Hoax

There’s a bridge over a river. As I type this I’m staring out, looking at the word “HOAX” spray painted in white on its side. It forms part of a suite of works by some piteous person whose other contributions to public art include, “Covid Hoax” and “Vaccine Fraud.” They’re on trail signs, traffic posts, light standards and sidewalks. They remind me of a block-long series of messages scrawled on King Street last week in downtown Toronto. All the same: “Masks R 4 Pedos”. Maybe it takes one to know one.

Trust me. The last thing this blog wants to address again is the damn virus and the variant humans that topic attracts. But we’re nearing a critical point of consequences.

As you know, governments have given up trying to accurately count the number of infections. It could be 9,000 in Ontario today, or 90,000, for example. What we do know about are hospitalizations. In that province there were 3,448 Covid patients on Wednesday, up a thousand in a week. Seven days ago 288 were in ICU. Now 505. Apparently 83% were admitted to the ICU seeking treatment for the bug and 17% came for other reasons but tested positive for the illness. In BC hospitalizations are at an 8-month high with 97 in ICU, the majority of which are not vaccinated, including people in their 20s and 30s.

So, no joke. Death counts have taken a serious jump this week. A kid under 10 succumbed a few days ago in NS, where Omicron is also out of control. Quebec is struggling so much, as you know, that it’s making global headlines with a tax on the unvaccinated.

Omicron is milder, but still kills. Sheer numbers are a threat to the health care system. The biggest economic impact comes from sickness, absenteeism and the abject labour shortages which are causing grocery store shelves to empty, train schedules to be truncated and the garage owner where I took my car this morning to shrug and tell all his employees were stricken.

No fraud there, either. Now we hear Omicron is seriously delaying RTW and eating away at worker confidence. A survey by pollster Morning Consult found a stunning 55% of people who are now WFHers would consider leaving their jobs if asked to come back to the office. Coming atop 4.5 million resignations in a single month, it’s a big deal. Meanwhile 12% of paramedics in the GTA are off sick and for a while last week there was one – 1 – ambulance unit available to service a city of millions.

Well, it’s not hard to see that when there are fewer of things – cases of ice tea at Loblaws, mechanics on duty, containers flowing out of the ports or car chips – prices increase. Look what Covid did to the cost of puppies, exercise equipment and houses in Kelowna. This has turned into an incredibly inflationary pandemic, and Omicron is making sure we’ve not seen the crest yet.

Yesterday this blog told you US inflation would hit 7% – the most in decades. And it did. Here’s what the financial press screamed would come next…

Year/year inflation is seven per cent in the States with core inflation at 5.5%. “We’ve not seen anything like that since February of 1982. Ominous,” said my veteran pal Ed Pennock. The virus is not only chomping its way through the labour force, but once again totally messing up the supply chain. There’s no way the Fed is going to allow 7% annual currency destruction. Nor is the Bank of Canada likely to deviate from its record of following the US central bank 92% of the time. Rates are not going up twice and retreating. The Canadian CB is not going to act independently. Get over it.

Meanwhile stock indices have been holding steady enough, but there’s a lot of sector rotation going on. The techs are looking wobbly. Value companies are looking safe. And Dog help anyone who recent paid $8 million for a non-fungible token.

Hopefully Omicron fluffs into a new flu we get used to and boosted for annually. But we’re not there yet. Not close. It will take months, or years, to repair the damage to the global distribution system, rectify shortages and convince people they’re not going to die by setting foot in the office. In those months inflation will stay elevated, rates will rise, debt will become more costly, living costs swell and real estate will be impacted.

Unless you own nothing but an attitude and a can of spray paint, it’s no hoax.

About the picture: “Love your blog my husband and I read it everyday,” says Judy in her MSU. “For 20 years my son has been begging for a dog he would always say “When I move out I am getting a dog!” and I would say “Hey so are we”. This year with no empty nest in sight, we relented – behold our Kijjiji “Pandemic Puppy” Australian Sheppard or as advertised – Max named after the Formula One champion. Now at eight months he is much larger than expected for his breed, 75lbs  of sheer puppy exurberance. We now think we have a Aussie / German shepherd mix, he is a beautiful dog, sweet temperament, so loving – CRAZY AMOUNT OF ENERGY – but so worth it, should not have waited so long.”

185 comments ↓

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 3:46 pm

@ Brandon
“The municipalities will go bankrupt. The provinces will go bankrupt. The entire country will go bankrupt!”

++++

Bwahahahaha.
The fault with your reasoning that there will be no major interest rate increases is….. the politicians don’t care about the debt.
Truseau double the nations debt in 2 years.
Does that sound like someone who gives a $!!t?

They created the debt because…they dont care.
It means nothing to them.
No personal financial consequences, no pension penalty, nothing.
Business as usual.
Its another politicians problem down the road.
They will leave and draw their massive, guaranteed pensions and laugh at the little people.

ahahahahahahahahahaha

#2 Shawn on 01.12.22 at 3:49 pm

Too much debt to raise interest rates?

Really?

#180 Brandon on 01.12.22 at 2:19 pm
Are we heading back to the ’80s? No way will interest rates reach double digits, let alone 3 to 4%.

Why?

One word: DEBT.

The municipalities will go bankrupt. The provinces will go bankrupt. The entire country will go bankrupt!

The massive debts that are evident now were not so in the ’80s. Simply put, the debt-service payments would crush us. The BOC will not let that happen.

Rates will be allowed to increase to a level slightly less than inflation (which won’t be allowed to reach double digits). So debt will be inflated away relative to GDP, very much like the time spanning the 1940’s and 1950’s.

This is the only way of this mess.

***************************************
Hmm so why in the 1990’s when government debt was considered massive and interest rates were far higher and the debt a big burden did “we” not inflate it away? In fact inflation kept falling.

U.S. politicians were calling the bond market more powerful than the President.

Whatever factors cause LENDERS in the bond market to lend at ultra low rates I don’t think it is the fact that the borrowers might go broke. When borrowers are shaky lenders tend to ask for higher interest.

Me, I don’t have the answers. Those that make emphatic claims of knowing do not impress me. Even with capital letters!

By the way were you an adult and in the market in the 90’s much less the 80’s?

#3 Burnaby Boy on 01.12.22 at 3:51 pm

If the jabs are kill shots my investments will lose a lot of value as investors fade away. On the other hand, as trust in government fades like the snow in spring, precious metals should do well.
Perhaps its time for this site to get some Canadian doctors that are pro and anti the jab to argue the point. Strictly for investment purposes, of course.

#4 mj on 01.12.22 at 3:52 pm

it seems to me like it’s the government causing the inflation. If they didn’t spend so much, we wouldn’t have the high inflation.

#5 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 3:53 pm

@#281 wrk.dvr
“Every car part I source seems to be Chinese, even antique replacement parts.”
+++

I used to by excellent product for the company from the Eastern US.
A family owned company that had been pumping out the same excellent product for 75 years
2 years ago they were bought out by a Chinese firm.
Closed the US plant and discontinued the product.
Now?
You can buy their cheaply made crap or go to the EU.
I go to the EU.
More expensive than the Chinese product but at least it outlasts the warranty by a few years.

The gutting of North American factories and businesses continues.

#6 Wrk.dover on 01.12.22 at 3:53 pm

Today NS Premier Tim Houston PC, stated that 25% of hospitalizations are un-vaxxed while 90% of province has some level of vax in them.

#7 Slim on 01.12.22 at 3:57 pm

A couple of evenings there was a power outage affecting all of south Edmonton. Fortunately, it was for only three hours and not -35 degrees. No explanation was given.

If we don’t have enough people to run the facilities, due to illness, we will have more to prepare for than just empty store shelves. This could get very serious.

#8 Soviet Capitalist on 01.12.22 at 3:59 pm

Spraying things and taking it to extremes is not helpful.
I don’t agree with that, but neither I do with mandatory vaccination since it appears that the latter is not effective against Omicron and it’s safety is up in the air.

My thinking is the following – if fighting the virus is the main goal, then people with natural immunity should get the passport as well. They don’t and that tells me that vaccination is the real goal.

The question about natural immunity appears to be dodged by the talking heads and I can’t understand why.

Can anyone help me with any insights about that?

#9 Bob on 01.12.22 at 4:00 pm

I guess my question would be “a hoax by whom?” The gnomes of Zurich? The servants of Cthulu? It’s quite awe inspiring when you consider that they’ve duped the governments and medical establishment of the entire planet.

#10 None on 01.12.22 at 4:03 pm

Currency question:

Oddly, the Canadian dollar has been going back up. I’m considering buying some US$ if the CAD hits .83 again. I already have decent US$ exposure via VTI & VXUS so really all I can re-allocate to a USD based position are some bonds.

What would a reasonable US-based bond ETF be that I could use to replace a portion of my VAB?

I just can’t imagine how the CAN$ has much more upside than 0.83 compared to a big downside considering the state of our economy and its massive link to housing (where the US is far less).

#11 Prince Polo on 01.12.22 at 4:04 pm

I own an attitude, and liquid portfolio. No FOMO on mortgage debt tho’. Pity me.

#12 Chris on 01.12.22 at 4:08 pm

Garth,
will be visiting the east coast for the first time and will be running the Bluenose Marathon in May. Please ensure that you help get rid of all the graffiti before I arrive as well as the virus. I’m still trying to figure out which house is yours, so I can stop in for a visit. Wife and I are fully vaxxed and look forward to seeing you out there. I assume you will be running the marathon as well?

#13 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 4:08 pm

Hopefully Omicron fluffs into a new flu we get used to and boosted for annually.
– Garth

Hope. Last to die.

———————–

Québec all the rage this AM CET on its tax in Europa.

Italia so surprised it dropped the accent in Québec like everyone else save Belgium.

Oddly, Le Figaro, Le Parisien & Paris Match…étaient silencieux.

#14 TurnerNation on 01.12.22 at 4:12 pm

Life in Kanada. We will be so healthy! I cannot wait :-)
(We are of course looking at permanent lockdowns, testing and jabs until 2025. Happenstance)

.Federal contracts poised to deliver 100 million vaccine doses annually for years (cbc.ca)

— LOL who called it. See I know how Science in Kanada works:

————-
#8 TurnerNation on 01.01.22 at 11:17 am
2022 schedule (Thanks to our sponsor, Fizer):
January: TFSA contribution; 3rd booster
March: RRSP contribution; 4th booster
June: 5th booster
September: 6th booster
December: 7th booster. Annual winter lockdown
—————


— The Business of Sports. Pssst don’t tell this weblog ;-)

https://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/33006959/ncaa-updates-covid-guidelines-winter-sports
“Individuals within 90 days of a documented COVID-19 infection fall within the equivalent of “fully vaccinated.””

#15 SunShowers on 01.12.22 at 4:13 pm

BC Supreme Court is not playing around today in Saik’uz First Nation v. Rio Tinto Alcan Inc:
https://www.bccourts.ca/jdb-txt/sc/22/00/2022BCSC0015.htm

[192] And most recently on June 21, 2021, the federal government passed into law the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, S.C. 2021, c. 14 (“UNDRIPA”), which includes in the preamble the statement that “the doctrines of discovery and terra nullius are racist, scientifically false, legally invalid, morally condemnable and socially unjust”.

[194] If the doctrines of discovery and terra nullius are indeed “legally invalid” or simply inapplicable in Canadian law, what then is the legal justification validating the assertion of Crown sovereignty over Indigenous peoples and Indigenous lands?

[195] In the very same paragraph in which the Supreme Court of Canada in Tsilhqot’in denied application of the doctrine of terra nullius in Canada, the Court simply restated:

At the time of assertion of European sovereignty, the Crown acquired radical or underlying title to all the land in the province. This Crown title, however, was burdened by the pre-existing legal rights of Aboriginal people who occupied and used the land prior to European arrival . . . The Aboriginal interest in land that burdens the Crown’s underlying title is an independent legal interest, which gives rise to a fiduciary duty on the part of the Crown.

[196] This construct has become a fundamental part of the framework animating Aboriginal law jurisprudence following 1982, when s. 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 formally recognized and affirmed the existing Aboriginal rights of the Indigenous peoples in Canada. But, one may rightly ask, if the land and its resources were owned by Indigenous peoples before the arrival of Europeans, how, as a matter of law, does the mere assertion of European sovereignty result in the Crown acquiring radical or underlying title? How and why does pre-existing Indigenous title somehow become subordinate?

[197] Rather remarkably, the Supreme Court of Canada has never directly answered this question even though the Court itself noted in Delgamuukw at para. 145, “it does not make sense to speak of a burden on the underlying title before that title existed”.

[198] True, in the same paragraph, the Supreme Court suggests that Aboriginal title “crystallized” at the same time sovereignty was asserted, hence presumably permitting the layering/burdening of radical title, but the logic of this is perplexing. Some argue, in my view correctly, that the whole construct is simply a legal fiction to justify the de facto seizure and control of the land and resources formerly owned by the original inhabitants of what is now Canada

#16 Dave on 01.12.22 at 4:15 pm

There is little doubt the Russia will invade Ukraine…..either partially or fully take over. Almost 100% guaranteed

This will lead to $100 plus oil….

