Time to float

Debbie’s an investor. B&D all the way. Doing great. “Look at Toronto!” she exuded to me yesterday as the TSX high-fived across 21,000 for the first time.

In case you hadn’t noticed, the maple market’s gained 23% in 2021. If it were a house in Victoria or Etobicoke, you’d be pumped. But this is better. Equities, and ETFs based on them, are liquid. No realtors. No commissions. No land transfer tax, property tax, condo fees or utilities. No insurance or maintenance. No neighbours or tenants. No bugs. No snow. And when using a TFSA, RSP or RRIF, no tax, either.

Why is this happening?

Companies are making money as the pandemic recedes and the economy expands. We’re back at pre-virus job levels. The banks are raking it in. Oil is way past eighty bucks and likely going higher as demand outstrips supply. Vax rates have soared to 80% and beyond. Consumers are spending hugely, borrowing their butts of and cities are repopulating. Government stimulus is flowing and the central bank has kept the spigots wide open.

But wait. There’s change in the air. Not so much for the economy- prospects are good – but for CBs and the cost of money. And, maybe, for portfolios. The latest inflation number is arresting – 4.4%. That’s beyond forecasts and the fastest rate of growth in almost 20 years. It’s above the Bank of Canada’s target range for the sixth month in a row, bringing big pressure to up rates sooner than later.

No wonder. The cost of everything is swelling. Gas, wow. Food. Clothes. Insurance premiums. Real estate. Meanwhile the busted supply chain means a year’s wait for new appliances and dog-knows-how-long to get the Lambo you ordered.

Deb’s on top of that. She can see rates have only one way to go in response. And she sent me this (very good) question:

There is a high probability that the portion of the portfolio invested in bond funds, albeit short term, will go down. I understand why they are in the portfolio. (offset to equities, shock absorbers, reduces volatility etc…). However with little room/low probability for rate reductions from hereon in and therefore only a small chance for any modest appreciation in value or return perhaps the bond funds might as well be in cash or an equivalent to serve the shock absorber purpose? Can some or all of the bond funds not be in a money mkt fund and at least earn 0.25% instead of a high probability of loss? I can’t wrap my head around this.

Answer: First, nobody owns bonds for yield. They’re insurance. Shock absorbers. They generally rise when stocks fall, and saved a lot of people’s bacon in March of 2020 when Covid crashed into our lives and drove stocks down by a third. You just never know what’s coming…

Second, yes, rates are going up. Sooner than most people believe, including everybody in the vaxport-protected comments section. Traders are now making bets on the CB hiking in a few months, with three increases (or more) in Canada in 2022. This will add at least three-quarters of a point to mortgages, which is a big deal. And more coming after that. Mr. Market just doesn’t believe the soothing words from the Bank of Canada that inflation’s temporary.

So, yeah, it’s coming. And as rates/yields increase, bond prices fall. This is why the 40% fixed-income component of a balanced portfolio needs to be rate-protected (as we have been doing for our clients consistently). So in addition to the safe shock-absorber federal & provincial debt ETFs, Deb’s portfolio contains a floating rate bond fund (which benefits from rising rates) as well as a healthy weighting of preferred shares – the rate reset kind. In total, almost half the ‘safe’ part of the portfolio is invested in stuff that increases in value when the cost of money does the same.

There’s more: the portfolio also includes corporate bonds, which outperform government debt in a rising rate environment. In fact, the ETF providing this also has a yield north of 3.5%. That beats the pants off a money market fund return. Meanwhile preferred shares have done exactly as this blog suggested they would when the pandemic started to come under control. They erupted. Values are up close to 20%. Prefs also pump out a 4% dividend. And you get the dividend tax credit. Everything but a massage and a cigar.

In short, don’t mess with the 40%. Never load up the FI portion of your portfolio with just one government bond ETF. Understand the impact higher rates will have, and invest accordingly. But don’t dump balance in favour of pure growth, or assume there won’t be more storms ahead.

When it comes to investing, human nature is not your friend. We fear loss. We get greedy. We vacillate, chase returns and let emotion lead. We read dodgy blogs, watch questionable people on YouTube, then make trades. Bad idea. Stop.

The best portfolio strategy is to correctly set it, forget it, and take the dog for a walk. She knows what matters.

About the picture: Remember Shane? He’s the house-lusty mechanic everyone had an opinion on two days ago. This is his pooch. “I just wanted to say thank you for your help,” he writes, “my wife and I had a great conversation last night about our finances and are starting a plan thanks to you. I’ll come back to you for advice when the children pop out. Here’s a picture of our first born child, Tucker.”

142 comments ↓

#1 Gerry on 10.20.21 at 3:10 pm

In Venezuela people are breaking off bits of gold to pay for meals. Why do Canadians believe Liberalism, socialism, communism, marxism and all the left, utopia crap that only destroys in the end. Between Trudeau and Freeland, a drama teacher and journalist, what do you expect, they use money like it’s water. The problem is by the time they use the water, it is dirty and useless to drink. Just like Canada’s finances under them.

#2 Consumerista on 10.20.21 at 3:11 pm

“Consumers are spending hugely, borrowing their butts of…”

We’ve learned nothing. Opportunity missed.

Life is all about STUFF!

You need more of it.

Someone has something you don’t have?

You need one too!
You need a better one!
You need a bigger one!
You need a faster one!

Can’t afford it? No problem.

JUST FINANCE IT!

OH YEAH!

YOLO…FOOL!

#3 Timmy on 10.20.21 at 3:17 pm

Stay out of bonds! Inflation will eat away any returns. Buy stocks, those that can pass on increases to their customers.

Nope. Rational people need growth plus safety. It’s not a race. – Garth

#4 Billy Buoy on 10.20.21 at 3:19 pm

Rates go up what .50 % and crush the bubbles with nothing coming along for organic growth?

Just print more money to support those without and bail out those with a lot?

As Mr. T says, don’t worry about rates. They are not going North for any amount of reasonable time..aka 3 months max, before they do a 180 and resume their normal course South until everything finally blows up.

Hopefully, we will all be gone before then.

Nice job Central thieves errr banks. Nice job. You should be proud of yourselves.

#5 Joey Jojo on 10.20.21 at 3:23 pm

What about gold? You can buy the Mint’s gold etr below NAV at the moment.

#6 Bonobo on 10.20.21 at 3:23 pm

Thank heavens Trump is making a comeback! He will sort it all out for us…

#7 Timmy on 10.20.21 at 3:31 pm

“Stay out of bonds! Inflation will eat away any returns. Buy stocks, those that can pass on increases to their customers.

“Nope. Rational people need growth plus safety. It’s not a race. – Garth”

Rational people realize that the chances of losing money in an index for diversified blue chip stock portfolio over periods of 5 years or longer is are very slim. In the long run equities always outperform bonds, so why tie up all that money unless you need it in a few years.

Because most people hate volatility and are prone to selling when things drop in value. They, unlike you, lack perfection. – Garth

#8 Lee on 10.20.21 at 3:32 pm

You get more than enough safety keeping 15% in cash (and maybe in really short-term GICs) and 20% in pref share etfs, including US ones. Nobody is exited by the 2.5% dividend short term corporate bond etfs spit out.

#9 Dogman01 on 10.20.21 at 3:39 pm

RE: Millennials and GenZ Standard of Living Decline – Yesterday, I can’t keep up

Say you have Country A and Country B

Country A has a Copper mining\production Industry but limited amounts of Copper.

Country B has no Copper industry but has abundant Copper, so much copper sitting idle that you have to step around piles of the stuff as you walk around the streets.

A & B form a “Free-Trade” Union.

Copper production virtually ceases in Country A and the productive assets, know how and managerial skill to produce are all moved to County B.

Now Substitute Copper with Human Labour (Population) and you get the picture. The 1990’s GATT treaty opened Western Workers to competition from Billions of other suppliers of Labour. Add in the Eastern Europeans after the 1990’s collapse of the Iron Curtain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PQrz8F0dBI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PS8MVcqN2uM

The creation of a middle class in the West was the result of high demand for Labour, the Middle Class was simply a highly paid working-class. By opening up production to Billions of new Labour Suppliers you destroy the middle class in the West.

It explains why the standard of living is declining and the growing Wealth Disparity. Why we have such an inflation of education credentials.(competing for smaller and smaller foothold on the rungs of upward mobility) The disparity between Government Jobs and Private Sector (pensions, benefits etc) and the disappearance of Unions.

Workers (the population) were thrown overboard by the Western Establishment, and they knew exactly what they were doing.

It is a Farm and if your not a farmer well then you’re an………

Read Animal Farm, it is what Humans do. Or for Canadian Flavor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqgOvzUeiAA

Four Legs Good!, Two legs Bad!

#10 Rook on 10.20.21 at 3:46 pm

It’s interesting that we seem to live in a time where both governments and citizens seem to believe that the price of a thing doesn’t matter, as long as you can afford the monthly payment on it.

When did “I cant afford it” become an admission of failure worthy of scorn, and not a declaration of responsibility worthy of praise?

#11 TVO on 10.20.21 at 3:47 pm

In between lovely Science shows I was watching on TVO, I caught this 3 min bit on Reconciliation…

https://www.tvo.org/video/what-is-reconciliation-indigenous-educators-have-their-say

Say what you want, sitting pretty in your home on land you think you own (but really The Queen owns and you have no ownership of), there are serious points in even this short TVO video that cannot be denied.

Facts are:
British and Canadian authorities recognized that indigenous peoples already on the lands had a prior claim, aboriginal title, which was not extinguished by the arrival of the Europeans.

Numbered Treaties were negotiated under laws of foreign land being imposed upon Natives, in foreign language, with consequences they could not have possibly have known.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbered_Treaties

I was born here. You may have been. It doesn’t nullify these fact and claims. I believe these Treaties will not hold up and will have be re-negotiated. Canada is on a clock in my view.

#12 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 4:01 pm

Cry me a River about globalization

Dogman01 on 10.20.21 at 3:39 pm lamented:

“By opening up production to Billions of new Labour Suppliers you destroy the middle class in the West.

It explains why the standard of living is declining and the growing Wealth Disparity.”

************************************
In my experience the standard of living keeps rising fairly dramatically.

People mostly live in homes with more toilets than butts. This was unheard of a few decades ago. Bathrooms are as big as bedrooms used to be… Closets too.

It may be debt fueled but the way the vast majority of people live is definitely better than ever.

If you can’t make in today’s economy in Canada, it’s not the economy’s fault. Not everyone can be middle class or better. By definition some must be lower and some higher.

Dogman has an explanation for something that is simply not happening. Just look around at how people actually live.

#13 Faron on 10.20.21 at 4:02 pm

#190 Wrk.dover on 10.20.21 at 12:25 pm

Faron; this site vindicated my belief on my local climate change.http://planthardiness.gc.ca/

SW Nova is now better than 1960’s St. Catherines.

Thanks for passing that along. Very cool that St. Catherines hasn’t changed all that much in those terms while southern NS has changed by 3 zones.

Maybe less reliance on brassicas for you nowadays? Maybe some corn even?

I’m sorry I didn’t get to your request before you found that info. I’ve been bogged down with work and a bathroom renovation that I’m DIYing (DIM perhaps?).

#14 Planetgoofy on 10.20.21 at 4:03 pm

Inflations here.
Many Canadians report difficulty feeding their family: Poll
https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/many-canadians-report-difficulty-feeding-their-family-poll-1.1668894

This will continue and with the new green deal being pushed it is the perfect storm to push everything up in price.

#15 Andrewski on 10.20.21 at 4:22 pm

Meanwhile in Manitoba, Mr. Alexander is trying to stay afloat. Lots of missing info in this story, but the story is pointing out that there’s a growing percentage of people who, do not plan to fail, they fail to plan.

https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.6217301

#16 Pylot Project on 10.20.21 at 4:26 pm

#10 Rook
When did “I cant afford it” become an admission of failure worthy of scorn, and not a declaration of responsibility worthy of praise?

===

Excellent comment. Instant gratification has destroyed most individuals ability to save for those type of purchases. Heck, even a lay-away plan was better than the debt people collect now.

#17 Scotia economist sees 8 BoC rate hikes on 10.20.21 at 4:39 pm

That equals 2% increase.

A 2% increase in rates will reduce current house prices by 29.36% based on lending capacity.

So, if you have a 1 million dollar home and this interest rate increase materializes you are going to be loosing $293,577.98 as the place will reprice to $706,422.02.

Canadian inflation readings will approach five per cent by the end of the year, which would be the biggest overshoot to the central bank’s target since 1991.

Looks like the 2023 Canadian housing correction call is right on schedule.

