:11 am

Now the schools have reopened…
As a BC teacher, I had 3 months of WFH. Otherwise my school and district have been in person full steam ahead. Even now with multiple cases of Covid in my room (me included) there is no shut down of schools. They are determined to stay open no matter what. And my other half works in Health Care. Not a single day off for any pandemic. In fact, quite the opposite. He has worked and been offered more overtime, including working his four days on and then working full time for his four days off for months on end. How nice it would have been to stay home and collect CERB.

#142 Jon B on 01.20.22 at 12:29 am

We’re governed by selfish children. What do you expect?

#143 Dr V on 01.20.22 at 12:32 am

Apologies if anyone has posted this already. I know we have bloggers from the Nanaimo area.

https://www.nanaimobulletin.com/news/nanaimo-city-council-denies-permit-for-cabin-on-islet-off-protection-island/

Sailo – know anything about this one?

#144 Scott on 01.20.22 at 12:34 am

@Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

Lol kind of went the other way on that one.

Misses the good ol days where employees had to kiss their bosses ass for letting them work there.

I’m exaggerating obviously. I’m assuming you believe in a utopian employer/employee relationship where both sides want what’s best for each other and both can prosper together. I wisened up to the real world long before Bezos (US 2nd largest employer) thanked his employees for sending him to space while simultaneously policing their pee breaks. The Waltons (largest US employer) at least keep pretty quiet raking in billions while their employees are subsidized by tax dollars to pay for their food stamps.

#145 Balmuto on 01.20.22 at 1:05 am

Sad to think of the whole Bay and King office complex and the Path becoming a giant anachronism overnight. But the pandemic just accelerated a long term trend towards remote work that won’t be reversed. You can’t fight technological change. Nothing to do but adapt. We live in a virtual world now.

#146 Dr V on 01.20.22 at 1:11 am

110 Ponz

“The CocaCola opened again today, 2 months ahead of expectations.
Thanks to all the hard working workers (public and private) who made this happen.”
——–

A good example of what we can actually get done, when
we need it done.

Unfortunately it is the exception, not the rule.

Oh and this may interest you

https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/cp-rail-significantly-expand-hydrogen-train-project-155809528.html

#147 Dr V on 01.20.22 at 1:43 am

113 Jason

“I work in tech. When I came to Canada in 2013, my first salary here was 55k. Now I work as a contractor and recently signed for a 1 year contract for $100/hr. That’s around 200k/year.
If I would be loyal and have stayed at my first company now I would have made around 85-90k a year.”
—————–

I notice many posters starting with the words “I work in tech/IT”.

Over an 8-9 year period, I do not see his experience as unusual, and believe it to be applicable in other careers,
esp professional or trades. Jason sounds very capable.

I think to appreciate loyalty, you have to look at it from both perspectives. Our 3 best employees were with us for years, and eventually became partners in our
business (for a very reasonable price)

What Jason has to realize is contractors = zero loyalty.
He may not get his contract renewed, and find another “contractor”, perhaps even an overseas one, has taken his place. Important to consider all terms of the contract.

Companies hire “contractors” when it makes economic
sense to do so.

#148 DON on 01.20.22 at 3:15 am

https://www.politico.com/amp/news/magazine/2021/12/28/inflation-interest-rates-thomas-hoenig-federal-reserve-526177

This is worth a read as it discusses inflation today and in the 1970’s from an ex Fed official (lone wolf) with experience who can see patterns. Looks like he was right when he voted against easy money a decade ago.

I don’t know…but maybe he knows something.

#149 Summertime on 01.20.22 at 5:52 am

And in a parallel universe far, far away from our daily lives:

https://ca.yahoo.com/finance/news/bank-of-canada-ends-quantitative-easing-signals-rate-hikes-sooner-142201520.html

Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem reiterated inflation’s temporary nature during a press conference following the announcement and tried to reassure Canadians concerned about higher prices.

“I want to assure Canadians that we can and we will keep inflation under control,” said Macklem

“We remain committed to holding the policy interest rate at the effective lower bound until economic slack is absorbed so that the 2 percent inflation target is sustainably achieved. In the Bank’s projection, this happens sometime in the middle quarters of 2022,” said the Bank of Canada.

