Shove it

Take this job and shove it.

Forty-four years ago some dodgy, scruffy country yodeler named Johnny Paycheque (seriously) released that song. It endures. In fact today it’s been embraced by GenZs whose moms were not even born when Mr. Paycheque gave the world voice. This time we know it more grandly as The Great Resignation.

Is it really a thing? Did Covid cause it?

The stats are what they are. On Friday we learned that job openings in the US, for example, sit at 10,438,000. Those are empty positions employers cannot fill. The number continues to grow as workers walk out. In fact in September 4.43 million Americans quit. The put the “quits rate” as a percentage of the entire work force at 3%.

Compare that to a shove-this-job rate of just 1.6% back in 2020 when the virus was taking hold and businesses were crashing. That was a seven-year low, and the pandemic hit women harder, as lockdowns shuttered the hospitality and childcare sectors. But as vax rates have increased and the pandemic crisis ebbs, big changes are hitting the labour market. The rate of resignations has now achieved a level double the historic norm. The result is the 10.4 million vacant employees in the US, signing bonuses for dishwashers in Vancouver, Deere workers refusing a $8,500 back-to-work cash offer in the US and the right-wingers who run Ontario jacking the minimum wage to $15.

The GR is vexing employers mightily. It’s making the supply chain issue worse. Canada alone is down 17,000 truck drivers. Same story at the ports. A study by Adobe found 50% of GenZers plan to find a new job in the next year. Another study by PriceWaterhouseCooper revealed 65% of employees are looking for another position. Microsoft’s polling finds that number is 44% globally. It’s staggering. Perchance historic.

So this has the potential of making the economic recovery more halting. It certainly impacts small and medium businesses with shallower pockets and more virus damage. It portends extra inflationary pressures and a wage-price spiral as workers wield greater bargaining power. Unions are reenergizing. Labour costs are destined to rise and you can bet this will help make our cost-of-living spike a structural one. No doubt what that means. Yep, six or eight Bank of Canada increases as rates rise to deal with the price romp.

But why? Why, even as the pandemic still hangs on and after two years of collective misery, is this happening?

Stress, the experts say. Covid stressed the hell out of everyone (except Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk) by upending daily and work routines, shuttering offices and schools while isolating us from each other. Telecommuting was everywhere. WFH became a reality for five million Canadians. Hospitality, restaurant and tourism workers were thrown on the pathogenic slagheap.

Stuck at home, shuttered from others, cut off, Zoomed to death and stripped of normalcy, people have been reassessing priorities and goals. After 19 months of this many have concluded they never want to commute again. They don’t want to spend most daylight hours in a work space. They crave a balance. They want to continue seeing their kids, walking the dog and doing the laundry on a personal schedule, not an imposed one. In short, the work ethic has been shot to hell.

Now, with so many jobs going begging the balance of power shifts.

Employers are being told they must coddle and yield. Companies have to work at building a sense of engagement and attachment to the business. Mostly, say HR poohbahs, they must support employee wellbeing which means personal time off, remote work arrangements, praise and rewards plus the realization that everything has changed because of a virus. Today people demand money, frequent tummy rubs and to not actually show up.

Well, if you run a business and need to employ anyone under 40, good luck. This genie may not be going back in the bottle until the next recession.

Meanwhile, we can think fondly of Johhny Paycheque’s time, when not getting killed on the job was a perk and only singers whined.

About the picture: “This is Bruin – my big, slobbery goofball with jowls to spare,” writes Jenn, from Ontario.  “Even in his senior years (for a Dane – he’ll be 7 in February), he is playful and loves to gallop around the woods. Although his slobber goes everywhere (truly, nothing is safe) – he makes up for this vice with his loyalty and devotion.”

177 comments ↓

#1 Flop… on 11.14.21 at 3:12 pm

With the news that Johnson & Johnson is splitting into 2 different companies, I tried to remember the last time I saw a Johnson entity split into two.

Then I recalled Lorena Bobbitt was involved…

M47BC

#2 OriginalAlex on 11.14.21 at 3:17 pm

This article was like music to my ears. I am an under 40 employee getting a new job because of non flexible management… Welcome to the new world! It’ll suck, but differently.

#3 life is good on 11.14.21 at 3:21 pm

DELETED (Anti-vax)

#4 wallflower on 11.14.21 at 3:24 pm

Hhhhhhmmmm. I don’t think the pandemic caused this. It may have expedited it.

Throughout 2018 and somewhat into 2019 I spoke with a lot of late 30 and mid 40 parents who were managers or business owners. (Yes, they were all parents because I was their kids’ soccer team manager.)
This was their common refrain:

I can’t get or keep decent employees:
-Prospects send their resume but then don’t respond to requests to interview. [my thought: in order to stay on EI they need to show they are making an effort?]
-Prospects agree to an interview then don’t show. [same thought]
-Interviewees ask me whether they can set their own hours.
-Candidates who get offered the position don’t show up for their first shift.
-Employees who start working, don’t actually work. They tell me, “I don’t do that.”

… for a 60s raised, “I do anything for work” gal, it was super super interesting to hear these refrains again and again and again.

I think a lot of this is coming out of the “everybody gets a ribbon for participating” ethos that I first encountered during my young son’s early school years.

The smarter ones have to come to realize, “Who TF needs a ribbon?”

So, maybe it’s all good: it was great in the 60s with my mom at home full time; one television, one car, a house the size of need… etc. Having one parent around or two parents around half-time each… superior to absent parents.

Maybe this is the Big Reduction.
Who gonna hurt most? China.

#5 Hans on 11.14.21 at 3:27 pm

“In short, the work ethic has been shot to hell.”

Maybe we’ve had it wrong all this time. The days when being a slave to the a wage have been exposed as not the only option. What I don’t understand is how people can afford to quit. Moving to the boonies might have helped them pocket a real estate windfall but that’s likely a one time lotto win. What happens when that starts to dwindle? Do low paying jobs in the boonies support the lifestyle that people want or will voters simply keep voting in parties that increase unproductive supports that keep paying people to stay at home?

#6 Yukon Elvis on 11.14.21 at 3:28 pm

Love the concept. Take this job and shove it. Always wanted to say that. But I knew that no one would feed me and I would be living under a bridge. I wonder how they do it today.

#7 WTF on 11.14.21 at 3:33 pm

For years the HR led “performance management” was a morale killer.

Gas the bottom 10%? Reward the top !0% Ignore the 80%. Might be appropriate for a year or two for a company that has gotten fat. After that it becomes a sick game which did little but piss off the 80% who did their jobs. Been going on for years, seething anger has been percolating below the surface, ergo engagement is in the toilet.

Shoe on the other foot now. Stick your now discredited Jack Welch failed experiment in employee relations where the sun don’t shine.

Inevitable really.

#8 Freedom First on 11.14.21 at 3:39 pm

It looks like many people must have learned how to live simply, either by massive sharing of housing, chores, resources and any number of creative ways to live and enjoy life, without needing a job. Perhaps, we are about to see an explosion of self employed business people. Another possibility is a growing black market without the rules or regulations the rest of us are adhering to?

#9 mj on 11.14.21 at 3:39 pm

I agree with you except raising interest rates. Although I believe interest rates should be higher, it won’t fix this inflation. We have a global shortage, and government spending out of control. Until those two things are fixed, rising interest rates will just kill our fragile economy. Bank of Canada Tiff said himself, he expects inflation to increase to almost 5 percent the beginning of next year. However, by the end of next year he expects it to be around 2 percent. So if he expects 2 percent inflation, why would he increase interest rates?
I believe by him saying that he will increase rates, is just as powerful as a rate increase.

The BoC did not say inflation will be 2% next year. And rates head up starting around April. Get used to it. – Garth

#10 Dave on 11.14.21 at 3:40 pm

Everyone needs money to live and eat….so you must have a job.

Unless of course the government sends you free money and encourages you to sit in front of your iPad

#11 Big Jim and the Twins on 11.14.21 at 3:48 pm

Can’t believe I commuted to a cubicle farm in an office tower all those years. Those days are done. I’ll Zoom it in wearing my sweats, though.

#12 Andrewski on 11.14.21 at 3:48 pm

Spouse’s employer has recently extended their WFH edict until the end of 2022. Yippee to that she says!

#13 Dolce Vita on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm

“WFH became a reality for five million Canadians.”

That’s a quarter of the workforce.

Instead of stress the cause maybe it’s people realizing there is more to life than being chained to a desk or an assembly line?

And if they must be chained then a pound of flesh extracted from the Shylock’s of the World.

Not such a bad thing after all.

Portia got it right.

#14 Tom on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm

“work ethic” shot to hell. You can tell the boomers that care more about money than life. Sad!

There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth

#15 millmech on 11.14.21 at 3:55 pm

Of course they will give more WFH opportunities, how else are they going to train your replacement(TFW) when your in the office?

#16 Marina on 11.14.21 at 3:55 pm

When print an additional 20% of the entire circulating supply of Trudeau Asswipe Units ($CAD) in just one year, the inflation won’t be 5%, it will be 20%.

Pretty simply arithmetic, and literally the same mechanism when a company dilutes their stock with a new offering.

CPI is an entirely fraudulent method of reporting inflation and should be banned/outlawed.

#17 mj on 11.14.21 at 3:57 pm

here is the proof Garth, it’s about two minutes into him speaking
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auUp43sTtKM

In only proves Tiff is covering his butt for allowing asset inflation to increase to this level. Rates are rising, and that is the only tool the CB has to deal with the issue. But believe whatever fantasy you wish. – Garth

#18 rk n usa on 11.14.21 at 3:58 pm

US Fed member interviewed on Face the Nation said they do not expect inflation to fall back to 2% until 2024!

so much for being transitory, but isn’t all inflation transitory?

5% a year for 3 years is a mighty haircut with no wage increases

wage demands will be going up likely lengthening inflationary period far past 2024

#19 Sail Away on 11.14.21 at 4:01 pm

Well, our firm requires full work from office and continues to hire experienced top performers. Not seeing an issue.

#20 Quintilian on 11.14.21 at 4:01 pm

“There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth”

Yes, it’s true, but we don’t have to work with the curmudgeons to find meaning in what we do.

I think I speak for many when I say that we just don’t want to be near the boomers, or ascribe to their corrupted ideals. We fear the contagion.

And here you are. Hypocrite or just careless? – Garth

#21 ElGatoNerodeYVR on 11.14.21 at 4:01 pm

Not necessarily a bad thing.
Au contraire, It should be now about time the employers start looking at the over 50 with serious consideration and understand that education and young age do NOT a high performance employee makes.
It always baffled me how one goes from 30’s high potential ,40’s good performance, 50’s old fart we don’t want ya.
Start by firing all of those under 50 recruiters who really don’t have a clue about working life and what older employees can bring to the table.
Recruiting should never 3ver be an entry level position for one who just finished an HR program of sorts and the only work experience they have is their summer jobs or interns.
The companies that would this will benefit immensely, not that the majority of MBA’s and CGA’s running operations nowadays can figure it out from their high glass palace.
Nothing at all against high education but hands on experience beats education every single time and as high maintenance as older workers are they do have work ethic and practical knowledge plus they would otherwise looking for the exits every 2 years or get their feelings hurt easily.

#22 Dolce Vita on 11.14.21 at 4:03 pm

It’s over
November 13th, 2021
Doug Rowat

————-

No, it’s not.

Winter is coming…

Still, I like your enthusiasm.

If only the bug was as enthusiastic about self-immolation.