Will this accelerate Interest Rate Hikes? Inflation will then be double digit.

#17 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 4:15 pm

Besides me and BBC, The Sun (the real one in the UK, not the fake one from Toronto) having a field day with the World’s dumbest, can’t take a hint jock:

DJOKING AROUND How Novak Djokovic met 25 kids and greeted people at THREE events while infected with Covid as he could face jail
https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/17288770/djokovic-met-kids-three-events-covid-jail/

[maps, 8×10 glossy’s, they have it all – like Alice’s Restaurant]

And Oz TV not thrilled, EXPLETIVES used:

Novak Djokovic: Newsreaders caught in expletive-laden rant
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-59964598

Of course you will all be disappointed there is not link in, above it all and fray, yet in there like a dirty shirt, BBC.

HERE YOU GO ‘possums…

https://twitter.com/MelbTigerTalk/status/1480851968893468674

[no Closed Captioning in English provided]

#18 Satori on 01.12.22 at 4:16 pm

Cutest dog ever!!! Love that nose!

#19 ogdoad on 01.12.22 at 4:19 pm

Why would someone want to return to their go nowhere job, reporting to their know-it-all boss who takes credit for your work, only to have to talk about covid with peers you don’t like…and who don’t like you. You have everything you need at home. Netflix, food delivery, video games…we could reasonable go through the rest of our lives without having a conversation with another live person. I know a few people who would relish this one reality (consequences of which will remain unsaid). and UBI would make it happen…what if THAT become a reality.

As far as hoax or no hoax – I don’t really care. If its real, I don’t want it. A hoax? Well done. Biggest data grab in history. Hugs all around.

What Quebec is purposing? If unvaxxed get sick and have to be admitted then they should also have to foot the bill. Seems reasonable. Better than ‘I told you so’

Crazy times that our youth will be suffering for in the future…if they don’t become irrelevant, depressed, lonely, addicted and emotionally numb…TOO LATE!

Og

#20 John on 01.12.22 at 4:19 pm

Is there a possibility that the Fed and CBs having gone a decade without raising interest rates, that the chickens are coming home to roost?

#21 Debel on 01.12.22 at 4:20 pm

Ontario updated their hospital data to disclose that, as of today’s numbers, 46% of covid hospitalizations & 17% of covid ICU numbers were incidental.

46 percent!!

#22 Reality Check on 01.12.22 at 4:21 pm

There’s no way the Fed is going to allow 7% annual currency destruction.
——————-
Central banks are always late to the game – it’s in their nature of wanting to appear to be the calm hand on the rudder. As such inflation has gotten away from them and if they have a weenie response inflation will run hot.

Inflation will be hard to reel in if it starts spiking to 10-12%. Politicians do not worry about inflation until voters do. And voters start worrying about inflation when they see prices continually outstripping wage increases. This is what happened in the late 1970s, early 1980s, and when politicians and central banks did finally act a soft landing was not possible and it lead to 15-20% interest rates.

Not too many people in charge lived through that period, so they don’t know the havoc of double digit inflation. Ok maybe they lived through it but they were in grade school.

#23 Not Crazy on 01.12.22 at 4:22 pm

Even if the Fed/BoC raise rates 4x this year, that’s only 1%…still well into negative real rates when there’s 5-7% official inflation. Hard assets, including housing, will continued to be valued if not continue to rise.

Or they won’t and the RE-heavy Canadian economy flounders and they have to lower rates to stimulate the economy.

There’s going to be a whole generation who can’t afford to live in Canada and I don’t expect them to act or vote rationally.

#24 Omicron Kenobi on 01.12.22 at 4:27 pm

I am no hoax.

I am in charge of everything.

Bow down before me, Luke and all your buddies.

#25 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 4:28 pm

Note to self this AM CET, buy Cannabis shares…

https://www.hln.be/wetenschap/amerikaanse-studie-cannabis-kan-coronabesmetting-voorkomen~ac0421b4/

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/marijuana

this AM showing all in the green, save 1 stock, 12 total.

Note to self the PM CET, don’t. All in the red, save 3.

Mr. Market not buying it.

————-

U of Oregon pretty proud and looking for new funding…

https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/oregon-state-research-shows-hemp-compounds-prevent-coronavirus-entering-human-cells

…imagine that.

#26 Chris L. on 01.12.22 at 4:32 pm

The hoax is that anything we tried is a solution. Nothing the pathetic humans tried stopped the ‘slimy pathogen’ literally nothing. It. Just. Keeps. Going. But these solution is built on a house of cards – that’s the hoax. That humans can ever, in history, stop a pandemic in it’s tracks with it’s pathetic measures.

Nothing works. Embrace natural immunity, or be crushed by human hubris. Get on with the living, or you’re already dead.

Lots of people made lots of money and amassed lost of power in the process. Such is humanity. Lots of people lost lots of freedom too.

#27 cmj on 01.12.22 at 4:33 pm

Well said as usual, Garth. Thanks for supplying us with facts among your frustrations. I’m fed up too and find it hard to reply respectfully to people who care more about their rights over the common good of our country/world. All of us have been affected in some way by friends or family getting sick or dying. How selfish.
Our politicians are also cowards and selfish, thinking of what they need to say or do to get the next election votes. We need leadership with moral action!!!

#28 CRA - Covid Revenue Agency on 01.12.22 at 4:34 pm

We are the Covid Revenue Agency.

We will be issuing taxes and tickets to all unvaccinnated deniers.

You will lose your Principal Residence. You will lose your TFSA savings and any employee stock options. Everything.

Don’t mess with the CRA!

#29 Reality Check on 01.12.22 at 4:35 pm

Todays Trudeau history lesson
——————
Anybody else out there remember the 1980 election. Conservative Joe Clark was proposing wage controls. Pierre Trudeau claimed wage and price controls had no place in a free and democratic society, plus they simply would not work. The Liberals won the election and the ever duplicitous PET enacted wage and price controls a few months later. PET was right – wage/price controls were a dismal failure. The only recourse then was monumentally high interest rates to crush inflation out of the economy.

Joe Clark – the best Prime Minister we never had. Ya, I know he was PM for 9 months, but that hardly counts.

#30 Observer on 01.12.22 at 4:38 pm

#21 Debel on 01.12.22 at 4:20 pm
Ontario updated their hospital data to disclose that, as of today’s numbers, 46% of covid hospitalizations & 17% of covid ICU numbers were incidental.

46 percent!!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
So? Hospitalizations continue to increase regardless whether a patient is there “with” or “for” COVID-19.

#31 BC Renovator on 01.12.22 at 4:38 pm

“And Dog help anyone who recent paid $8 million for a non-fungible token.”

That made me laugh out Loud! couldn’t agree more

#32 Diamond Dog on 01.12.22 at 4:51 pm

https://www.macrotrends.net/2015/fed-funds-rate-historical-chart

Note in the chart above, every time inflation has spiked in the past, a recession followed. We haven’t seen inflation like this since the 80’s and Fed policy is currently without a doubt, “inflationary”.

7% inflation (combined with a .08% Fed funds rate) comes at a time when there are only 4 of 7 governors that usually sit on the board:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Reserve_Board_of_Governors

By law, the vice chair, as part of the Board, make a full report of its operations to the speaker of the House, on progress towards the Fed’s responsibilities and monetary policy objectives, which are “maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long-term interest rates.” – enwiki

It’s worth noting the duties of the vice chair as Richard Clarida retires 2 weeks early under the cloud of scandal due to the appearance of insider trading.

https://apnews.com/article/business-economy-jerome-powell-2c1a64e941a3dde0112729d7bff2f5de

#33 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 4:51 pm

I think you nailed it the other day Garth.

The ’80s all over again.

One good thing no jobless recovery like back then. This time around plenty of jobs and unfilled. Unfortunately the jobs are not going to keep pace with inflation.

I still remember doing M&A Pro Forma’s on target companies while at then, the 10th largest company in the World, having to add a minimum of:

5%/year

to any Revenue sensitivity analyses (show on a seperate line) with an IRR bounced up just to make sure what with the risk free ‘roller coaster” rate changing near daily (US Corporate decrees, not me).

Excel had just come out on Mac II’s (most powerful then). Blew up when the file size was > 320KB. Makes you learn how to be frugal in spreadsheet B/S, Cash Flow and I/S pro formas. *

Now, to the slugs doing what I used to do back then in the 80’s, make that 7% and knock yourselves out with 5 year projections + Covid.

At least Excel won’t blow up anymore.

—————–

* Back then firm I was at was 1 of the largest Excel purchasers for Microsoft, got to speak to the Programmer liaison in Seattle and 2 days later floppy disks arrived by Courier where Excel would only blow up at 500KB.

https://twitter.com/harrymccracken/status/593129465154129921

No Susan, I got to see it many times with Excel back then.

#34 steve on 01.12.22 at 4:54 pm

Surprised you are stunned by 55% of workers not willing to go back to the office.

I mean, I guess I’m not based on your blogs, but it just shows the disconnect that some have from reality.

Progressive companies will take advantage of archaic companies. You force your workers back? (for some unknown reason) you’ll lose them.

You want to reduce their pay? You’ll lose them.

Companies kept their profit margins up during the pandemic. Watch what’ll happen to them margins when they lose their long standing employees and have to re-rain sub standard employees.

Or maybe they’ll just re-hire everyone from India, right Garth? We just let our three year contract for outsourcing lapse. They aren’t worth the headache for the savings.

#35 leebow on 01.12.22 at 4:56 pm

As students of operations research, we should remember that any organization solves an optimization problem.

Under abundant resources, it is possible to claim vague objective functions, such as equity, social justice, etc.

When resources become scarce, objective functions become more pragmatic. A good example is maximizing survival rate. That usually means rejection of low probability patients, faster relocation of expectant patients, and other logical forms of sacrifice for common good. There really is no need for that. A bit of inconvenience often prevents heroic sacrifice. There is nothing good about heroic sacrifice.

You can find a whole bunch of testimonies from ICU people about the transformation of thought process in covid deniers once they or their loved ones start circling the drain.

We are almost done, now is the time for one, hopefully, last push. Take this shit seriously, you may change your mind about being a hero if you end up with 20% of your lungs left. Are you willing to bet all you have on a tube of horse dewormer?

#36 I am Groot on 01.12.22 at 4:57 pm

#24 Omicron Kenobi on 01.12.22 at 4:27 pm
I am no hoax.

I am in charge of everything.

Bow down before me, Luke and all your buddies

%%%%%%%
I am Groot.

#37 Wrk.dover on 01.12.22 at 5:03 pm

Then there was the time in the 80’s when newly exposed NS govt financial documents revealed an immense old toll bridge across the harbor had more owing on it than it had cost to build, and was in need of a rebuild (road salt).

Compounding high interest rates bite!

#38 saskatoon on 01.12.22 at 5:06 pm

The virus didn’t do any of these things. Governments did.

#39 Brett in Calgary on 01.12.22 at 5:07 pm

Yes, for pediatrics in Alberta it is 50% who actually have a COVID diagnosis. Problem is the ‘gold standard’ dataset which reports diagnosis data is 2 month’s lagged, leaving the only real-time option to call hospitalizations, a positive COVID test within 12 days of an admit date. I would expect this assumption to hold better for 70+ let’s say, but it doesn’t work well at all for low-risk populations. This is no hoax, but COVID is also a data disaster.
—————————————————————
#21 Debel on 01.12.22 at 4:20 pm
Ontario updated their hospital data to disclose that, as of today’s numbers, 46% of covid hospitalizations & 17% of covid ICU numbers were incidental.

46 percent!!

#40 Linda on 01.12.22 at 5:08 pm

And another adorable pup photo of the day:)

The whole supply chain thing is something everyone gets impacted by. Thus far we have been able to secure whatever grocery items, albeit we might have to purchase a different brand due to our preferred brand(s) being out of stock. However, those alternate brands not only may feel or taste ‘different’ to our preferred brand but may also come with a much higher price tag. Whether that is due to inflation, the item normally being priced at a higher price point or if it is priced the same as our preferred brand may come in a smaller size which means it does cost more is less easy to pinpoint. Regardless of the why’s, the bottom line is the monthly expenditures have increased & not because of our changing our buying habits.

#41 cramar on 01.12.22 at 5:10 pm

Maybe the dude that painted “HOAX” was the last fool to buy the bridge by getting a cheap mortgage. Maybe he caught the FOMO virus.

#42 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.12.22 at 5:12 pm

#5 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 3:53 pm
@#281 wrk.dvr
“Every car part I source seems to be Chinese, even antique replacement parts.”
+++

I used to by excellent product for the company from the Eastern US.
A family owned company that had been pumping out the same excellent product for 75 years
2 years ago they were bought out by a Chinese firm.
Closed the US plant and discontinued the product.
Now?
You can buy their cheaply made crap or go to the EU.
I go to the EU.
More expensive than the Chinese product but at least it outlasts the warranty by a few years.