So it is the energy prices and the supply chain issues to blame for the inflation. Not the idiotic policies leading to this.

The guy with the 500 $ shoes on the picture and a private limo at tax payers expenses believes that inflation is low so he needs to do more to elevate it.

You won’t see 2% real inflation in the next decade or two. Double digits as a minimum.

#150 Summertime on 01.20.22 at 6:01 am

#113 Jason on 01.19.22 at 8:47 pm

Jason, of course you are right, loyalty goes both ways.

The stingy, stupid, greedy owners of this place believe they own you, by giving you a huge credit and then beating you with the stick to return it back.

The purpose of your life for them is to be a debt slave, die working and not to collect any benefits, leaving nothing behind to your hairs so the scheme can keep going.

Any deviation from the allowed behavior or elements of critical and independent thinking will be strongly discouraged.

You are ‘their’ employee, not in an equal, mutual beneficial relationship. No wonder we are at this point now. Atlas shrugged all over.

#151 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 6:59 am

#[email protected]
Wow.
The “Scientist” and the “Exaggerator” are tag teaming.
The “0dd Couple” comes to mind.

#152 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 7:12 am

#125 yvr_lurker on 01.19.22 at 9:54 pm
My 17 year old tested positive on Sunday. Was zonked the past 3 days, but today is much better. My wife and I have an appointment for a booster on Saturday. All is good at this stage and likely we are asymptomatic (feel a little strange), but frankly who the hell knows. We are all going to be exposed to this omicron eventually. I am starting to have the sense that we just need to let it rip and be done with it. However, I do realize the burden on the hospitals and the nurses dealing with those (random, mostly unvaccinated) people who get super sick. School is trucking along and from what I see there are no concessions in high school for those who get sick….Trying to help my kid keep up with school has been challenging, as we are now in home schooling mode….
———————-
I feel the same.
I think in BC they are not testing much more.
Just telling people to quarantine for 5 days if they have any symptoms.
Lots of people off sick now. Could be Covid, the Cold or the flu. Who knows.
As I said before , the lousy weather is not helping.
A winter of discontent, for sure.
My kids are in Uni, and it’s kinda hybrid.
But, it seems in the States, the cases are dropping overall.
Knock on wood.

#153 Stone on 01.20.22 at 7:25 am

Small businesses are, together, the largest employer group in Canada. Nowhere is their agony better viewed than by taking a walk through the PATH, which runs through the bottom of my building.

———

One word to small businesses: Adapt!

Or die. Stop whining.

#154 Stone on 01.20.22 at 7:41 am

#138 The Woosh on 01.19.22 at 11:33 pm
#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

———————————————

That was really petty of you Garth. It’s your blog, do what you like but Sam deserves an apology.

Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

———

Sam has adapted. He looked out for #1 and there’s nothing to be ashamed about that. I think Sam is more grown up than most others out there. Like a balanced and diversified investment portfolio, Sam ensured he is getting full value for his skillset. He isn’t being lazy or selfish. He’s exploiting employers for maximum profit. Just like employers exploit employees for maximum profit. Apparently, his skillset is in high demand and employers are drooling for him. When I was the employer, I made it clear to all new hires I expected to get full value out of them. I also expected them to move on when it was warranted, whether internally or externally. Because growth is natural and shouldn’t be stymied.

Apparently, small businesses should learn something from Sam. It seems they don’t understand the concept of adapting and exploiting opportunities (challenges) like Sam has. I guess they’re not real businesses and therefore don’t deserve to survive.

I spend my money with businesses that know how to adapt and cater to their customers.

#155 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.20.22 at 8:00 am

@#141 Half Full
“How nice it would have been to stay home and collect CERB.”

+++

Yes, please thank our beloved Prime Minister and his head nodding non finance Finance Minister …… at election time.

#156 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.20.22 at 8:08 am

@#151 Pouting Ponzie’s Personal Purgatory.
“The “Scientist” and the “Exaggerator” are tag teaming.”

+++

Yes.
‘Tis a rare day when Faron and CrowdyFartz join hands and dogpile a foolish statement.
But you deserved the rubber hose treatment.