#23 Baffled on 11.14.21 at 4:04 pm

The supposed shortage of truck drivers is not the problem at the ports. The six to twelve hour wait so that they can back a chassis under the crane so the box can be lowered onto it (less than 5 minute operation) is the far bigger problem. Even larger problem in all of this is that these trucks are expected to sit there for free for the pleasure of getting the cheap Chinese made garbage to the retailer where a new round hurry up and wait starts. Biden’s 24 hour idea will take quite some time to have any effect at Long Beach or L.A. also, do you think you just drive down to Home Depot in your pickup and say hey Pedro do you want operate a gantry crane unloading containers? That isn’t how it works, it’s a good way to tip a ship over from unloading it wrong and screwing up the whole harbor though.
Some of these experts on logistics really ought to be duct taped to the passenger seat of a truck for a few days before they opine.

#24 Damifino on 11.14.21 at 4:10 pm

#1 Flop…

With the news that Johnson & Johnson is splitting into 2 different companies,
—————————-

News? I thought they’d always been split in two.

#25 Quintilian on 11.14.21 at 4:11 pm

#16 Marina
“CPI is an entirely fraudulent method of reporting inflation and should be banned/outlawed.”

Absolutely, and it is the main culprit why the “Greenspan Put” is still in effect.

Sure, their will be empty chatter about raising rates, but empty chatter is all it is.
Invest accordingly.

#26 Doug in London on 11.14.21 at 4:13 pm

For about the last 40 years the wages of a lot of lower to medium paid workers didn’t keep up with the real world cost of living. Economists would cook the books and fudge inputs for the real inflation rate. For example, the cost of housing was never really taken into account. Thus interest rates were wrongly set by the artificially low “official” inflation rate. That caused housing costs to go up like a thermonuclear explosion, even worsening the problem. It’s like an engine governor where the belt that drives the centrifugal flyweights breaks, so the governor wrongly detects the speed is too low, opens the throttle, and the speed goes even faster.

The end result is a lot of company employees were finding it hard to make ends meet due to higher living costs while the CEO and other executives helped themselves to extravagant salaries. That’s trickle down economics for you. Now, at long, long, long, long last the tables have turned. With a shortage of employees to fill jobs, wages will be bid higher. It’s about time to right the wrongs of the last 40 years. Bring it on!

#27 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 4:19 pm

Marina, how is your life going?

#16 Marina on 11.14.21 at 3:55 pm

When print an additional 20% of the entire circulating supply of Trudeau Asswipe Units ($CAD) in just one year, the inflation won’t be 5%, it will be 20%.

Pretty simply arithmetic, and literally the same mechanism when a company dilutes their stock with a new offering.

CPI is an entirely fraudulent method of reporting inflation and should be banned/outlawed.

**************************
I’d be interested in knowing how your life is going and what success you are having with this incredibly distrusting attitude.

Have you checked out entirely to squat and live off the land someplace? Or still trying to make it in the society you have no trust for?

Probably money (asswipe) is not your goal or measure of success?

I mean to each his own, but I am just curious how you live your life in a society you have no trust in.

#28 TurnerNation on 11.14.21 at 4:21 pm

What’s next for this wretched UN-run country which fell silently in a coup that cold week March 2020?

This war, WW3, is for LAND – as any other. Internet Consp. Theorists always said they are coming from our land.
“You will own nothing any be happy”. Abolish private ownership. But how?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/nov/11/first-nations-ontario-cback-rent-court-ruling
“Canada could face compensation payments to Indigenous communities worth billions, after a court found it had willfully deprived First Nations of the immense wealth extracted from their lands.
The Crown has made payments to 23 First Nations of the Robinson-Huron Treaty territory since 1850, in exchange for a territory roughly the size of France.”

https://www.vancouverislandfreedaily.com/news/lawyer-large-scale-transfer-of-crown-land-to-first-nations-will-shock-b-c-s-system/
“Lawyer: Large-scale transfer of Crown land to First Nations will shock B.C.’s system
Jack Woodward says the next generation will see large chunks of B.C. move to Indigenous ownership”

https://www.campbellrivermirror.com/news/british-columbians-in-for-a-big-adjustment-with-the-settlement-of-aboriginal-title-aboriginal-rights-lawyer-says/?
The shift in ownership will be from what is normally called Crown ownership to Indigenous ownership, “Not for the entire province but…for fairly large chunks of it,” he said.

#29 crossbordershopper on 11.14.21 at 4:21 pm

I have done as little as possible all my life to get what i need. i am happy that millions have taken up that strategy. If you want to work for the man, or society, to get a picture of yourself as employee of the month in the hallway by the washroom then go ahead. Some of us have a life to live and not answer to anyone, at any time. like songs goes, I am free to do what i want, any old time. Sometimes you need money, but with a little hustling you can get some to get a few things that you need. that you cant borrow, trade, or steal.
At first i thought it was lazyness with the younger people, then maybe they were worrried about getting the virus, but maybe there are some people like me afterall who know this capatilst system is a scam where workers work for little money while employers and corprations and governments minupulate everything to keep the little people down forever.

#30 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.14.21 at 4:22 pm

@#20 Quint was eaten by a Boomer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiafVbkfyFs

“I think I speak for many when I say that we just don’t want to be near the boomers, or ascribe to their corrupted ideals. We fear the contagion.”

++++

Would that be the contagion of “work ethics”?

Good luck surviving the shark eat shark of the next recession.

#31 fishman on 11.14.21 at 4:24 pm

If you don’t want to work don’t go to New York City. Just came back. My bus tour guide said we were the first Canadians he’d seen since hauling the excess bodies away in reefer trucks for processing. No, I didn’t make the pilgrimage to the source & get my MAGA hat. As soon as you land in LaGuardia; New York starts turning you to into a feral narcissist. Instead of wasting one’s time admiring the Trumpster; one starts the process of becoming him. Darwin worked his magic & I feel much better. Great positive state of mind when grovelling for the filthy lucre against sensitive types waiting around for a no stress, meaningful, high paying, “calling”.

#32 Prince Polo on 11.14.21 at 4:26 pm

Back in the late ‘00s, I was in my first job after university and my manager received weekly reports showing how much time each employee was spending online. I assume tracking technology has improved over the last decade so what is to stop WFH from growing in popularity [especially if the Mills (even geriatric ones like moi) & Gen Z’ers are too fragile for WFW]?

#33 mike from mtl on 11.14.21 at 4:26 pm

Coming around, since even the MSM can’t ignore the obvious.

Governance by decree, political ideologies, free money, bombardment of stress and yes changes to the “work” environment not seen since a full on war.

It’s not just the mills by the way, my office is mostly late-40s and 50s and NONE of them will ever step foot in the office 5/35 unless forced and/or a deep pay cut. Out of around 200 only 5 max 10 warm the seats.

On the surface it seems things are looking better but the reality is the cube farm is so done. Public transit is in real bad trouble (-50% even with all the students), stable lunch crowd is gone, tourism dead, no big shows until 2022 unless cancelled.

But hey.. on the bright side stonks are green ATH!

#34 Izzy Bedibida on 11.14.21 at 4:28 pm

I work in education. After 2 years of online teaching and no support from admin other than to be thrown under the bus because a “Karen ” parent complained about supposedly “triggered ” kids. Top it off with 15 yrs of being ” just the shop teacher” and admin having the attitude that I teach “an expensive diversionary course that takes kids away from academics…” I and most members of the Technological Studies Dpt have had enough and are looking for exit strategies. Good thing that we have been goodbsavets and investors and can take a no big deal job at Home Depot or do some consulting on the side.

#35 OK, Doomer on 11.14.21 at 4:29 pm

I wonder if Trudeau is aware that passing laws requiring others to self-immolate so that he and his friends can cook ‘Smores over an open fire is not really Green Energy?

#36 Doug in London on 11.14.21 at 4:29 pm

@ElGatoNerodeYVR, post #21:
You’re absolutely right, consistent with my observations. I’ve even found this age prejudice exists for anyone over 40. I don’t understand why, because older workers bring a lot of experience with them. That’s not just job experience, but life experience which is also valuable. It allow you to see intuitively what is or isn’t a good idea, what will work and what won’t. There’s also this WRONG idea that older workers will expect higher pay. When you are older, you’ve had more time to pay off debts and accumulate more net worth. For example if you have a small or no mortgage obviously your needs will be less.

I’m not looking at the job market now, but my guess is there are a lot of older people who could fill many of those jobs. If these recruiters have age prejudice and refuse to hire anyone older, whose fault is it they can’t fill jobs?

#37 DON on 11.14.21 at 4:32 pm

Read an article recently that stated that after every virus scare in history people were more likely to seek more leisure time rather then worry about the next promotion. Fear of missing out on your life is stronger.

I know many people who are retiring earlier than expected, no longer trying to max things out. One guy said he would be happy sitting in his garden and garage and working on his own projects.

#38 Barb on 11.14.21 at 4:32 pm

Take this job and shove it … what’s next?
Divorces, lots of them.
Seems many people want to LIVE alone.

Not us though. Hubs and I will mark 50 years on Nov.20th…he’s a keeper!

#39 George S on 11.14.21 at 4:38 pm

Work Ethic.
It is similar to “Stockholm Syndrome” where people that are kidnapped and abused eventually come to love their captors and don’t try and escape any more and serve them, even to the point of resisting rescue.

When people are taken out of an abusive situation it takes them a long time to recover from it and realize what happened to them and the longer they are in the situation, the longer intake them to recover from it.

When people are put back into a similar situation that they now realize was abusive they immediately recognize it and get out of it ASAP.

A week or two of holiday now and then is not long enough. It took Covid and the months long forced removal from the abusive situations to do it.

People also realized that they can cook better than some annoying punk in a commercial kitchen and that they don’t need all that stuff. So they don’t need as much money to get by as they thought they did.

People realized that spending time with people you love is what life is about. They may have also realized that you only live once and you can’t take anything with you and nobody has ever come back to earth with verifiable true stories of any kind of afterlife.
They went from living to work to working to live, there is a big difference and we are seeing it.

#40 DON on 11.14.21 at 4:38 pm

#24 Damifino on 11.14.21 at 4:10 pm
#1 Flop…

With the news that Johnson & Johnson is splitting into 2 different companies,
—————————-

News? I thought they’d always been split in two.

****
Always a good idea to rebrand…especially after a law suit.

IBM just spun of its Services Division.

#41 Steven Rowlandson on 11.14.21 at 4:39 pm

Sounds like people with skills and experience who were getting $15 an hour ought to get a raise in pay. Something that is long overdue.

#42 More Shoving on 11.14.21 at 4:45 pm

The majority of jobs people hold are merely sources of income so they can live their lives. Work to live. Those people who have fulfilling, stimulating careers (live to work) are the minority. Not surprised this is happening. Although some are retiring, many are quitting for better offers. And if money is the only reason one is working, no doubt more money is equivalent to a better job.

#43 NOSTRADAMUS on 11.14.21 at 4:46 pm

THE BIG BLAME.
Day in day out, I hear the same old refrain, it is the supply chains that are the cause of all our misery. Once they clear the ports it’s back to the good old days. Am I the only one thinking that this excuse is being used as a ROPE-A-DOPE tactic by the Government supported press gang? Give your head a shake, more money printing will only make the real problem (monetary inflation) worse, not better. And so approaches the moment of truth, when the Fed will have to lay its cards on the table. Raise interest rates to limit inflation, or Let-Er-Rip and continue to blame the supply chain in order to protect, their ( the Fed’s) insane monetary experiment. Fun fact, alcohol increases the send button by 89% Amen Brother.

#44 canuck on 11.14.21 at 4:49 pm

And here you are. Hypocrite or just careless? – Garth
_____________________________________________

Epic burn…

We have created our own problem with the work force by paying people to stay home and play video games and hide from the boogeyman man known as COVID-19. (Personally, I never missed one day since the beginning of this whole mess, run a retail dealership and haven’t lost one employee to COVID)

Not everyone can rely on the bank of mom to keep their lazy asses in sweats so sooner or later, they will actually have to get a job if they want to survive. Until then, enjoy shortages of just about everything because of chain supply issues.