The gutting of North American factories and businesses continues.
————–
It’s a “dog eat dog”, world, My friend.
It’s just that the Chinese are doing their share of eat’n now.
They have learned from the best.

#43 Trust the FORD govt on 01.12.22 at 5:12 pm

This report (https://publichealthontario.ca/-/media/documents/ncov/epi/covid-19-epi-confirmed-cases-post-vaccination.pdf) from
@PublicHealthON
, used to include COVID-19 deaths by vaccination status.

This was the only source for this information.

As of today, it has been removed.

Must be because of all the unvaxxed that are dying in droves..

Former ICU Nurse.

#44 Faron on 01.12.22 at 5:14 pm

#23 Not Crazy on 01.12.22 at 4:22 pm

Or they won’t and the RE-heavy Canadian economy flounders and they have to lower rates to stimulate the economy.

You have to divorce yourself from that paradigm. 40 years into it, it very well may be over.

With high inflation the damage done by cutting rates will be greater than the damage done by a crashing equity market. Remember, the stonk market and/or the RE market is NOT the economy! GDP chugged along quite nicely at very high CB rates and through all kinds of market woopsies over the last 70 years.

In the long run, a real estate crash would be healthy. The ~20% of GDP that orbits the RE markets in Canada is an obscene misallocation of resource from an innovation perspective. Could you imagine how much more competitive Canada would be in a world in which trillions weren’t wasted on the RE bubble and went to R+D instead? RE is a dinosaur/leech when it comes to making an economy more advanced

In the short run, the crash will hurt like heck. CBs will be powerless leaving fiscal stimulus and other federal deficit spending would be the only alternative to keep a modicum of comfort and to avoid a depression. Although a depression would be deflative…

#45 T-Rev on 01.12.22 at 5:23 pm

Preach, Brotha Garth!!! It has right-effed the supply chain of goods and services we rely on. I don’t know if vaccines fix it (other than healthcare capacity) but they won’t make it worse. I dare say maybe what needs happen is that once this wave crests, we shorten quarantine times to whenever you’re feeling well enough to go back, sick or not.

Even better idea would be to eliminate income taxes on secondary sources of employment to encourage those who are willing and able to take a second job. I’ve got a class 1 license I’ve never given up and love driving rig for fun, still do it occasionally to help out a buddy in need once a year or so and I’d happily go drive truck for $40/hr to alleviate some supply pressure and make extra cash a couple weekends a month to help out the economy while making a few bucks. But after taxes, I’d take home less than half of it, so I ain’t given up weekends for a pittance. Insert a skill or credential here and I’m sure you can say the same thing about lots of folks. The tax system de incentivizes putting in any extra work. Yay socialism!

#46 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 5:23 pm

@#15 Sunshowers
“And most recently on June 21, 2021, the federal government passed into law the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples ”

+++

Ahhh yessss.
The Un.
A gathering of Wokesters ganging up on anyone that isnt politically correct.
Increasingly spewing out irrelevant doctrine that the world dictators AND democracies ignore.

So much for the creation of a “world body” of “United Nations” to avoid world war, disease, and poverty.

Just another squabbling confab of overpaid bureaucrats drunk with their own self importance.
I wonder if “Free Medicare” is a UN perk?

But never underestimate Trudeaus’ fawning of all thing politically correct.
Damn the cost, he’s isn’t paying for it.

#47 Faron on 01.12.22 at 5:25 pm

#25 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 4:28 pm

U of Oregon pretty proud and looking for new funding…

https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/oregon-state-research-shows-hemp-compounds-prevent-coronavirus-entering-human-cells

…imagine that.

As an OSU alum and general pedant, I have to correct you. Oregon State University not U of Oregon.

OSU: Corvallis, Oregon, Home of the Beavers. Crappy football but excellent in baseball. Excellent in Ag, Engineering, Forestry, Oceanography, resource Geology (minerals) and Food Science. A healthy blend of conservative leaning students and liberals.

U of O: 70ish beautiful farmland kilometers south of OSU along the Willamette River. Eugene, Oregon. Home of the Ducks. Very good football team and big track school. Excellent in Law, Arts and also Geology and probably some other stuff. Quasi birthplace of Nike. Once one of the more progressive campuses in the US.

#48 TurnerNation on 01.12.22 at 5:27 pm

Sail Away – for anything in the ground I stick with ETFs – LIT.US, REMX.US COPX.US
and NUGT.US (3x leverage :-o )
SLX.US is okay too

#49 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 5:31 pm

@#7 Slim
“A couple of evenings there was a power outage affecting all of south Edmonton. Fortunately, it was for only three hours and not -35 degrees. No explanation was given.”

+++

I knew an insurance salesman that used to refuse to insure rural homes if they kept their wood stoves.
“Too much fire risk”
This went on for about 10 years.
Many a farmer/home owner put their wood stoves in the barn or garage but most got rid of them.
Then a major winter storm hit and power was out for over a week.
The people with wood stoves?
Houses didnt freeze….pipes didnt burst….
Quite a slew of insurance claims after that week.

#50 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 5:34 pm

#37 Faron

FFS Faron.

Would you get a life and the Long Covid attended to.

#51 Dan in Nanaimo on 01.12.22 at 5:44 pm

J. Powell will be forced to raise rates – albeit reluctantly – due to pressure from the incumbents in the WH. Because people only vote with their wallets, the Dem’s will desperately need to project confidence that they are doing something about inflation in order to buy votes for the upcoming midterms.

Tiff will get the telegram the week before and follow with a corresponding rate hike

If, however, a newer and more lethal variant replaces Omicron in short order, then the FED will keeping expanding their balance sheet. And that will be the cue for Let the Good Times Roll.

#52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 5:47 pm

@#42 Ponzies Pals

“It’s a “dog eat dog”, world, My friend.
It’s just that the Chinese are doing their share of eat’n now.
They have learned from the best.”
+++

Yes they have.

Thats why they’re moving factories from “expensive” Chinese workers to cheaper ones in Vietnam….

https://www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/3142287/chinese-manufactures-forced-halt-production-vietnam

#53 Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 5:50 pm

For all the

“incidental” Covid people here…

Honest Israeli graphical take on the different Covid waves:

https://twitter.com/LittleMoiz/status/1481373472416845827

What it will look like soon enough, Worldwide less incidental.

——————-

You haven’t peaked yet Canada and you won’t for some time. And you won’t know either since your testing is ABYSMAL.

https://i.imgur.com/9uHycZd.png

You probably have, conservative, 2X, TWO TIMES, at least the new cases being reported. My guess is 3X and that’s based on tracking Italia testing vs. cases during, pre- and post- holiday periods.

You are 3-4 weeks typically behind Europe. Just a few in Europe showing a peak so far, UK, Iceland and Ireland…that’s it.

So can the BS you read from some hapless 2 bricks short of a full load MSM article.

REALITY CANADA:

You are in a lot worse shape with Omicron than being reported by your Gov’s. A lot worse.

#54 Barb on 01.12.22 at 5:51 pm

Max looks like a racer, Judy! Gorgeous colours.

Son will never leave now.

#55 Faron on 01.12.22 at 5:52 pm

#26 Chris L. on 01.12.22 at 4:32 pm

Embrace natural immunity, or be crushed by human hubris.

LOL. There’s a pretty good chance that the hubris you speak of is in thinking that natch immunity will protect you in the face of a crap ton of information stating otherwise.

#43 Trust the FORD govt on 01.12.22 at 5:12 pm

Former ICU Nurse.

Right, just like #175 Typical Cognitive impairment is an ER DOCTOR.

#56 VladTor on 01.12.22 at 5:53 pm

Canada next? What do you think?

Hungary fixed the prices of six food products at the level of October 15, 2021, Prime Minister Viktor Orban said at the end of the parliamentary meeting.

“Today we decided that we will intervene in the pricing of six products: sugar, wheat flour, sunflower oil, pork hams, chicken breasts and cow’s milk 2.8% fat, which means that the price of these six products should return to the level of October 15

Starting in February, this should be the case in all stores,” Orban said in a video message posted on his Facebook account.

He noted that the government is resorting to such measures to protect the interests of fellow citizens in the face of rising prices for essential products caused by the energy crisis in Europe: Orban said that Hungary had already limited the rise in gasoline prices and was pursuing a policy of lowering utility bills.

#57 DON on 01.12.22 at 5:58 pm

https://www.reuters.com/world/uk/party-over-uk-pm-johnson-faces-crunch-day-parliament-2022-01-12/

Examples like the above are contributing to the whole issue.

@Judy…

I have a shelti\auussie shepard

He was the biggest in the pup hut. Took more or the Sheltie height. The aussie part gets into trouble when left alone…trust me. A ball of constant energy is to say the least. The energizer bunny gots nothing on these dogs.

Very protective of their chosen master. Great around kids and family.

#58 Russ on 01.12.22 at 5:59 pm

Søren Angst on 01.12.22 at 5:50 pm

You haven’t peaked yet Canada and you won’t for some time. And you won’t know either since your testing is ABYSMAL.

https://i.imgur.com/9uHycZd.png

You are 3-4 weeks typically behind Europe. Just a few in Europe showing a peak so far, UK, Iceland and Ireland…that’s it.

You are in a lot worse shape with Omicron than being reported by your Gov’s. A lot worse.

=================================

You guys know how to read trends.

Is this a peak or a dead cat bounce?

https://bccdc.shinyapps.io/covid19_global_epi_app/

Thank you Dr. Bonnie Henry

Cheers, R

#59 Dogs Not Barking on 01.12.22 at 6:05 pm

Why is it that the people who are calling for another round of lockdowns always seem to be the ones who will collect a paycheque even if the country is locked down?

It seems to me that if your paycheque isn’t on the line you really shouldn’t have a say as to someone else’s paycheque.

#60 Barb on 01.12.22 at 6:07 pm

“…the word “HOAX” spray painted in white on its side.”

——————–
Graffiti is evidence of the only power these lonely people possess.

#61 Senator Bluto on 01.12.22 at 6:10 pm

I recently saw a question posed by an American on a U.S. website. The question was:

Why do Canadians keep electing Trudeau if he’s so incompetent?

The response by a Canadian was priceless:

“When we first elected Trudeau, he legalized pot. Then..then…he… what was the question again?”

#62 Big Mie on 01.12.22 at 6:14 pm

I tried reading thru the comments!
Do they NOT teach how to write a sentence in Canadian schools anymore?
I (cringe) am glad I do not live in Kanuckistan anymore!

#63 Alberta Ed on 01.12.22 at 6:17 pm

I am totally in favor of vaccines, having experienced the polio epidemic as a child. OTOH, I am opposed to know-it-all politicians dictating what people do with their own bodies. Ask, suggest, but don’t dictate — not in a free Canada.

In a public health emergency, like a pandemic, here is a role for public policy. When I received the vax for polio as a child no choice was presented. Today it is a dead disease. How is that a bad outcome? – Garth

#64 complicated on 01.12.22 at 6:22 pm

Interest rates will have a real hard time rising substantially and here is why.

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/interest-rates-still-cannot-rise-heres-why

US National debt is 30+trillion. Interest rates cannot ever get back to 5 percent or they become Greece. Same thing in Canada. And please lets not think we are special. Its just math and the math dont add up.

They will raise rates once twice maybe three times thisyear and by then the equity markets will topple and once again the Fed will panic and stop raising rates and bring back even more QE. They are in an impossible situation that they created and it will be epic when it finally blows.

The meme of stocks being killed by rates is a myth. There is no historical evidence, since rates rise in a growing, inflationary economy which is normally good for corporate profits. We have as many tinpot macroeconomists on this blog as we do pretend epidemiologists. – Garth

#65 Faron on 01.12.22 at 6:24 pm

#198 Sail Away on 01.12.22 at 4:42 pm
#190 Faron on 01.12.22 at 3:25 pm
#138 Sail Away on 01.12.22 at 11:11 am

… doing well …

Sorry bud, embarrassment, not fury. I’m sorry that my embarrassment on your behalf came across to you that way. It must be hard living as a person who can’t read basic emotional states of others. <3 #StayStrong.

You have actually done poorly. A more skilled and disciplined investor would have snoozed their dollars in SPY with equal or better results at far far less risk. Look up risk management. Real investment involves a ton of mundane risk calculations. Ask garth. Or just buy XEQT and some bonds and prefs and live a healthier life overall.

Also, by continually flouting your TSLA holding, you are exposing your reputation to concentration-risk in much the same way you did by "diversifying" with three mining companies engaged in producing roughly the same, indistinguishable product. Again, poor risk management.

Just FYI for the inevitable.