So rather than admit we both provided legitimate rebuttals to your incredulous, inaccurate, biased babbling.
You take the easy route and revert to insults.
It must be wonderful to always be stubbornly correct…even when you’re wrong.
Life is much easier that way.
A typical ponzie tactic and 100% expected…
:)

#157 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.20.22 at 8:15 am

@#146 Dr V

Oh.
Ponzie was talking about the Coquihalla Hwy!

When he babbled about the Cocacola being finished
I thought he was excited that another new sugary drink factory had opened up somewhere nearby to slake his unquenchable thirst for tooth rotting beverages.

He has to wash those cheap, buck fifty, inedible Costco “schnitzels” down somehow. The free water fountain in the corner just wasn’t cutting it.
Penny Pinching Ponzie can sniff out a deal in the weirdest places…..but we still luv him.
:)

#158 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 8:51 am

#146 Dr V on 01.20.22 at 1:11 am
110 Ponz

“The CocaCola opened again today, 2 months ahead of expectations.
Thanks to all the hard working workers (public and private) who made this happen.”
——–

A good example of what we can actually get done, when
we need it done.

Unfortunately it is the exception, not the rule.
————————
Agree.
Having Teutonic DNA, I tend to be a perfectionist.
And sometimes, I could pull my hair out.
But, you gotta work with what you have.
Hiring smart is paramount.
And don’t be a micro manager.

#159 OK, Doomer on 01.20.22 at 8:56 am

Biden lost on the filibuster. Not many people understand how big of a deal that was. It was a massive save for democracy in the U.S.

The rule Biden wanted to kill was probably the only rule that preserves any sense of bi-partisanship in the U.S. It stated that you needed 60 votes in Senate to pass legislation. That rule means that only laws that both sides can agree on get passed. Political squabbles are by and large left at the door as they don’t get you anywhere; people have to get along to get anything done.

To see the damage that removing a 60 vote requirement in the Senate causes, we only have to look at how Supreme Court nominations have turned into national dumpster fires. In 2013 Democrat Senate leader Harry Reid managed to push through killing the filibuster for Supreme Court justice nominees. He did that because Obama’s nominees had no widespread support. At the time, the Democrats thought that Hillary was a shoe in for President, so they would be able to pack the court with Justices that would be puppets of the Democrats.

Harry Reid’s experiment with killing the filibuster backfired spectacularly on the Democrats when Trump unexpectedly won and then pushed three conservative justices onto the Supreme Court. Reid’s rule change also unleashed the mother of all dumpster fires, unleashing partisan politic hell into what used to be a moderately interesting bi-partisan snooze-fest. Hyper-partisan politics were suddenly rewarded, and any thought of co-operation went out the window. Mayhem ensued. And you can blame the Democrats for that one. They wrecked a system that worked fine for 250 years just to push an Obama candidate.

Enter Joe Biden. His big plan, contrary to narrative that CTV and Global push, was to federalize U.S. elections. This means that the role of the states in checking the power of the federal government would be removed. It would have given hyper-partisan Democrats in Washington D.C. total control over all U.S. elections, a clear violation of the Constitution. The dumpster fire on this move would have been seen from the Moon.

Fortunately, some Senate Democrats broke ranks and killed Biden’s stupidity before it caught hold. Now, if the Senate was wise enough to undo the damage that Harry Reid did, that would be something that would de-fang hyper-partisan politics.

Checks and balances exist for a reason. Removing them, like Biden wanted to do was a bad, bad idea.

#160 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.20.22 at 9:12 am

@#159 Ok Doomer
“Checks and balances exist for a reason. Removing them, like Biden wanted to do was a bad, bad idea.”

+++

Yep ,
That Senate filibuster legislation was Dead on Arrival.
Good to see since we’ll probably be suffering through a another Trump Presidency in Jan 2025.

#161 Love_The_Cottage on 01.20.22 at 9:15 am

#123 Bronze Bullet on 01.19.22 at 9:49 pm
Statistics reported ‘inflation’ of 4. 8% is a complete joke.

It sounds more like 12-15 % minimum to me as housing alone that accounts for 50 % of household expenses increased by 25 %.
________
My property taxes are going up 1.3% this year. Utilities up a few percent, I own my home so how exactly are my expenses up 12-15%? For some it will be higher, but 4.8% is an average.