Some people are meant to work with their brains while others are meant to work with their hands. Both will come back to work out of necessity.

#45 conan on 11.14.21 at 4:52 pm

I think there were a lot of jobs before the pandemic that were part time, bad pay, and lousy bosses. Covid taught people to avoid these jobs in the future.

I think there are also areas in the economy that were hoping to avoid the wage increases due everyone, and shaft their workers further.

People are saying enough.

#46 Habitt on 11.14.21 at 4:53 pm

Bring in more immigrants or pay livable wages. That’s the equation. That’s like growth at any cost. We require another model. Free stuff for all may not lwork even if it puts people in poverty. We need a different model for all. Darn if I know what that is though. And the know it all’s and money bunch don’t either. There is never enough for some. TFF

#47 Papabear on 11.14.21 at 4:54 pm

I am curious how many of the openings are on the “low skill” job end of the scale.

After putting up with 1.5 years of customers who can’t follow Covid rules or act like jerks while making peanuts and possibly working two jobs to keep a roof over your head, wouldn’t you want to bail?

If you can ditch that second or third job because your pay went up, wouldn’t that imply there are now two new openings? I imagine there are a lot of those making up the bulk of those millions of vacancies.

Besides, experience has told my friends and I that job hopping is the best way to get a sizeable raise. Sitting around hoping for a good performance increase of 2% doesn’t cut it year after year.

#48 Diamond Dog on 11.14.21 at 4:55 pm

It’s a convergence of several factors seemingly unrelated, but the one thing they all have in common is the pandemic. Firstly, the pandemic made people sick. From the link below, these numbers of estimates from the CDC:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/burden.html

1 in 4.0 (95% UI* 3.4 – 4.7) COVID–19 infections were reported.
1 in 3.4 (95% UI* 3.0 – 3.8) COVID–19 symptomatic illnesses were reported.
1 in 1.9 (95% UI* 1.7 – 2.1) COVID–19 hospitalizations were reported.
1 in 1.32 (95% UI* 1.29 – 1.34) COVID-19 deaths were reported.

– Estimated Total Infections – 146.6 Million

– Estimated Symptomatic Illnesses – 124.0 Million

– Estimated Hospitalizations – 7.5 million

– Estimated Total Deaths – 921,000

Key numbers to consider with unemployed quitting their jobs is the estimated hospitalizations. I remember thinking an out loud 11 million hospitalizations a month ago but didn’t factor in asymptomatic cases tested positive, a large oversight, apologies for that.

Still, the thesis is sound. 7.5 million hospitalizations is not a small number:

https://www.psu.edu/news/research/story/how-many-people-get-long-covid-more-half-researchers-find/

The link above was an Oct 2021 study of data from PSU (Penn State) of 254,000 infected from Covid19, 78% of this number having spent time in the hospital. The median age was 54, 56% male and the study concluded that half of this number was experiencing lingering symptoms 6 months after recovery, i.e. long Covid19 symptoms.

These numbers indicate that close to 4 million people are feeling long term effects of Covid19, chief among them being symptoms related to damage to the lungs.

These numbers do not include people who have missed elective surgeries and cancer diagnosis/treatment, or the tens of millions who lived an unhealthy life related to being somewhat confined from the pandemic due to government shutdowns.

The pandemic was highly disruptive to human health with around 4 million experiencing long term Covid19 symptoms and what could be double this number or more considering disruptions to hospitals putting off elective surgeries and inadequate general health care for those with long term health issues and the numbers reflect this. Of, say, the ball park 8 million or so still feeling the long term effects of Covid or who didn’t get the health care needed, is a best guessed 3 million too adversely effected to return to work? (Ahah! Our missing 1% of the work force) I believe so.

So why did 4.3 million quit their jobs? Many factors:

– Government assistance ran out this fall with those on unemployment insurance forcing a percentage of those running out of benefits to formally quit their jobs as opposed to being fired. Why? Looks better on a resume. The same logic also applies to those who are too sick to return to work. Better to quit than get fired.

– Stock market & crypto gains. Crypto in particular, is a young person’s investment. 74% holding shares in crypto stocks are between 18 and 45. Another 19% own Crypto stocks/coin between the ages of 46 and 55. Those who are 55 and older (who also own the large bulk of global stock markets) own a whopping 7% (there’s a message in that, will largely expand on this later on).

Of the 4.43 Americans that quit, 4% (of course, the young) listed gains in Crypto as their reason for quitting (or so I’ve read). Ponzi’s, after all, create a wealth effect until of course, investors begin to bail and then it becomes a poverty effect. In the case of Crypto, a nearing 2.5 trillion dollar poverty effect concentrated mainly on the young.

– Changed worker psychology. Herd behavior comes into play, just as it does with corps selling less for more through smaller packaging en masse, or monopoly price fixing in general throughout sectors. Unions are now reacting to inflationary pressures, trying to get ahead of it with higher wages with the belief inflation is structural.

– Strong pent up demand. This demand as we know has been fueled by a series of wealth effects, some of them on steroids from central bank policies of low rates, bond buybacks in MBS’s and treasuries creating wealth effects in the markets, in housing and real estate overall where asset inflation has created a tremendous wealth effect, in bonds early on, in recovering commodities, in ponzi Crypto to name a few not to mention this orgy of new debt.

Now we have inflation from all of the excess liquidity hitting the system with valuations hitting new highs for a completely different conversation concerning the money supply and what it will take to reverse it (most lead to recession) but I digress.

Point is, we can’t underestimate the pandemic’s direct consequences of human health on such a high percentage of people quitting their jobs. It’s not just stimulus running out or wealth effects and supply disruption coupled with pent up demand, its related to human health. People aren’t as healthy as they were before this pandemic. The average life expectancy of the average American dropping by 16 months last year (1 year solely related to Covid19 deaths), thanks Trump, somewhat fleshes this out. These numbers are measurable and I believe, it’s the #1 factor driving such a high “quit rate”. Some of us are simply too unfit to come back to work.

#49 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 4:56 pm

Revenge of the Workers

Cross border shopper said:

some people like me afterall who know this capatilst system is a scam where workers work for little money while employers and corprations and governments minupulate everything to keep the little people down forever.

Some others have similar views.

**********************************
But do you realize that Garth has been teaching you here for a decade how to use tax-advantaged savings and become capitalists by owning a piece of those corporations and employers through a balanced and diversified portfolio approach.

Many of here can attest that it works. Get started around age 30 and by age 65 your investments will easily be earning more than the average worker makes working 40 hours a week. By about age 60 you can decide if you want to keep working for the mental fulfilment, do volunteer work, or just play full time. Many choices.

When it comes to our system you can’t likely change it or “beat it” so why not “join it”.

Most people will work 35 or 40 years anyhow. The choice is will you slowly buy your own piece of the employers or not. Choices… Retire on old age pension and CPP or retire in style… Work within the system to your best advantage or just complain about the unfairness.

#50 Amazon on 11.14.21 at 5:07 pm

I just saw the funniest commercial in a long long time!

It was an Amazon ad.

The tagline at the end of the ad was “Kindness. The Greatest Gift”

WOW.

This is where we’ve arrived.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z73AKLBgLg

#51 Pens Ions on 11.14.21 at 5:09 pm

#88 Dragonfly 58 on 11.14.21 at 12:41 pm

There is a reasonably large group of retired Canadians that are quite financially vulnerable these days.
We put far too much faith in pensions, and grew up in very average, middle class Canadian households where investments were seen as gambling and thought of as either a fools game or the domain of very wealthy people who could risk money without hurting their overall wealth.
Far too late in the game did million’s of us see that pensions are potentially very badly effected by inflation. Middle class and even perhaps upper middle class when working, but once retired things are going from OK to worse. Possibly quite a lot worse if current inflation rates continue for a lengthy period of time.
Perhaps if we go all in on investments we can salvage something. But that also means a very cash starved late 60’s and early 70’s so we might be in better shape in our 80’s. Just about the time it’s more or less over anyway.
Hard to see an upside. Won’t be homeless or starving, but other than taking up birdwatching or perhaps lots of nature walks not a lot to look forward to.
In some ways the stronger the recovery becomes, the more left behind many retirees will be.

/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\

Very interesting post for many reasons.

But instead of talking about that, may I ask a few quick follow up questions please?

Where are all these pension plans invested?

Does that put these pension plans at any risk?

Anyone stand to benefit if those risks were to materialize?

To your point, who, if anyone, benefits from inflation eating away at these pension plan liabilities?

#52 Stoph on 11.14.21 at 5:09 pm

@ #98 Don on 11.14.21 at 2:11 pm

—————————–

You may be interested in a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine, that looks at the risk ratio of potential side effects after receiving the Pfizer vaccine and after getting Covid. Myocarditis may be the most well know potential side effect, since it gained media attention; however its risk ratio is still lower than if you get Covid (see Figure 3).

All in all, in a balance of risk, I would say that people are not doing themselves a favor by not getting vaccinated (see Figure 4).

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa2110475

#53 Graeme on 11.14.21 at 5:15 pm

“work ethic shot to hell”

I don’t agree based on the fact my own productivity is the same as it was before. Building software doesn’t benefit from being in office–perhaps only during the initial design phase of larger projects. As I recall 90% of the drive-by, ad-hoc conversations executives put so much value on were about movies and video games. Once you factor in commuting, WFH is a no-brainer at least in my industry.

#54 Pinball on 11.14.21 at 5:20 pm

I just had a friend (41) who after a long time traveled to US to meet a single solitary customer for 2hr meeting and then dinner. He came back with a breakthrough case. He rated it quite serious in terms of not feeling well, and is quarantining for 10 days. Customer he met was apologetic, but it is sufficiently serious already with HR and legal involved with wavers, etc.

I can see a scenario where the liability risk is not eliminated in our current environment Garth. Certainly not if the lawyers have anything to say about it.

By the way, that guy’s HQ is not going back to work, but strangely is allowing the risks associated with traveling to customer sites, if customers will accept visitors.

I’m seeing plenty of issues with all of this, legal and liability wise, and so just this simple scenario poses a reality check.

#55 Grandv!ew on 11.14.21 at 5:21 pm

But why? Why, even as the pandemic still hangs on and after two years of collective misery, is this happening?

Maybe this is why.

https://mobile.twitter.com/ronmortgageguy/status/1458202360023498752?cxt=HHwWgICy_cHUybwoAAAA

#56 Nonplused on 11.14.21 at 5:23 pm

Some things are causes, and some things are just triggers. No single snow flake causes the avalanche.

The Spanish flu did not cause a widescale reassessment of work practices, because there was not the technology to do things a different way. This time there was. Automation, computerization, and telecommunication have been building in power for years. Probably 50 years.

And they have been causing disruptions all the way along, with certain jobs disappearing and others arising. I mean who has a secretary to type your letters anymore? Who sends letters? The bank doesn’t even want to send you a statement. They charge extra for it.

I remember my first cell phone. I didn’t really want one, but the company made me take it. An old StarTec flip phone. It did phone and text, and that was it. As my memory goes, that wasn’t all that long ago. Now I don’t go anywhere without a full on miniature computer in my pocket complete with more apps than real computers used to have.

Changes were coming either way.

#57 TurnerNation on 11.14.21 at 5:23 pm

Life in Kanada. From the BC Government.
What I noted back in Q2 2020. Every system designed to protect us has been turned against us.

https://www.bcrpa.bc.ca/fitness/covid-19-fitness-updates/
“Remember, the purpose of the PoV card is to incentivize residents to be vaccinated, not to control the spread of the virus. Virus spread is controlled through vaccination, physical distancing, masking, hand hygiene. ”

“This is an important shift to keep aware of for your decision-making; the province has shifted from actions that provide a COVID-safe environment to actions that provide discretionary services to the vaccinated.”