Don’t fight the cycle.

Let’s see what tricks the Feds have to counteract this.

#18 mmm on 10.20.21 at 4:48 pm

Spend 50% of your income just to keep a roof over your head and then have your purchasing power reduced for all other essential.

The canadian government has a lot to answer for in being asleep at the wheel as all our quality of life goes down the tubes, all in the name of feeding a housing bubble.

#19 Stone on 10.20.21 at 4:51 pm

#7 Timmy on 10.20.21 at 3:31 pm
“Stay out of bonds! Inflation will eat away any returns. Buy stocks, those that can pass on increases to their customers.

“Nope. Rational people need growth plus safety. It’s not a race. – Garth”

Rational people realize that the chances of losing money in an index for diversified blue chip stock portfolio over periods of 5 years or longer is are very slim. In the long run equities always outperform bonds, so why tie up all that money unless you need it in a few years.

Because most people hate volatility and are prone to selling when things drop in value. They, unlike you, lack perfection. – Garth

———

I hold bonds (ETF) in my B&D portfolio. For exactly the reason Garth states. If for some reason the markets decide to take a dump, that’s more than likely where most of the money will come from for me to rebalance the portfolio and buy up the other ETFs in the portfolio on sale/discount. So, even with those “pointless” bonds, my B&D portfolio achieved another wonderful milestone of surpassing the 20% return ytd and ended off the day at 20.14% ytd. Bonds have their place.

#20 pk on 10.20.21 at 4:53 pm

B&D
60% TSLA
40% AMZN

#21 TurnerNation on 10.20.21 at 5:01 pm

– Life in the Former First World Countries/Economic Shutdowns.

KANADA – Get. Out. Now. Sell all hard assets. Start making plans. It’s over.

“Common Sense Calgary [email protected]
Jyoti Gondek announced this morning, in an interview with Ryan Jespersen, that her top priority, and first-order-of-business as Mayor will be declaring a Climate Emergency.
She said that Calgary needs to “move past” oil and gas.
https://twitter.com/CommonSenseYYC/status/1450567654297653249?

ITALY.
Why are the Globalists hammering Italy so? It was the only county in the news, early 2020. And now – destroying Way of Life via the CV Rules.
A super strong, homegenous culture; god-fearing people. Yep that’s gotta go in the New System

https://www.zerohedge.com/political/things-are-getting-messy-draghis-italy
“Sixteen percent of the country’s officially employed workforce just lost their jobs (temporarily for the moment). And as one would expect, they’re not happy….”Italy, by contrast, has just introduced the strictest rules in Europe.”



— Climate Lockdowns? Their words not mine. This will be a global thang. You will own nothing and be happy.

https://www.climatedepot.com/2021/09/13/new-co2-monitoring-credit-card-enables-tracking-of-carbon-footprint-on-every-purchase-monitors-cuts-off-spending-when-we-hit-our-carbon-max-mastercard-un-join-forces/
“Climate Lockdowns: New CO2 monitoring credit card enables tracking of ‘carbon footprint on every purchase’ – ‘Monitors & cuts off spending when we hit our carbon max’ – Mastercard & UN join forces”

#22 Stone on 10.20.21 at 5:09 pm

#15 Andrewski on 10.20.21 at 4:22 pm
Meanwhile in Manitoba, Mr. Alexander is trying to stay afloat. Lots of missing info in this story, but the story is pointing out that there’s a growing percentage of people who, do not plan to fail, they fail to plan.

https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.6217301

———

Interesting story. That article really demonstrates the financial illiteracy that abounds in society. Could Mr Alexander and his spouse not figure out ahead of time that they were financially pooched and at least try to fix the problem before it actually became a problem? I guess that’s too much to ask for.

And then, Laurie Campbell, states the following:

“Many have invested on their own in RRSPs, Campbell adds, which are dependent on the market. That can be problematic because they don’t often keep up with inflation, she said.”

Really? Hey Laurie, apparently you’re a financial expert. Are you clueless to the power of a B&D portfolio to counter the effects of inflation?

I really like how everyone is a financial expert yet are so dim on the basics of long term investing. But yeah, she’s a financial expert in insolvency. Or is she an insolvency expert? 1 out of 5 stars to the CBC reporter for understanding the difference.

#23 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 5:16 pm

Housing Bust on Schedule?

Scotia economist sees 8 BoC rate hikes on 10.20.21 at 4:39 pm

Looks like the 2023 Canadian housing correction call is right on schedule.

***********************
Maybe so, which would be in contrast to the similar call every year since about 2009.

#24 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 5:17 pm

Canada’s annual inflation rate came in hot once again in September, and Scotiabank economist Derek Holt sees the Bank of Canada responding with a series of rate hikes beginning next year.
“This isn’t transitory at all in my opinion,” said Holt, head of capital markets economics at Scotiabank, in an interview. “When it’s your home and your grocery bill and your car among the leading categories in terms of year-over-year contributions to this inflation picture, it suggests it’s broadly based.”

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/not-transitory-at-all-scotia-economist-sees-8-boc-rate-hikes-1.1669087

#25 Faron on 10.20.21 at 5:29 pm

#149 Nonplused on 10.19.21 at 11:28 pm

#114 Faron on 10.19.21 at 8:58 pm

Simply put, it shows that, adjusted for age successive generations are doing worse …

[It shows nothing of the sort. It shows that older people have more money because they’ve been working longer and also inherited the farm. And I thought you weren’t going to explain it?]

OMG, seriously? The chart explicitly accounts for age, that’s the whole point. Again. Someone needs to come shake you.

Regarding the wealth argument. You are the one that brought up taxes. So don’t be surprised that rates factor in. It’s easy to show that Bezos will pay a relative pittance in taxes if at all/ever. Tax rates are important because the foundation of your mark-to-market nonsense is that the wealth is virtual. Bezos has many many ways to live with great wealth that avoids paying income tax either through borrowing massively against his shares or directly through capital appreciation and sale of shares.

Bezos is an extreme example, but the same principles apply at all levels of net worth.

The more you have, the more you can borrow. The more you can borrow the more growth you can realize.

Leverage spawns greater and greater wealth because, no matter where (within reason) the money is invested, one is leveraged long the economy which is almost always growing. In the case of houses, if you are 20x leveraged on real estate and you see 5% annual price appreciation, your initial down grows very fast.

100k home. 5% down is $5,000. $5,000 is your investment, you owe $95k @3% interest. Crudely speaking, the next year the house is worth $105k. You’ve laid out $3k in interest payments. Your $5000 is now net $7000 — a 40% gain crudely speaking. These examples exist throughout the economy, not just in RE.

An entire generation starting in the gutter has less ability to leverage and will end up with less wealth in the long run. The WaPo graph shows exactly this phenomenon in action.

#26 Faron on 10.20.21 at 5:31 pm

#115 Faron on 10.19.21 at 9:00 pm

There is no reference to age in that statement. – Garth

Garth, much of your post was dedicated to generational differences. Age is directly implied.

Maybe you should vent at Generation Squeeze if you’re outing ageism. – Garth

#27 Barb on 10.20.21 at 5:36 pm

#11 TVO
“Say what you want, sitting pretty in your home on land you think you own (but really The Queen owns and you have no ownership of), there are serious points in even this short TVO video that cannot be denied.

Facts are:
British and Canadian authorities recognized that indigenous peoples already on the lands had a prior claim, aboriginal title, which was not extinguished by the arrival of the Europeans.”
———————————————————

Feels like we’ve been dreading the immoral treaty issue for way too long.
I might even opt to see this line on my next property tax notice:

Third Party Collection, annual land lease: $800.00

At least that’d be closure, with an end to some possibilities.
About time too.

#28 Dogman01 on 10.20.21 at 5:52 pm

#12 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 4:01 pm

Dogman has an explanation for something that is simply not happening. Just look around at how people actually live.

————————————
Paul Krugman and other mainstream trade experts are now admitting that they were wrong about globalization: It hurt American workers far more than they thought it would.

https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/10/22/economists-globalization-trade-paul-krugman-china/

1980’s where a single income father with only high school education was able to support a family of five and a dog, no debt, only a mortgage at 3.5 x earnings. It was a benchmark I evaluate from.

Fast forward to today:
– Household Debt skyrocketing
– House prices unaffordable
– Disappearance of Pensions
– Both members of a household have to work full time to keep heads above water.
– Education Credential Inflation
– Dream jobs for the Working Class is with Government.

When the supply of labor approaches infinite (or 8 Billion) the value of labour declines.

#29 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 6:31 pm

Jealous of a Made Up Past

Dogman01 claims:

1980’s where a single income father with only high school education was able to support a family of five and a dog, no debt, only a mortgage at 3.5 x earnings. It was a benchmark I evaluate from.

****************************
I imagine there was a few situations like that. It was certainly not the norm. Were you there?

What job did your fictional hero have? Not every high school grad in the 1980’s was living well.

The living standard in your example was far lower than today. One bathroom, 7 people. One phone. Probably two televisions. Not much of a vacation afforded. No restaurant meals. One car, Dad took it to work, Mom stuck at home doing housework and cooking. Ask her how great it was.

This is basically a mythical family. The mother here did not have a paid job because she already had more than a full-time job at home.

Just jealous of fictional situations. There are fantastic opportunities for people today and if you don’t take advantage of it others will. That’s on you.

#30 Dirty Dan on 10.20.21 at 6:35 pm

#1 Gerry on 10.20.21 at 3:10 pm
In Venezuela people are breaking off bits of gold to pay for meals. Why do Canadians believe Liberalism, socialism, communism, marxism and all the left, utopia crap that only destroys in the end.

Now trans people are fighting to get different pay for the same job. We’ve come full circle.

https://youtu.be/BnnbBKMN0gM

#31 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 6:51 pm

@#28 Dogman01
“1980’s where a single income father with only high school education was able to support a family of five and a dog, no debt, only a mortgage at 3.5 x earnings. It was a benchmark I evaluate from.”

+++

What mythical country did this “father of 5” live in?
Was he a doctor?

#32 Faron on 10.20.21 at 7:00 pm

Maybe you should vent at Generation Squeeze if you’re outing ageism. – Garth

Give me a break, I’m not venting and eye-roll in your general direction. You are certainly being provocative though.

TL;DR — Post-war 20th century economic expansion with an abundance of well-paying, pensioned and long lasting high-school level jobs and organized labour explain the wealth gap between generations. Erosion of worker protection and the massive offshoring of labour and the obscene wealth that the offshoring produced through increasing corporate profitability and goosing equities and other assets sealed the trajectory of mills and younger generations. Ascribing the differences to laziness is just a shameful trope and also wrong.

The long:

There’s nothing ageist about recognizing disparity in age-controlled median wealth and trying to address it. Meanwhile, you seem to be suggesting that the differences among generations has to do with “laziness” which is bogus nonsense.

Using mean statistics is statistically inappropriate (happy to detail why median and mean should not be blended) and you are ignoring a preponderance of data that shows it’s harder to get started today than ever (stagnating wages, student debt, erosion of labour organization, massive spikes in RE/rent, starting one’s career during the GFC when unemployment was massive). The baby boomer generation (yours) was fortunate enough to be born in an exploding (good way) economy built on the back of forming the US superpower. That economy also had strong worker organization and a very high top couple of marginal tax brackets. All of these things provided lift for your generation to get off the ground and a touch more protection if things went sideways.

All of those things have eroded since the Reagan era. Even in the pre-COVID period of sub 4% employment in the US, wages had declined on inflation adjusted terms since you were a young’un and despite full employment, wages were barely rising. The prospects of getting a secure, well-paying job out of high school have declined massively with the offshoring of manufacturing. This necessitates post sec ed and very often taking on student debt. Meanwhile, housing is blisteringly expensive and thus eats into ability to accumulate any kind of wealth.

Data is not on your side and attempts to skew the perception toward one of “laziness” or “entitlement” is offensive. Not to me, I’m Gen X, but to those who work around me in this entrepreneurial co-work space I’m in. Many are millennial and younger and they work their asses off.

It’s a human trait, and failing, to believe you live in unique and difficult times. In reality, the opportunity today is unparalleled. – Garth

#33 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 7:03 pm

#27 Barb on 10.20.21 at 5:36 pm

Facts are:
British and Canadian authorities recognized that indigenous peoples already on the lands had a prior claim, aboriginal title, which was not extinguished by the arrival of the Europeans.”
++++++++++++++++++++
Not an agreed upon recognized fact Barb. Only in your mind. The majority understands that they were immigrants same as the rest of us. They did not originate here, they came from Asia over the Bering Strait land bridge.