…fury…

OMG, LOL. If writing a coherent (with my August views) take on why your indiv stock investment choices were poor then (were very good more recently and are probably very good choices in coming months) is fury, you live in a strange world. When a consultant hits you up with a detailed look at some aspect of a project you are engaged in, do you think she is “furious”? If so, yikes.

To be clear. I am referring to past performance. Barring a broad correction, It seems likely that your holdings will continue the trends they started in Nov (dollar lost steam, Chinese RE situation is improving, Chinese credit impulse likely to pick up).

#66 Warren-the-lagging_indicator on 01.12.22 at 6:25 pm

Propaganda is abuse. Maybe a big part of the problem is that many people are not really scared of needles but rather the purveyors of deceit and deception.

#67 espressobob on 01.12.22 at 6:28 pm

Beating this bug is a team effort.

Anti vaxxers have the right to their own decisions. The problem isn’t about that so much but rather the lack of concern to protect others even if it means putting oneself in harm’s way. The majority have rolled up their sleeve selflessly to protect you, and they don’t question the science.

It might be time to mull things over, make the right choice, and be part of the solution. I’m sure our stressed out healthcare workers would appreciate the effort.

#68 Nonplused on 01.12.22 at 6:29 pm

#8 Soviet Capitalist on 01.12.22 at 3:59 pm

“My thinking is the following – if fighting the virus is the main goal, then people with natural immunity should get the passport as well. They don’t and that tells me that vaccination is the real goal.”

Well I don’t know if “vaccination is the real goal”, it could be that they just hadn’t thought it through. Never assume malice where simple incompetence will suffice.

Assuming they record positive covid cases the same way they record vaccinations it would take but a few lines of code to add “natural immunity” to the passport program. But that doesn’t answer the question as to whether “natural immunity” is a real thing or perhaps there is new information saying it isn’t all that and you still need the vaccine.

And no, for those who would assume otherwise, I am not “anti-vax”. I never had covid so I got the two doses as recommended. I still haven’t had covid or if I did I didn’t notice. I think it is quite a different thing to discuss whether natural immunity is enough for those who have had covid and to be anti-vax. If you haven’t had covid, the vax just makes all kinds of sense as you don’t have natural immunity either and you could end up one of the ER stats. Hoping to just get natural immunity if you do get covid is rolling the dice as to whether you will survive to enjoy that immunity. Ya, the odds are good, but don’t bet the farm.

#69 BCWally on 01.12.22 at 6:33 pm

Just took a look at this
https://www.ratehub.ca/5-year-fixed-mortgage-rate-history
The charts have the posted rates along with the discounted real world rates from 2006 on.
OK, so we know from the early 80’s it took an interest rate higher than the inflation rate to tame inflation down to about 2%.
Back then they used all the daily costs for the average person not the fake news stripped down version of today to calculate inflation percentage.
Let’s say we settle out at 4% given a bit of time for all the factors to settle down like supply chain issues (not fake news version).
That would mean an interest rate slightly higher than 4% which would mean about maybe 6.5% mortgages?
According to the chart to beat inflation we would have to have mortgage rates that have never been 6.5% since before 2006.
Good news is with the amount of principal paid down the payments are manageable on mortgage renewal, unless you really went high like $1M.
Bad news is the value of the place is decreasing in price with the principal due to monthly affordability issues for new buyers, and interest paid to the bank goes through the roof.
OK I think I know how to beat inflation. Invest in the banks, buy a winterized RV with satellite internet uplink for mobility.
Have I got this right?

#70 Faron on 01.12.22 at 6:36 pm

#50 Søren Angst The Pot on 01.12.22 at 5:34 pm

Would you the kettle get a life and the Long Covid attended to.

↑↑↑ Fixed it for you. ↑↑↑

#53 The Pot on 01.12.22 at 5:50 pm

…some hapless 2 bricks short of a full load MSM Another Kettle article.

Point taken regardless.

#71 truefacts on 01.12.22 at 6:47 pm

The “Hoax” is that many people believe we have a good health care system in Ontario.

When 500 people in ICU can wreak havoc on a population of 14,700,000 people province-wide, you have to face facts…our health care system SUCKS!

What are the politicians going to do about that?

#72 complicated on 01.12.22 at 6:53 pm

The meme of stocks being killed by rates is a myth. There is no historical evidence, since rates rise in a growing, inflationary economy which is normally good for corporate profits. We have as many tinpot macroeconomists on this blog as we do pretend epidemiologists. – Garth

So then why has the stock market more or less crashed each and every time over the past 15 years when the Fed raised rates. With the amount of debt in the system we cannot deal with rates even a percent or two higher. The system is leveraged to the hilt. Do the math Garth. How can governments possibly pay the interest on the debt if interest rates go back to normal levels. The Fed will be lucky to get to 1.5 percent before the system chokes.

And again Garth if our economy was so strong and amazing why, pray tell, do we need interest rates at record levels of zero percent for years???? Why has the Fed added trillions to its balance sheet in a few years..it has gone from 1 trillion in 2008 to 9 trillion now. It was 4 trillion 2 years ago!! And this is all ok and you still think these guys are so smart.

We are going to look back at the past 25 years and say what the heck were the central bankers thinking. And how could so many people be fooled by this obvious bubble to end all bubbles.

#73 Midnight’s on 01.12.22 at 6:59 pm

So, the government lies about:
-Inflation
-CPI
-why they’re doing things for the greater good.
-campaign promises
-climate
-taxes(GST in particular)
-Vaccations
-Spending
And the list goes on.
Now, we’re all suppose to believe the gov’t in regards to the numbers of those infected? While I drive past the hospitals and I see no overflowing lines or ambulances, trailers etc., sitting there. Maybe it’s my lying eyes or ears. One doesn’t have to be a scientist to get a general idea how things are going. And I quote,

The scientific method is an empirical method of acquiring knowledge that has characterized the development of science since at least the 17th century. It involves careful observation, applying rigorous skepticism about what is observed, given that cognitive assumptions can distort how one interprets the observation. Wikipedia…
Where is this skepticism, because I’m only seeing and reading one side of the story (mainstream that is).

#74 J. Morris on 01.12.22 at 7:01 pm

Will The Circle Be Unbroken
Seems Humber College Funeral Program undergraduates are being pulled from their classes to assist in funeral related services.
On a side note:I do own PLC-T

#75 Chester in Summer on 01.12.22 at 7:05 pm

In the first lockdown, I remember seeing children writing with chaulk on their driveways “Let me out”.

#76 Buford Wilson on 01.12.22 at 7:06 pm

I hear you’ll have to bend over for fourth and subsequent vaccine shots.

#77 Mattl on 01.12.22 at 7:07 pm

Not sure I’d ever get triggered enough to spray paint a bridge, but I get why people are frustrated. While it’s great that the vaccine results in better outcomes for those infected, that wasn’t what we were sold by governments.

2 weeks to flatten the curve, herd immunity, sacrifice Christmas for the greater good, etc etc. 500B spent and the system can’t handle say 500 hospitalizations in BC or 500 ICU patients in Ontario? 20% of which aren’t even there for Covid? I can’t get rapid tested after a necessary trip prior to returning home, to protect my family?

Hard to take governments seriously about the serious of the pandemic when 22 months and 500b later the system is still not prepared for a pandemic.

All the while in the US they are living a mostly normal existence, treating this like what it is now, basically a very transmittable seasonal flu.

So ya, people are going to be frustrated.

#78 westcdn on 01.12.22 at 7:09 pm

So I go where I will. Not always pleasant but enough to keep me trying. I do want to be rich. I will work at it.

At the end of the day I respect people who can it done. They are worth it. Probably my blue collar background – gals and guys intended. Trust me. I will not let them down.

I will never give up. I will learn and do better. But then life can throw a curveball.

#79 Mattl on 01.12.22 at 7:13 pm

#21 Debel on 01.12.22 at 4:20 pm
Ontario updated their hospital data to disclose that, as of today’s numbers, 46% of covid hospitalizations & 17% of covid ICU numbers were incidental.

46 percent!!

——————————————————–

A virus so deadly (now)……that people don’t even know they have it.

#80 You know Val on 01.12.22 at 7:17 pm

Another one for the history books Garth.
https://betterdwelling.com/four-canadian-banks-urge-the-boc-to-raise-rates-another-is-warning-home-buyers/

#81 commoncents on 01.12.22 at 7:32 pm

C’est enfin arrivé ! Toute ma vie, j’ai attendu de voir quelqu’un introduire la stupide taxe. Economiquement parlant, c’est hystarique.

bonne chance Québec

#82 Ronaldo on 01.12.22 at 7:35 pm

#2 – Shawn

IMO I believe that the situation we are facing today is more like the early 70s where housing prices from the beginning of 1973 were rising so quickly and demand so high that a house sold before the sign was on the lawn. A small home I purchased in Feb. of 73 in Pt. Coquitlam for $26000 rose on average by $1000 per month up to August of 74 when just like a switched was turned off, the market came to a grinding halt and dropped 20% overnite. Lineups at the pumps to get gas. Prices of goods were rising so quickly that companies stopped printing the prices on the package. The price of oil had doubled and people were rushing out to by wood heaters. I got into a bidding war on a pot bellied stove. It was nuts. Interest rates were heading to 12% and many people walked away from their homes. Wage and price controls were implemented. There were bidding wars for rentals. People offering to pay people a bonus if they could get their place. The biggest drop in prices was in West Vancouver which dropped 40 percent. Even with the large drop in my place the price was still only 3.4 times my own average salary after the drop (two salaries were not considered back then). Can this happen again. You betcha.

#83 Neo on 01.12.22 at 7:37 pm

In a public health emergency, like a pandemic, here is a role for public policy. When I received the vax for polio as a child no choice was presented. Today it is a dead disease. How is that a bad outcome? – Garth

The difference is once 87% of the population was fully vaccinated against Polio we didn’t proceed to have 7,000 to 10,000 polio cases a day. The Polio vaccine provided immunity from infection and spread. This Covid vaccine doesn’t offer immunity and we have no idea what fully vaccinated is.

#84 yvr_lurker on 01.12.22 at 7:41 pm

Food, gas, and heat are up for sure. I do all the grocery shopping in our house, but am always careful and look for specials. However, by cutting back on discretionary expenses (no outside coffee, pubs, dinners out), it is not so hard to keep costs in check. This is our motto. The one splurge was a season’s ski pass at Cypress for the 3 in our family, but we did it last spring for cheap. Bring our own sandwich lunch and eat in a snowbank with great views. These &^T&TUI endless atmospheric rivers have put a damper on all of this for the past week.

Bottom line is that even if inflation is running rampant, you can still make choices to cut expenses. Do not feel that you “owe it” to go to the restaurant down the street just to keep them afloat when your budget no longer allows it due to pressures from everywhere else.

#85 Observer on 01.12.22 at 7:42 pm

How to respond to: “Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated can catch COVID.”

“Both Serena Williams and I can play tennis.”

#86 Faron on 01.12.22 at 7:50 pm

#70 complicated on 01.12.22 at 6:53 pm

still think these guys are so smart.

TBH, “they” (whatever that actually means) are probably a good deal smarter than the author of your ZeroHedge article who has soft porn on the front page of his blog… Nothing necessarily wrong with that, but shows a lack of professionalism befitting a hack.

#87 espressobob on 01.12.22 at 7:50 pm

#73 Buford Wilson

I hear you’ll have to bend over for fourth and subsequent shots.

Yoga might become mandatory giving the anti vaxxers the ability to bend over and kiss their asses goodbye.

#88 IsleOfVanMan on 01.12.22 at 7:56 pm

#10 None – Canada’s #1 export is still oil.. and it’s price is rising lately. The strength of the CAD typically moves in lock step with the price of oil.

#89 HOAX! on 01.12.22 at 8:01 pm

HOAX!

HOAX!

….just saving spray paint and the environment.

#90 D Ter Me on 01.12.22 at 8:04 pm

DELETED

#91 Flop… on 01.12.22 at 8:11 pm

Thor, check your inbox.

I just sent you photos of some of the slop I pulled off at work the other day.

Put your goggles on first…

M47BC

#92 Sydneysider on 01.12.22 at 8:15 pm

“In BC hospitalizations are at an 8-month high with 97 in ICU, the majority of which are not vaccinated, including people in their 20s and 30s.”

BC Health updates its covid data each day. From today’s report:

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2022HLTH0012-000043

“Past two weeks cases hospitalized (Dec. 28 to Jan. 10) – Total 615

Not vaccinated: 194 (31.5%)
Partially vaccinated: 27 (4.4%)
Fully vaccinated: 394 (64.1%)”

In short, 1 in 3 hospitalizations involve the unvaccinated. This proportion has not been a majority for some time.

The reference was as stated. ICU. – Garth

#93 Sheesh on 01.12.22 at 8:23 pm

#81 Neo on 01.12.22 at 7:37pm

‘The difference is once 87% of the population was fully vaccinated against Polio we didn’t proceed to have 7,000 to 10,000 polio cases a day.

……….