——
——
Alllmost back to normal guys! So close now the final stretch.
And the goal of isolating children, getting them stuck of home addicted to Big Tech?

.Serbian Minister of Health: Vaccination every five or six months will be our new normality and new reality(beta.rs)

.’Stretched too thin’: With staff ‘exhausted,’ schools cancel class or return to remote learning(money.yahoo.com)


->> Just for fun. Some wag posted this onto Twitter.

“”Simultaneously trying to sell the 3rd and 4th shots to people who took the first 2 or 3, whilst trying to sell the 1st one as ‘highly effective’ to people who have taken zero, is a bold strategy.””

–Fact: T2 signed deals with the drug companies for tens of millions of doses into 2024. Needless to say that’s ALL we will be hearing about for the next few years.

#58 Keith on 11.14.21 at 5:30 pm

Back in the olden days, when unions were powerful and labor was more scarce, the balance of power between labor and management was with labor. Union leadership and members at their worst behaved very badly with contracts that gave workers far too much power in the workforce. Some of the older blog dogs can probably tell great stories about people getting paid for nothing, and many ridiculous clauses in collective agreements that protected unproductive workers at outrageous cost levels.

When the pendulum swung, due to changing labor laws that cut union power and a global oversupply of labor driven by demographic and a replacement of labor by capital, of course it swung too far. In my post 1980 working career, labor income stalled and management was increasingly able to behave … however they liked. Don’t like it here – there’s the door, I’ve got a stack of resumes on my desk a mile high. I worked in unionized retail, in the nineties turnover fell to 7 percent in my workplace- quite a testament to the ugly realities of the labor market at that time.

If you calculate the true inflation rate, most workers are still losing ground. It’s still not that hard to be a relatively good employer, best to step up the game now and face the new reality.

#59 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 5:33 pm

Wow.
The PineApple Express (Faron probably has a Latin name for it) is roaring thru the Lower Mainland.
Must be a new record, (can you say: climate change).
Well, we optimistic Vancouverites call it Liquid Sunshine.
I was out there for an hour, washing enough sins away to last me for a few months.
Had to come. Forgot the umbrella.
My fair skin burns easily.

#60 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.14.21 at 5:45 pm

#59 Ponzie’s Prewash
“The PineApple Express (Faron probably has a Latin name for it) is roaring thru the Lower Mainland.

+++

Yep.
ALL the ditches, creeks and storm drains are filled to overflowing and we have another 50mm due in the next 24 hours.

A friend who remembers visiting the Hope / Princeton slide immediately after it happened….remarked the other day, “It rained buckets for weeks before that mountain let go.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Slide

#61 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 5:47 pm

Work ethic?
I always believed in working smart rather than hard.
Always look for ways to make your work easier, and always ask: Why are we doing this?
When the answer is: because we always have done it this way. Discontinue or reevaluate the task.
And use the freed up time to live in the moment.
And I tought my kids to do the same.
You’re guaranteed to live longer, says Dr. Ponzie.

#62 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.14.21 at 5:49 pm

#14 Tom on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm
“work ethic” shot to hell. You can tell the boomers that care more about money than life. Sad!

There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth

‐‐———‐——————————————————-
There is more to a company than EPS…. There’s another good joke. Just re-iterate that to the shareholders.

There is more to life than working for a company that only cares about making money.

I am glad nobody here works for me. Big relief. – Garth

#63 Victoria on 11.14.21 at 5:50 pm

Just putting this out there. At the end of the day maybe this is not such a bad thing. During all the mass downsizing in the 80s and the new mantra of workers – don’t ever stay more than five years with a company and screw them before they screw you.

My dad always spoke of the “company man”. People worked for decades at the same company. They were proud of their company. Their company helped them and they helped their company. I remember my mom used to get a tea cup every year on her birthday. A nice gesture.

My cousin was a company man. Then with the downsizing in the 80s he was kicked out on his butt in this 50s. He killed himself.

#64 the Jaguar on 11.14.21 at 5:51 pm

I posted this some time ago, but it’s timely again today. Kevin Warsh comment from March 2020 when the crisis began:

“What we wanna do is we want there to be a generous safety net for people who find themselves in harm’s way through no fault of their own, but when the world, when the patient comes out of that induced coma, we want them to reattach themselves immediately to the labor force, want them to come back and be part of the American dream, be part of their employer, be part of this dynamic economy. In the last crisis, what we ended up with for nearly a decade was a generation of workers that suffered from bouts of despair. They had detached from the labor force. And if we learned anything from the post crisis era of ’09, we don’t want to commit that same sin again because it’s not good for those workers, and it’s certainly not good for our economy.” +++

Then there is this:

I think I speak for many when I say that we just don’t want to be near the boomers, or ascribe to their corrupted ideals. We fear the contagion. Quintilian.

And here you are. Hypocrite or just careless? – Garth +++

Great response, Garth. His comments really reinforce what Bill Maher talks about in the link below. Be forewarned that Bill likes the odd bit of salty language.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYSLyvbR_1w

#65 Polecat on 11.14.21 at 5:54 pm

Garth, Adele has a special on Global tonight

Argh. – Garth

#66 Cici on 11.14.21 at 6:04 pm

How is all this Shove-It! largesse funded?

Hmmm… how about huge COVID-enabled RE equity gains (some realized, others used as collateral to buy and flip more properties for more tax-free gains) and of course, the oh-so-Woke, under-the-radar Bitcoin gains. In addition, illegal basement suites and AirBNB-type income flows are of great help.

And thanks to all this enabling, it’s probably time we take the “irrational” out of “exuberance” and just accept the Ponzi economy for what it’s worth… apparently more than labour.

#67 Shawn allen on 11.14.21 at 6:26 pm

Who’s in ICU?

Just ran into an ICU nurse who worked overnight last night. Saw her walking our respective dogs. (So clearly trustworthy). I said I head its mostly unvaccinated in ICU. Oh 100 percent she said. Now I would not take that to be literally 100% but close enough. Lots of younger people she said. Yes mostly pre-existing conditions being mostly obese. Anyone unvaccinated and especially if overweight proceed accordingly. We’ll just get vaccinated unless there is a medical reason. Anecdotal yes. Just one ICU nurse on the front lines in Edmonton.

#68 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 6:29 pm

To be clear I am already triple vaxed and heading south Tuesday morning

#69 Km on 11.14.21 at 6:30 pm

There needed to be a reset for employees, no wage growth and no balance has been the norm for so long most forgot what it was like to enjoy life and have a job. Hard to blame most people for now having it as a requirement in their life.

#70 Doug t on 11.14.21 at 6:42 pm

Covid woke the masses up and shoved their mortality into their faces – the last century had the church to calm your fears by telling you a comforting tale about eternal life – now that religion isn’t a thang for the millennial and genx types they see the stark reality of their short time on this rock – the world is a changin just like always – just like always

#71 Work and Tumble on 11.14.21 at 6:47 pm

I gave my notice that I was done Jan 1/22 worked in sales for the last 30 years, (40 years in the same industry.)
Started as a apprentice really understood the job.
Commission was how I was compensated on all of my sales work. It was hard work and over the years the company was cutting back % here or there my sales managers and mid management resented my pay checks and made life more difficult than needed in spite of all that I did very well for my family and planed for my exit. Thanks Garth free at 57.

#72 Another Deckchair on 11.14.21 at 6:57 pm

This is all really interesting. “Follow the money” is what I do when sitting on my deckchair.

Jobs vacant while food banks are having record visitations? Sign of the times – it’ll be *really* interesting seeing how the snowflakes adapt to the downside of freedom and ‘living off the man’. They have not seen anything yet, what a “learning experience” we’ll be going through.

Hope #4 Wallflower is right, but it’s fun to grow, really hard to adapt to downsizing. Especially if the bank account is in the red.

#73 Bay Street is a Ghost Town and PATH is Dead on 11.14.21 at 7:06 pm

This change has barely begun.

Thinking people will go back to normal commuting and bowing down before the boss in the tower is just delusional.

And think of the huge environmental impact of the old ways, for just a moment.

Employers, bend over.

Or go away.

#74 long hauler on 11.14.21 at 7:07 pm

‘Canada down 17000 truck drivers’..no wonder ,,if you keep reading autonomous driving trucks is the future,,why would you hang around if you know you will be made redundant in the near future??

#75 canuck on 11.14.21 at 7:13 pm

Papabear on 11.14.21 at 4:54 pm

Besides, experience has told my friends and I that job hopping is the best way to get a sizeable raise. Sitting around hoping for a good performance increase of 2% doesn’t cut it year after year.
___________________________________________

As someone who is responsible to hire and fire employees, I throw away resumes of job hoppers, regardless of how talented they are. Not worth the grief and disruption to the team.

#76 kc on 11.14.21 at 7:13 pm

Recession coming, stock up on beans….

there is also a show “take this job and shove it” and the song was written by David Allen Coe …

But in real life … all these empty jobs are going to have a negative feed back loop.

stock up….

#77 DON on 11.14.21 at 7:16 pm

Adele concert starts @ 8:30 EST.

Quick shut the power off.

#78 Smartalox on 11.14.21 at 7:17 pm

It’s worth noting that the protagonist in Johnny Paycheck’s song was quitting because his partner had left him, and taken the reasons that he’d been working for. He goes on to describe a fairly toxic working environment, (factory work can be pretty dehumanizing) and significant contempt for his bosses and supervisors, their petty vanities, and their disdain for the other factory workers.

If those are the conditions, I can’t blame him for leaving.

Still, the song also makes references to self-doubt, and not ‘having the guts’ to quit, or not being able to afford to quit, given his debts, and his obligations to support his family.

#79 UCC on 11.14.21 at 7:17 pm

Congratulations on Miss Nova Garth!

#80 Tom in Toronto on 11.14.21 at 7:17 pm

What you aren’t seeing, Garth, is that working from home has completely dislodged the separation between life and work. While you can do your laundry and walk the dog at 11am, many of us are also expected to be basically online 24/7 (minus sleep) as our coworkers in other geographies are up. There is a very large percentage of people who pine for the days of stamping their timecard at 5pm and not thinking about work until the next morning. I’m one of those and can’t wait for normalcy to return – and I’m not alone.

#81 Sportscenter on 11.14.21 at 7:29 pm

Packers beat Seahawks 17 – 0

Aaron Rodgers performing at highest level with double the possession time of Seahawk.

#82 willworkforpickles on 11.14.21 at 7:45 pm

Blue collar wages will increase slowly adding to higher inflation. Those wages won’t increase enough to dislodge the sit at home deadbeats from their hovels like steady rising inflation will.
Rising inflation will force the layabouts back into the workforce before better wages ever could as having no money to buy stuff as prices steadily rise really sucks.
Gov. support cutbacks would further guarantee it.

#83 Not Fooled on 11.14.21 at 7:45 pm

Any Mill or Gen Z who thinks they’ve got employers over a barrel should probably not hit send on that resignation email just yet.

Immigration will definitely be ramped up to meet demand for workers. Of course, this has the added benefit of keeping the real estate game of musical chairs going indefinitely.

If you are out of the workforce for a year or 18 months, your value as an employee is greatly reduced. Employers know that remaining attached to the workforce, in any capacity, is a sign of an engaged individual. If it looks like you’ve been playing disaffected keyboard culture warrior instead, you’re about as desirable an employee as blue-haired, nose-ringed, neo-pronouned, professional victim.

Anyone deluded enough to think they’re going to hang on for UBI/crypto profits/wage inflation, is going to be sorely disappointed. The Libs are not coming to save you. They’re going to import less troublesome workers who’ll turn themselves inside out to buy a house, and won’t complain that they were fatally misgendered.

There’ll be no wage inflation for most people. Just asset inflation for those of us lucky enough to have them. The rich will get richer, and the rest will sink further down.