#34 XGRO and chill on 10.20.21 at 7:06 pm

The inflation numbers are kind of misleading. Gas is crazy high now but was crazy low 1 year ago. Makes the YoY number worse than the real picture.

#35 Capt. Serious on 10.20.21 at 7:15 pm

I would say the only reason to hold so much (40%) fixed income is if you’re approaching the age you need to keep your gains and/or you are prone to panic in a 50% drawdown. If you instead react to a 50% drawdown by looking for money hiding in the sofa to buy more equities, perhaps you don’t need so much. Investing is about probabilities, but also about humans (emotional beings). If you haven’t been through a 50% drawdown, assume you would panic and error on the side of holding at least some fixed income. In a 60/40 a 50% drawdown in equities is only a 30% loss (probably less because the safe stuff will go up), so you are less likely to lose the plot. A plan isn’t worth anything if you can’t execute it.

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan - no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm

Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

Ok sure… piece of cake!

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/calgarys-new-mayor-says-the-city-needs-to-move-past-oil-and-gas

#37 Paterfamilias on 10.20.21 at 7:20 pm

# 27. Barb. ‘At least that’d be closure.’

Don’t kid yourself. What you suggest may indeed happen, but it will change nothing. It will be one more form of taxation by government. The same sort of outfit that has been collecting taxes for one century and a half, ostensibly on behalf of indigenous peoples.

Despite the billions of dollars collected and dispersed by departments called ‘Indian and Northern Affairs’, or the more palatable and politically correct names in use to-day, many indigenous folk (in Canada) still lack access to water that is fit to drink.

If it makes you feel better to pay yet one more tax, then be happy ! There is no good reason to believe it will make any difference to the indigenous residents of this country.

#38 Faron on 10.20.21 at 7:26 pm

#24 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 5:17 pm

Canada’s annual inflation rate came in hot once again in September, and Scotiabank economist Derek Holt sees the Bank of Canada responding with a series of rate hikes beginning next year.

And even if it is transitory inflation, the prices don’t come back down unless there’s a deflationary event which no one wants. What goes up, stays up.

#39 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:38 pm

#25 Faron on 10.20.21 at 5:29 pm
#149 Nonplused on 10.19.21 at 11:28 pm

#114 Faron on 10.19.21 at 8:58 pm

Simply put, it shows that, adjusted for age successive generations are doing worse …

[It shows nothing of the sort. It shows that older people have more money because they’ve been working longer and also inherited the farm. And I thought you weren’t going to explain it?]

OMG, seriously? The chart explicitly accounts for age, that’s the whole point. Again. Someone needs to come shake you.

———————————————-

Maybe we aren’t looking at the same chart. I was looking at this one:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/12/03/precariousness-modern-young-adulthood-one-chart/

There isn’t even any overlap between the millennials and the boomers on this chart. We can compare GenX to the millennials and see that GenX did slightly better to age 32 than the millennials but it is no screaming hell. In fact the only thing we can clearly see from the chart is that most of the wealth accumulation starts after age 32, so the millennials haven’t got there yet.

Ya, the boomers have a steeper rate of growth. Perhaps less student loans? Perhaps beneficiaries of the housing bubble? Perhaps their parents are all dead and they inherited a bunch of money? Perhaps they lived longer on average than their predecessors? Probably all 4.

The silent generation isn’t shown (conveniently, it would wreck the point the author is trying to fabricate) but if it were it would show a similar rise in % to the boomers and then a steady decline to zero as they all died. Dead people don’t own things. It must be the case that the living end up with the assets of the dead. There is no other way it can work.

So we really can’t tell anything from this chart other than that the author has a narrative he wants to spin. We can also tell, just using logic, that at some point in the future the millennials will own it all, because everyone else will be dead. It is just kind of how it works, this life thing.

#40 Dragonfly 58 on 10.20.21 at 7:38 pm

Shawn Allen, I was there . And yes that more or less describes every family I knew including my own. My Father bought in North Vancouver about 1970 when I was 15 years old, then traded up to a bigger , newer place in South Delta in the late 1970’s. High School only, my Mother didn’t work except for a month or so just before Christmas each year. Made the holiday expenses a bit easier to manage. But just a job in a Vancouver area car dealership. 3 kids, never a brand new car , but most of the time a year old trade in at the dealership every 5 years or so. Either of those two houses would be pushing 2 million + these days. North Van house was modest but in a very good location, South Delta house was on a 1/2 Acre lot, price that out these days. My father paid $72,000 in Delta and about $18,000 in North Van.
I don’t know where you were in those days, but as far as I can see Dogman is spot on.

#41 TVO on 10.20.21 at 7:50 pm

#27 Barb

Barb, I don’t think it will be a line item. It comes back to actual transfer back of land ownership – which puts the entire union in question.

It is a fact that British and Canadian authorities recognized that indigenous peoples already on the lands had a prior claim, aboriginal title, which was not extinguished by the arrival of the Europeans. Now it’s just a matter of how enforceable those treaties, agreed to under duress are. I’m thinking they won’t pass the test.

#37 Paterfamilias

It is pretty much impossible to argue with your point that our leaders sure as heck know how to squander our tax dollars. But in this case, I don’t think this will play out as such.

If The Crown’s claim on the land is dubious in the first place, and Canadian Government acts on behalf of The Queen – she being the landlord who allows the leaseholds to be assigned on all of “currently, her land” it means that once she is found to infect not have the rights to it, as noted above, WHO you pay to will likely change completely, along with what rights you are granted to the land.

#33 Yukon Elvis

What majority believe is irrelevant. What matters is what The Crown believe and how enforceable those Treaties really are. And to be honest with you, what I’ve learned so far doesn’t pass the smell test.

Written in the language that wasn’t natively the Natives, applying law principals that wasn’t the Natives, in a system of control that wasn’t the Natives, explain to them by European translators? They did not have proper representation in the room. And considering the obvious flaws of such a contractual agreement being clear for all to see, including the courts – these Treaties cannot stand the challenge. It’s actually fascinating that they are still enforced, because they seem highly dubious and certainly not agreed to with full knowledge of consequences and certainly under duress. Such contracts do not hold up to scrutiny.

Even the terms of what is promised are antiquated and of questionable value if you read these treaties. Where are the exit clauses? Where are the renegotiation clauses?

A good lawyer would get these nullified, and I believe they are being worked on. Once The Queen has no landlord status in this land…then what?

#42 Flop… on 10.20.21 at 7:50 pm

Haven’t been feeling well the last few days.

Went to the doctor and got to the bottom of it.

Apparently I was prescribed 50 micrograms of Faron and Sail Away daily.

The body and mind need very little of this stuff, if any at all.

The pharmacist made a mistake, and I had been administered 5000 mcg of Faron and Sail Away, which is way too much for human consumption.

Gotta take that stuff in small doses…

M47BC

#43 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.20.21 at 7:55 pm



— Climate Lockdowns? Their words not mine. This will be a global thang. You will own nothing and be happy.

https://www.climatedepot.com/2021/09/13/new-co2-monitoring-credit-card-enables-tracking-of-carbon-footprint-on-every-purchase-monitors-cuts-off-spending-when-we-hit-our-carbon-max-mastercard-un-join-forces/
“Climate Lockdowns: New CO2 monitoring credit card enables tracking of ‘carbon footprint on every purchase’ – ‘Monitors & cuts off spending when we hit our carbon max’ – Mastercard & UN join forces”
————-
Great news.
Thanks TN for digging this morsel up.
Love to see the face of the F-150 owners when the gas pump stops pumping gas after 50 bucks.

#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

Ok sure… piece of cake!

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/calgarys-new-mayor-says-the-city-needs-to-move-past-oil-and-gas

——————————————

If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor.

But now that we have her, we still have to try and determine her motives for saying something like that. Clearly mayors have very little impact on climate policy, so she isn’t planning to save the world. Maybe she wants a Vancouver style gasoline tax? What mayor wouldn’t want more money?

Or maybe she is just playing along with Trudeau in the hopes of capturing some lovely green money? I mean he is going to give it away, why not line up for it?

The other possibility is that she is entirely clueless, but I would suspect malice before that.

“Move past oil and gas”? Why don’t we see if places that don’t have oil and gas can do that first? After all it is our customers that are burning most of it, not us. If we had no customers economics would force us to leave it in the ground. We wouldn’t need any declarations from powerless mayors. Once we see Vancouver ween itself off oil and gas and stop living off of the Trans Mountain pipeline, we can use that as an example for what Calgary might do. Until that happens we need to see this for what it is; a propaganda narrative. Empty words that mean nothing except maybe new taxes.

Of course if she means to build a nuclear power plant then I take that all back. We could use one of those if we are to reduce our carbon footprint in a meaningful way. We already got a bunch of pinwheels and they didn’t do nothing.

#45 Dogman01 on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

#29 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 6:31 pm

31 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 6:51 pm

—————————–

Support a family of five. Him, Wife, 3 Kids, and Dog. (not five kids)

1982, Calgary, seemed pretty common in my working class neighborhood. Just one Car.
Mother started working PT I think in 1983 but never held a job before that.

But….My Wife’s Father (good catholic) had six kids and Mom was stay at home her entire life. Dog and 2 Vehicles! Working Class job,however High school completed.

“1960 Dad worked, Mom stayed home, 5 Kids, no debt
1970 Dad worked, Mom worked part time, 4 Kids, no debt
1980 Dad worked, Mom worked full time , 3 Kids, a little debt
1990 Dad worked, Mom worked full time , 2 Kids, more debt
2000 Dad works 2 jobs, Mom worked full time , 1 Kid, tons of debt
2010 Dad works 2 jobs, Mom works 2 jobs, No Kids, absolutely broke and in debt.
Today why is it that with our great educational system, and with all the kids with degrees why can’t they see they have been shafted?”- Smoking Man

#46 Dragonfly 58 on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

I was living on my own by the early 1980’s but my two younger sisters were still at home. No frills growing up , but certainly no hardships. I had a paper route at about 12 and started working Saturdays at the dealership when I was 15. Pocket money for me , my parents only wanted $50.00 / month when I was working full time over the summer months, actually it just went into a savings fund for post secondary although I didn’t know it at the time. Paid my first term’s tuition. Bought a 10 year old MGB cash when I was 17.

#47 The pandemic recedes on 10.20.21 at 8:00 pm

DELETED

#48 Lobo on 10.20.21 at 8:07 pm

This is all still premised on the assertion that rates will go up continuously over the medium and long term! The the group think at the moment no doubt. Longer term I believe the deflation supercycle is too strong and a prolonged rate hike cycle is very unlikely. Although I am locked in to a 5 yr mortgage so I may be slightly biased! Supply side shortages can be righted over time but aging populations and declining birth rates are something we cant fix. Not to mention huge and increasing inequality world wide growth and gdp will still be tacked to the floor.

#49 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:10 pm

#37 Paterfamilias on 10.20.21 at 7:20 pm
# 27. Barb. ‘At least that’d be closure.’

Don’t kid yourself. What you suggest may indeed happen, but it will change nothing. It will be one more form of taxation by government. The same sort of outfit that has been collecting taxes for one century and a half, ostensibly on behalf of indigenous peoples.

Despite the billions of dollars collected and dispersed by departments called ‘Indian and Northern Affairs’, or the more palatable and politically correct names in use to-day, many indigenous folk (in Canada) still lack access to water that is fit to drink.

If it makes you feel better to pay yet one more tax, then be happy ! There is no good reason to believe it will make any difference to the indigenous residents of this country.
++++++++++++++++
Right you are. And your and my kids and grandkids will be the tax donkeys to fund a historical falsehood that has not worked in the past and will not work in the future.

#50 What if? on 10.20.21 at 8:19 pm

What if Canada was to fall apart? As in back to Natives to whom it belongs for example.

Would CAD survive as a currency?

Or are there serious risks to it?

#51 Sydneysider on 10.20.21 at 8:28 pm

#14 Planetgoofy

While many Canadians may struggle to feed families, the outcome is likely to be an improvement in their health, as happened in the UK to the war generation.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/9728#1

#52 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:34 pm

#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor.
++++++++++++++++++++
I had no idea that Calgarians were that woke.

#53 the jaguar on 10.20.21 at 8:34 pm

@44 NonPlused

AMEN! One could see this one coming from a mile away. All show and no go. Can’t wait for reality to sink in… The next 12 months will be one for the ages. Everywhere. Keep your powder dry.

#54 Anon poster on 10.20.21 at 8:40 pm

Here is the scary forecast for 2022

Interest rate hikes
Oil at $200
Supply side inflation
Housing bubble collapse
Recession after Q2
Fall election, majority Conservatives

Rense and repeat

#55 JP on 10.20.21 at 8:46 pm

#42 Flop… on 10.20.21 at 7:50 pm
“Haven’t been feeling well the last few days. Went to the doctor and got to the bottom of it. Apparently I was prescribed 50 micrograms of Faron and Sail Away daily.”