#162 Do we have all the facts on 01.20.22 at 9:20 am

There was a time when this blog seem convinced that once the Covid Crisis ended the Canadian economy would return to normal and a large percentage of workers would return to their jobs in office towers.

It is becoming clear that the lockdowns imposed during the Covid Crisis have caused irreversible damage to several sectors of the Canadian economy. The most significant change is the shift towards the internet as a source of goods and services. When goods can be purchased and delivered to homes at the lowest price possible and work can be completed without the need to pollute our environment with hydrocarbon based travel permanent change seems inevitable.

The Covid Crisis has shifted wealth way from tens of thousands of small businesses towards very large businesses and our governments are just beginning to realize the financial impact of this shift to their bottom line.

The financial consequences of the “better to be safe than sorry” decisions made during the Covid Crisis are beginning to emerge and the preliminary results are far from encouraging. Covid 19 has altered the paradigms that existed in Canadian cities prior to 2020 and the net financial impact on the pre 2020 paradigms has yet to be determined.

Perhaps it might be time for our governments to start a realistic examination of the impact of that decisions made during the Covid Crisis will have on their revenue generating capacity in the future.

Residential property taxes look ripe for a significant paradigm shift to me.

#163 George S on 01.20.22 at 9:29 am

#32 Ballingsford on 01.19.22 at 4:48 pm wrote:
“Less commuters is probably a great help to fight climate change.”

WFH requires that you heat or cool your house for an extra 8 to 10 hours during the day to a nice comfortable temperature. So it is probably not as much help as you may imagine.

#164 Millennial 1%er on 01.20.22 at 9:43 am

Pick a side, garth :^)

Life is gray, kid. – Garth

#165 AM in MN on 01.20.22 at 9:45 am

#6 Prince Polo on 01.19.22 at 4:02 pm

70% of us are wealthy land barons, while 30% are social pariahs (aka loser renters). I am confident all the home owners will gladly pay the extra property taxes that are required to fund all the expenditures. Pinch me!

————————————————————

“Gladly” is irrelevant. They will pay because there is no other source of wealth to tax that can bring in the kind of funds that Governments need.

Garth you missed out the carnage done by the border closures, or defacto closings as the cost and hassle has been made enough of a barrier. To a trading nation that relies on a lot of imports for the people, not being able to cross and do business has been a big killer.

There will be a big transfer of wealth, one way or the other, based on political decisions, as the debt burdens finally come into reality. Do they just print more money and give it to people? Raise taxes? Give the public sector unions the raises they seek for the inflation they caused?

One way or another it won’t be pretty.

The work ethic can come back if the government supports get cut back. People will do what they have to in order to survive.

#166 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 9:49 am

#138 The Woosh on 01.19.22 at 11:33 pm
#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

———————————————

That was really petty of you Garth. It’s your blog, do what you like but Sam deserves an apology.

Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

———————————————

Glad to hear it! Why ever would you want an employee with ambition and drive? Those kind of employees are never a good fit. Only vacuous serfs will do. Let’s not forget lickspittle. Too much of a risk that “those kinds” of employees might set up their own shop and take away their former employer’s customers. Pffft…ambition and drive! Who needs that?

Hmmmm…makes you wonder…

Such silly comments on this topic. No employer wants a worker who is constantly looking over his/her shoulder for a better offer, has no loyalty and flits around impetuously. This is not ambition or drive. It’s the ultimate in short-term gig thinking. When I hire someone, the CV matters. A record of 12-month employment stints means I take a pass. – Garth

#167 Brian on 01.20.22 at 10:08 am

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/politics/putin-could-take-all-of-europe-in-the-blink-of-an-eye-its-time-to-be-awake-not-woke/

#168 tbone on 01.20.22 at 10:21 am

I worked for my former employer for 30 years.
Company was sold and they purged all longtime employees to make room for low priced replacements.
Not many new hires stayed very long.
The low pay and no benefits were a factor as they moved on to other better offers with companies that valued their knowledge and training.
I didnt blame them at all for their departure and was happy to help them develop their skills during their stay.

