The ethic

Years ago, between periods of insanity when I joined Parliament to save Canada (it didn’t work) I was the talking head financial-news dude on CTV. That’s when people watching TV cared about business stuff. (They go to TikTok now.)

While doing the television thing I wrote a few books and started accepting speaking gigs. Soon that was a full-time pursuit taking me coast-to-coast, making it impossible to be in the studio every night. So I quit the network and started my own television production company.

We built out a studio in a Bay Street tower and eventually turned out a dozen weekly series, including one on real estate, plus a dog show (of course) and ‘Investment Television” which ran for years on Global. The business model was simple – back when TV was still a viable medium. I bought big chunks of network airtime, created content, then we flogged the commercial spots to companies interested in reaching that demographic. It was actually a lot of fun. And I even sold a hunk of the outfit to a covetous mutual fund.

The staff included editors, camera guys, reporters, writers, admin and sales folks. One day a young woman showed up with TV experience back home (Israel) and asked for a job. But we were tapped out. “I will work for nothing,” she said. That caught my attention. And so she got a desk and went on air. Six months later she was on salary. Soon she was hosting one of the shows. Eventually I sold the operation, lost my mind again, and was elected.

That woman moved on to become a senior reporter on a big-city station. Then she went national on network prime time. All because she’d asked for nothing but a chance to prove herself.

Moral: the work ethic matters. But is it now slipping away?

Covid’s slimy hands are all over this recalibration of society. It came at a unique moment – as the largest cohort (Millennials) was entering those years when people hardline a career yet crave nesting and family. There’s always been a tension. But the pandemic seems to have tipped the scales. For example, now employers try to attract people not with the lure of compensation, fulfilment and advancement, but with personal time off, remote work and offices that are inclusive. Diverse. Collaborative. Empathetic. Many hugs.

The virus sent five million people home to work in their jammies and sweats, yet collect full wages. That threw into question the entire logic of commuting, conforming, being supervised, judged, measured or merely having the discipline to show up on time. WFH led people to believe the workplace was dead so they could move to Armpit, get chickens, do personal errands at will and still make a city income. Governments stepped up to take the edge off things with massive cash transfers to individual bank accounts, enhanced child care money and – as this election is showing – a crop of politicians who ask nothing but give everything. We’ve all learned to eschew responsibility today by borrowing from the unseen future. Way easier.

This week more evidence where we’re headed. A new survey has found that – for the first time ever – Canadians say “salary and benefits” are not the primary reason for taking a job. Instead the overriding goal is work-life balance. This preference has surfaced out of the pandemic, and almost doubles among those who work remotely, distant from the eyes of any supervisor or bothersome colleagues. “The data shows there has been a significant shift in what working Canadians value within their current workplace,” says ADP Canada.

The company also found a mess of people changed jobs during Covid, with many more planning to jump. The three main reasons: personal life changes, wanting to work less and stress. “This data draws a clear picture of what working Canadians are looking for, and what workplaces should be prioritizing as we move forward,” adds the company. “Work and life are not independent entities fighting for a 50/50 balance. Companies need to acknowledge work and life are intertwined with one affecting the other.”

Regular addicts will have seen this sentiment laced through comments in the steerage section. It seems nobody wants to congregate with others in a workplace anymore. Or to be judged. Or wear pants, unless absolutely necessary. After 18 months of a public health crisis, many have decided that doing the laundry whenever they want is more important than a raise and a promotion. This has also led to a surge of interest in the FIRE movement, with a warren of self-help web sites spelling out how 30-year-olds can retire comfortably at 40. So they can find themselves.

Suddenly a whole gen thinks everything just changed. Workplaces are tyranny. Careers are gone. The gig economy’s here and employees should get paid for being smart, not being seen. Zooming, not commuting. Experiences over money. Personal time is paramount and YOLO. They believe the virus accelerated change. There is no retreat. It’s different this time.

And, by the way, nobody would work for nothing now. It might even be illegal. Figures.