No, no we didn’t….
Polio never infected that many people in the first place.

https://www.canadashistory.ca/explore/science-technology/the-polio-epidemic-in-canada

In 1937 there were 4000 polio cases in Canada (population about 11 million). 119 people died in Ontario alone!

I’m guessing with numbers like that, you’d have been fine taking your chances with the virus. It only affected kids, and not very many of them, so whuts the big deal, amirite?

#94 Diamond Dog on 01.12.22 at 8:25 pm

https://www.financialsamurai.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/inflation-10year-yield-fed-funds-rate.jpg

My bad, put up the wrong chart. The above chart shows quite clearly that every other time in history inflation popped, a recession followed dating back to 1970. When rates start to rise, it takes a while (average 2.5 years or so) but it always comes. Maybe it’s different this time.

Who knows how long a rising rate environment would take to trigger a recession, especially starting near zero. It’s uncharted waters, but there is a very clear pattern of Fed rates triggering recessions going back to the 40’s in the graph below and it’s a fairly safe bet that this pattern is unchanged back to the beginning:

https://ei.marketwatch.com/Multimedia/2017/03/15/Photos/NS/MW-FI181_chart__20170315123502_NS.png?uuid=56659290-099d-11e7-be3d-001cc448aede

#95 Tinpot⁷ Economist on 01.12.22 at 8:49 pm

The 30 year Cdn bond yield pushed through 2%.

Is it better to be an owner of stocks, or a loaner with bonds?

The Swiss Gnomes want to know.

#96 Shawn on 01.12.22 at 8:52 pm

29 reality check

Me thinks you were not there. Wage and price control l debate was1972 Bob Robert Stanfield versus Trudeau.

1980 was joe Clark John Crosby proposing a 25 cent gasoline tax raise and Pierre Trudeau said no, got elected and raised it more than 25 cents. That’s how I remember it.

#97 Shawn on 01.12.22 at 8:57 pm

1972 election stanfield virtually tied Trudeau but Trudeau about 109 seats to 107 formed Coalition with edbroabent NDP. Wage and price debate may have been the 1974 election where trudeaugot a majority,

#98 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 9:03 pm

@#74 Bubba Buford
“I hear you’ll have to bend over for fourth and subsequent vaccine shots.”

+++

Only if YOU want to.
NotThatThere’sAnythingWrongWithThat…..

#99 Beetman on 01.12.22 at 9:12 pm

DELETED

#100 Shirl Clarts on 01.12.22 at 9:14 pm

#6 Wrk.dover on 01.12.22 at 3:53 pm
Today NS Premier Tim Houston PC, stated that 25% of hospitalizations are un-vaxxed while 90% of province has some level of vax in them.

——-
I keep hearing examples reverse opposite of what you would expect. Apparently in Manitoba it’s more vaccinated folks in hospital than unvaccinated.

Does the vaccine even work anymore? Will 3rd and 4th shots make any difference?

I know one thing. I don’t buy the same Adele album I already own. I wait for a new one to come out. I am not a fool.

#101 DON on 01.12.22 at 9:15 pm

@Ronaldo
Thanks for the knowledge/perspective.

@Midnight’s
Yup to the scientific model. Helps protect against personal bias.

#102 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 9:22 pm

@#95 Shawn.

A lot of people thought that Stanfield “fumbled” the election and lost votes because of this photo…

https://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2009/08/15/robert-stanfield-fumbles/

#103 Faxination on 01.12.22 at 9:24 pm

#6 Wrk.dover on 01.12.22 at 3:53 pm

Today NS Premier Tim Houston PC, stated that 25% of hospitalizations are un-vaxxed while 90% of province has some level of vax in them.

———————

In other words, the unvaxxed are using 2.5* as much resources than the vaxxed, per capita.

That seems a bit low to me. I’ve always seen it over 7 times as much. Some of that could be attributable to those having only 1 shot, or 2 shots without a booster.

#104 Hindsight Is 2020 on 01.12.22 at 9:31 pm

Michael really wanted to open his own restaurant. He’d worked his way up from prep cook to dinner chef through his teens and twenties. Just when he’d gotten enough experience and savings the pandemic struck. He lost his job and had to go on CERB. He saw the world around him change as he was stuck at home. With nothing to do but scroll through the internet he began to feel anger about what was happening. Nothing the government claimed to be doing made any sense. Even worse, it was happening across the world and every day the news was all death statistics and fear. Finally, one day he was able to get his job back but things weren’t the same. He got the mandatory vaccine in order to keep the job. Things were getting better. Omicron. Lockdown. He lost his job again this time there was no CERB. In anger one night he saw his chance. His chance to have a voice amongst the barrage of 24 hour media onslaught. HOAX. SCAM. Spray paint on the side of a bridge. It wasn’t much but it was enough.

#105 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 9:34 pm

The Climate Govt Bureaucrats are at it again in the Lower Brianland.
The Vancouver Port Authority has legislated a Climate Action Policy starting Feb 1st.

All trucks hauling containers from the Vancouver Ports cannot be older than 10 years.
New trucks cause less pollution.

This is not a BC Govt policy.
It is not a Transport Canada Policy.
Truck Owners are also pointing out the extreme back log of containers now.
There is also a lack of Drivers due to covid.
Used trucks less than 10 years old are very few and very expensive.
New trucks are also in short supply.

Common sense does not matter to govt bureaucrats.
Prepare for a wild cat truckers strike in Vancouver.

#106 Shawn on 01.12.22 at 9:36 pm

Will higher rates “kill” stock prices?

The meme of stocks being killed by rates is a myth. There is no historical evidence, since rates rise in a growing, inflationary economy which is normally good for corporate profits. We have as many tinpot macroeconomists on this blog as we do pretend epidemiologists. – Garth

********************************
Garth brooks no debate on this point but here is how I think the math works.

Earnings growth is a buoyancy force on stock prices of course.

Higher interest rates are a gravitational force on stock prices. That’s basic present value analysis and a term used by Buffett.

Now the two may well occur together and cancel each other out. But I would not be so sure that the gravitational force of higher rates won’t overcome the buoyancy force of higher earnings for a time. (Nor are higher earnings guaranteed in the short term.)

I simply don’t know. But if rates rise a lot I would bet on gravity.

At the same time, of course the stock indexes will still be higher in the long term.

I certainly would not bail out of stocks. But neither would I be shocked by a 25% decline in stock prices if interest rates really start rocking higher.

Seldom a dull moment in the markets.

You invest your money and you takes your chances.

#107 Doug t on 01.12.22 at 9:37 pm

Folks the problem is that the planet is OVER POPULATED- this shite is only going to keep happening more and more frequently- Mother Nature will cull the herd no ways about it – we think we are special, we are not – WE are killing this planet that is our HOME – well get ready for the next and the next and the next that Mother Nature throws at us in order to reclaim balance – it’s not going to be fun but it will happen

#108 Faron on 01.12.22 at 9:41 pm

Well, given the past few days of comments about the Vax including Lead Paint conversion to unappreciative prig I think we can say: “COVID has made society dumber.” Maybe the antivaxers had asymptomatic bouts of COVID and suffer cognitive decline? Maybe it’s the deleterious effects of excessive screen time? Lack of impulse control from isolation? Fun time to be an anthropologist. Terrible time to moderate comments.

#109 Phylis on 01.12.22 at 9:46 pm

#41 cramar on 01.12.22 at 5:10 pm
Maybe the dude that painted “HOAX” was the last fool to buy the bridge by getting a cheap mortgage. Maybe he caught the FOMO virus.
Xxxxxxxx
Maybe that dude knows were the flag is…

#110 Faron on 01.12.22 at 9:53 pm

BTW Sail Away, you don’t have to update me on TSLA’s price change. I watch it as part of a basket of things that indicate when and where the dumb money is swinging. Not the dumbest money, that would be ARKK and some of the meme stocks, but Trump level dumb. Crappy condo in an Arizona suburban hellscape dumb. Hitting up the Rock ‘n Roll Cafe in Florence, Italy dumb. ’cause sometime keeping a wary eye on the dumb herd is smart.

Thx though.

#111 HUNGRY BEAR on 01.12.22 at 9:53 pm

SUCK IT UP…. and get VAXED!

Or get transported to an island in the Arctic.

If your UN-VAXED your not welcome on Canadian soil.

Your a burden on our system!!!!

#112 mike from mtl on 01.12.22 at 9:55 pm

I don’t know what to make of this mess anymore than you but there has to be dialogue on what it means to actually return to some 2019 normal which I fear like 9/11 is not coming back. Honestly in Canada, office WFW due to politics alone I feel is for the most part is done.

At this point yes the mass clinical testing for better or worse now two years on is a total waste, this is clear. Trying to ‘isolate’ your cases is equally a waste of time. The ‘vaccines’ despite being by far the most administered overtaking routine MMR etc, reality is if you’re the ‘right person’ just delaying the inevitable. Demanding proof of vaccination might sort of prove you’re most probably not going to consume health resources, however speaks nothing to actually being infected.

The unique national problem we face is that our public health was in awful shape spanning decades, now this is front and centre for all to bear. This is especially a troubling problem as now can be held above all our heads indefinatly with zero recourse.

#113 Sail Away on 01.12.22 at 10:12 pm

#104 Hindsight Is 2020 on 01.12.22 at 9:31 pm

Michael really wanted to open his own restaurant. He’d worked his way up from prep cook to dinner chef through his teens and twenties. Just when he’d gotten enough experience and savings the pandemic struck. He lost his job and had to go on CERB. He saw the world around him change as he was stuck at home. With nothing to do but scroll through the internet he began to feel anger about what was happening. Nothing the government claimed to be doing made any sense. Even worse, it was happening across the world and every day the news was all death statistics and fear. Finally, one day he was able to get his job back but things weren’t the same. He got the mandatory vaccine in order to keep the job. Things were getting better. Omicron. Lockdown. He lost his job again this time there was no CERB. In anger one night he saw his chance. His chance to have a voice amongst the barrage of 24 hour media onslaught. HOAX. SCAM. Spray paint on the side of a bridge. It wasn’t much but it was enough.

———

Probably better for Michael in the end. New restaurants have a phenomenally high failure rate.

#114 Sail Away on 01.12.22 at 10:19 pm

#107 Doug t on 01.12.22 at 9:37 pm

WE are killing this planet that is our HOME – well get ready for the next and the next and the next that Mother Nature throws at us in order to reclaim balance – it’s not going to be fun but it will happen

———-

Wrong, the planet is just fine. Conservation of mass, conservation of energy and all. Distribute one way, distribute another, it matters not.

Humans are not as important as some seem to think. Except the Sail Aways, of course.

#115 Winterpeg on 01.12.22 at 10:23 pm

#29 : “Joe Clark – the best Prime Minister we never had. Ya, I know he was PM for 9 months, but that hardly counts.”

Actually, I believe Robert Stanfield was the one who was called “the best Prime Minister we never had”.

#116 Michael in-north-york on 01.12.22 at 10:27 pm

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/sports/tennis/article-djokovic-did-not-have-guaranteed-entry-to-australia-government-says/

The judge hearing Novak Djokovic’s legal challenge to the Australian government’s decision to revoke the star tennis player’s entry visa raised several concerns on Monday about how the Serbian was treated by border officials on arrival.

Judge Anthony Kelly said it appeared Djokovic had received the required medical exemption before he travelled to Australia and presented evidence of that on his arrival at Melbourne’s airport on Wednesday evening.

“The point that I am somewhat agitated about is what more could this man have done?” Kelly said as Djokovic’s lawyers outlined their case challenging the federal government’s decision to revoke the player’s visa at the airport.

#117 Rural Rick on 01.12.22 at 10:30 pm

Just stay home for a bit.

#118 Neo on 01.12.22 at 10:33 pm

#93 Sheesh on 01.12.22 at 8:23 pm
#81 Neo on 01.12.22 at 7:37pm

‘The difference is once 87% of the population was fully vaccinated against Polio we didn’t proceed to have 7,000 to 10,000 polio cases a day.

……….

No, no we didn’t….
Polio never infected that many people in the first place.

https://www.canadashistory.ca/explore/science-technology/the-polio-epidemic-in-canada

In 1937 there were 4000 polio cases in Canada (population about 11 million). 119 people died in Ontario alone!

I’m guessing with numbers like that, you’d have been fine taking your chances with the virus. It only affected kids, and not very many of them, so whuts the big deal, amirite?

**************************************

Dude. Even if we just use this current pandemic. In December 2020 we peaked at just over 3,000 cases in a population where 100% wasn’t vaccinated. Fast forward and 78% of that same population now fully vaccinated peaked at over 14,000 JUST in fully vaccinated cases in December 2021 and then they shut down testing so we have no idea what the real numbers are anymore.

Rule #1 for a vaccine is to provide immunity is my point and the Polio vaccine accomplished that. If the Covid vaccine did that there wouldn’t be 1,800 fully vaxxed in hospital and 167 in ICU right now. End of story.