#169 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 10:21 am

#163 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 9:49 am
#138 The Woosh on 01.19.22 at 11:33 pm
#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

———————————————

That was really petty of you Garth. It’s your blog, do what you like but Sam deserves an apology.

Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

———————————————

Glad to hear it! Why ever would you want an employee with ambition and drive? Those kind of employees are never a good fit. Only vacuous serfs will do. Let’s not forget lickspittle. Too much of a risk that “those kinds” of employees might set up their own shop and take away their former employer’s customers. Pffft…ambition and drive! Who needs that?

Hmmmm…makes you wonder…

Such silly comments on this topic. No employer wants a worker who is constantly looking over his/her shoulder for a better offer, has no loyalty and flits around impetuously. This is not ambition or drive. It’s the ultimate in short-term gig thinking. When I hire someone, the CV matters. A record of 12-month employment stints means I take a pass. – Garth

———————————————————

It’s the world of today, not yesterday. Those times are long gone. Who changed the dynamics that created the gig economy? Short-term corporate thinking needing to meet quarterly expectations, that’s who. No need to bash employees who are able to pivot and profit from it.

As for hiring people with short stints on their CV, I had no issue doing just that. That employee stayed just 9 months but brought some great ideas from his previous gigs and actually implemented them. An open mind is a wonderful thing. You know who profited from it in the end? Me. And that’s all that matters at the end of the day.

Quite evident. – Garth

#170 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.20.22 at 10:25 am

@#166 The Woosh

Job hoppers.
If you show no loyalty.
Expect no loyalty.

However I also agree in the “new” reality of ruthless cuts and texts announcing closures is a kick in the teeth to any hard working valuable employee.
Large corporations that prattle on about their employees being their “greatest asset” spewing the same “empowerment” and “synergies” tripe at annual staff meetings seem to be the worst offenders for killing jobs without blinking an eye.

I foist some of the blame on govts that have brought in unbelievable amounts of regulatory bs ( before all the latest HR diversity, inclusion and equality bs) and rules.

The latest cash cow for the lazy.
5 MORE paid sick days starting Jan 1st.

Gee whiz.
Anyone notice the amount of staff that decided that amounted to 5 more paid vacation days?
The absenteeism this month is through the roof …….. everywhere.

Loyalty, ethics, and productivity are punchlines in the joke that is the Canadian workforce of today.

We need a 1980’s style… brutal, deep, recession with high unemployment to snap people out of the whiny La La land that they have created for themselves.

Start your own company and spend countless hours training employees to the point where they can work on their own and a competitor poaches them.
Awesome.

Rant over.
Ponzies turn.

#171 OK, Doomer on 01.20.22 at 10:25 am

#164 Millennial 1%er on 01.20.22 at 9:43 am
Pick a side, garth :^)

Life is gray, kid. – Garth
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I like to think that every so often, you run into something that you don’t know or understand, so it goes into “The Big Box of Things I Know Nothing About”.

What’s surprised me, as I get older, is that box gets bigger, not smaller :)

#172 Sail Away on 01.20.22 at 10:28 am

” A record of 12-month employment stints means I take a pass. – Garth”

——–

Likewise. The first year salary is mostly sunk cost for training. Speaking of… we’re hiring. No WFH, sorry.

#173 Sam on 01.20.22 at 10:30 am

Such silly comments on this topic. No employer wants a worker who is constantly looking over his/her shoulder for a better offer, has no loyalty and flits around impetuously. This is not ambition or drive. It’s the ultimate in short-term gig thinking. When I hire someone, the CV matters. A record of 12-month employment stints means I take a pass. – Garth

———————————————

With all due respect Garth, this is pretty out of touch with the way things are now. Jumping jobs every year or two is pretty common practice for those of us in our 20s without a big nest-egg, defined-benefit pension, or children. Matter of fact, I get recruiters banging on my door just about every week, most of them saying “You’ve been at your current gig for almost a year now, think it’s time for a change?”

In tech, breadth of experience matters. Some of the worst, most stubborn colleagues I’ve had are people who stayed at the same job for a decade. I’m a better employee for having seen more of the corporate world.