About the picture: “Here are our two rescue litter mates, Reese and Aero,” writs Charlie. “They are  9-year-olds who enjoy boating and cottaging.  Part Chocolate Lab and Australian Shepard, and we ended up with one of each. Keep up the great work on the blog  you are an inspiration to many! Feel free to use the pic on your blog as you see fit.”

224 comments ↓

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 2:00 pm

If work from Home in your jammies doesnt work out…..there’s always the NDP who will “tax the super rich”

And when the “super rich” pack their bags and leave…. guess who gets taxed next?

#2 none on 09.15.21 at 2:05 pm

Nothing about the 4.1?

#3 Shakabra on 09.15.21 at 2:09 pm

DELETED

#4 SoggyShorts on 09.15.21 at 2:10 pm

I’m so glad I cashed out. Even pre-pandemic it was becoming a nightmare to staff no matter what was offered. Getting someone to work a few hours of overtime (at 2x) was like pulling teeth. Forget about anyone coming in on the weekend (for 2x + gift card)

“Just hire more people” doesn’t work for a small business because the dips between spikes of how busy you are mean either layoffs or cut hours which also make people leave. Plus every employee means a full set of equipment/vehicle/training etc.

I honestly think that despite paying more than double (4x on a Saturday) I would have struggled to compete with CERB. I guarantee no one I hired was on the path to FIRE despite my early offers to mentor in it.

So here I am retired at 40, and they will work until they die, but at least they are never late for dinner?

#5 Prince Polo on 09.15.21 at 2:12 pm

I am willing to bring the delete hammer down on this steerage section for free…nyuk, nyuk, nyuk.

#6 WhereToNow on 09.15.21 at 2:14 pm

Canada is sinking underwater by following trudeau’s liberal government. First he promotes the population to be a bunch of marijuana smoking , non-working lazy munchkins, then these ones are all too lazy to work so he starts paying them to NOT WORK. We have a serious problem here folks. Wake up and support a resurgence of Canada via the Conservative Government. VOTE FOR A BETTER GOVERNMENT TODAY

#7 Boomer on 09.15.21 at 2:21 pm

Kids these days I tell ya.

Ever consider your work ethic is and was rare Garth? Maybe that individual was also rare? Maybe for most people, work involved clocking in and out on a regular basis with a steady job they knew they had for life with a union to back them up?

Kids these days… they have shit paying jobs, wages that have not increased in forty years, dead and dying unions, global competition for talent, ever-increasing unaffordability, no chance of building a life together with a spouse in a home that they own together.

Kids these days… imagine, wanting to be able to feed their family and see them once in a while too. Lazy bastards, should just start a TV empire like everyone else in my generation did.

My example was of a young person willing to sacrifice for career advancement. No empire involved. And she made it. But feel free to remain a victim. Like I said, it’s easier. – Garth

#8 Jack Sparrow on 09.15.21 at 2:26 pm

Garth 2021: There will never again be a gold standard. Thank goodness. – Garth

Jack Sparrow of Jack Sparrow Investments here, a subsidiary of Pirates of the Caribbean Investments.

Just visiting to check on the performance of my portfolio over the past 300 years.

Can someone tell me please how my chest of gold treasure from 1720 has held up in value?

Did inflation do anything to me except add many many…oh so many zeros to my wealth?

Does my treasure chest of gold still hold purchasing power anywhere and everywhere?

Can I buy myself an island with ease with parking for at least two pirate ships with a few handfuls of this stuff?

Wonder what will happen to all the crypto and electronic currencies of countries when the upcoming giant solar flare wipes out the earth’s power grid and data networks.
You kids haven’t lived through the one in 1859. Back up your family photos and videos on BluRay optical media discs ASAP!

…that last part is advice I’m just passing on. To me BluRay is a blue colour fish.

#9 My Body My Choice on 09.15.21 at 2:33 pm

“The Scientific Trajectory:

We are creating a new society. Not a changed society. Not an extended, larger-than-life version of our present society. But a new society.