Flop, this is your best post, ever :)

#56 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:50 pm

#41 TVO on 10.20.21 at 7:50 pm
#27 Barb

Barb, I don’t think it will be a line item. It comes back to actual transfer back of land ownership – which puts the entire union in question.

It is a fact that British and Canadian authorities recognized that indigenous peoples already on the lands had a prior claim, aboriginal title, which was not extinguished by the arrival of the Europeans. Now it’s just a matter of how enforceable those treaties, agreed to under duress are. I’m thinking they won’t pass the test.

#37 Paterfamilias

It is pretty much impossible to argue with your point that our leaders sure as heck know how to squander our tax dollars. But in this case, I don’t think this will play out as such.

If The Crown’s claim on the land is dubious in the first place, and Canadian Government acts on behalf of The Queen – she being the landlord who allows the leaseholds to be assigned on all of “currently, her land” it means that once she is found to infect not have the rights to it, as noted above, WHO you pay to will likely change completely, along with what rights you are granted to the land.

#33 Yukon Elvis

What majority believe is irrelevant. What matters is what The Crown believe and how enforceable those Treaties really are. And to be honest with you, what I’ve learned so far doesn’t pass the smell test.

Written in the language that wasn’t natively the Natives, applying law principals that wasn’t the Natives, in a system of control that wasn’t the Natives, explain to them by European translators? They did not have proper representation in the room. And considering the obvious flaws of such a contractual agreement being clear for all to see, including the courts – these Treaties cannot stand the challenge. It’s actually fascinating that they are still enforced, because they seem highly dubious and certainly not agreed to with full knowledge of consequences and certainly under duress. Such contracts do not hold up to scrutiny.

Even the terms of what is promised are antiquated and of questionable value if you read these treaties. Where are the exit clauses? Where are the renegotiation clauses?

A good lawyer would get these nullified, and I believe they are being worked on. Once The Queen has no landlord status in this land…then what?
++++++++++++++++++++
Your argument makes sense for someone on LSD.
We are all here now and more are coming. To make it work we all need to have equal rights and benefits and privileges and we all have the responsibility of building a better country for future generations. No special rights or benefits or free lunch based on race or language or religion or gender or whom has been here longer than whom. That only causes strife and division. Equality for all is the only way to go forward. Anything else would be systemic racism.

#57 the Jaguar on 10.20.21 at 8:59 pm

P.S. If you ever doubted which aspect of human nature would take hold after the pandemic, i.e Tiff versus the CEO of RBC ( saving/paying down debt versus going on a wild spending spree), here is an example of human nature and it’s not pretty. This is the Calgary Humane Society, full of dogs, no doubt turned in by the thoughtless now that things are opening up again. The instant gratification crowd who lack responsibility for themselves, others, and even animals who need a home.

I have been saving one of my imaginary Silver Bullets for them. In the meantime if anyone has been thinking about giving an animal a home this might be good time. I am sure this scenario is playing out across the country. I might offer my services to the right person who needs an adoption interview with a suitable candidate.

https://twitter.com/CalgaryHumane/status/1450906668590501893?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

#58 False Hood on 10.20.21 at 9:05 pm

#48 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:10 pm

Right you are. And your and my kids and grandkids will be the tax donkeys to fund a historical falsehood that has not worked in the past and will not work in the future.

++++++++++++++++

Which falsehood are you talking about? The one upon the claim of The Crown to these lands was gained?

Yukon Elvis – I’m starting to read and understand these Treaties, and let me tell you – the scam is HUGE!

From the terms, to the lack of comprehension, to the lack of understanding of the laws, to the fact that they required interpreters, to the fact they had no legal council representation, to the fact that Natives were rushed, to the fact that the Chiefs were bribed with better terms to sign off on behalf of all without any referendum or discussion for the people to vote upon the Treaties.

These things have SCAM written all over them, regardless if you want to look at them from the lens today or 150 years ago. Or to put it in legal terms, fraud.

To argue these Treaties are binding is the falsehood indeed.

#59 The Republic of Oilbertastan on 10.20.21 at 9:09 pm

#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

Ok sure… piece of cake!

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/calgarys-new-mayor-says-the-city-needs-to-move-past-oil-and-gas

——————————————

If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor.

While she tilted Nenshi-style left…. she certainly never uttered anything like this in the campaign… cause well she would have then lost!.. so yeah I wonder why we all have no trust whatsoever in politicians…. crazy crazy

This is Jagmeet tik-tok type stuff… to just state oil is over.. simple as that!

Ok maybe you’re right.. it’s just a clever plot to get lotsa Fed $$ !! well Quebec plays that game well….

#60 Joseph R. on 10.20.21 at 9:09 pm

#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

Your ignorance of Calgary politics is in full display for all to see:

You are commenting about the new mayor-elect, elected by the plurality of Calgarians, going through what had previously pledged she would do (imagine that!)

You can also read her politics rather than making it up in your mind! (imagine that too!) (Unfortunately, the only Justin Trudeau in your mind, not in her politics):

https://www.jyotigondek.ca/priorities.html#KeyDetails

“Until that happens we need to see this for what it is; a propaganda narrative. Empty words that mean nothing except maybe new taxes.”

Actually, the city needs to take a green turn to prevent introducing new taxes. You see, carbon taxes will be passed down from federal to provincial and local governments. She is about to prepare the city to prevent municipal taxes from going up in 10 years due to carbon taxes.

“If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor”

The Trumpian defence. “When someone I don’t like gets elected, it means elections are rigged!”

#61 Flip it! on 10.20.21 at 9:15 pm

#1 Gerry

Between Trudeau and Freeland, a drama teacher and journalist, what do you expect, they use money like it’s water.

>>>>>>

Gerry, don’t worry…Canada is a little country with a HUGE weakness in our political system and tiny population.

Canada is just 38 million people. Any country with over billion population could easily spare to send just 1% our way here and not even feel it. To be welcomed here with open arms and could completely take over control of the county via democratic legal and completely legitimate means.

Meaning, Canada may not have to worry about weak leadership for too much longer. We may get strong leadership in not to distant future.

#62 gfd on 10.20.21 at 9:28 pm

TD Behehenk NEW Mortgage rates
Term Rate 25y 25+y Rental
chng amort amort
2 Year Fixed ↑10 2.34% 2.44% 2.49%
3 Year Fixed ↑10 2.34% 2.44% 2.49%
4 Year Fixed ↑15 2.44% 2.54% 2.59%
5 Year Fixed ↑20 2.49% 2.59% 2.64%
5 Year Fixed High-Ratio ↑20 2.39% – –

TD Canada Trust – New Mortgage Rates Effective October 21, 2021

#63 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 9:29 pm

@#53 Anon Poster
“Fall election, majority Conservatives”

+++

I dont have a problem with the other pain if it means we rid Canada of the Woke, nauseatingly hypocritical apologists in charge of the sandbox.

#64 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 9:34 pm

@#51 Yukon Elvis
“I had no idea that Calgarians were that woke.”

++++

They probably aren’t.
Just sick of the incompetence and bureaucracy.
Also known as the antivote.

However, if the first priority this new Mayor has is “declaring a climate emergency” in a city full of “Big Oil Headquarters”………
She’s already completely out of her depth.

#65 cuke and tomato pickere on 10.20.21 at 9:37 pm

Number 1 Gerry all you have to do is run in the next election and FIX IT YOU ARE OUR SOLUTION .

#66 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 9:44 pm

@#45 Dogman01
“Today why is it that with our great educational system, and with all the kids with degrees ”

+++

Only the unionized educators and the Degree factories seem to pat themselves on the back for the “good job” their tell us they are doing.

They have set a generation of kids up for failure.

Constantly telling them “good job” for mediocre or pathetic performance.

Letting kid-dults practice their “empowerment” on their cohorts as they preach anti bullying……. as bullying increases.

Degree Factories that spew out thousands of “graduates” every year with essentially useless pieces of paper that they will take years to pay off and filled they minds with endless, argumentative “wokeisms” that have zero relevance in the dog eat dog real world.

I don’t bother argueing with 20-30 somethings because…..they already know everything as they bitch and moan their CERB cheque isn’t auto deposited in their bank account.

#67 Do we have all the facts on 10.20.21 at 9:48 pm

No doubt that many Canadian companies are on the upswing but one should not confuse substantial increases in market cap since January 1, 2021 with comparable increases in earnings and profitability.

The market cap of the big five banks, Shopify and Brookfield Asset Management increased by over 28% since January 1, 2021. This is a very strong indicator of market confidence in future growth.

However when the market cap of just seven Canadian companies increases by over $161 billion in just nine months something other than increased earnings and profitability might be driving that bus.

Investment capital is definitely gravitating towards equities and as a result the P/E ratios and market caps of most Canadian companies increased in 2021. At some point the market will settle down and current returns of the TSX index will probably retreat to historical levels.

#68 NOVA on 10.20.21 at 9:50 pm

Just finished watching NOVA on PBS.

An episode about insects as food in form of protein, perhaps as powder. Insects as food waste recyclers as well.

Potential looks to be amazing. Smart people are working on it.

WOW.

#69 VicPaul on 10.20.21 at 9:50 pm

#29 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 6:31 pm
Jealous of a Made Up Past

Dogman01 claims:

1980’s where a single income father with only high school education was able to support a family of five and a dog, no debt, only a mortgage at 3.5 x earnings. It was a benchmark I evaluate from.

****************************
I imagine there was a few situations like that. It was certainly not the norm. Were you there?

What job did your fictional hero have? Not every high school grad in the 1980’s was living well.

The living standard in your example was far lower than today. One bathroom, 7 people. One phone. Probably two televisions. Not much of a vacation afforded. No restaurant meals. One car, Dad took it to work, Mom stuck at home doing housework and cooking. Ask her how great it was.

This is basically a mythical family. The mother here did not have a paid job because she already had more than a full-time job at home.

*********

My Boomer Dad – graduated at 17 in ’62. Married at 18 (with first born brother), second son (me) at 19. Made his way as an electrician/pusher/Super/Project Manager often over 100k/yr (80s, 90’s, 00’s). First house at 24, second at 27, third at 32 (still owned all of them) while he built our cedar A-frame at the lake (Superior…summer heaven). Mom was stay-at-home until we were 5 and then got a nursing degree and worked it for 35 years. Many memorable family vacations (Disney World in ’73 – drove…down I-75 – through Memphis/Nashville/New Orleans – I got lost in the French Quarter!). I grew up with many who went to the same schools, had a camp at the lake, traveled…it was the norm for many.

Not mythical at all. Though, you’re right about one thing…my Dad and Mom were superheroes.

* Note the intact family unit working together, building on strengths. Our society could use more of these.

M57BC

#70 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.20.21 at 9:51 pm

@#33 Yukon Clovisman
“They did not originate here, they came from Asia over the Bering Strait land bridge.”

++++

Yep.
And , genetically speaking, we all came from a small tribe in Africa.

Time for people to drop the horrendously expensive social awareness experiment this Country’s Leadership has allowed to control the narrative for the past 5 years.

We have a holiday with Orange T-shirts.
There’s no more money.

Although I did enjoy Trudeau squirm on the hook the other day.
All his endless, apologist, “wokeness” is coming back to bite.

#71 TurnerNation on 10.20.21 at 10:03 pm

On the Permanent rolling economic lockdowns/shutdowns. The soft sell begins. There is no more news, only manufacturing of consent.

UK: https://twitter.com/thetimes/status/1450736509951303680
“The Times @thetimes Will there be another lockdown?
The Times analyses the best and worst case scenarios for winter as the UK faces flu season and a potential surge in Covid-19”

– USA: Alllmost over guys! But you knew this is going till 2025. Don’t call it a #reset

.COVID-19: New, infectious strain of Delta variant detected in the US (nypost.com)


— Comrade get your 4th $hot.

.In secret vaccine contracts with governments, Pfizer took hard line in push for profit, report says (msn.com)
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/in-secret-vaccine-contracts-with-governments-pfizer-took-hard-line-in-push-for-profit-report-says/ar-AAPIlby

https://news.yahoo.com/fda-official-booster-announcements-coming-154214414.html
“FDA OKs mixing COVID vaccines; backs Moderna, J&J boosters”

UPPA UPPA! ——————

https://storeys.com/report-toronto-city-council-donations-from-development-industry/
“A new report from ACRON Canada may raise some eyebrows.
In a report titled “Who Controls Toronto? People or Developers,” ACORN Canada alleges that over one third of Toronto City Council donor funds are from people who have ties to the real estate development industry. “

#72 westcdn on 10.20.21 at 10:04 pm

I was down about 50% with my portfolio after March 2011. I stead the course. I even bought more equities. They haven’t always panned out. Yet I win more than I lose so the game will continue. Got it all back – plus the divies continued to roll in.