This isn’t the dawning of the age of Aquarius, and a kinder, gentler, workplace. This is the blissful moment of ignorance before reality crushes you like a bug. It’s not different this time.

#84 Charlie on 11.14.21 at 7:50 pm

“Most of the 5.0mn persons who have exited the labor force since the start of the pandemic are over age 55 (3.4mn), largely reflecting early (1.5mn) and natural (1mn) retirements that likely won’t reverse.”

https://twitter.com/carlquintanilla/status/1459142010972033024

The Great Resignation is being driven primarily by the Boomers, not the Millennials, at least in the USA.

Never mind good luck hiring someone under 40 … good luck retaining someone over 55!

#85 Emma Zaun - GreaterFool Unpaid Intern #007 on 11.14.21 at 7:51 pm

Good suggestion, Garth.

We’ll let you know soon what the unpaid Amazons think about this, and their treatment as unpaid slaves for a selfish bastard.

Emma Zaun
Shop Steward
CUPE (Canadian Union of Peelers and Exhibitionists)

#86 Elon Fanboy on 11.14.21 at 7:54 pm

One of the newest largest growth forums on Reddit, is ‘r/ antiwork’.

Over a million subscribers, who all apparently think they can survive adult life without working. Presumably they’ve all moved back in with Mummy and Daddy.

#87 I'm A Believer on 11.14.21 at 7:56 pm

#23 Baffled

Port authorities in LA and in Long Beach just implemented daily compounded fines for each day containers sit at the ports. Day #1 $100, day #2 $200, etc. They have run out of space to put the containers. 70-100 ships parked in the ocean can’t get into ports.

#88 Ronaldo on 11.14.21 at 7:58 pm

With all the rain happening in the lower mainland we better hope that we don’t see a flood like that of 1948. Check this out.

https://www.vancouvergunners.ca/floods—1948.html

#89 tbone on 11.14.21 at 7:58 pm

#71 Work and Tumble
That is my story , even the time lines , lol.
Top performer for the last 20 years, new management comes in , and i end up at the bottom of the pack.
Fortunately i had FU money 10 years ago and could of left at any time, I hung in for my customers .
Retired for 2 years now.

#90 Working 9 to 5 no more on 11.14.21 at 8:02 pm

How quaint a boomer slagging millenials….Time to geld the lousy bosses…….

https://youtu.be/WPQRMeU4Co0

#91 yvr_lurker on 11.14.21 at 8:04 pm

#26 The end result is a lot of company employees were finding it hard to make ends meet due to higher living costs while the CEO and other executives helped themselves to extravagant salaries. That’s trickle down economics for you. Now, at long, long, long, long last the tables have turned. With a shortage of employees to fill jobs, wages will be bid higher. It’s about time to right the wrongs of the last 40 years. Bring it on!
——-

I am hoping that this is the case and that the Gov’t does not make it easier to ease the labour shortage by bringing in an excessive number of low wage earners from overseas.

If I was a young person in a low income job impacted by COVID, I would have used the time off and CERB to retrain into a more lucrative direction. It is very hard to try to retrain in a different direction when one is working 50 hours a week making minimum wage, or more with two minimum wage jobs. Take the CERB, expand your skillset (trades, computers, whatever) and perhaps come out of it working for yourself or in some better gig.

#92 Meh on 11.14.21 at 8:04 pm

#68 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 6:29 pm
To be clear I am already triple vaxed and heading south Tuesday morning

——————————————————

Ohhhhh dude you’re going south alright

#93 Faron on 11.14.21 at 8:10 pm

#60 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.14.21 at 5:45 pm

#59 Ponzie’s Prewash

No latin names for these things. Atmospheric River was coined in the ’90s. I prefer tropical moisture plume.

Highway 1 closed before Hope and 5 closed on the way up to the summit and the next surge of moisture is going to be wetter than the first. It’s all falling on snow that accumulated last week.

River forecast centre is looking at 1 in 200 year stream flows in small and medium basins.

Record temperatures too. Almost 16 in Victoria.

Luckily, our sail race managed to fit into the rain-free window here in Victoria. Skies opened up as we were flaking the mainsail. Drank the beers in the garage.

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 8:18 pm

The Great Resignation!
Have been following this for a while now.
My conclusion:
Workers are not stupid.
Take Amazon.
Bezos is worth Gadzillions and flies into almost space with his billionaire buddies.
Delivery drivers make minimum wage, are not allowed breaks to go pee.
So they have to pee into bottles.
And when they come home, the kids ask Daddy how was work today.
Moral : there always comes a time when enough is enough.

#95 Faron on 11.14.21 at 8:19 pm

#87 Ronaldo on 11.14.21 at 7:58 pm

With all the rain happening in the lower mainland we better hope that we don’t see a flood like that of 1948. Check this out.

https://www.vancouvergunners.ca/floods—1948.html

Those photos are beautiful.

Pretty rare for fall rains to get the Fraser to flood. Typically happens in the spring freshet. It’s a massive basin and takes a lot of water. Biggest concern are the flashier streams flowing off the North Shore and Fraser Valley.

http://bcrfc.env.gov.bc.ca/fallfloods/map_coffee.html

#96 Ronaldo on 11.14.21 at 8:20 pm

#34 Izzy Bedibida on 11.14.21 at 4:28 pm
I work in education. After 2 years of online teaching and no support from admin other than to be thrown under the bus because a “Karen ” parent complained about supposedly “triggered ” kids. Top it off with 15 yrs of being ” just the shop teacher” and admin having the attitude that I teach “an expensive diversionary course that takes kids away from academics…” I and most members of the Technological Studies Dpt have had enough and are looking for exit strategies. Good thing that we have been goodbsavets and investors and can take a no big deal job at Home Depot or do some consulting on the side.
==================================
Well Izzy, I have always said that some of the best training I had during my school years was Industrial Arts. Although my various careers never required those skills I learned in school, I was able to use them in my day to day life over the next 57 years.

#97 Linda on 11.14.21 at 8:24 pm

Covid isn’t actually over yet. If stats from Worldometer can be believed, most of Europe is undergoing yet another wave of infections. Perhaps Covid will be the new seasonal virus & every winter will see a Covid shot, just like the flu.

Anyway, the long hiatus from WFW has definitely seem a lot of folks reassess how they want to live their lives going forward. I’m wondering whether there is an expectation that JT & crew will bestow UBI upon the masses, forever rendering ‘having’ to work an obsolete concept. Insofar as WFH is concerned, there are some wider societal benefits. As in far less GHG emissions since folks are no longer commuting. Of course, not every type of job can be done at home. But if 5 million or so Canadians can WFH, why not? Yes, it is a big change but how we work, live & play has changed before. People will adjust.

#98 willworkforpickles on 11.14.21 at 8:27 pm

#20 “Quint was eaten by a Boomer”
#30 crowd-vator-ftz “Good luck surviving the shark eat shark of the next recession.”
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Quint knows a half ass astronaut with a shark cage.

#99 Bclue on 11.14.21 at 8:37 pm

Don’t forget to watch Adele tonight…your head must be spinning in anticipation!

#100 Working 9 to 5 no more on 11.14.21 at 8:44 pm

#62 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.14.21 at 5:49 pm
#14 Tom on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm
“work ethic” shot to hell. You can tell the boomers that care more about money than life. Sad!

There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth

‐‐———‐——————————————————-
There is more to a company than EPS…. There’s another good joke. Just re-iterate that to the shareholders.

There is more to life than working for a company that only cares about making money.

I am glad nobody here works for me. Big relief. – Garth

Hey let’s slag millenials day…..Fear not… the feeling is mutual

I have no idea what the age of posters is. Except you. – Garth

#101 Dtree on 11.14.21 at 8:53 pm

Please leave Elon out of this. He is running several high growth and humanity upgrading companies simultaneously through the challenges you describe above.

#102 Grunt on 11.14.21 at 8:54 pm

Lure employees back with pension plans. Nows the opportunity to bring it back.

#103 Kato on 11.14.21 at 8:57 pm

#74 long hauler on 11.14.21 at 7:07 pm
‘Canada down 17000 truck drivers’..no wonder ,,if you keep reading autonomous driving trucks is the future,,why would you hang around if you know you will be made redundant in the near future??
________________

The sad thing is, the near future isn’t as near as those stories make it seem. There’s a wide gulf between “we trained a truck to drive itself down one stretch of freeway” and “we trained trucks to drive in all conditions and on all roads across the continent.” Just ask Tesla how easy it is to push out a fully autonomous vehicle.

The old way of starting a logistics company could still be in play too. Earn some cash and buy a truck. Then buy another and hire a person (or robot in this future case) to pick up the extra work. Soon you have a business going, and self driving trucks don’t take a cut outside of their purchase price and maintenance.

#104 Do we have all the facts on 11.14.21 at 9:00 pm

Clearly there is still a fear of coming into contact with the Covid 19 virus. As long as EI benefits are available the urgency of earning a paycheque is diminished.

The media is keeping potential workers focussed on the reality that the Covid Virus is still infecting individuals in the workplace. Many jobs, especially lower paying jobs involving contact with customers, still seem full of risk.

At some point the Covid 19 virus will become a memory, EI benefits will end, rising prices will require employment income and vacant jobs will be filled.

Time to pause and consider the impact of the Covid 19 virus and extended government assistance on the human psyche.

#105 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.14.21 at 9:30 pm

@#100 I dont work I live at my Mom’s

“Hey let’s slag millenials day…..Fear not… the feeling is mutual”

+++

Finished playing Call of Duty and decided to comment?

Dont worry. If we go to war with China.
All you young kids get to go for the real thing.
Us Boomers are too old.
:)

#106 Sportscenter on 11.14.21 at 9:33 pm

So….

Aaron Rodgers Covid-Comeback pushed back that Adele special with Oprah as host.

You’re all welcome.

#107 Intern? on 11.14.21 at 9:38 pm

I am glad nobody here works for me. Big relief. – Garth

You’re right Garth, why are we on there proofreading and fact checking all these comments for free?

Boom FM is paying $1000 per hour this week!

I think it’s high time you start paying us at least minimum wage. Greaterfool.ca – THE BLOG THAT PAYS!

#108 CL on 11.14.21 at 9:39 pm

A lot of people also found other ways to make a living. Many people have taken up gigs like Uber, Uber Eats, Skip the Dishes, Youtube channels etc etc etc. so it leaves the conventional workforce lacking manpower. I don’t know if they actually make money but gigs like these allow for more life and flexibility than the dreaded Monday to Friday 9-5er. Nobody wants that anymore.

I was working remotely from 2008 to 2013 and it was awesome. Went to the office 2 maybe 3 times a week for a few hours. The work always got done and I had a tremendous amount of flexibility and still made a great living. It was the perfect role aside from the incredible stress that also came with it which was ultimately the reason I let it go. The point is, remote work can absolutely be done and maintained. Offices will not re-populate as much as before. It will be a hybrid model. And, until there is a real recession / depression, don’t expect these labor challenges and having to coddle employees to change.

#109 Soviet Capitalist on 11.14.21 at 9:40 pm

Stress?! Really?! Employees are seeing their wages loosing purchasing power at an accelerated rate and the only explanation is stress?! We have a culture where any employee raising concerns about salary will be put on a chopping board. I guess that explains why they give answers like stress or whatever, but it seems to me, probably, the majority are concerned about the loss of purchasing power and chasing higher paid jobs to catch up.

#110 SHUT THIS BLOG DOWN NOW! on 11.14.21 at 10:05 pm

STOP INTERRUPTING ADELE!

#111 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 10:11 pm

Amazon workers have had enough?

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 8:18 pm
The Great Resignation!