You will learn. – Garth

#174 Brian on 01.20.22 at 10:40 am

From last Nov. 09/2021

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/canadian-officials-who-met-with-ukrainian-unit-linked-to-neo-nazis-feared-exposure-by-news-media-documents

#175 DonM on 01.20.22 at 10:47 am

Personally know of 9 people who got Covid now. 7 vaccinated, 2 not (prior to vaccines).

Britain ridding mandates. Government realizing there is nothing they can do. Vaccines do not work and mandates will bankrupt families and all levels of governments.

Canadians are angry folk who thrive on dividing the country and its citizens. Very sad. Anyone young in this country should leave to greener pastures whose citizens as a whole respect rights and freedoms and to escape the decades of excessive taxes coming their way.

Canada as we knew it, is turning third world status.

#176 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 11:15 am

171 OK, Doomer on 01.20.22 at 10:25 am
#164 Millennial 1%er on 01.20.22 at 9:43 am
Pick a side, garth :^)

Life is gray, kid. – Garth
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I like to think that every so often, you run into something that you don’t know or understand, so it goes into “The Big Box of Things I Know Nothing About”.

What’s surprised me, as I get older, is that box gets bigger, not smaller :)
—————————
Yeah,
The old saying :The more I know, the more I realize how little I know”.
It’s the opposite with CEF.
He thinks he knows stuff, because he’s got Google on his phone.
That’s why true knowledge is in short supply these days.

#177 SunShowers on 01.20.22 at 11:27 am

“Such silly comments on this topic. No employer wants a worker who is constantly looking over his/her shoulder for a better offer”

If you compensate your employees well enough, you’ll never have to worry about them looking for greener pastures.

The kind of loyalty you’re expecting used to command those vaunted DB pensions we’re always talking about. Those pensions get taken off the table, and you expect everyone to be ok with it? That nothing will change? That’s simply unrealistic, Garth.

If you want loyalty, you have to pay for it.

A majority of people never had a DB pension. Just you government guys. And lower wages are normal when such a pension is offered. – Garth

#178 SunShowers on 01.20.22 at 11:58 am

“A majority of people never had a DB pension. Just you government guys.”

In the 1960s and 70s, ~50% of Canadian private sector employees had DB pensions. Those were the days of loyalty, where people would stay at a job for decades instead of years, because there was a huge incentive for doing so. You take away the incentive, you change the behavior, simple as.

And why would you think I work for the government? Public sector is the only flavor of employment I haven’t had.

#179 Brett in Calgary on 01.20.22 at 12:04 pm

Good blog post Garth. Many of things we tried did not work at all. And better yet, we kept doing them!!

Remember when Murray Edwards left for Britain as soon as the Liberals came to power? He’s a business man and knew higher tax brackets were coming. Fast forward several years; the Calgary Flames just relieved themselves of a costly arena build. Why? Because Edwards is a business man.

I was at the Flames – Panthers game which supposedly allowed 50% capacity. If one in every 4 seats had someone in it, you’d be lucky. The entire east end was empty. Now I don’t expect anyone to feel sorry for Edwards or the Calgary Flames, but their actions suggest they are battening down the hatches.

If there is a business out there you like, support it, or it will not be there next month.

#180 leebow on 01.20.22 at 12:09 pm

#177 SunShowers

Money is not all there is to it. Sometimes it is also about doing a meaningful thing.

#181 Faron on 01.20.22 at 12:12 pm

#176 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 11:15 am

Yeah,
The old saying :The more I know, the more I realize how little I know”.
It’s the opposite with CEF.
He thinks he knows stuff, because he’s got Google on his phone.
That’s why true knowledge is in short supply these days

Reading is one of the principal ways of gaining knowledge regardless of medium. I would argue that CEF demonstrates a pretty good grasp on a wide variety of topics.

Unless you have lived experience under Putin, your knowledge of the matter is as or less reliable. It seems to have been tainted by personal experience in a similar but different regime from which you are extrapolating. That makes your view feel right to you, but likely unreliable.

#182 Habitt on 01.20.22 at 12:46 pm

Great comments today from all the dogs. A sincere thank you to all. Especially you Mr Garth for the awesome post.

#183 SunShowers on 01.20.22 at 12:46 pm

#180 leebow on 01.20.22 at 12:09 pm
“Money is not all there is to it. Sometimes it is also about doing a meaningful thing.”