GT will call me a cowboy. I don’t play it safe – it is not just me to make money or lose it either. Lets just say my instincts are good. I go after companies that have cash flow. I have missed Bitcoin, Tesla as a consequence. So sad, too bad. Still I am happy with my choices though I could have done better. There are so many choices that slipped my fingers. Anyway I am still batting.

Cdn Dollar is ripping and commonalities are taking a hit. That serves me right for being a braggart. I am tough and will make amends and survive.

I have faith in myself despite challenging others who have more than me. God has a much bigger hammer but I think we will work it out. My brother said God may have made room for you – we will deal with it when the time comes.

Meanwhile, I will fight for better? It has been a tough world out there for me yet I won’t give up. As my neighbor said ” you play the cards you were dealt ” and I took it to heart. I make do with I have.

#73 BillyBob on 10.20.21 at 10:06 pm

It’s a human trait, and failing, to believe you live in unique and difficult times. In reality, the opportunity today is unparalleled. – Garth

=================================================

Yep. My employer, myself, my colleagues…we are officially Making Bank. Bigly. Hardly have time to read/write here anymore. Don’t really need it, but lining the pockets is a nice side effect of doing something I enjoy. It’s like a renaissance, feel like I’m back in the ME earning days. Of course, I had to adapt to the shock of Covid but blaming everything on everyone else or relying on the government is…lame.

——————————————————————————————-

#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

Of course if she means to build a nuclear power plant then I take that all back. We could use one of those if we are to reduce our carbon footprint in a meaningful way. We already got a bunch of pinwheels and they didn’t do nothing.

—————–

Nuclear is the short-term future. That’s it, that’s all. Embrace it or watch energy costs run wild as ideology meets reality. (Already happening.) Sure glad I live in a more enlightened place. Screw relying on Russia, and reduce emissions to keep the Klimate Klowns happy. Win-win. But will never happen in Kanuckistan.

https://world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Czech-support-for-nuclear-becomes-law

#74 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:19 pm

#59 Joseph R. on 10.20.21 at 9:09 pm
#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

Your ignorance of Calgary politics is in full display for all to see:

[I guess it is a sign of the times, all disagreements are now “ignorance” and anyone who disagrees with you is “ignorant”. Who would say that? Who would be unable to handle disagreement? An ignorant person perhaps?]

You are commenting about the new mayor-elect, elected by the plurality of Calgarians, going through what had previously pledged she would do (imagine that!)

[She didn’t get a majority. But that’s sort of how municipal elections work. Multiple candidates.]

You can also read her politics rather than making it up in your mind! (imagine that too!) (Unfortunately, the only Justin Trudeau in your mind, not in her politics):

https://www.jyotigondek.ca/priorities.html#KeyDetails

[Why would I read that? No one else did.]

“Until that happens we need to see this for what it is; a propaganda narrative. Empty words that mean nothing except maybe new taxes.”

Actually, the city needs to take a green turn to prevent introducing new taxes. You see, carbon taxes will be passed down from federal to provincial and local governments. She is about to prepare the city to prevent municipal taxes from going up in 10 years due to carbon taxes.

[Prepare how, exactly, and for what? Federal carbon taxes? I think we already have that and I don’t think anything at the city level will stop it. Carbon taxes aren’t about carbon they are about revenue.]

“If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor”

The Trumpian defence. “When someone I don’t like gets elected, it means elections are rigged!”

[Sheesh, Seinfeld is right. People just can’t take a joke anymore. Of course the election wasn’t rigged. Much more likely the electorate was stupid and hadn’t read anybody’s platforms. Name recognition means everything at the municipal level. How many times have you voted for school board trustees without being able to identify one single name on the ballot? That’s how municipal elections work.]

#75 Doug t on 10.20.21 at 10:21 pm

TurnerNation – nailing it bro – keep up the good work

#76 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:27 pm

#51 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:34 pm
#44 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:59 pm

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

If you ever needed any more evidence that all elections are rigged and voting doesn’t matter, there it is. There is no way on Dog’s green planet that the fine people of Calgary elected this mayor.
++++++++++++++++++++
I had no idea that Calgarians were that woke.

——————————————

Calgary isn’t very woke because thems that isn’t cowboys is immigrants and you don’t find woke in either crowd. There is some woke at the university but it is easy to avoid, just stay away from the smoking areas and the liberal arts building.

#77 Shawn Allen on 10.20.21 at 10:54 pm

Meanwhile, Back in the U.S.A. here is a description of single family houses starting at $600k ($750 Canadian)

“Toll Brothers, the nation’s leading builder of luxury homes, today announced its newest community of luxury single family homes, Toll Brothers at Holding Village, is now open for sale in Wake Forest, N.C.

Situated on 254 acres, Toll Brothers at Holding Village features large, wooded home sites that allow homeowners to enjoy the beauty of nature right outside of their door. Modern home designs offer up to approximately 3,900 square feet with 5 to 6 bedrooms, 3 to 6 bathrooms, and 3-car garages. Pricing starts in the low $600,000s.

This new home community is ideally located just south of downtown Wake Forest, providing many conveniences of a larger city while maintaining its charming small-town feel. Wake Forest is just 30 minutes from downtown Raleigh and accessible to RTP employers in Durham, Cary, and Chapel Hill via 540.”

#78 Barb on 10.20.21 at 10:58 pm

That’s why I called the treaties immoral.

#79 DON on 10.20.21 at 11:07 pm

#34 XGRO and chill on 10.20.21 at 7:06 pm
The inflation numbers are kind of misleading. Gas is crazy high now but was crazy low 1 year ago. Makes the YoY number worse than the real picture.

*****

Gas only dipped for a bit. I took advantage and filled up the tanks of two vehicles that sit most of the year. It wasn’t long before gas rose back to 1.30+ and now it is shooting towards 1.70 and oil is only back to $83 a barrel.

Some of this energy crisis is political in nature. China/Australia trade spat and EU/Russia Nord Stream 2 politics with the US in the background.

Countries being run by adults that act like children

Less than 6 weeks ago inflation was transitory. Fast forward to today and the talk about rate hikes is mainstream. How long till the herd gets spooked?

More people are paying attention that’s for sure and the experts seem to be changing their views lately.

Shrinkflation is also alive and well.

#80 The Woosh on 10.20.21 at 11:25 pm

#42 Flop… on 10.20.21 at 7:50 pm
Haven’t been feeling well the last few days.

Went to the doctor and got to the bottom of it.

Apparently I was prescribed 50 micrograms of Faron and Sail Away daily.

The body and mind need very little of this stuff, if any at all.

The pharmacist made a mistake, and I had been administered 5000 mcg of Faron and Sail Away, which is way too much for human consumption.

Gotta take that stuff in small doses…

M47BC

—————————————

Priceless! Excellent work good sir!

#81 Armpit on 10.20.21 at 11:39 pm

Friend had a 9yr old water heater rental that would cost an additional $800 to buy out. Glad Friend didn’t buy it, as it crapped out 1 month after the inquire, resulting in being out of the Contract :)

Went to Home Depot to purchase one. $1089 – identical to the one that was installed. Salesperson said too bad you didn’t come by 2 weeks earlier as it was $100 cheaper. Installation would make it $1885 plus HST

Instead, I installed it for the friend – straight swap – adjustments and returned the old tank on my way to my place(saved the $75 rental pickup charge).

Two weeks later, Home depot has the same Water Tank for $1187.

If salesperson was correct – this is a $200 hike or 20% in the past two months.

4.4% Inflation you say? What are they smoking???

#82 Diamond Dog on 10.20.21 at 11:52 pm

#3 Timmy on 10.20.21 at 3:17 pm

It’s plenty wise to have fixed income, no doubt about it.

https://www.multpl.com/shiller-pe

There are reasons why one continues on the risk train of owning stocks at these levels:

– The height of bubbles generate the highest percentage of high flyers in the overall market and there are bubbles everywhere. Real estate, bond coupon values, stock markets, commodities ratcheting up ever higher, high risk can lead to unexpected opportunities but is it rear view mirror? Does one still have the time and opportunity to find a greater fool?

– CB’s have shoveled so much money into the markets by lowering interest rates through MBS and treasury bond buy’s forcing CB rates in a ditch, where is the investor to go but stocks? Or so this is the prevailing belief which in and of itself creates a framing effect (cognitive bias) by narrowing choices to 2 or 3 when in fact, there are more than 2 choices for investors as any seasoned money manager will tell you. Certain ETF’s, preferred shares, certain corporate bonds, it’s not a race but risk management. There are still some decent gains to be had with much lower risk investments and we need low risk investments outside of stocks, Garth speaks it true.

– The money supply (U.S. M2) has swollen by 40% over the last 21 months. Inflationary, but juices higher revenue numbers and earnings relative to historical norms. Bears sometimes fall into a bear trap of recency bias not adjusting for this, but bulls can fall into the trap of mistaking higher incomes with higher PPP. They aren’t one and the same.

– CB’s are tapering but the percentage of which they are decreasing is minimal. By the time they go to zero, 3 years will have likely gone by… if nothing goes wrong. CB’s (this group anyway) are sending the markets a message that they will continue to manipulate rates that continue to grow a U.S. housing bubble generating the wealth effect that fuels the markets, at the same time forcing bond investors to take more risk in the markets. All of this is good for stocks short term… as long as rates don’t surprise and rise and/or real estate doesn’t begin to deflate.

Stock market Con’s:

– Historically high valuations everywhere we look. It’s in commodities from O & G to metals and fertilizer fueled by consolidation and price fixing (yes, corruption with deregulation forcing government and the courts to look the other way). It’s in real estate, bond coupon values and stock market caps everywhere we look and this all further elevates risk.
– High inflation. If high inflation is sustained through a multi year period, incomes can’t adjust and consumer spending shrinks.
– Higher future interest rates. Inflationary, also takes a bite out of consumer spending, incomes and profit.
– Higher taxes. Takes a bite out of incomes and consumer spending and it should be said, anything that takes a bite out of consumer spending over time slows economic growth.

If incomes can’t keep up with the cost of living what happens? Contraction. Consumer spending shrinks into recession leading to higher unemployment. Growing numbers of people start running out of money and if earnings plummet and bubbles start to deflate, look out, it triggers a crash.

For one, the S/P looks to be positive for earnings across most sectors in this quarter. Pent up demand continues to generate earnings, but what is it that keeps share value from dropping “after earnings season is over”?

The markets won’t see earnings season for a good number of stocks for 6 months following. Between now and then is thanksgiving and Christmas, a time for investors to take stock of their investments and look at the risk of riding out their investments through the next earnings cycle. Is this what triggered largely unexpected Black Monday? A wave of investors taking profit and risk off with the rest of the markets waking up to a herd mentality of investors jumping ship, can it happen again?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Monday_(1987)

No one really knows but the risk is there for sharp corrections with valuations at these levels specifically, leaving not much choice but for a seasoned investor to diversify.

Put another way, we get blinded to risk sometimes when we invest our own money with our own bias’s (like for example, “I’m more gifted than most”)but when we invest other people’s money, that’s when we see the true need to diversify and pay special attention to our own bias’s as ultimately it’s all about managing risk.

#83 Cassowaries anonymous on 10.21.21 at 12:16 am

Don’t I remember some clown spouting off about a housing crash? Where’d he get to?

#84 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:25 am

The MPs will be subject to Vaccination Pass before entering the Parliament.
Will affect quite a few Cons.
Pretty Machiavellian, Mr.Prime Minister.

#85 Dr V on 10.21.21 at 12:34 am

41 TVO

Did you just “wake up this morning?”

some info for you and everyone who may be interested.

https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1100100030291/1539617582343

#86 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:38 am

I hope that the new Mayor of Calgary will implement the progressive policies, that the Mayor of Vancouver had promised, but does not have the guts to implement.
Voted down a 52 dollar yearly fee to park on city streets.
“It will hurt the poor”, he said.
4 dollars a month?
People driving around in circles to find free parking, spent much more than that on gas.
Short sighted.

#87 Dr V on 10.21.21 at 12:47 am

43 Ponzie – earlier this year, I hit the reset button on the B trip odometer in my “ego-boost F150”. It was at the beginning of March.