This simple premise has not yet begun to tincture our consciousness. Yet unless we understand this, we shall destroy ourselves in trying to cope with tomorrow.

A revolution shatters institutions and power relationships … police stand aside in ghettos as ancient property laws are openly violated, sexual standards are overthrown, great cities are paralyzed by strikes, power failures, riots … financial and political leaders tremble – not out of fear that communist (or capitalist) revolutionaries will oust them, but that the entire system is somehow flying out of control.

These are indisputable signs of a sick social structure … we are simultaneously experiencing a youth revolution, a racial revolution, a colonial revolution, an economic revolution and the most rapid and deep-going technological revolution in history.”

Future Shock, Alvin Toffler, 1970

Fifty-one years later, still bunk. Until human nature changes, human society will not. – Garth

#10 Eco Capitalist on 09.15.21 at 2:34 pm

If you can’t win, why play? There are now two cohorts (Millennial, Gen Z) that see little to no benefit to playing by the rules of the current game. They will exert pressure to change the game until they have enough positions of power to change it themselves.

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Well guess what? It’s broke.

#11 Dave on 09.15.21 at 2:36 pm

Canada’s economy runs on real estate. Federal, provincial and municipal….they live and breath because of real estate.

Government can not allow Prices to drop…the economy would collapse. Sure the will be interest rate increase a year but minor increases. To compensate…new government policies to keep prices moving higher.

There will be NO major correction…small blips followed by prices increases

#12 By George, you've got it! on 09.15.21 at 2:36 pm

#202 Quintilian on 09.15.21 at 1:23 pm

“Please, outline the plan, now that you’ve identified the problem.”

Let it run its course. The addicts will have to hit bottom.
It won’t be an orderly check in at the rehabilitation center.

Similarly, you cannot pull away the gambler from the table while she is winning.

——————–

Same solution for smokers? Let them die?

Same solution for opioid addicts? Let them O.D.?

Same solution for polluting corporations? Let them pollute until we’re extinct?

Sounds like a plan a Drama Teacher would propose.

#13 [email protected] on 09.15.21 at 2:39 pm

Now balance this against your mantra of time being our most precious commodity.

I enjoy all the time I spend working. If you don’t, get another occupation. – Garth

#14 Privilege on 09.15.21 at 2:40 pm

My favourite are the Mills complaining about the privilege of the boomers from their Kitsilano apartment with the 65 inch OLED TV and $4,500 gaming computer.

They should travel to South East Asia or Africa sometime.

#15 Grandv!ew on 09.15.21 at 2:40 pm

The results of the casual search of internet for the term: “work life balance”

DO WE NEED HELP !

A 2014 French labour agreement between unions and employers ensured that around 250,000 French consultants voluntarily ensured they could not be overworked. And this agreement made international headlines because it described out-of-office handheld communications as work. That is, French union representatives equate checking business emails on a smartphone with working!

Now, consider that Harvard researchers have suggested that North American managers, who ought to work 45 hours a week at most, actually work 88 hours, if emailing on handheld devices is factored in.

Interestingly, the Germans have gone a step further than France. Nationwide, Germany mandated that managers cannot call or email employees outside business hours, except in emergencies. In a world where many employees seem unwilling to take the initiative on work-life balance, German law-makers took the initiative.

At the moment, there are no clear plans for Canada’s government to emulate its European counterparts. But there are numerous organizations and employers calling for Canadians to reconsider work-life balance.

https://www.theheadhunters.ca/blog/work-life-balance/

#16 Millennial 1%er on 09.15.21 at 2:41 pm

By switching to working remotely (before covid started), I was able to triple my total compensation (and I was already right past six figures)

Many people who work from home actually do productive valuable work
Deal with it

#17 Boomer on 09.15.21 at 2:42 pm

> My example was of a young person willing to sacrifice for career advancement. No empire involved. And she made it. But feel free to remain a victim. Like I said, it’s easier. – Garth

I also addressed the issue of the model citizen you employed. Just because 1% rise to the top, doesn’t mean that is exemplary of a generational trends. Your generation would want work life balance if they were as blocked out of basic life stepping stones as this generation is. Boomers are THE most selfish and entitled generation, bar none.