Going back to my original post (#43), if people’s basic needs were met regardless of their employment, they would be free to pursue work that has more meaning to them, even if it meant a lower rate of pay.

Until that day comes, my question will always be: Can I pay my rent or mortgage with meaning? Can I buy food with it?

#184 Shawn on 01.20.22 at 1:10 pm

Inflation 4.8%?

#161 Love_The_Cottage on 01.20.22 at 9:15 am said

#123 Bronze Bullet on 01.19.22 at 9:49 pm
Statistics reported ‘inflation’ of 4. 8% is a complete joke.

It sounds more like 12-15 % minimum to me as housing alone that accounts for 50 % of household expenses increased by 25 %.
________
My property taxes are going up 1.3% this year. Utilities up a few percent, I own my home so how exactly are my expenses up 12-15%? For some it will be higher, but 4.8% is an average.

*****************************
That’s worth repeating. Statistics Canada does the best job it can of measuring inflation.

But the many people go nuts if you suggest that their number is anywhere near reality. The lack of trust is scary.

#185 Shawn on 01.20.22 at 1:16 pm

Loyalty?

Two way street. Warren Buffett who is extraordinarily talented as a people manager said something recently along the lines of:

We earn trust from our employees by giving trust.

Basically they also they earn loyalty by giving loyalty (unless certain key rules are broken)

They show they trust employees and the employees return the favor.

#186 Sail Away on 01.20.22 at 1:17 pm

#179 Brett in Calgary on 01.20.22 at 12:04 pm

If there is a business out there you like, support it, or it will not be there next month.

——-

It’s a circle: invest in and patronize good companies and the company pays you back through investment returns. Eventually you will be getting greater benefit than your outlay.

This does require some tailoring of your consumerism to feed the companies you own.

Home Depot, Costco, A&W, Intuit, Fortis, Tesla and others all pay the Sail Aways handsomely for buying their products. Getting paid to consume, baby!

#187 Shawn on 01.20.22 at 1:29 pm

Thought for the day

In Alberta, our house values rarely need the word “point” to describe them, as in one point three million etc..

But with higher wages and lower taxes it’s far easier in Alberta to reach a portfolio value that has a “point” in its description of value.

Send your young to Alberta.

#188 Midnights on 01.20.22 at 1:35 pm

You have to love how the narrative changes daily.

https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/whos-top-scientist-says-no-evidence-healthy-kids-adolescents-need-covid-19-2022-01-18/

You have to love the headlines today. Nurses say, Dr’s say.
Pull the agenda and they are aloud to, “say”. But if you don’t we’re pulling your license, lol.
Question if investing and making money is out of the box thinking why is it that most people post the mainstream headlines? Meaning most people must make crap returns because they’re reading everything the m(ass)es read.

#189 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 1:37 pm

#169 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 10:21 am
#163 The Woosh on 01.20.22 at 9:49 am
#138 The Woosh on 01.19.22 at 11:33 pm
#44 Sam on 01.19.22 at 5:12 pm
Sorry to break it to you Garth, but WFH is here to stay. I work in tech and before the pandemic I was at a company where I went in every day (but could WFH if I was sick or the roads were dangerous). We went fully online in March 2020.

A year later I changed jobs to work for a local, fully remote company for a significant pay raise. Fast forward another year and I did it all over again.

I’m a 27 year old baby millennial and my career prospects have never been better. I can work from wherever I want for whomever I want, for whatever wage is highest.

When you grow up you might even learn about loyalty. – Garth

———————————————

That was really petty of you Garth. It’s your blog, do what you like but Sam deserves an apology.

Glad he’s not my employee. – Garth

———————————————

Glad to hear it! Why ever would you want an employee with ambition and drive? Those kind of employees are never a good fit. Only vacuous serfs will do. Let’s not forget lickspittle. Too much of a risk that “those kinds” of employees might set up their own shop and take away their former employer’s customers. Pffft…ambition and drive! Who needs that?