Yesterday the B odo read 3540km. I get around 900km/tank so 4 tanks in over 7 months. Yes its a big tank, and I try to do multiple errands on an outing. Makes sense economically and environmentally.

Went to my Garmin account and checked the stats for “road cycling” since March 1. 4180km.

You see? You can actually have the best of both worlds.
I want to get a bike sticker that says “my other bike is an F150” but that wouldnt be true as I have a few other bikes.

#88 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:59 am

14 Planetgoofy on 10.20.21 at 4:03 pm
Inflations here.
Many Canadians report difficulty feeding their family: Poll
https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/many-canadians-report-difficulty-feeding-their-family-poll-1.1668894

This will continue and with the new green deal being pushed it is the perfect storm to push everything up in price.
———————
Are those the same Canadians, who allegedly live paycheck to paycheck, or are $200 away from bankruptcy?
Not in my blue collar neighbourhood.
2 cars in the driveway, one on the street.
Garage full of junk from China.
I know much of this is on credit, but they are far from being destitute.

#89 Paterfamilias on 10.21.21 at 1:00 am

# 41. TVO. ”I don’t think this will play out as such”. You might be right. Of course, you might be wrong. Think = opinion. You have a right to your opinion – that does not automatically make your opinion right (same applies to me, btw).

”If… claim is dubious”. If I rob a bank, I am subject to arrest and prosecution. Of course, if I do not rob a bank, then the consequences are subject to change. ”If” can turn out to cover a lot of ground. Having some passing familiarity with the judicial system, I hope no one is in a hurry for a final outcome.

#90 Faron on 10.21.21 at 2:26 am

#39 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 7:38 pm

We can also tell, just using logic, that at some point in the future the millennials will own it all, because everyone else will be dead.

:facepalm:

#91 NoName on 10.21.21 at 6:20 am

#86 Dr V on 10.21.21 at 12:47 am

Went to my Garmin account and checked the stats for “road cycling” since March 1. 4180km.

Pffft…

Went on my Garmin, Since beginning of the year i have 1.7M steps. Yes that is correct!

Sadly Iam steel morbidly obist…

#92 Another Deckchair on 10.21.21 at 7:30 am

Hey @44 Nonplused:

Hey Nonplused;

One will get tarred and feathered these days if you speak out that oil is going to be dead in a year or two. So, your new mayor is avoiding a world-shunning, and simply hoping to keep her job.

Recently the Globe and Mail had an article, with no author’s name attached. (from “the Editorial Board”)

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/editorials/article-this-isnt-the-first-energy-shock-of-the-green-era-its-the-last-energy/

Final paragraph: “Right now, in the fight between present and future, the clean energy alternatives are still comparative pipsqueaks, while fossil fuels are Muhammad Ali in his prime. It will take a massive, collective effort to change the outcome.”

Those in the know understand that just using less energy (from any source) is the path to saving this planet, but from what I can see, that is not anybody’s plan. This has all turned political, and chemistry/physics and math have no place in the debate.

#93 Do we have all the facts on 10.21.21 at 8:02 am

The British and Canadian legal systems consists of two distinct branches; Common law and Equity.

Very few Canadians are aware that in December 1867 the Senate and the House of Commons of the Dominion of Canada made the following promise in an address to Her Majesty Queen Victoria;

“That upon the transfer of the Territories in question to the Canadian government, the claims of the Indian tribes to compensation for lands required for the purposes of settlement will be considered and settled in conformity with the equitable principles which have uniformly governed the British Crown in its dealings with the aborigines.”

This address including the promise noted above was attached as Schedule ‘A’ to the Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territory Order and subsequently attached as an Appendix to the British North America Act enacted in June 1870.

The Victorian Treaties negotiated with First Nations in western Canada after 1870 were to be negotiated under Equity not under Common Law. First Nations agreed to share a legal interest in their traditional hunting grounds with the British Crown in Right of Canada in exchange for equitable compensation as promised in an address to the British Crown in 1867.

As each Victorian Treaty was negotiated with First Nations who held legal interests in their hunting grounds the Government of Canada was able to establish legal title to these hunting grounds under Common law. The legal title created under Common Law was the foundation of trillions of dollars of wealth generated for Canadian citizens and corporations since 1870.

The current issue quite simply is that the compensation provided to First Nations for their agreement to share legal interests in land with the British Crown in right of Canada after 1870 has not been equitable.

Common law, including a series of discriminatory Indian Acts, has been used to deprive Treaty based First Nations of the equitable compensation promised in 1870, a promise currently integrated within the Canadian Constitution.

The conflict between Equity and equitable compensation and Common Law has been going on for over 150 years and as a result the current population of Canada has lost sight of what was actually promised to First Nation members in western Canada as the Dominion of Canada was being created in 1867.

Time for a refresher course!

#94 Phylis on 10.21.21 at 8:08 am

#57 False Hood on 10.20.21 at 9:05 pm
Xxxxxxx
You seem to be up on the topic, how does this compare to our neighbours to the south and their southern neighbours?

#95 IHCTD9 on 10.21.21 at 8:17 am

#67 NOVA on 10.20.21 at 9:50 pm
Just finished watching NOVA on PBS.

An episode about insects as food in form of protein, perhaps as powder. Insects as food waste recyclers as well.

Potential looks to be amazing. Smart people are working on it.
_______

Nothing new there – just ask Bear Grylls. Except he eats bugs in the form of… bugs.

#96 Joseph R. on 10.21.21 at 8:21 am

#44 Nonplused

But now that we have her, we still have to try and determine her motives for saying something like that.

——————————————————–

Obviously, you don’t know much about Calgary. The City owns a power utility called ENMAX. 86% of it’s energy produced is through natural gas turbines, the rest through wind power.

The carbon tax will effect the price of natural gas, therefore utility costs. This is why the city wants ENMAX to find less carbon intensive source of power.

#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.21.21 at 8:32 am

@#91 @ Deckchair
“Final paragraph: “Right now, in the fight between present and future, the clean energy alternatives are still comparative pipsqueaks, while fossil fuels are Muhammad Ali in his prime. It will take a massive, collective effort to change the outcome.”

++++++

No.
It will take gas at $5.00 a liter.
Think it cant happen?
The Klimate Klowns will “make it so.”

One wonders what/who they will blame next as the planet continues to heat from 8 billion people farts in the New World Order after all the ICE vehicles are permanently banned and electric vehicles reign.

#98 Joseph R. on 10.21.21 at 8:41 am

Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:38 am
I hope that the new Mayor of Calgary will implement the progressive policies, that the Mayor of Vancouver had promised, but does not have the guts to implement.
Voted down a 52 dollar yearly fee to park on city streets.
“It will hurt the poor”, he said.
4 dollars a month?
People driving around in circles to find free parking, spent much more than that on gas.
Short sighted.

——————————————————————–

It will through modernizing the city’s power generation from ENMAX and make it mess reliant to Natural Gas and/or the use of carbon capture. City buses to be all hybrids. They are already using Fatty acids from the wastewater treatment plants to fuel the city buses (Calgary Transit).

#99 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.21.21 at 8:42 am

Can we cut as many old growth trees down with electric chainsaws or will the old growth already be gone?

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/climate-un-amazon-tipping-point/

#100 TVO on 10.21.21 at 8:43 am

#77 Barb

That’s why I called the treaties immoral.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

You said it Barb. Reading about these treaties, the terms, the negotiations process, it hardly sounds like an agreement of any sort. Here a tidbit about Treaty 3 for you, just a snippet. See how this reads to you…

>>>
Morris arrived at the North-West Angle (the area where the borders of present-day Manitoba, Ontario and Minnesota intersect) in September 1873, accompanied by a military escort and ready to negotiate a treaty. The Saulteaux delayed the meeting, initially asking for a change in location, which was denied. They then stated that they needed more time to discuss treaty terms. This request was granted.

#101 TVO on 10.21.21 at 8:46 am

#77 Barb

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Actually Barb…a little more from Treaty 3 for you…some stunning stuff here really. Note how “he will give them land!”…

>>>>

By 1 October, treaty talks resumed. Morris outlined the government’s terms:

I will give you lands for farms, and also reserves for your own use. … It may be a long time before the other lands are wanted, and in the meantime you will be permitted to fish and hunt over them. I will also establish schools whenever any band asks for them, so that your children may have the learning of the white man. … I will give you ten dollars per head of the population, and for every other year five dollars a-head. But to the chief men, not exceeding two to each band, we will give twenty dollars a year for ever. I will give to each of you this year a present of goods and provisions to take you home, and I am sure you will be satisfied.

After contemplating Morris’s offer for one day, the main spokesperson for the Saulteaux, Chief Ma-We-Do-Pe-Nais, presented his people’s terms. They demanded $50 a year for each chief, $20 for each council member and $10 for each band member. They also asked for a one-time cash payment of $15 for each band member. In addition, the Saulteaux requested clothing, fishing and farming tools and equipment, household items, food items and farm animals. Chief Ma-We-Do-Pe-Nais emphasized, however, that these goods and monies served as compensation for use of their land, not ownership. He told Morris and the commissioners, “All this is our property where you have come.”

Morris refused these demands, arguing that his initial offer was fair. The Saulteaux also remained unmoved. Chief Ma-We-Do-Pe-Nais stated: “I lay before you our opinions. Our hands are poor but our heads are rich, and it is riches that we ask so that we may be able to support our families as long as the sun rises and the water runs.” Chief Ma-We-Do-Pe-Nais was aware of how other Indigenous nations had had their land taken away from them by colonials for few concessions, and was therefore defensive.

#102 False Hood on 10.21.21 at 8:55 am

#93 Phylis

Turns out that the Canadian Natives are on a different legal ground than others.

All of Canada, save a section of southern Quebec exempted by the Royal Proclamation of 1763, is subject to Aboriginal title.

Perhaps this is why Canadian politicians have pushed for such an accepting immigration policy. It allows them to settle the lands further and push Natives into a smaller minority to undermine their what look to be legitimate legal claims.

#103 FIFO on 10.21.21 at 8:57 am

#90 NoName on 10.21.21 at 6:20 am
#86 Dr V on 10.21.21 at 12:47 am

Went to my Garmin account and checked the stats for “road cycling” since March 1. 4180km.

Pffft…

Went on my Garmin, Since beginning of the year i have 1.7M steps. Yes that is correct!

Sadly Iam steel morbidly obist…

It’s the input, not the output. Check those hidden sugars – they stick the damn stuff into EVERYTHING!

#104 Dharma Bum on 10.21.21 at 9:15 am

What’s all the fuss about?

So many people seem to be certain that continued improvements in technology are going to make everyone’s lives so much better in the future.
They blame the curmudgeonly boomers for the social ills of today.

I guess they don’t own mirrors.

Sure, just relax and enjoy the improved, leisurely lifestyle that’s coming for all the kids – due to “technological advancement”.

Keep believing that economics is irrelevant, and that utopian happiness is just around the corner for all.

Ignore the fact that technological improvement is exactly why there will be continued globalization, wide spread unemployment due to A.I., and the continued intensification of income and wealth disparity.

The 1 percenters will become the .1 percenters.

As technology improves, the ignorant masses will suffer. Only the highly educated, naturally intelligent, and inherently monied will thrive.

Think there’s a lot of dummies among us now? Wait 50 years and see what the general ignorance and lack of skill yields the average schmoe.

Idleness awaits.

Drudgery and grinding it out doesn’t necessarily imply hard physical labour. Low employment, boredom, lack of purpose, and the uselessness of being can wear on young people. Sitting back while technology takes on the repetitive but necessary tasks of day to day existence can do a number on one’s head.

Truck drivers, retail store clerks, baristas, taxi drivers, factory workers, cashiers, and the rest of the unskilled jobs that fill the time and pay the wages of the majority of people are going to disappear.

https://blog.careerbeacon.com/the-ten-most-popular-jobs-in-canada-right-now-are-all-available-right-here/#:~:text=The%20most%20commonly%20held%20job,the%20most%20popular%20occupation%20overall.

These people will become totally obsolete – due to the eagerly anticipated advancement in technology.

UBI, however, will allow them to barely survive and while away their minutes, hours, days, months, and years sitting around.

I said it before, and I’ll say it again – the economic boom of the 20th century led to lifestyle improvements for a few generations that were historically unprecedented.

It was a euphoric high that will never be recreated or recaptured in any of our lifetimes or our children’s lifetimes.

Unless, of course, you are a .1 percenter.

#105 TVO on 10.21.21 at 9:17 am

#55 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:50 pm

++++++++++++++++++++
Your argument makes sense for someone on LSD.
We are all here now and more are coming. To make it work we all need to have equal rights and benefits and privileges and we all have the responsibility of building a better country for future generations. No special rights or benefits or free lunch based on race or language or religion or gender or whom has been here longer than whom. That only causes strife and division. Equality for all is the only way to go forward. Anything else would be systemic racism.