Have been following this for a while now.
My conclusion:
Workers are not stupid.
Take Amazon.
Bezos is worth Gadzillions and flies into almost space with his billionaire buddies.
Delivery drivers make minimum wage, are not allowed breaks to go pee.
So they have to pee into bottles.
And when they come home, the kids ask Daddy how was work today.
Moral : there always comes a time when enough is enough.

********************************
But with no job, Daddy ends up “not having a pot to piss in” as they used to say in the old days. Well I suppose that was before the days of free money from Trudeau.

Labor shortage? Not to worry, supply and demand will work its magic. Wages up somewhat. Investments in labor saving technology up somewhat. And so… “The economy will balance itself”. There, I beat Trudeau to that one.

#112 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 10:21 pm

#106 Sportscenter on 11.14.21 at 9:33 pm
So….

Aaron Rodgers Covid-Comeback pushed back that Adele special with Oprah as host.

You’re all welcome.
——————–
That proves beyond a reasonable doubt,
That there is a God.

#113 Ed on 11.14.21 at 11:01 pm

Adele just starting…my wife loves her therefore I do as well.

#114 Doug in London on 11.14.21 at 11:01 pm

Some of you here have mentioned the Adele concert on Global TV tonight. I also watched this concert and rather enjoyed seeing her fine show.

#115 Jane24 on 11.14.21 at 11:13 pm

My husband just retired from his hair salon here in England. We gave some thought to getting in a manager and keeping the business running but we knew we would not be able to both find and fund staff at the prices our clientele would be willing to pay so he just walked out and we shut it down. FREEDOM after 53 years of working since he was 17. I thought he would never retire but lockdown taught him that there is plenty to do in life other than working.

Many others have also realised this. So many of our friends age 55 plus have handed in their notice and are home enjoying life. Many have realised that the pundits that advise you need millions for retirement are lying through their teeth. You can have a very happy life on far less.

My niece from Calgary age 24 has shown up here. She says that she is fed-up of the cold and knows that she will never own a home or afford to raise a family in Canada. In England/EU she feels she has a chance. She applied for 20 jobs and got most of them. Apparently two of her cousins are also on their way from TO for the same reasons. Second passports obtained through grandparents and parents emigrating to Canada in the 1950s and 1960s are useful in life. I need to extend my house.

I am currently looking at buying another AirBnB in the South coast city of Southampton and know I can get a nice 3 bed semi that needs no work for £300,000 or $525,000. This is what my Canadian nieces and nephews have their eyes on.

#116 BillyBob on 11.14.21 at 11:23 pm

#87 I’m A Believer on 11.14.21 at 7:56 pm
#23 Baffled

Port authorities in LA and in Long Beach just implemented daily compounded fines for each day containers sit at the ports. Day #1 $100, day #2 $200, etc. They have run out of space to put the containers. 70-100 ships parked in the ocean can’t get into ports.

================================================

I love stories like this. My employer is hiring and running training courses every month for the foreseeable through 2022. Except December, because they couldn’t get the simulator slots the demand is so massive.

Gotta get the stuff to the insatiable masses. Not enough ships? Put it on our big, carbon-thirsty planes, you green hypocrites.

Just can’t relate to these lazy workers. Good grief, find something you love doing and it’s not even work. Then you get to enjoy going to work AND your days off.

Oh, and those clever Czechs. Exploring the sub-atomic universe and sighting a ∑-hole for the first time. (Not to be confused with the much more commonly sighted A-hole, commenting prolifically here, our very own “handsome servant”.)

https://www.expats.cz/czech-news/article/czech-scientists-become-first-in-world-to-see-inside-atom

Science and expertise, bitchachos.

#117 Contained on 11.14.21 at 11:23 pm

Did you see all those containers and ships on 60 minutes?

This is cancelling consumerism and will close businesses.
Christmas 2021 will be all about giving romantic IOU coupons.

#118 kc on 11.14.21 at 11:47 pm

#74 long hauler on 11.14.21 at 7:07 pm
‘Canada down 17000 truck drivers’..no wonder ,,if you keep reading autonomous driving trucks is the future,,why would you hang around if you know you will be made redundant in the near future??
________________

The sad thing is, the near future isn’t as near as those stories make it seem. There’s a wide gulf between “we trained a truck to drive itself down one stretch of freeway” and “we trained trucks to drive in all conditions and on all roads across the continent.” Just ask Tesla how easy it is to push out a fully autonomous vehicle.

The old way of starting a logistics company could still be in play too. Earn some cash and buy a truck. Then buy another and hire a person (or robot in this future case) to pick up the extra work. Soon you have a business going, and self driving trucks don’t take a cut outside of their purchase price and maintenance.

*******

Love to see an auto truck drive over the coquihalla highway in January (think show, Highway Through Hell) and need to put on chains… I will pay to watch it….

#119 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 11:51 pm

#111 Shawn Allen on 11.14.21 at 10:11 pm
Amazon workers have had enough?

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.14.21 at 8:18 pm
The Great Resignation!

Have been following this for a while now.
My conclusion:
Workers are not stupid.
Take Amazon.
Bezos is worth Gadzillions and flies into almost space with his billionaire buddies.
Delivery drivers make minimum wage, are not allowed breaks to go pee.
So they have to pee into bottles.
And when they come home, the kids ask Daddy how was work today.
Moral : there always comes a time when enough is enough.

********************************
But with no job, Daddy ends up “not having a pot to piss in” as they used to say in the old days. Well I suppose that was before the days of free money from Trudeau.

Labor shortage? Not to worry, supply and demand will work its magic. Wages up somewhat. Investments in labor saving technology up somewhat. And so… “The economy will balance itself”. There, I beat Trudeau to that one.
—————–
Good try, old man.
What you forget is, that most family have two incomes now.
Not like the olden days when you brought home the bacon.
And BTW, I once worked for a company that allowed only two washroom breaks.
So, we did not drink any water and prayed for no diarrhea.
It was a summer student job.
When we were back at UNI in fall, we organized a boycott of the company.
A poor Austrian boy like me had to learn to stand up for myself at an early age.
No daddy bringing home the bacon.

#120 yvr_lurker on 11.14.21 at 11:52 pm

The one thing we have learned as a family over the last two years is that we can drastically cut superfluous expenses (restaurant meals, consumer items, “professional” entertainment events, bars, fitness memberships etc…) and do not feel we are missing out on anything. At this stage, despite the 54% marginals, we are saving more than ever before each month. I can well imagine that many people have the same new mindset; they can live on much less than before by cutting out the fat and therefore have much more flexibility when it comes to their jobs (willing to quit or renegotiate a WFH arrangement for a little less $$$ or likewise). Frankly, if one scales up their lifestyle with fancier cars, outings, consumer items every time they get a pay raise, it will be harder to get ahead and have the freedom to make work/life balance decisions.

I don’t feel one built of guilt that I am a poor consumer and not frequenting the same businesses as I used to do keeping the velocity of money going. I prefer to keep it in my pocket and have found other diversions (guitar, books, DIY jobs, local hiking trips with the dog, growing vegetables etc…). At this stage I could easily live on 50% of my salary.

#121 The Solution on 11.15.21 at 12:03 am

20% pay raises are coming.

Companies with CPHRs don’t know what to do with all of their talent coming through the pipelines.

Employers need a CPHR individual on their team to solve these present day issues with hiring and retention. CPHRs are worth their weight in gold, but can typically be acquired for 90k, plus a few stock options and the ability to WFH.

#122 zoey on 11.15.21 at 12:29 am

The biggest transfer of wealth is happening right before us… do you know what it is Garth ? The millenials do.

#123 baloney Sandwitch on 11.15.21 at 12:35 am

Inspired post today, Garth. The kids are alright, we boomers never had the guts to shove it. Maybe its the legal weed ….

#124 Dr V on 11.15.21 at 1:39 am

95 Faron thx for the link. I pasted this for the San Juan River

Latest Reading =599(m3/s)
Return Period Observation =1 to 2y
Forecast Maximum in 5 Days =1519.9(m3/s)
Forecast Return Period Maximum =100 to 200y

Just to confirm

Latest reading seems clear enough
Return period means this latest reading is a one or two
year event?
Forecast max is sometime in the next five days flow will be over 1500 cub m/s, representing a one in 100 (or two hundred) year event?

Almost biblical.

#125 Wrk.dover on 11.15.21 at 3:24 am

I thoroughly enjoyed being every job I have ever had.
I could never afford to keep any of them though.

Self employment became a lifeline, until it wasn’t.

When you can’t make money making money, it is time to do for your self what by tradition the Borg always pay others more money than they can clear at their own job in the same time frame it requires. (Some exceptions like dental work don’t apply.)

It is redundant to have two wage earners with benefits married. One should be the full time employee of said couple. The pay sucks at first glance, but the deductions do pay an allowance, while the transportation costs eliminated, and the elimination of labor related bills covers the much of the loss of income. The convenience is stellar!

This choice, we made at 35 landed me with $100/mo CPP at 60. Selling another 30 years wouldn’t have been such an impressive gain on that, after all would it?

Academics that we know have always urged me to write a book, on how I pulled this off, because they recognize how well it turned out for us, when they see our home and the freedom we enjoy with our lifestyle afforded by having an in house unencumbered full time employee.

I’ve always been afraid the book would collapse the system, but now according to the Greater Fool topic of the day, it has happened. No one wants to work!

The first step for success is to find the balance between a McMansion and a shanty. Never take more than you need. Every thing you think you need is going to cost your time. There is never enough. Certainly not enough to under sell any of it.

I’m posting at 4am because I worked so hard outdoors all day Saturday, that I laid around Sunday. Now I’m all revved up for another week of accomplishment.

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 8:06 am

@#123 Baloney
” we boomers never had the guts to shove it. Maybe its the legal weed”

+++

We boomers had to fight each other for crappy, low paying jobs, that we had to keep to pay 8, 10 and 20% interest on loans and mortgages.
We didnt have the luxury of quitting..
And all those kids at Woodstock in ’69… smoking low grade dope…. were Boomers.

#127 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 8:10 am

Still POURING buckets of rain and the wind is picking up.
60 to 90 kms today.
Where oh where is Faron to save us?

Gonna be lots of crappy drivers in the ditches.
Hwy#1 will be a 3 hour crawl.
Check out the Lower mainland highway traffic cams in an hour of so to see the “Car-mageddon”

#128 cropgrower on 11.15.21 at 8:20 am

Officially retired Nov. 1st. at 66 years old. Phone been wringing off the hook. Seems nobody wants to work. Starting to look like new speedo a waist of money.

#129 Dharma Bum on 11.15.21 at 8:52 am

This is just another economic phase we are going through.

Just a blip on the timeline of infinity.

The pendulum will always swing back. The ol’ mean will be reverted to.

The economy and the market will figure out a way to shake loose the deadbeats, takers, fakers, stay-at-homers, quitters, shirkers, loafers, grifters, sandbaggers, idlers, laggards, jottlers, layabouts, and Quintillians.

Then we’ll be back to the good old days.

Work, work, work.

With a sprinkle of strikes, union busting, arbitration rhetoric, and misery for all.

#130 Dharma Bum on 11.15.21 at 9:05 am

#115 Jane 24

So many of our friends age 55 plus have handed in their notice and are home enjoying life.
—————————————————————————————————

It took a global pandemic to finally get this concept across.

I embraced it years and years ago.

Well, actually, I knew that I would the second I started full time work. I realized that I just didn’t like it. But, I didn’t just “quit” like today’s fools. I picked up Garth’s early books, one after the other, followed the financial advice, made a plan, stuck to it, and 35 years later, I said chuck you farlie to the man, Johnny Paycheque style.

Like our blogdog pal said, TANSTAAFL!

#131 Quintilian on 11.15.21 at 9:17 am

#123 baloney Sandwitch
“ Inspired post today, Garth. The kids are alright, we boomers never had the guts to shove it. Maybe its the legal weed ….”