Hmmmm…makes you wonder…

Such silly comments on this topic. No employer wants a worker who is constantly looking over his/her shoulder for a better offer, has no loyalty and flits around impetuously. This is not ambition or drive. It’s the ultimate in short-term gig thinking. When I hire someone, the CV matters. A record of 12-month employment stints means I take a pass. – Garth

———————————————————

It’s the world of today, not yesterday. Those times are long gone. Who changed the dynamics that created the gig economy? Short-term corporate thinking needing to meet quarterly expectations, that’s who. No need to bash employees who are able to pivot and profit from it.

As for hiring people with short stints on their CV, I had no issue doing just that. That employee stayed just 9 months but brought some great ideas from his previous gigs and actually implemented them. An open mind is a wonderful thing. You know who profited from it in the end? Me. And that’s all that matters at the end of the day.

Quite evident. – Garth

—————————————————

And without any shame. I’ve learned very well the ways of the world.

#190 All lies and manipulated u decide on 01.20.22 at 2:09 pm

#116 Cowtown Cowboy on 01.19.22 at 9:00 pm
================
2 thumbs up.
Our life’s affected by all this=zero thankfully.
I know a lot of people and know 3 that got the bug.
A lot of bullshit came alone with this gig and the media is a disaster.

#191 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 2:22 pm

#181 Faron on 01.20.22 at 12:12 pm
#176 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.20.22 at 11:15 am

Yeah,
The old saying :The more I know, the more I realize how little I know”.
It’s the opposite with CEF.
He thinks he knows stuff, because he’s got Google on his phone.
That’s why true knowledge is in short supply these days

Reading is one of the principal ways of gaining knowledge regardless of medium. I would argue that CEF demonstrates a pretty good grasp on a wide variety of topics.
—————
Okay give me a few topics that he “has an pretty good grasp” on.
This guy hates everyone, The Russians,The Chinese,The Arabs, The Germans, His Coworkers, Civil Servants.
He only likes himself.
I think you know what they call a person like that.
As for knowledge, take away  Google and Wiki, and show me where the pretty good grasp is.
CEF reminds me of my x-wife.
Always whining and always had to have the last word.
Over and end.

#192 Doug in London on 01.20.22 at 2:30 pm

Only in hindsight will we really know if the virus won. We do know that governments ran up a big bill paying for it all. I don’t know if it will ever all be paid back but you have to start somewhere. We all know how house prices have exploded over the last 2 years, so there’s a lot of money tied up in this sector of the economy. As Prince Polo suggested in post #6, why not reassess house taxes based on market value? How about a capital gains tax on any gains made with selling your principal residence? An increase in capital gains tax on selling stocks would be a good idea also. Any other ideas?

#193 leebow on 01.20.22 at 2:34 pm

#183 SunShowers

Sorry, I didn’t mean to appear preaching or anything like that. No doubt basic needs to be satisfied for good work. That’s like a 17th century idea, can’t be wrong.

It’s just the whole conversation was around numbers, and that’s not the only thing to consider. That’s the point I wanted to make.

#194 Doug in London on 01.20.22 at 3:17 pm

Further to my comment #192, there’s another way to raise money, and that’s to follow the example of The Right Honourable Quebec Premier Francois Legault with a tax on anyone who is eligible to be vaccinated but isn’t.

After all that flak over Bill 21 about a ban on wearing religious symbols, here’s a chance for him and his government to be vindicated.

#195 Hope on 01.21.22 at 7:46 pm

Doug in London, i hope the tax out of you and your family, house tax, rent tax, debt tax, credit card tax etc. You after all take in your rear and are a proud Canadian slave.

#196 Doug in London on 01.21.22 at 11:12 pm

@Hope:
Where’s the money going to come from? Should the government keep printing money so we have hyperinflation like in Germany 100 years ago? How about getting rid of all taxes and letting everyone fend for themselves? If that happened and you needed any kind of assistance like health care then YOU would be the first one to bitch, whine, and complain saying why doesn’t the government do something to help me?

I remember travelling around rural eastern Ontario and seeing many signs that said: This land is our land, back off government. I wonder how many of them said that during the 1998 ice storm when the government paid for the army to come in for assistance? I wonder how many complained when government owned Ontario Hydro brought in lines and forestry crews from all over the province to get the power back on?

You don’t get something for nothing, never did, and never will. Oh, and one last word, I’m triple vaccinated so if there’s a no vaccination tax I say bring it on!