++++++++++++++++++++

Yukon Elvis,

I hear what you’re saying – but the legal foundation is completely off the kilter in your thinking. How can you not see it?

Imagine this scenario: You sit across a table from a woman. You take out a gun and put it on the table. You say, you will take all she has. She will be yours. Conditions is you give her $5 and some clothing. She will exist at your pleasure. She will agree to this in your language, without any legal rights, or else. You invite a bunch of people over and tell them they can hang.

Now some time passes and you declare everyone can maybe be equal, but on your terms, because you own the place still. You make the rules and the laws.

This is basically what you are arguing.

I recall laughing at the 100 or so years of Canadian history taught in school here. In reference to other nations 1000s of years, it was a total joke. I can see now why those years of history the light is not being shined on. I’m starting to question all I see.

Why are Natives women being murdered? Specifically women? You know, women are creators of new Native lives…mighty inconvenience this is.

Why don’t Natives have water? This is a valid point. We can send a team anywhere in the world and get them water in a day, but Natives are living without water access in Canada? Seriously? In 2021? Isn’t it a human right in Canada? I guess those human rights are for appearances on paper only.

There is a lot wrong about how this country was made. Who is in charge. Who gets to say how things go.

In fact, the very fact that these Treaties are not being questioned in the highest courts is a fascinating point – as if the scrutiny of law would not allow these immoral and fraudulent contracts to stand if a spotlight was placed on them.

When you base a dream on a lie, on fraud, it never ends well. And Canada looks to be built on just that, unfortunately.

#106 chalkie on 10.21.21 at 9:23 am

Human Chemistry
Its funny how a downward market puts fear into 98% of all people, no one feels good about buying, thinking the market perhaps will go lower. Only the brave jumps in, borrow to the max and makes a good profit.
But somehow right now, everyone is brave and jumping in at these sky high prices, no fear-but willing to take that gamble.
For those 2% of people that have already taken the 40% profit, they don’t understand the other 98% of the way the general population analyzes investing.
There may be another 10% of profits left to gain, but for the most part, the real Brave has already pocketed the 30 to 40% gain and smiling, even if the stock markets retreat somewhat, the gains were real.
“Most people are saying”, the next time this happens, I will borrow to my maximum limit, “no worries, you again will get cold feet” and only the same brave group will really profit, hats off to these brave 2% of our smart people, how truly understands the economy and the Stock Markets & folks, they don’t even pay any financial advisor, its all intuition Human Chemistry do it yourselves, pay yourself first.

#107 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.21.21 at 9:23 am

@#92 Do we have all the fax

I’m sure that far, far superior legal minds have studied, debated, argued and summarized the last 150 years of Commonwealth Law than you.

Let me sum it up.
Enjoy the newest Holiday to reflect.
There’s no more money.

#108 crowdedelevatorfartz on 10.21.21 at 9:32 am

For all the brainiacs out there that dont believe in getting a vaccine.

BC population 5.17 million
BC 85% double vaxxed from 16 years old and up.
BC deaths from Covid : 2050

Alberta population 4.4 million
Alberta 77% double vaccinated ( how many in the past few weeks)
Alberta deaths 3000

https://vancouver.citynews.ca/2021/10/20/alberta-surpasses-covid-death-milestone/

BC has 700,000 more people and 1000 fewer deaths.

I guess the numbers speak for themselves….unless you believe…numbers lie.

#109 Is anybody home? on 10.21.21 at 10:09 am

DELETED (Anti-vax)

#110 BoomerKid on 10.21.21 at 10:20 am

@VicPaul ” My Boomer Dad – graduated at 17 in ’62. Married at 18 (with first born brother), second son (me) at 19″

So you and your brother are Boomer children of a Boomer dad.

#111 Data Analyst on 10.21.21 at 10:21 am

#107 crowdedelevatorfartz

Well, you’ve qualified it, but have you quantified it?

BC has milder weather. People go out more. Not as overweight perhaps? Not as focused on pickup trucks and steaks, more on hiking, biking, and healthy diet?

Fresher air in BC vs Alberta with all that Oil industry? Means, better lungs, healthier lungs?

Fewer chipped diesel pickup trucks polluting the air with NO2?

Look, I’m not saying your data point is wrong by any means. I’m just saying that it is easy to pull one data point and not account for all the contributing factors and variables.

People don’t understand that science and data isn’t black and white. Analysis is needed and conclusions as clear as you draw are illusive.

#112 IHCTD9 on 10.21.21 at 10:23 am

#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

Ok sure… piece of cake!

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/calgarys-new-mayor-says-the-city-needs-to-move-past-oil-and-gas
____

Looks like she’s off to a great start LOL!

It’s starting to get hard listening to this stuff. She isn’t going to do a thing, and no one’s moving “past oil”, including Gondek.

Maybe her contract says she’s getting paid by the word.

#113 Sheesh on 10.21.21 at 10:25 am

#104 TVO on 10.21.21 at 9:17 am

Your naivety is astounding. Both about human history here and around the world, and about the corruption that exists on and off reserve that prevents things like adequate housing and water from happening.
Are you aware that many of the homeless indigenous population have been banned from their own reservations?
Do you know the history of interactions between the various tribes before white people showed up? They were not a homogenous group.
More money is spent per capita on the indigenous population, and yet these problems persist. To go on about the treaties is a rather simplistic view on the situation.

#114 Not Fooled on 10.21.21 at 10:46 am

#104 TVO on 10.21.21 at 9:17 am

“Why are Natives women being murdered? Specifically women? You know, women are creators of new Native lives…mighty inconvenience this is”

************

Indigenous women, like all women, are mostly killed by their current or ex-partners. So Indigenous women, who suffer 3.5X more violence on reserve than women who live elsewhere, are killed predominantly by Indigenous men.

Most stranger murders of women are related to street prostitution, amongst which Indigenous women are sadly over-represented. Maybe focus on the men who use prostitutes, many of whom you’ll be shocked to discover are not white.

More Indigenous fetuses are aborted each year than Indigenous women are murdered. Who’s genociding who?

#115 Do we have all the facts on 10.21.21 at 10:47 am

#106 Crowded

All I was pointing out was that the creation of legal title to all land covered by the Rupert’s Land and North-Western Territories Order required the offer of equitable compensation to First Nation members. The Supreme Court of Canada has already informed the Government of Canada that they have a legal obligation under equity to recognize current claims to aboriginal title.

No need to comment on my qualifications to acknowledge what the Canadian Constitution promised in 1867 or how the Supreme Court of Canada interpreted the obligation to compensate existing First Nation members for their interest in aboriginal title.

The Specific Claims process exists because Equity continues to exist under Canadian law. Your bitterness over the resolution of legal obligations to First Nation members established in 1867 is telling.

Google is not the best place to get a balanced perspective on the legal rights of First Nation members in Canada.

#116 Dragonfly 58 on 10.21.21 at 10:52 am

TVO, not trying to pick a fight here. But on your example of water , do you realize many non- native Canadians also are living with Ag. chemical contaminated well water ? A very large part of the Fraser Valley; right next door to Vancouver proper, has low quality well water.
Homeowners have no choice but to install very expensive home water treatment systems, 100% on their own dime. This is the case in many parts of rural Canada , not just Native homes. And no non native homeowner expects anyone to pay but themselves.

#117 Quintilian on 10.21.21 at 10:52 am

#103 Dharma Bum

“It was a euphoric high that will never be recreated or recaptured in any of our lifetimes or our children’s lifetimes.”

You make Malthus seem like a Pollyanna.

The dreary picture you paint of the future is an expression of your disorganized thinking.

Man moves forward and becomes that of which he thinks about. Get out from under that cloud of misery.

#118 earthboundmisfit on 10.21.21 at 10:56 am

#60 Flip it

Canada may not have to worry about weak leadership for too much longer. We may get strong leadership in not to distant future.

As in … Mark the Carney? Ms. Freespender? Be careful what you wish for.

#119 Dr V on 10.21.21 at 11:04 am

90 No name – good work on the 1.7M steps!

My wife counts steps. I dont but my road bikes have a cadence sensor. I have calculated my pedal revolutions
over that time period to be 0.75M with each revolution
comprising a left-right action so 1.5M pedal pushes.

I can also add off-road cycling (no sensor). Less time overall and a slower cadence due to the sustained climbs, and more coasting. So maybe another 0.5M pedal pushes.

Also some walks and hikes, but I currently dont bother
recording these, but may add them again. I prefer hikes with minor obstacles like rocks and roots, so you have to change your gait. Works balance, ankles, knees and hips better than just walking the flats, and better all-
round than just pedaling.

And of course the everyday steps we take. Many people count these, but as they are part of each day, this doesnt add anything to the amount of activity. From what others have told me, you can hit 5-10000 steps just doing this.

#120 yvr_lurker on 10.21.21 at 11:06 am

Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:38 am
I hope that the new Mayor of Calgary will implement the progressive policies, that the Mayor of Vancouver had promised, but does not have the guts to implement.
Voted down a 52 dollar yearly fee to park on city streets.
“It will hurt the poor”, he said.
4 dollars a month?
People driving around in circles to find free parking, spent much more than that on gas.
Short sighted.
—–

The policy was to be “market rates” (whatever the &%&%%& that means) in a very short time… 450.00 per month parking on a street with no congestion…. overnight visitor fees would increase exponentially from the $3.00 per day (how about $10.00) per night. Hired goons in yellow from the city wandering around giving 100.00 tickets per infraction.

Am totally opposed as well as everyone I know in my neighbourhood. Our family is greener than ever before; biking to work, 8000Km per year for the car only (but no laneway) and we like relatives visiting. Next up will be mobility pricing, charging 8.00 to drive through downtown (no stops) to go up x-country skiing or hiking … give your head a shake…

The ones who voted for this on council have to go. I never thought I’d see the day where I will be a foot soldier for the NPA and for Ken Sim for mayor. Voted Kennedy last time and for the greens, but never ever again. Go look downtown at the anarchy all down Granville street and the decay over the past 4 years… worst mayor the city has ever had.

#121 Yukon Elvis on 10.21.21 at 11:10 am

#104 TVO on 10.21.21 at 9:17 am
#55 Yukon Elvis on 10.20.21 at 8:50 pm

++++++++++++++++++++
Your argument makes sense for someone on LSD.
We are all here now and more are coming. To make it work we all need to have equal rights and benefits and privileges and we all have the responsibility of building a better country for future generations. No special rights or benefits or free lunch based on race or language or religion or gender or whom has been here longer than whom. That only causes strife and division. Equality for all is the only way to go forward. Anything else would be systemic racism.

++++++++++++++++++++

Yukon Elvis,

I hear what you’re saying – but the legal foundation is completely off the kilter in your thinking. How can you not see it?

Imagine this scenario: You sit across a table from a woman. You take out a gun and put it on the table. You say, you will take all she has. She will be yours. Conditions is you give her $5 and some clothing. She will exist at your pleasure. She will agree to this in your language, without any legal rights, or else. You invite a bunch of people over and tell them they can hang.

Now some time passes and you declare everyone can maybe be equal, but on your terms, because you own the place still. You make the rules and the laws.

This is basically what you are arguing.

I recall laughing at the 100 or so years of Canadian history taught in school here. In reference to other nations 1000s of years, it was a total joke. I can see now why those years of history the light is not being shined on. I’m starting to question all I see.

Why are Natives women being murdered? Specifically women? You know, women are creators of new Native lives…mighty inconvenience this is.

Why don’t Natives have water? This is a valid point. We can send a team anywhere in the world and get them water in a day, but Natives are living without water access in Canada? Seriously? In 2021? Isn’t it a human right in Canada? I guess those human rights are for appearances on paper only.

There is a lot wrong about how this country was made. Who is in charge. Who gets to say how things go.

In fact, the very fact that these Treaties are not being questioned in the highest courts is a fascinating point – as if the scrutiny of law would not allow these immoral and fraudulent contracts to stand if a spotlight was placed on them.

When you base a dream on a lie, on fraud, it never ends well. And Canada looks to be built on just that, unfortunately.
++++++++++++++++
Have fun staggering down the endless rabbit hole of systemic racism. Consider trying to build a country in which all people have equal rights and benefits and responsibilities regardless of race or language or country of origin.

#122 Shawn Allen on 10.21.21 at 11:26 am

Your Mission is Clear

#103 Dharma Bum on 10.21.21 at 9:15 am doomed:

It was a euphoric high that will never be recreated or recaptured in any of our lifetimes or our children’s lifetimes.