Too funny baloney, I say “the truth is often told in Jest”, some of us can do the job- any job, without the supervision of some half-witted sycophant middle management thug.

We don’t need approval, or validation of our self-worth from the wardens at the office.

We can, and do work smartly, and can be productive from Starbucks or home.

#132 Armpit on 11.15.21 at 9:18 am

History Lesson from the 70’s

Wash, Rinse, and Repeat.

#133 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 9:19 am

Hmmm,
Run away inflation.
slowing production.
Could a Japanese style “Stagflation” be rearing it’s ugly head in the Far East?

https://www.reuters.com/world/china/chinas-factory-gate-inflation-hits-26-year-high-2021-11-10/

Several Asian economists seem to be discussing it.

#134 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 9:47 am

“There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth”

And yet approximately one half of Canadians actively hate their jobs, while only approximately one quarter actually like what they do for a living (leaving another quarter more or less ambivalent).

Seems to me that with numbers like these, there is a dearth of jobs that are enjoyable, attainable, and well paid.

#135 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 9:57 am

#120 yvr_lurker on 11.14.21 at 11:52 pm
“At this stage, despite the 54% marginals, we are saving more than ever before each month”

To have a 54% marginal tax rate in BC, you would need to have a household income of $223k per year (or more, since this is the top rate).

So, just so we’re clear, you feel good about saving a lot of money when you make, at the very minimum, 2.5 times what the median family does?

#136 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.15.21 at 10:00 am

#62 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.14.21 at 5:49 pm
#14 Tom on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm
“work ethic” shot to hell. You can tell the boomers that care more about money than life. Sad!

There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth

‐‐———‐——————————————————-
There is more to a company than EPS…. There’s another good joke. Just re-iterate that to the shareholders.

There is more to life than working for a company that only cares about making money.

I am glad nobody here works for me. Big relief. – Garth

‐———————————————–

I am sure the feelings are mutual.

Give more to the employees (wages and benefits) if you want to change the culture.

People are sick of working just to be broke while a few dozen own the majority of the worlds money supply.

What does 1 man need 100Billion dollars in his bank account for while so many others are starving and homeless?

Jeff Bezos employs about 1.5 million people. There will always be the achievers, and the whiners. We know where you fit in. (BTW, no billionaire has billions in cash. It’s business equity.) – Garth

#137 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 10:08 am

#125 Wrk.dover on 11.15.21 at 3:24 am

It is redundant to have two wage earners with benefits married. One should be the full time employee of said couple.

Academics that we know have always urged me to write a book, on how I pulled this off, because they recognize how well it turned out for us, when they see our home and the freedom we enjoy with our lifestyle afforded by having an in house unencumbered full time employee.

——–

So you got a Sugar Momma?

#138 IHCTD9 on 11.15.21 at 10:10 am

Not surprising. Covid sucks, urban living sucks, urban RE prices suck, commuting sucks, inflation sucks, Trudeau sucks. Took a while and a touch more hardship for the urbanites to get thinking outside the box – but the Pandemic finally did it.

Now with a little remote WFH, and a taste of the good life, none of them want to go back. Maybe there is some sacrifice being made on the income front in order to maintain what they’ve gained on the lifestyle front.

If Covid hit 5-6 years later than it did, maybe I’d be saying ttjasi too. 2-3 days per week running auto parts for 20.00/hr has massive appeal. No stress, and a 4-5 day weekend – every week? Sign me up. Trudeau and Covid are wrecking my industry. I can live real cheap and love it.

#139 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 10:28 am

“(BTW, no billionaire has billions in cash. It’s business equity.) – Garth”

So we should tax unrealized capital gains like the Democrats plan to, but the $1 billion asset threshold is far too high. Realistically, anyone with over $10 million in assets should be subject to the tax as well.

Will they get it back when stock values fall? – Garth

#140 PastThePeak on 11.15.21 at 10:29 am

I wonder how many are quitting or retiring early because they have made some money in crypto/meme stocks, and believe that this is just going to continue because “the Fed has our back”?

Why work when you can make (on paper at least) a few $K each week by playing the “can’t lose” markets?

#141 B on 11.15.21 at 10:32 am

Disagree with the generalization that people who WFH have no work ethic Garth. Pre-pandemic I would spend between 2-3 hours per day either commuting, ironing clothes, preparing a brown bag lunch, gassing up car etc… Now, no more. I get my exercise in during the day, and work during the evenings after kids are down. I estimate that my 7.5 hour work day is now 9 on average, at the same salary, and the business owner no longer pays commercial rent.

How is this bad for the economy – do I need to waste gas just to give the O&G folks something to do? Shouldn’t capitalist economies be rewarded for pursuing the most efficient pathway to producing a product or service?

If bosses feel that visibly seeing employees sitting in chairs is a good way to assess output, then that is an indication that management is doing a crappy job of monitoring the value generated (or lack thereof in some cases) by their staff. Perhaps this level of supervision is required for more entry level/clerical jobs, but I don’t feel it’s true for mid-level or experienced professionals.

#142 Sartori on 11.15.21 at 10:40 am

I work in a hospital and in the past six months we had at least 20 resignations! The majority are Nurses changing careers, leaving town, getting ‘outta here’. Trying to re-fill the positions… its any warm body available. I don’t even know why we ‘interview’… and I am on my way out soon too!
STRESS, who needs it?

#143 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 10:40 am

#136 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.15.21 at 10:00 am

Give more to the employees (wages and benefits) if you want to change the culture.

People are sick of working just to be broke while a few dozen own the majority of the worlds money supply.

———

I guess a person can only speak from their own perspective. The truth of the matter is that company culture is a fine idea, but the first order of business is always to keep the lights on. The bigger the company, the bigger the liability.

Consider that you, hypothetically, own and operate a small firm with $100k monthly payroll and average $110k monthly revenue. If revenue dives suddenly due to events out of your control, trust me: you will very quickly have a choice to become a heartless bastard or go broke.

#144 Mattl on 11.15.21 at 10:43 am

#14 Tom on 11.14.21 at 3:49 pm
“work ethic” shot to hell. You can tell the boomers that care more about money than life. Sad!

There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth

———————————————————

I find my work incredibly satisfying so agree. But there are millions of jobs and people that don’t have the same experience. These folks work for the weekend, and it is all about a paycheck. I mean how satisfying would a front line customer service job be? If they have figured out how to minimize expenses, scratch out the 30 or 40K they were making and live more fulfilling lives more power to them. There is no glory in grinding our a crappy, low paid, 9-5.

All of the above assumes these people aren’t on social welfare, I am talking about folks that have figured out a better way to use their time without being drains on society.

#145 Ageism on 11.15.21 at 10:43 am

#128 cropgrower on 11.15.21 at 8:20 am

Officially retired Nov. 1st. at 66 years old. Phone been wringing off the hook. Seems nobody wants to work. Starting to look like new speedo a waist of money.

……

I was actually wondering if ageism would become a thing in this 65+ age bracket, maybe even 50+ bracket.

Why?

Well, the virus seems to be ageist, like many other viruses, and so, would corporations want the risk of serious issues due to this increased risk?

Say your job puts you at risk – won’t specify, many do. Well, even if you’re vaccinated there is a risk to you, higher than to younger individuals. I’m thinking to keep your job you’ll have to agree to a liability release from getting Covid on the job.

Of course there were other issue with this already in place – like older employees being a higher drain on the health insurance side, which already probably made companies push for youth, but this little virus could just add to that.

I don’t know. Just thinking out loud, but I can see this becoming an issue that needs to be addressed.

#146 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.15.21 at 10:56 am

I think it’s time to go minimalistic.
Separate your wants from your needs.
Like the chaff from the wheat.
Look at the F-150 as a money wasting, useless piece of metal and plastic.
Just don’t touch your [email protected] retirement investment.
You may just need it.

#147 IHCTD9 on 11.15.21 at 11:00 am

#108 CL on 11.14.21 at 9:39 pm
A lot of people also found other ways to make a living. Many people have taken up gigs like Uber, Uber Eats, Skip the Dishes, Youtube channels etc etc etc. so it leaves the conventional workforce lacking manpower. I don’t know if they actually make money but gigs like these allow for more life and flexibility than the dreaded Monday to Friday 9-5er. Nobody wants that anymore.
_________

Heh, I stumbled on a new YT Channel where the guy works on diesel trucks, heavy equipment, does some interesting swaps, and puts together a great high quality, enjoyable to watch video. Jan 2020 channel start date.

One video dealt with how he got into YouTube. He was a software engineer in Cali working for a company “you’ve certainly heard of” and left “due to the same basic reasons everyone else is leaving”. IE he had that golden silicon valley FAANG job, and left due to the cost of living there.

Looks like he lives somewhere in New England now, has a partner/roomie, probably works a low paying job, and does side jobs on top, and YT. Bet he’s got a better lifestyle now than he did back in Cali. Mechanical projects was always his passion and hobby since a teen – now it’s his job too. Win.

I can totally see a future where several income streams are employed to provide a great increase in standard of living via a LCOL area, compared to an urban environment where you basically can’t make enough money to get anywhere for 99.9% of people no matter what you do.

#148 The West on 11.15.21 at 11:06 am

” In short, the work ethic has been shot to hell.”

I guess we’re not going to talk about the elephant in the room. According to all the “boot strap Bills” in the steerage Millenials and GenZ deserve the hand they were dealt by their parents….

Not saying there isn’t an issue of complacency but, as one of those Millenials who is sitting pretty good – look at the structural damage that has been done to society since 2009…..we need to reckon with that if we are to avoid a Soviet style collapse.

I understand the printing press is good for the Boomers but you need to understand what’s happening to the future here. It is almost too late.

#149 DM in C on 11.15.21 at 11:18 am

There’s an entire movement of people quitting crap (mostly service) jobs that pay crap money — they’re fed up with dealing with entitled Aholes who just live to abuse service folk, and employers who live to exploit them.

I don’t blame them one iota. https://www.reddit.com/r/antiwork/

#150 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 11:24 am

Weapons charge dropped, F. Weird, if it was, like, illegal.

https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/15/us/kyle-rittenhouse-verdict-wisconsin-national-guard/index.html

#151 666 on 11.15.21 at 11:35 am

666 Covid Cases in Ontario on Sunday.

300 vaccinated
300 unvaccinated
24 partially vaccinated
42 unknown status

50% of the cases from 20% of the people. The vax is working. – Garth

#152 BillyBob on 11.15.21 at 11:36 am

#134 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 9:47 am
“There is more to work than money. Sad you cannot see that. – Garth”

And yet approximately one half of Canadians actively hate their jobs, while only approximately one quarter actually like what they do for a living (leaving another quarter more or less ambivalent).

Seems to me that with numbers like these, there is a dearth of jobs that are enjoyable, attainable, and well paid.

==============================================

A lot of the “enjoyable” part comes down to attitude. The expectation that every job will be 100% fun and well-paid and “fulfilling” and so on pretty much guarantees disappointment.

I’ve worked many menial jobs in my earlier worklife and always found elements to enjoy in each of them and ways to parlay them to bigger and better opportunities. In my current job I encounter a lot of folks in much more modest jobs than mine, funny how some are quite content and others just complain all the time. For the exact same job description.

I’ve also noticed the satisfaction seems to correlate to how much pride one takes in the accomplishment of one’s tasks, no matter the pay or basic the job function. Watching an immigrant hotel housekeeper going about her job with excellence, singing cheerfully to herself, will remind one that it isn’t always about the job itself but one’s mindset to it. There is a basic dignity in doing something well no matter what it is. If you drag yourself down thinking you’re only doing something for “the man” no wonder you’re unhappy. There are many above-and-beyond things I do in the performance of my job that I do for my own satisfaction, not my employer. Sometimes I want to grab my more whiny, entitled colleagues by the shoulders and shout “Get some pride, man!”.