#119 canuck on 01.12.22 at 10:35 pm

In a public health emergency, like a pandemic, here is a role for public policy. When I received the vax for polio as a child no choice was presented. Today it is a dead disease. How is that a bad outcome? – Garth
______________________________________________

C.mon Garth… Apples to apples, okay? Eradicated viruses like polio and smallpox are not coronaviruses… and it took decades and decades for that eradication to happen and no economies, businesses or schools were shut down.

Corona viruses are respiratory and have never, ever been eradicated. The Spanish flu is still alive and part of you flu shot that protects against it.
Covid19 didn’t screw up the world, gov’ts did. Remember how the media was always talking about how well Australia was doing to contain the virus? 84,000 cases reported yesterday.

When will common sense and critical thinking come into play?

#120 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.12.22 at 10:50 pm

#105 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 9:34 pm
The Climate Govt Bureaucrats are at it again in the Lower Brianland.
The Vancouver Port Authority has legislated a Climate Action Policy starting Feb 1st.

All trucks hauling containers from the Vancouver Ports cannot be older than 10 years.
New trucks cause less pollution.
———————-
Not only that, they cause far fewer breakdowns.
I don’t drive too often, but almost every time I do, there’s a broken down truck holding up traffic.
There don’t seem to be any truck checks anymore.
Time bombs waiting to go off.

#121 IHCTD9 on 01.12.22 at 10:53 pm

#202 dragonfly58 on 01.12.22 at 5:26 pm
Hi TD , I hear you about the final drives. At work one of our purchasing agents found out he could source Romanian bearings at a substantial discount compared to the name brand SKF , FAG and similar we had been using. Mainly for European pumps and gear drives. They quietly went in the bin. Some of those gear drives had a replacement cost in excess of $50,000. So what if you save a hundred or two on bearings. Does it make any sense to risk a cut rate product ? We started specifying the exact bearing required after that.
—— –

Yep, good bearings last a long time, there was one presumably original 1952 pinion bearing still going (barely) in the left drive. There are so many makes and variations when it comes to bearings – way too much to dive into. When it matters I just stick with the “known good” SKF, FAG, INA, Timken, NSK etc… Like you say, the savings just aren’t worth the cost/work in the event of a failure.

#122 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.12.22 at 10:57 pm

The humming birds are back.
I have not seen them since x-mas.
I do not feed wild life, so I felt somewhat guilty when the cold weather arrived and they just disappeared.
I wonder where they were hiding.

#123 meslippery on 01.12.22 at 11:12 pm

#105 crowdedelevatorfartz
Used trucks….
—-
If new trucks were economically viable a government mandate would not be required.Truck drivers who remain solvent do not need to be micromanaged.
Trucks in a good state of repair is all they should worry about.Maybe more of the great resignation.
Giant safety meeting …Nobody moves nobody gets hurt.

#124 Chester in the Fall on 01.12.22 at 11:25 pm

#113 Sail Away on 01.12.22 at 10:12 pm
#104 Hindsight Is 2020 on 01.12.22 at 9:31 pm

Now don’t give these two a can of spray paint.

https://www.msn.com/en-sg/news/world/chinas-mass-lockdowns-left-one-woman-in-a-nightmare-scenario-of-being-stuck-at-a-blind-dates-home-for-a-week-and-she-didnt-have-kind-words-for-him/ar-AASIP9V

#125 Yukon Elvis on 01.12.22 at 11:28 pm

#122 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.12.22 at 10:57 pm
The humming birds are back.
I have not seen them since x-mas.
I do not feed wild life, so I felt somewhat guilty when the cold weather arrived and they just disappeared.
I wonder where they were hiding.
++++++++++++++++++++++
I was tinkering with my car one day in the garage and a humming bird flew in the door and crashed into the window on the opposite side of the garage. He was stunned for a bit then tried and tried to fly thru the solid window but he couldn’t. I watched for a minute and it looked like he was panicking. I though he might die of stress.I picked him up and cupped him gently in both hands and took him outside and opened my hands and he flew away. I hope he is ok out there. It was really cool to hold a humming bird.

#126 short horses on 01.12.22 at 11:32 pm

After reading todays blog I decided to funge all my NFTs; turns out they were fungible after all.

#127 IHCTD9 on 01.12.22 at 11:32 pm

#52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.12.22 at 5:47 pm
@#42 Ponzies Pals

“It’s a “dog eat dog”, world, My friend.
It’s just that the Chinese are doing their share of eat’n now.
They have learned from the best.”
+++

Yes they have.

Thats why they’re moving factories from “expensive” Chinese workers to cheaper ones in Vietnam….

https://www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/3142287/chinese-manufactures-forced-halt-production-vietnam
———

Read a few years back about China losing contracts to countries lower in the food chain. Live by the sword, die by the sword eh? That’s what happens when you’ve built your business around being the cheap guy. No one is going to pay a premium for Chinese parts when some other country will save them an additional 1%.

They should have done what Japan did, and what S Korea is doing. Start building internationally recognized brands associated with value and quality. Japan did it from scratch in just 4 decades.

It’s pretty much assured that human labour will be largely written out of garden variety mass manufacturing in the next few decades, pretty much eliminating the cheap human labour advantage places like China used to build their economies. What happens then?

Japan already has a lights out factory where robots are building more robots completely unsupervised…

#128 45north on 01.12.22 at 11:39 pm

Year/year inflation is seven per cent in the States with core inflation at 5.5%. “We’ve not seen anything like that since February of 1982. Ominous,” said my veteran pal Ed Pennock. The virus is not only chomping its way through the labour force, but once again totally messing up the supply chain. There’s no way the Fed is going to allow 7% annual currency destruction. Nor is the Bank of Canada likely to deviate from its record of following the US central bank 92% of the time. Rates are not going up twice and retreating. The Canadian CB is not going to act independently. Get over it.

In 1982, Paul Volker was the Chairman of the Federal Reserve. He took a stick to inflation and raised interest rates to 20%. Inflation stopped.

Today, if interest rates were raised to 10%, there’d be widespread hardship. There’s no way out. Inflation is a wild animal, it does what it wants. There’s no such thing as a gentle stick.

#129 Overheardyou on 01.12.22 at 11:47 pm

311 has a graffiti removal service in Toronto, you can even submit the request online.

#130 stage1dave on 01.12.22 at 11:55 pm

#82 Ronaldo

70s redux? Price appreciation in a few cities has been steady thru the ‘teens, but it was quicker in the early 70s (actually mirroring the 03-06 period) before leveling off.

My parents paid 19.7k for a working man’s bungalow in Regina (hillsdale) in aug 71; sold April 76 46.5k (!) Mind you, back then we had interest rates, now we don’t; so will the values flatline after this current round of appreciation? Or crash?

Or will some enterprising HF buy out entire city blocks from home owners who are underwater and rent them out perpetually at userous rates to people who can barely afford them?

#96 #97 Shaun

What a flip-flop artist Trudeau sr. was; both my parents voted for him in 68; by 72 he’d POd both em so badly they voted for Broadbent…after HIS support for minority govt they voted for Stanfield in 74. And they weren’t PC voters at all…despite the fumbled football pick…

Interestingly, Dr. Foth relates in one of his books how the photographer supplied AP with 4 pics in total, in 3 of which Stanfield caught the ball gracefully…strange how only ONE got published in almost every paper!

Someone mentioned Joe Clark, and now I can’t find the post. The best PM Canada never had? I’ve wondered about that frequently over the years, 80 was the first federal election I voted in. I remember his gas price increase stated as a method of moving up Alberta’s reimbursement to something resembling the “world price” for its oil at that time, and the Easterners voted with their wallets…it may have proven to be a more unifying force countrywide over the long term.

Price increases came anyway, just went into different pockets.

Anyway, I always got the feeling that Mr. Clarke was a fundamentally decent person, and that those traits might have been his undoing as a politician. I also have the feeling we’d be living in more balanced country if he’d served his full term.

It must be an absolute nightmare to try and govern this country…

#131 Brian on 01.13.22 at 12:00 am

I recently saw a question posed by an American on a U.S. website. The question was:

Why do Canadians keep electing Trudeau if he’s so incompetent?

The response by a Canadian was priceless:

“When we first elected Trudeau, he legalized pot. Then..then…he… what was the question again?”

#132 45north on 01.13.22 at 12:01 am

Sheesh Polio never infected that many people in the first place.

In 1937 there were 4000 polio cases in Canada (population about 11 million). 119 people died in Ontario alone!
I’m guessing with numbers like that, you’d have been fine taking your chances with the virus. It only affected kids, and not very many of them, so what’s the big deal, amirite?

In 1921, Franklin D Roosevelt got polio as an adult. He was crippled for the rest of his life.
Growing up in North York, in the 1950’s, the girl down the street got polio and died. The boy around the corner got polio and was crippled for the rest of his life.
it is a big deal

#133 the Jaguar on 01.13.22 at 12:04 am

Poor Garth. Having to wade through the swamp of all these comments daily. Like scenes from ‘The Shining’, he must stumble along with the sounds of ‘Red Rum, Red Rum,..” reverberating in his head.

Speaking of ‘Shining’, those who are so cowardly to paint ‘Hoax’ on a bridge in a town in Nova Scotia that has Unesco Heritage Site designation are beneath contempt. Are they the same ones who operate under the cover of darkness to steal flags off of buildings? Look up the phrase ” The Shining Path (Peru)” and you will find their origin. Beneath contempt, and that’s a long way down. Not so far down that many wouldn’t want to apply boiler plate screws to keep them in their chosen place.

All this Omnicron/Covid stuff has become a crashing bore. With three vaccinations I’ve scheduled another escape from it’s unacceptable confinement, with another more ambitious adventure mid year. In researching that second escape I checked out a library book today. It demands greater than average research.

I asked when it ( the book) was due and was advised the date, but also told if there was no “hold” on the material it would be automatically renewed. Strange, I thought. No responsibility for timely return. They have given up, I thought. Finally realizing the futility of beating a dead horse that doesn’t understand or appreciate the role that character plays in keeping a promise. If only a small promise to return books on a given date. An elegy for so many elements character fallen in the ditch in recent times.

Next steps seem clear. There is no longer any point to sit at the bedside of the comatose patient waiting and pleading for it to wake up. Appealing to reason and common sense. All the usual suspects are engaged in the “Full Monty”. ( Elected officials, media responsible to keep the truth alive, and faith in common sense and collective responsibility..)

Best to just look away from the scene of the accident and use every means possible to further one’s personal agenda.

This dog Max seems to be a canine version of a calico cat. Knowing he resides in a loving home provides some small relief to the rest of humanities current failings…….

#134 R on 01.13.22 at 2:34 am

110 Faron
You try so hard to sound so cool, it’s actually kind of cute.

#135 Shawn on 01.13.22 at 2:47 am

45 North at 127 said:

In 1982, Paul Volker was the Chairman of the Federal Reserve. He took a stick to inflation and raised interest rates to 20%. Inflation stopped.

Today, if interest rates were raised to 10%, there’d be widespread hardship.

**************************
There was widespread hardship then as well. Lots of bankruptcies. In Alberta there a recession caused by the National Energy Program and many lost their houses. That must have been exasperated by high interest rates.

Lots of people in Ontario also lost their houses.

Unemployment was very high.

Yeah lots of hardship.

#136 Debel on 01.13.22 at 6:19 am

#30 Observer on 01.12.22 at 4:38 pm
#21 Debel on 01.12.22 at 4:20 pm
Ontario updated their hospital data to disclose that, as of today’s numbers, 46% of covid hospitalizations & 17% of covid ICU numbers were incidental.

46 percent!!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
So? Hospitalizations continue to increase regardless whether a patient is there “with” or “for” COVID-19.

———————————–

So? were there a high percentage of deaths incorrectly labeled due to covid as well? Basing covid response policy on incorrect data isn’t concerning to you?

#137 Damifino on 01.13.22 at 6:21 am

#122 Ponzius Pilatus

The humming birds are back.
I have not seen them since x-mas.
I do not feed wild life, so I felt somewhat guilty when the cold weather arrived and they just disappeared.
I wonder where they were hiding.

————————————–

One of them was hiding at my place.

On December 23, in anticipation of some very cold days ahead (for Vancouver), I rigged up a 25-watt carpenter’s glue heater to a camera tripod and put it underneath my balcony’s hummingbird feeder to keep the nectar from freezing.

It worked beautifully. I left in on 24 hours a day. I figure the electricity cost to be 10 about cents a day.

For the next two weeks we were well below freezing most of the time. One bird decided to perch above the feeder for hours on end every day. I think it was because, in addition to keeping the nectar warm, the heater created a slightly warmer space above it where the bird was able to escape some of the cold. It disappeared at every night but always returned early the next day.

Hummingbirds are able to go into holes in trees and fall into a “torpor” where their system shuts down almost completely. It’s like a short term hibernation for the night.

Anyway, I figure I saved the little guy by providing an unfrozen food supply on those very cold days. We’ve warmed up since then and there’s no longer a need for the heater.