Unless, of course, you are a .1 percenter.

*******************************
Your mission is clear then, get on it.

#123 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 11:41 am

#97 Joseph R. on 10.21.21 at 8:41 am
Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:38 am
I hope that the new Mayor of Calgary will implement the progressive policies, that the Mayor of Vancouver had promised, but does not have the guts to implement.
Voted down a 52 dollar yearly fee to park on city streets.
“It will hurt the poor”, he said.
4 dollars a month?
People driving around in circles to find free parking, spent much more than that on gas.
Short sighted.

——————————————————————–

It will through modernizing the city’s power generation from ENMAX and make it mess reliant to Natural Gas and/or the use of carbon capture. City buses to be all hybrids. They are already using Fatty acids from the wastewater treatment plants to fuel the city buses (Calgary Transit).
——————-
Thanks for the information.
Sometimes, innovation comes from unexpected places.
Pollution and climate change are real, we all need to do our part, even if it seems insignificant.
As for China: because your neighbour burns his garbage in his yard, does not mean you should too.
Your freedom to pollute does not supersede my freedom to breath fresh and clean air and water.

#124 Philco on 10.21.21 at 11:58 am

#75 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:27 pm
———————
And that my friends is also why Socks and Biden love immigration or even jumping the fence is A ok.
Its very easy to manipulate, legislate and impliment new controls, laws and taxes. And your getting a boat full of all of them. Forgive the pun.
The newbies take it all sitting down.

#125 Faron on 10.21.21 at 12:01 pm

Miners really enjoying the slowing industrial output in the US, the overall slowdown in Chinese construction and a DXY that just. wont. die. XBM still up since mid August. Individual names… not so much.

#126 Faron on 10.21.21 at 12:08 pm

#72 BillyBob on 10.20.21 at 10:06 pm

Nuclear is theone of the short-term futuresolutions.

The Czech Republic doesn’t have a sunny and windy Alberta and Saskatchewan and is densely populated, so good on them for going nuclear. But, each country needs to take the path that makes sense for them. Building out the nuclear plants in Canada needs to happen ASAP but, until it does, wind and solar are off the shelf solutions to make headway until large nuclear generating plants can get online.

Pushing absolutist, universal solutions isn’t helpful unless they are recognized as such.

#127 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:12 pm

#123 Philco on 10.21.21 at 11:58 am
#75 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:27 pm
———————
And that my friends is also why Socks and Biden love immigration or even jumping the fence is A ok.
Its very easy to manipulate, legislate and impliment new controls, laws and taxes. And your getting a boat full of all of them. Forgive the pun.
The newbies take it all sitting down.
———————-
In what century do you live?
All the new immigrants in my blue collar neighborhood are well educated, fairly well off and know and stand up for their rights.

#128 Proud CERBian on 10.21.21 at 12:14 pm

Call your MP – we must SAVE OUR NATION!

All Hail CERBia!

#129 KLNR on 10.21.21 at 12:25 pm

@#36 The Republic of Oilbertastan – no more on 10.20.21 at 7:18 pm
Calgary’s new mayor declares a climate emergency…. and says it’s time to just move past oil…

It certainly is.

#130 IHCTD9 on 10.21.21 at 12:47 pm

#120 Yukon Elvis on 10.21.21 at 11:10 am

Have fun staggering down the endless rabbit hole of systemic racism. Consider trying to build a country in which all people have equal rights and benefits and responsibilities regardless of race or language or country of origin.
____

Aye, following this stuff means seeing the narrative take more rights and lefts than a Tyson/Lewis bout. There is an article on the CBC right now about land acknowledgement for indigenous Canadians. The authors literally spell out how we are to think, speak, and act.

Sorry, but somewhere along the line my interest slipped away…

Trudeau has steered Canada right into this quagmire, even though he must know it’s just throwing gas on a fire that could never have been extinguished anyway. I mean, name one woke issue ever that has been solved to the satisfaction of all parties? Never happened, never will. Activists aren’t here to solve problems, they’re here to bitch about them.

#131 IHCTD9 on 10.21.21 at 12:52 pm

#126 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:12 pm
#123 Philco on 10.21.21 at 11:58 am
#75 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:27 pm
———————
And that my friends is also why Socks and Biden love immigration or even jumping the fence is A ok.
Its very easy to manipulate, legislate and impliment new controls, laws and taxes. And your getting a boat full of all of them. Forgive the pun.
The newbies take it all sitting down.
———————-
In what century do you live?
All the new immigrants in my blue collar neighborhood are well educated, fairly well off and know and stand up for their rights
___

He must live on my planet because over here the new immigrants work 80-90 hrs per week doing the jobs nobody else wants to do, making crap wages, and have absolutely no idea what their rights are.

#132 Damifino on 10.21.21 at 1:08 pm

#128 KLNR

You wouldn’t care much for the world Jyoti Gondek would have you living in, if it were actually in her control. Fortunately she’s only the mayor of a middle-sized city and has no control over world energy policy. She should get cracking on commercial vacancy rates.

The world will always demand cheap, abundant, reliable energy sources. Countries with less integrity than Canada will step up to provide them if we don’t.

The supply chain issues of today will seem like a joke compared to a world attempting to generate industrial level heat with wind turbines and solar panels.

It’s a profound fantasy. You might as well hope to run your kitchen stove on a handful of Duracell double A’s. Mayor Gondek is simply naive, like those who elected her.

#133 Donnie on 10.21.21 at 1:12 pm

Maybe government can issue a covid inflation pass. You can pay the prices before covid mess happened. I hope you like your liberalism, it is the real threat not covid. Pretty soon you will not be able to do anything because you Canadian dollars will be infected by Tredeaunomics, Freelandnomics, Morneaunomics. Canada is a communist country now.

#134 westcdn on 10.21.21 at 1:29 pm

I have an interest into indigenous history. No there were not heroes and died in droves due to disease introduced by Europeans. The West was won by just walking in from a depopulated area. BC natives were not helped by living in lodges.

The war of 1812, I gained most of my information from Pierre Burton – a great Canadian author, maybe biased but I not found any evidences to refute him. Canada lost great men – Tecumseh and Brock. They formed a relationship that saved Canada as a nation – for better or worse.

As for the indigenous, they got screwed. Think Rupert’s Land as the start. When they signed the treaties they were starving to death. The buffalo were gone and they know how to farm. https://allthatsinteresting.com/buffalo-slaughter

I still will share a foxhole.

My Metis grandfather was given 160 acres to farm as part of Treaty 7. He gave up his “benefits” and got scrubland after the best land was sold to European settlers in 1905. The kids and he made it work. It was not easy.

The land in Saskatchewan was sold by lottery ticket – ingenious excluded. One guy got ticket number 1. The guy next to him I will give you my ticket and $10 which was considerable back then. Deal done

My mother missed residential schools. But she had to endure a horse covered wagon trip with a potbellied stove during the winter. Days were cancelled when it too cold for the horses. Never mind the goose that would attack her when she got home.

However, teachers were hard to recruit. The farmers were poor so they had to offer free housing and food plus firewood which is not easy in the southern prairies. An apple on the desk was common.

#135 KLNR on 10.21.21 at 1:32 pm

@#126 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:12 pm
#123 Philco on 10.21.21 at 11:58 am
#75 Nonplused on 10.20.21 at 10:27 pm
———————
And that my friends is also why Socks and Biden love immigration or even jumping the fence is A ok.
Its very easy to manipulate, legislate and impliment new controls, laws and taxes. And your getting a boat full of all of them. Forgive the pun.
The newbies take it all sitting down.
———————-
In what century do you live?
All the new immigrants in my blue collar neighborhood are well educated, fairly well off and know and stand up for their rights.

same here in my part of Ontario

#136 Paterfamilias on 10.21.21 at 1:37 pm

# 115. Dragonfly 58. Not looking to pick a fight here, either. You point out, correctly, that a non-indigenous person is expected and required to install sytems at personal expense. An indigenous person living on First Nations Land (used to be called a ‘reserve’), is dependent upon someone, appointed by government, controlling all funds, to see the job gets done. It seems to have happened (a lot), that a huge number of ‘dimes’ will be spent – without the indigenous person in our example seeing any improvement, in water quality for example.

I presume once you have spent the money allocated to install a water system, you actually have good water.

When the people supposedly responsible for overseeing improvements to life on First Nations Lands are confronted with ‘inconvenient truths’, a stock response is ‘Don’t accuse us of doing nothing for ”them”, look how much money we spend – our budget(s) are huge ! Thanks !’

#137 Gravy Train on 10.21.21 at 2:05 pm

#131 Damifino on 10.21.21 at 1:08 pm
“[…] You might as well hope to run your kitchen stove on a handful of Duracell double A’s. […]” Your comment is laughably stupid. Almost half (48%) of my household energy needs (including my kitchen stove) are met by my solar panels. (If I lived close to the equator, I could be completely off-grid and charge my car as well.)

Sara, I just couldn’t resist getting into the fray. I usually just try to ignore these idiots. :)

#138 Philco on 10.21.21 at 2:38 pm

#126 Ponzius Pilatus on 10.21.21 at 12:12 pm
—————–
Im married to one that means Im married to a few more.
They do and many others don’t and I know a pile more of them also.
Some of the nisest pasive people I do know. Passive a nieve as hell they believe CNN my wife doesnt.
Then when ya get down to the Mexican USA boarder where I was recently.
Piles of illegals.
Your special i guess all your friends upper crust.
Or super small scope Ponzo

#139 Philco on 10.21.21 at 2:43 pm

#130 IHCTD9 on 10.21.21 at 12:52 pm
—————-
Indeed!
The wives got 6 brothers and all engineers from Asia… Great peeps and then theres a whole pile of others I know….lovem but clueless and passive.
Conclusion Ponzo has no scope.

#140 Philco on 10.21.21 at 2:49 pm

#130 IHCTD9

If ya want to hear some serious Sock bashing…. get my brother inlaws in a room. Bloody HILARIOUS!!

#141 Philco on 10.21.21 at 2:53 pm

Hey Ponzo
I know a lawyer that works for the UN. Shes a Flip….she drank the coolaide my wife cant even stand to talk to her.
Lovely lady other then that.
Open minds people open minds we all need to try and get along.

#142 Immigrant man on 10.21.21 at 3:03 pm

#134 KLNR on 10.21.21 at 1:32 pm
same here in my part of Ontario
——

Canada has one of the most complicated immigration systems in the world. Born-in-Canadians usually have no idea. And why should they?

Anyways, you get points for education, job credentials, $ in the bank, English/French level and your age (wrinkles, forget about it). If you make enough points above a cutoff level in a seasonal “draft” you get invited for permanent residency (can’t vote, but can live/work/study). Canada welcomes about 350k per annum of those. After 3 years you can apply for citizenship (its a breeze if you haven’t murdered anyone).
There is also a work visa (not the same). The first hurdle is you have to have a job contract. The other thresholds are level of English/education/comparable work experience and importantly “ties to home country” (we don’t want you to overstay here, show us lots of property/work/family back home). There is also “seasonal work” like on the farm that has much lower English/educational requirements, but as far as I can tell those outfits are run by ethnic mafia so you have to be “in the know” to come through that program since you need an invitation from employer to apply.
Then there is the study visa. Can’t work (unless on campus + regional exceptions). Needs certain certified level of Eng/Fr + money in the bank to pay international student fees (x2 to x3 times what locals pay for Uni/College).
Then there is the “family sponsorship” (for permanent residents and citizen). You can invite your spouse/kids to live here with you in Canada (yep, its a process). Usually this goes pretty smooth, but I have heard of people waiting years to reunite. For parents – it’s a lottery. Put in your ticket and if you are lucky you can bring mom to live in Canada (“bank of mom”, please, you guys are so lucky here). Chances of winning are slightly better than 649. 20k parents per year quota and Dog knows how many hundreds of thousands of applicants.
Then there is the marriage fraud. Oh yes, not only can you import a wife from Asia or Eastern Europe you can also make some dough helping ppl come over here. Back in the early 2000s the going rate was ~15k USD, not sure what the current prices are. This goes under family reunification.
Of course there is also the regular visitors visa. It is still a pile of paperwork. And I mean a pile. Some of the people stay here illegally hoping they can get naturalized somehow after the years.
Then there is refuges and asylum seekers. From my limited info: we don’t always get the people most in need/danger, but people who are most able to navigate the system.
There is probably more. And all of this feeds a massive booming immigration consultancy/lawyer business.

So no wonder the immigrants in your part of Ontario are educated. You have to hustle if you want to come over here.