Attitude is a choice. Losers who choose to be miserable in seemingly mindless menial jobs will be just as miserable in the so-called “enjoyable, well-paid” jobs. I see it every day.

#153 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 11:44 am

#135 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 9:57 am
#120 yvr_lurker on 11.14.21 at 11:52 pm

“At this stage, despite the 54% marginals, we are saving more than ever before each month”

To have a 54% marginal tax rate in BC, you would need to have a household income of $223k per year (or more, since this is the top rate).

So, just so we’re clear, you feel good about saving a lot of money when you make, at the very minimum, 2.5 times what the median family does?

———

Personally, I’d be much happier if the tax rate were 32%, as it is in the US for similar salary.

Does Canada really deserve $49,000 more per year for the same income? That covers a lot of second-rate socialized healthcare where I still have to get in line behind first-come, first-serve junkies. Ludicrous.

#154 the Jaguar on 11.15.21 at 12:17 pm

@#152 BillyBob on 11.15.21 at 11:36 am

Conscientiousness. One of the big five personality traits. Some have it, others do not. While the daily indoctrination from the nanny state and others preach ‘equality’, the reality is that input remains a very reliable indicator of outcome and a sizable chunk of the populace simply don’t ‘get it’. Don’t ‘have it’. Why some succeed and others do not. Truth is like math. Hard.

As the world crawls out of the rabbit hole it went down and back into daylight there will be some who seize opportunities, while others are left standing on the shore in stunned silence with the sudden realization their ship just sailed. Their bloated gasbag of defiance and indignation deflated.

Fade out. Roll credits. The end.

#155 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 12:26 pm

#151 BillyBob on 11.15.21 at 11:36 am
“A lot of the “enjoyable” part comes down to attitude.”

I’m sure many people were content with their wretched lot in life throughout the ages.

Slaves who were content to be slaves.
Child laborers who were content to be child laborers.
Workers who were content to work in unsafe conditions.
Workers who were content to work 16 hour days with no weekend.

At the time, they thought they were making the best of an inevitable situation, but now everyone agrees that these “inevitable situations” were unjust and abhorrent, and more often than not served to enrich the few with the sweat and misery of the many.

The labor practices of 2021 are not written in stone, never to change. To think the labor practices and arrangements we have now are perfect, and will continue to be perfect eternally into the future is naïve and without a base in logic. And it was that thinking which some people at the time used to argue against abolishing slavery, against ending child labor, against shortening the work week to 40 hours, and against safe workplaces.

Things change, and they will continue to change, because people (at least 50% of them, going by this survey) will continue to not be satisfied with inequity simply because that’s the way “things are.” And more often than not, that change only occurs in one direction. Towards less work, not more.

By the way, do you work? Where and for whom? – Garth

#156 some guy on 11.15.21 at 12:29 pm

The pandemic changed a few of my friends for the worse. Now they are bundles of anxiety, afraid of the world, and unable to socialize. Its really sad.

#157 Stoph on 11.15.21 at 12:37 pm

#136 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 11.15.21 at 10:00 am

Give more to the employees (wages and benefits) if you want to change the culture.

—————————————————–

A better stance is to ask for fair benefits and compensation.

Paying too much is also bad for company culture. Just ask government workers.

#158 Doug t on 11.15.21 at 12:40 pm

for the majority of the population, work is just that WORK – a cheque that pays the bills, not some satisfying passion that fulfills their life – “work” is a slog

#159 yvr_lurker on 11.15.21 at 12:52 pm

#135
So, just so we’re clear, you feel good about saving a lot of money when you make, at the very minimum, 2.5 times what the median family does?
——
Yup. It took over 25 years in my career to get to a really good position and I came from zero, being born not even on home plate. Still have the mindset of people who have always been thrifty (grandparents living through the depression, immigrants etc..) and proud of it. Take the long view, acquire new skills and work hard….

#160 Doug t on 11.15.21 at 1:10 pm

#156 some guy

yup – alot of people I know as well

#161 IHCTD9 on 11.15.21 at 1:17 pm

#155 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 12:26 pm
#151 BillyBob on 11.15.21 at 11:36 am
“A lot of the “enjoyable” part comes down to attitude.”

I’m sure many people were content with their wretched lot in life throughout the ages.

Slaves who were content to be slaves.
Child laborers who were content to be child laborers.
Workers who were content to work in unsafe conditions.
Workers who were content to work 16 hour days with no weekend.
_____

Yep there were. Plenty. Do some reading. Context is everything.

I get the feeling you have no idea how good you got it.

#162 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 1:52 pm

@#155 Sunshowers

“Things change, and they will continue to change, because people (at least 50% of them, going by this survey) will continue to not be satisfied with inequity simply because that’s the way “things are.” And more often than not, that change only occurs in one direction. Towards less work, not more.”

++++

Bwahahahah.
Less work for more money….
Bwahahahahaa.
Dream on.
you job will be replaced by… hundreds of millions of Chinese workers…..eating….. your….. lunch…..

#163 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.15.21 at 1:55 pm

154 the Jaguar on 11.15.21 at 12:17 pm
@#152 BillyBob on 11.15.21 at 11:36 am

Conscientiousness. One of the big five personality traits. Some have it, others do not. While the daily indoctrination from the nanny state and others preach ‘equality’, the reality is that input remains a very reliable indicator of outcome and a sizable chunk of the populace simply don’t ‘get it’. Don’t ‘have it’. Why some succeed and others do not. Truth is like math. Hard.

As the world crawls out of the rabbit hole it went down and back into daylight there will be some who seize opportunities, while others are left standing on the shore in stunned silence with the sudden realization their ship just sailed. Their bloated gasbag of defiance and indignation deflated.

Fade out. Roll credits. The end.
————————-
Actually, I like your prose.
Ever considered going into writing fiction.?
There is a shortage of script writers in Hollywood.

#164 Don Guillermo on 11.15.21 at 1:56 pm

#159 yvr_lurker on 11.15.21 at 12:52 pm
#135
So, just so we’re clear, you feel good about saving a lot of money when you make, at the very minimum, 2.5 times what the median family does?
——
Yup. It took over 25 years in my career to get to a really good position and I came from zero, being born not even on home plate. Still have the mindset of people who have always been thrifty (grandparents living through the depression, immigrants etc..) and proud of it. Take the long view, acquire new skills and work hard….
*************************************

Good for you yvr. You’ve every right to be proud!

#165 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 1:56 pm

Wow.
Semi arid Merritt is under a town wide evacuation order due to flood waters inundating the town.

https://www.castanet.net/news/Kamloops/351573/Approximately-2-000-residents-evacuated-in-Merritt-with-more-widespread-orders-possible

#166 Immigrant man on 11.15.21 at 2:00 pm

#149 DM in C on 11.15.21 at 11:18 am
Huh, that’s an interesting portal into the world of disgruntled employees. A quick scroll indicated that most are service jobs or low paying jobs, but there are some WFH-not anymore jobs and some professional jobs. Low-pay/service jobs just suck. There is no way around it. And it’s not even the low pay itself, it’s the treatment. I had a few exceptional bosses/work environments in those days of low pay, but the rule was crappy boss + treated like criminal/child/stupid.

Curiously there are some professionals complaining on recruitment/hiring practices. They can be awful. I could throw in my 5 cents into that. Maybe there some silver lining to this after all.

#167 Wrk.dover on 11.15.21 at 2:47 pm

#137 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 10:08 am
So you got a Sugar Momma?
___________________________________

My father told me not to work for anyone else, and marry money.
It’s not a secret.

#168 SunShowers on 11.15.21 at 2:53 pm

“Will they get it back when stock values fall? – Garth”

I don’t see why, because the issue self-corrects.
If someone is forced to sell so much stock that it reduces the share price, that directly lowers their tax burden for the following year, as their unrealized gains have now decreased not only by the quantity of shares, but also share price.

“By the way, do you work? Where and for whom? – Garth”

I put in 60+ hour weeks for multiple employers, as well as “gig” work.
What makes you think somebody who hates working doesn’t work? Why would they hate doing something so much if they don’t do it?

#161 IHCTD9 on 11.15.21 at 1:17 pm
“Yep there were. Plenty. Do some reading. Context is everything.
I get the feeling you have no idea how good you got it.”

What a ridiculous argument.
Just because things are better now than they were before before doesn’t mean that we therefore right now live in the single best possible way.

Your position could be used to argue against any positive change from the dark ages until the present day because “at least we have it better than plantation slaves in the Roman Empire!”

Better things are always possible, and if you don’t want to be a part of it or you choose to work against better things for the rest of us, then you should put your money where your mouth is and sell yourself into slavery. Or at the very least work 16+ hour days with no weekends, vacations, or days off (except maybe Christmas day) in appallingly unsafe conditions for 3rd world subsistence wages (no minimum wage, remember!).

#169 Alberta Ed on 11.15.21 at 2:55 pm

Employers who realize their staff are a vital asset are rare, sad to say. I’ve played “Take this job and shove it” more than once.

#170 Faron on 11.15.21 at 3:03 pm

#150 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 11:24 am

Are you really this stupid?

#171 Mudguy on 11.15.21 at 3:15 pm

9 months off work from Covid was the best 9 months of my life. I live on a acreage so never felt locked down. Work in the oil patch wages still not where the use to be. Going to work the winter Until break up but if oil price is still high not going back until the money comes back. They just want more more more but don’t want to pay. Kind of hoping they implement mandatory Vax for an excuse to quit.

#172 Faron on 11.15.21 at 3:19 pm

#124 Dr V on 11.15.21 at 1:39 am

Yeah, the latest reading means that the current flow (now at 1160 cumecs) is between the 5yr and 10yr return event based on historical statistics. The maximum of the range of forecasts (worse case scenario) is a 1 in 200 year flow as high as 1800 cumecs and well above the record of 1350+ cumecs. Average forecast was for a flow of 1070 cumecs which is a 5 to 10 year event and sub-record.

There’s a lot of flooding in the lower mainland and over the hill in Meritt and Princeton.

Blue skies now, but the wind is picking up. Everything eases by tonight.

No one responsible should be making claims about this event and climate change other than that this is consistent with what is expected in a warming climate.

#173 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.15.21 at 3:54 pm

220 mms of rain in Hope.
Almost 8 inches of rain in 24-36 hours….

#174 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 3:54 pm

#170 Faron on 11.15.21 at 3:03 pm
#150 Sail Away on 11.15.21 at 11:24 am

Are you really this stupid?

——–

Thanks for the respectful, wide-ranging discussion.

Dig, son.

#175 kommykim on 11.15.21 at 4:22 pm

“Working for the Man” Roy Orbison 1962
“Money” Pink Floyd 1973
“9 to 5” Dolly Parton 1980
“Working for the Weekend” Loverboy 1981
etc…

Nothing really new to see here.

#176 Bob Dog on 11.16.21 at 1:08 am

DELETED

#177 Allan Wilson on 11.16.21 at 12:31 pm

I’m a trucker about to contribute to the driver shortage. This coming Friday is my final day driving a tuck.
I’m only 59 and retiring. Life on the road definitely hasn’t kept up with inflation. In 1980 we all stopped at the mom and pop restaurants and truck stops along the way across Canada for a home cooked meal. Those places are all gone now, today’s trucker doesn’t make enough to eat on the road. We sit in solitude in our trucks reheating left overs from home in a microwave oven. I also can make my own coffee, have a fridge and an induction cook top for frying up a steak or bacon and eggs.
In 1980 a friend earned $48,000 a year driving for Radio Shack, today that same run pays $60,000. Coffee back then was 25 cents, now it’s pushing three dollars.
Not to mention the lost time away from family and friends.