The bird still comes around and so do many others. But never at the same time. They are extremely territorial and will fight ferociously to defend a food source. In fact, they are downright wicked to each other. Hummingbirds are tough as nails. I guess that’s how they’ve survived since the days of the dinosaur.

#138 Summertime on 01.13.22 at 6:46 am

https://twitter.com/PierrePoilievre/status/1481390582111125508

BREAKING: Finance Committee to investigate housing bubble and other inflation.

#139 Summertime on 01.13.22 at 6:49 am

450 billions in new house sales/mortgages in the last year.

Where is the money coming from?

#140 Wrk.dover on 01.13.22 at 7:27 am

#126 IHCTD9 on 01.12.22 at 11:32 pm
Japan already has a lights out factory where robots are building more robots completely unsupervised…
_______________________________
Reminds me of GTA RE purchasers in their condos.

#141 Wrk.dover on 01.13.22 at 7:38 am

#136 Damifino on 01.13.22 at 6:21 am
The bird still comes around and so do many others. But never at the same time. They are extremely territorial and will fight ferociously to defend a food source. In fact, they are downright wicked to each other. Hummingbirds are tough as nails. I guess that’s how they’ve survived since the days of the dinosaur.
____________________________

At the place we periodically wintered in Mesa, one evening just before dark (last call) there were eight hummers sharing a four port feeder, four on for ten seconds while the other four hovered eight inches away, then all eight swapped at the same time. This went on, back and forth for a few minutes!

Is illusive World peace actually possible?

#142 Wrk.dover on 01.13.22 at 7:42 am

With interest rates above inflation, who would need stinking stonks?

Hence, interest rates are below inflation.

Now, put that cat back in the bag.

#143 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.13.22 at 7:47 am

Ponzies Perpetual Presumptions.

“There don’t seem to be any truck checks anymore.”

+++++

Never driven in Burnaby?

https://globalnews.ca/news/6626623/burnaby-truck-inspection-blitz/

The RCMP set up in Burnaby due to its central location ( unlike sleepy backwaters such as Tsawwassen) and the fact that the Trans Canada Hwy runs through the middle of it.

Great.
Pull all the 10 year old trucks( and older) off the road and watched the unemployed big rig drivers go to Amazon and never come back.

As to the road blockages due to broken down vehicles on you infrequent trips.
Perhaps I can offer a more experienced opinion based on my daily work schedule that takes me all over the lower Brainland.
Big Rigs arent the issue. Its the ubiquitous $100,000 SUV’s everywhere with green “N” ( New Driver) decals

Perhaps the govt “planners” in the Lower Brainland should have been improving the highway and bridge infrastructure as the city doubled in population over the past 25 years.

Think traffic is bad now?
Give Trudeau another term in office so he can import another 500,000 “N”ew drivers per year.
We have a massive Debt and more taxpayers are required to service it.
As BC govt ( monopolistic) car insurance leaps above $2000 per year for a 7 year old truck.

Yep.
A shortage of truck drivers in the country and the Vancouver Port Authority has made it even harder to drive one.
Cutting off one’s nose to spite ones face comes to mind.
Brilliant.

#144 TMac on 01.13.22 at 7:50 am

Don’t agree with people stating this is a hoax(it’s not), nor do I think this is some sort of mass attempt to take over society and strip rights away.
However, I can see how these people would come to this conclusion. We were told, if you take two shots of any of the approved vaccines then this would all go away. Well now here we are on shot number 3 and none of this is going anywhere.
So I can understand how people would start to lose faith in experts when what we were originally told turned out to be completely false.

#145 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.13.22 at 8:01 am

@#137 Summertime
“BREAKING: Finance Committee to investigate housing bubble and other inflation.”

+++

Yawn…..
Another Dog and Pony show.

Politicians dont care until a majority of voters lose their homes due to
a) Rising interest rates
b) a recession
c) a market crash
d) all of the above

When a majority of voters are then screaming for blood and pointing blame….

THEN and only then will a Royal Commission be formed to spend years (and millions of dollars) travelling the land like a circus road show.
The appointed commissioner will be a political hack that has been faithful to the Party in power. He or she ( they?) will be generously paid to appear concerned and wise.
The commission will be highjacked by the Woke, the politically correct, the Left, the Right, the crazy and the Zealous….
The commissioner will eventually resign due to discoveries of their past, insensitive indiscretions ( they ate Japanese food on Dec 7th).
The commission with denigrate into a potboiler of slurs, allegations and endless Woke bickering.

All these commissions are nothing a placebo to placate us from burning everything down.

#146 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.13.22 at 8:08 am

@#136 Damfino

I did the same thing.
A 10wattfridge light bulb in a coffee can.
Strapped it to the bottom of the feeder.
The outside thermo showed -9cel for a few days the last week of Dec.
I had two Anna’s H-Birds zipping about.
A male ( bright red throat) and a female ( bright green).
They tolerate each other and probably have been mating. They sit side by side on the same branch for minutes at a time.
Only seem to spar if one goes to the feeder.
The female has been around the longest.
Its her second winter.

#147 crowdedelevatorfartz on 01.13.22 at 8:21 am

@#131 45North

“Growing up in North York, in the 1950’s, the girl down the street got polio and died. The boy around the corner got polio and was crippled for the rest of his life.
it is a big deal”

++++

I remember we were all talking about what we remembered receiving as the best Christmas gift ever as a kid.
A friend had polio in the late 1940’s.
He was stuck in an Iron Lung in the hospital for treatment for over a year when he was about 8.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/may/26/last-iron-lung-paul-alexander-polio-coronavirus

Christmas Eve he was on a Quarantined polio ward with 2 other miserable kids.

No family, no visitors. No one but the nurse on duty.
She asked him what he hoped he was going to get for Christmas.
“A hug.”
She opened the machine and gave him a hug.

He smiled and said, “She was very pretty. I hugged her a loooong time.”

To all the stubborn, pig headed anti vaxx’er out there.
Get a vaccine. End this ridiculous shutdown.

#148 enthalpy on 01.13.22 at 9:52 am

well at least they decided against that Trucker border vaxx mess.
So toilet paper should still be available.

Its time we open it up and moved on. This is over.

#149 X on 01.13.22 at 9:54 am

These rolling surges with employees off sick (even if we don’t have actual shut downs) will still impact the supply chain, and won’t be stopping anytime soon. Which makes me wonder about rates going up more/longer than some predict.

#150 Observer on 01.13.22 at 10:19 am

#143 TMac on 01.13.22 at 7:50 am
Don’t agree with people stating this is a hoax(it’s not), nor do I think this is some sort of mass attempt to take over society and strip rights away.
However, I can see how these people would come to this conclusion. We were told, if you take two shots of any of the approved vaccines then this would all go away. Well now here we are on shot number 3 and none of this is going anywhere.
So I can understand how people would start to lose faith in experts when what we were originally told turned out to be completely false.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Viruses evolve and mutate in unpredictable ways. Who’d a thunk it?

#151 Oakville Rocks! on 01.13.22 at 10:40 am

@ #132 the Jaguar

What?

You consider the fact that the library will automatically renew a book for you a sign they have given up and accept the failure of character of their users because they do not hold them to the original due date? If no one else has asked for that book, why not let it renew automatically? This is common sense and convenient.
I have used this feature several times with programming/software resource books from the Oakville Library system.

FYI: The automatic renewal will only happen twice and only if someone else has not requested the book in that time. And they will TXT or email the renewal with the new due date. You can also renew automatically online. Easy peasy.

Sometimes you are so ridiculous you are funny. You remind me of Dana Carvey’s Church Lady. I guess that makes me, a scofflaw who does not respect original return dates, oh I don’t know.. SATAN! Why not show the library what stern stuff the Jaguar is made of and pull an allnighter, use their book and return it the very next day?

I shudder to think what conclusions you would draw about our customers who rarely return equipment on loan/evaluation in the agreed upon time. And don’t get me started on how long it takes some of them to pay their invoices. (Our customers are all employees of their respective provincial governments and no surprise – those Quebecers are the worst )

The new Calgary Central Library is beautiful by the way. I have only seen pictures but will likely make an effort to visit the next time I have to be in Cowtown. Lucky you to have such a beautiful building.

#152 Faron on 01.13.22 at 10:54 am

#133 R on 01.13.22 at 2:34 am
110 Faron

You try so hard to sound so cool, it’s actually kind of cute.

So, you identified with the AZ suburban hellscape comment? Cool!

It’s okay if you think I’m cute. I mean, I like Taylor Swift’s music. We all have our vices.

Enjoy those LEAPS.

#153 Jesse on 01.13.22 at 11:02 am

>It will take months, or years, to repair the damage to the global distribution system, rectify shortages and convince people they’re not going to die by setting foot in the office.
*****************

Pandemic or not, people DO NOT want to go back to the office. Those days are over. Big companies are already accelerating the offshoring of employees and cutting office space, it’s a double whammy and saves lot’s of $$$.

#154 Dharma Bum on 01.13.22 at 11:31 am

Citizens need to do their part to reduce the pressureon hospitals and ICUs.

If you get Omicron, JUST STAY HOME. Call in sick. Tell the boss you got the Omicron. Make some tea. Take some Tylenol. Stay in bed. Sleep. Binge Netflix. Take hot showers. Repeat. For a week.

Relax. It will pass.

No need to run to the hospital freaked outta your skull.

Unless of course you are part of the unvaccinated cult.

Then, you can go directly to jail. Do not pass GO. DO not collect $200.

At least Quebec is facing some facts. The biggest problem is the unvaccinated. Period.

All levels of government need to grow a set and crack down on these cretins. Grab ’em and Jab ’em.

The few causing problems for the many.

Selfish bastards.

#155 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.13.22 at 11:37 am

#142 CEF

Perhaps the govt “planners” in the Lower Brainland should have been improving the highway and bridge infrastructure as the city doubled in population over the past 25 years.
—————————-
This is another example of linear thinking.
More is not better.
The short answer is no – new roads don’t reduce traffic congestion on their own. That is primarily thanks to Induced Demand. Induced demand refers to the idea that increasing roadway capacity encourages more people to drive, thus failing to improve congestion.

When they opened the Alex Fraser bridge, I moved to NorthDelta to cut down on my commute downtown.
So I thought.
Within 6 month, the bridge traffic was a night mare, completely congested.
I ended up leaving the car at home and taking bus and sky train, which saved a lot of money and time.

#156 Dharma Bum on 01.13.22 at 11:43 am

#29 IHCTD9

When it matters I just stick with the “known good” SKF, FAG, INA, Timken, NSK etc…
———————————————————————————————————–

Uhuhuhuhuhuhuh…he said FAG…uhuhuhuhuhuhuh….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEFXXipezJw

#157 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.13.22 at 12:07 pm

#188 Novaxx
No he is not being a diva. He’s the #1 rank player. He’s THE draw. You want your “open” to matter, you want the headliner to be there.

He’s been invited.
He’s been given a visa.
That visa was cancelled for PR reasons, because politicians looked like fools and Australians realized they’ve been bamboozled.
——————————-
I speak from experience.
If you have a Visa to go to the USA, it does not guarantee you entry.
The border guard has the final say.
As the saying goes: The Visa let’s you knock on the door, the border guard lets you in, or not”.
If he’s in a bad mood, he can sent you back if you want to “smuggle “ in an “undeclared” apple.

#158 the jaguar on 01.13.22 at 12:14 pm

Re 151. What a rant about library due dates. Sure hope this doesn’t go in the same direction that ‘tatoos’ went recently. Clearly some posters don’t care for the observations of some other posters on this blog. I have my own list, with three people I don’t read. Why not just roll your eyes and scroll on? All these personal attacks because you disagree with another’s viewpoint ….just don’t read the post.

#159 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 12:16 pm

127 – IHCTD9

“It’s pretty much assured that human labour will be largely written out of garden variety mass manufacturing in the next few decades, pretty much eliminating the cheap human labour advantage places like China used to build their economies. What happens then?”

Good morning (here) and a good question IHCTD9.

IMO, China still wins. They will have the most automated factories. Why? Because their development and trained labour costs are still lower.

Let’s say a canadian factory, employing 100 workers, is shut down and manufacturing off-shored to China, who uses about 150 lower cost workers to produce the same amount of widgets. Canadian capitalists review this and determine they can highly automate this, and want to return production to Canada. The downside – only 10 jobs – administration, systems and highly skilled technicians – for similar production quantity.

Canada has little political will to do this, and a quagmire of permitting etc to be able to build such a facility.

In all likelihood, the automated factory would be built in China, or other low(er) cost country.

#160 Victor Maitland on 01.13.22 at 12:28 pm

#29 Reality Check, that was the 1975 election, with Robert Stanfield as PC leader.

#161 Summertime on 01.13.22 at 12:41 pm

#159 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 12:16 pm
127 – IHCTD9

“It’s pretty much assured that human labour will be largely written out of garden variety mass manufacturing in the next few decades, pretty much eliminating the cheap human labour advantage places like China used to build their economies. What happens then?”

Production makes sense as far as there are markets/buyers.

How the poor sheeple that takes 30 + years of labour for an average shack, soon to be 50 can afford anything and drive markets is beyond me. It will soon have no demand power whatsoever.

#162 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.13.22 at 12:44 pm

#159 DR V, IHTCD9
What is happening is, that China’s labour costs are already rising.
And the product quality is improving.
They themselves are now outsourcing, and even building factories in other countries with Vietnamese workers.
It does not always go smooth.
https://www.voanews.com/a/vietnamese-workers-at-chinese-factory-in-serbia-cry-for-help/6321688.html

#163 IHCTD9 on 01.13.22 at 12:45 pm

Amid the din of the Covid wars, I still plan preparations for what comes after. Especially if our ruinous abomination of a PM still resides in Ottawa come that day. Canada is in for turbulent times, and I would not be one bit surprised if Trudeau steps down the minute Canadians lose interest in the Covid distractions. He’s not gonna what to wear that mud.

Taxes just have to soar – even if rates don’t go up, and we don’t pay a dime down on the debt. But rates are going up. Every 1% increase in borrowing costs on just our Federal debt is 10 BILLION dollars per year. When Harper exited stage left, our Federal deficit was under 1 billion, and the total accumulated debt for the entire history of Canada was 612 Billion.

Yeah, that is a lot of mud…

#164 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 12:46 pm

155 Ponz

“The short answer is no – new roads don’t reduce traffic congestion on their own. That is primarily thanks to Induced Demand. Induced demand refers to the idea that increasing roadway capacity encourages more people to drive, thus failing to improve congestion.”

Also known as the “rebound effect” in energy consumption ie more fuel efficient vehicles encourage more driving.

#165 Immigrant man on 01.13.22 at 12:47 pm

#157 Ponzius Pilatus on 01.13.22 at 12:07 pm
If you have a Visa to go to the USA, it does not guarantee you entry.
————
Such is the case in Canada too.

#166 Alexander Solzhenitsyn on 01.13.22 at 12:47 pm

#111 HUNGRY BEAR on 01.12.22 at 9:53 pm
SUCK IT UP…. and get VAXED!

Or get transported to an island in the Arctic.

If your UN-VAXED your not welcome on Canadian soil.

Your a burden on our system!!!!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++

And thus spawned the Gulag.

#167 Shawn on 01.13.22 at 12:53 pm

10 year old trucks

I don’t agree with pulling well-serviced trucks off the road JUST because of age.

But look at TFI International (formerly Transforce). It’s ran by the incredible French Canadian CEO Alain Bedard who has made investors very happy for 25 years now. Their average truck age is astonishingly young. About three years as I recall. Apparently that has been efficient. They sell off their trucks at apparently about 4 years.

TFI is another unsung Canadian business success. They have done extremely well in the U.S. after conquering Canada. Not quite in the category of Alain Bouchard at Couche-Tard but close. And of course there is Tobias Lutke at Shopify which has been incredible. All three are Canadian business heros.

#168 Farm Boy on 01.13.22 at 12:54 pm

*When will common sense and critical thinking come into play?*

On this blog? Bahaaa LOL

#169 Faron on 01.13.22 at 1:03 pm

#151 Oakville Rocks! on 01.13.22 at 10:40 am
#133 the Jaguar on 01.13.22 at 12:04 am

She won’t read this, so I can say nice things behind her back. She’s a seemingly kind, observant person if a bit overwrought from time to time. Generally high quality comments despite occasionally getting flustered by perceived black-bloc spooks.

That said, I’m amazed that she, unironically, writes:

doesn’t understand or appreciate the role that character plays in keeping a promise

And this:

every means possible to further one’s personal agenda.

In the same comment. So, the solution to people abandoning their societal obligations is to just jump on the me me bandwagon? “I don’t like how society is dissolving so I’m just going to abandon society so it can dissolve faster.” We are so screwed.

#170 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 1:03 pm

Dr Vs morning ramble

Thanks to all who have provided info on their retirement income strategies.

My acct (no not ponzie) provided a tax planner for the
year. A mix of public pension, RRSP/RRIF, personal corp dividends. Some non-reg divvies and some cap gains to top off. Can increase RRSP or corp divs if required. A bit of a trade there. Acct prefers increasing the RRSP withdrawals over the corp dividends, but suggested we talk again after 2021 taxes filed.

When I moved everything to my current FA, her reaction was “Wow this is really well set up”. I gather this is the result of following my acct’s instructions for 25 years.

With this comes flexibility but it can drive me a bit nuts.
Always more than one way to do it.

#171 HOAX! on 01.13.22 at 1:03 pm

Now you tell me please how this makes sense.

Vaccinated are allowed to fly all around the world, and bring variants and spread because they have a passport.

Meanwhile, truckers – working mostly in isolation must be vaccinated or else?

Of course they had no choice but to back off it…obviously.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/ottawa-reverses-course-on-mandatory-vaccines-for-canadian-truckers-crossing-border

Tell me again how policies put in place aren’t precisely designed to create shortages and inflation?

Politicians – NEVER WASTE A CRISIS!

It’s never been this fun to be a politician if you think about it.

SPEND, SPEND, SPEND!

Do whatever the hell you want! …because you can, because it will take the courts a year to sort it out and by then it doesn’t matter. Hey, EMERGENCY!

Instead of needing to be responsible, answer for your actions and follow rules like at all other non-pandemic times? NO CONTEST!

Pandemic has been the best and most fun time to be a politician. $400B spent? Let’s see if we can spend more next year!

And if they give you too much crap – just say you came in contact with someone who had Covid and you need to self-isolate for 2 weeks. Yay! 2-week vacay!

DOES IT GET ANY BETTER?

#172 Vax On, Vax Off on 01.13.22 at 1:13 pm

DELETED (Anti-vax)

#173 IHCTD9 on 01.13.22 at 1:17 pm

#159 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 12:16 pm
127 – IHCTD9

“It’s pretty much assured that human labour will be largely written out of garden variety mass manufacturing in the next few decades, pretty much eliminating the cheap human labour advantage places like China used to build their economies. What happens then?”

Good morning (here) and a good question IHCTD9.

IMO, China still wins. They will have the most automated factories. Why? Because their development and trained labour costs are still lower.

Let’s say a canadian factory, employing 100 workers, is shut down and manufacturing off-shored to China, who uses about 150 lower cost workers to produce the same amount of widgets. Canadian capitalists review this and determine they can highly automate this, and want to return production to Canada. The downside – only 10 jobs – administration, systems and highly skilled technicians – for similar production quantity.

Canada has little political will to do this, and a quagmire of permitting etc to be able to build such a facility.

In all likelihood, the automated factory would be built in China, or other low(er) cost country.
____

Yes, lots of different ways it could go. IMHO, the killer for developing nations would be the closure of the manufacturing cost gap. I agree DN’s could still produce for less – but it might only be half the cost instead of 1/20th the cost. The cost of freight to other nations will suddenly be a much bigger detriment than it has been so far. Where are fuel costs going in the next few decades? DN’s may start to see cost savings with manufacturing closer to their customers (or among them).

Finally, if a “no-name” chainsaw from China with no dealer network ends up costing 450.00, and a genuine Stihl costs 550.00 – who’s going to buy the Chinese one? China has built themselves a global reputation for producing cheap unsupported throwaway products, so they live and die on price alone. Folks won’t pay a premium for Chinese products. In fact, they won’t even pay par for them. They absolutely have to be dirt cheap to sell.

I agree governments in the West will sleep in the bed they make for themselves WRT putting hurdles in front of automation within their own borders. All of us should be looking at Germany and Japan for inspiration – it’s going to happen regardless. We don’t even really have much of a choice.

I think we can all look forward to some serious international strife and social upheaval as a result of all this too.

#174 Faron on 01.13.22 at 1:26 pm

#159 Dr V on 01.13.22 at 12:16 pm

Canada has little political will to do this

Keep in mind that “political will” here has much more to do with the vested interests of shareholders and the damaging tendency of capital markets to maximize $$$ profits regardless of any human, societal or environmental externalities. In that humans are involved, I guess there is politics. But the phrase “political will” offloads the issue onto lawmakers and our enfranchisement when the issue really lies within each of our retirement accounts and our individual willingness to sacrifice returns to mend these ills.

Globalism has served equity growth at the expense of a large pool of stable domestic jobs and has made winners and losers. That it has happened is the fault of everyone who reads this blog because we are all shareholders and have all voted with our money for this process to happen.

#175 V for Vendetta on 01.13.22 at 1:29 pm

Sat down and watched V for Vendetta yesterday.

Have not seen is since some time pre-pandemic.

How disturbing it is to see the politicians and laws in a movie predict our reality.

Personally, the screen talking directions at deputies (video conference) and telling everyone how it will be is most disturbing. And it is what happens right now. TV tells us what to do, when to do it, and takes our rights away.

V for Vendetta, if you haven’t seen it, see it. 2005 movie, takes place in 2020 and predicts what we are living quite disturbingly. What a piece of acting too – Hugo not having access to facial expressions at all. Master class performance.

#176 Faron on 01.13.22 at 1:32 pm

Man, and I know this is equally pathetic, but it warms the cockles whenever Sail Away crows about a gain in order to get my goat and then it reverses all or more of that gain within days. He’s becoming his own kind of inverse indicator.

I’ll try to make this my last comment today.

#177 Felix on 01.13.22 at 1:41 pm

Dogawful mutts continue to perpetrate the biggest hoax on humanity, luring lower IQ people into relationships.

Luckily, smart humans avoid this by getting cats.

Darwin in action.

#178 ValueInvestor on 01.13.22 at 1:50 pm

No hoax. Lost my father to covid. It was painful even to watch. It is very real.
Take precautions. Boost up your immune system.
Most of all, let’s not fight and biker. Let’s get through this one together.

#179 Soviet Capitalist on 01.13.22 at 1:55 pm

Thank you, Nonplused !

Would it be correct for me to conclude that we are being led by people who are either evil/corrupt (hoax is real or they’re just filling up their pockets from Big Pharma) or incompetent (the thought that natural immunity may be of higher quality than artificial has not crossed their minds) ?

Does above is not enough to justify being hesitant in following their advice?

#180 IHCTD9 on 01.13.22 at 1:55 pm

My youngest really likes computers and has been teaching himself Python since he was 15. Yesterday he showed me a program he wrote where you type in a country and it digs up a bunch of information on its Covid status.

I was thinking he might do something like that for Trudeau. An app that measures the decline of Canada’s financial condition and several other metrics related to loss of QOL and COL increases, BOC rates and fiscal policies, house prices, wages, and how many times Freeland’s head oscillates per minute when Trudeau speaks to a camera.

He might then connect all this data to a “Doomsday Clock” animation that accurately counts down the minutes to Canada’s eventual financial destruction. It could then forecast what life in post-Trudeau Canada would be like for anyone rich enough to live here at that point.

I feel there will be a strong demand for something like this very soon :)

#181 Lead Paint on 01.13.22 at 1:56 pm

#8 Soviet Capitalist on 01.12.22 at 3:59 pm

Excellent question! One of several Politicians and MSM won’t address or acknowledge, leading to justified skepticism about what we are being told and forced to do.

#182 Shawn on 01.13.22 at 2:31 pm

The interest on the federal debt?

#163 IHCTD9 on 01.13.22 at 12:45 pm

Taxes just have to soar – even if rates don’t go up, and we don’t pay a dime down on the debt. But rates are going up. Every 1% increase in borrowing costs on just our Federal debt is 10 BILLION dollars per year.

************************
Lately we simply borrow even more money to pay the interest. Painless. Until at some point its no longer possible to do that.

Believe me taxes have contributed nothing to interest payments in the past few years.

God love those bond investors that lend to government at negative real rates!

#183 Chumpy Le Chump on 01.13.22 at 3:05 pm

So, a healthcare system designed to support 14 million people collapses when 505 people need an ICU. Has anyone thought about more beds? or should be just isolate forever and ignore the problem?

#184 Barb on 01.13.22 at 4:32 pm

My share is certainly growing faster than I can pay for it. Will tell daughter and grandson…

https://www.debtclock.ca/

#185 I.M. on 01.13.22 at 8:51 pm

Garth, as a Bluenoser I want to know your source about the “kid under 10” allegedly dying from Covid in Nova Scotia. No such death has been announced by the provincial government this week. All recent announced deaths have been persons 60 and older. A quick web search turns up no source that can verify your claim; not NS govt, not MSM, etc. Surely such a death would have been blasted all over the media and would have led to screams of outrage about reopening schools to students on Monday. Yet nothing.

The closest I can find is a statement that a child under 5 is currently hospitalized, which came out yesterday, but there were no additional details given (i.e. was the child already seriously ill with some other condition).

My error, as the child died of Covid in Ontario. – Garth