They didn’t all “get after it” like you or your protege did. You are guilty of taking an anecdote and blowing it out of proportion.

And I am not a victim, by the way. I am doing quite well for myself. But my eyes are open to the real challenges facing young people today that will not be resolved by taking an unpaid internship.

#18 Vic on 09.15.21 at 2:42 pm

However the Liberals want to address these issues, looks like they will get the chance.

Polls still creeping up for the Libs everywhere.

And today, an unprecedented change.

Two (2!) NDP candidates dropped out, too late to be replaced.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/federal-election-2021/two-ndp-candidates-resign-after-social-media-posts-cause-backlash-1.5586163

This will turn those ridings over to the Libs, plus likely a few more as voters grow NDP-hesitant

Liberals now – 95% chance of victory

Liberals now – 75% chance majority

#19 Islandgirl on 09.15.21 at 2:47 pm

Everywhere I turn I see signs announcing staff shortages and to please be patient while the few employees left are scrambling to serve customers. And then on the next day I see postings on Facebook of people trying to find work without luck. Not sure what the disconnect is.

#20 Madcat on 09.15.21 at 2:50 pm

Good luck with the whole ‘work life balance’ when you have a mountain of debt… This survey is garbage… The answers given were based in lala land not reality… Back to work couch potatoes LOL!

#21 My Body My Choice on 09.15.21 at 2:51 pm

“Fifty-one years later, still bunk. Until human nature changes, human society will not. – Garth”

Change is being forced upon us in an attempt to change our human nature.

#22 enthalpy on 09.15.21 at 2:53 pm

but aren’t the top concerns global climate and “reconciliation “???

* roll eyes*

#23 My Body My Choice on 09.15.21 at 2:54 pm

On a different subject …

If the Conservatives win, the Canadian oil and gas producers should skyrocket … to the moon! (SU,CVE, ENB,PPL).

#24 Chris on 09.15.21 at 3:02 pm

“Exposure” doesn’t pay the bills. In your example, it worked out for the woman. But let’s be realistic, people should be paid for their time. Many aren’t in a financial situation to work for free to prove themselves. Also, some people/companies will take advantage of free labour and never turn it into a paid role.

It’s basically modern day slavery that is justified as experience or exposure.

#25 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 3:03 pm

@#7 Boomer blamer
“Kids these days… they have shit paying jobs, wages that have not increased in forty years, dead and dying unions..”

+++
Shit paying jobs?

The union workers I hire make $41/hr

ANY apprentice with zero skills starts at $25/hr.

IF they have a brain, work ethic and last longer than 3 months I bump them to $28/hr

It’s not the wages….its the lack of discipline and motivation that sucks the life out of most workers.

I have guys that are 50+ years old and have zero savings, no motivation to take on new jobs or skills and bitch and moan about their “bad luck”.
Spare me.

Becoming financially successful isnt easy or fun but people can do it if they are willing to try new things, change, have patience and devote extra time to get there.
Sadly its easier to bitch and moan.

#26 Dolce Vita on 09.15.21 at 3:10 pm

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.”

Experience and tradition provide greater stability than revolutionary uprisings.

Così fan tutte.

One is to perceive the world through objectivity and reason; one should not be emotionally distressed by the “way of the world”.

——————

And ya Garth, read Toffler’s Future Shock when it first came out. Thought it was a bunch of bullsh!t back then.

It still is.

#27 Dogman01 on 09.15.21 at 3:11 pm

Be true to yourself; if you are not in the top 1/3 of success traits you likely will have a job not a career. If you are in the top 1/3 of success traits get a career in an area where you can be in the top 20% of people in that career , as that is where the interesting work is. So if you are unlikely to have the traits to be in in the top 20% of Lawyers then perhaps you do have the traits to be in the top 20% of Police Officers. So then become a Cop, you will have a happy career and get the interesting work and best promotions. Be the big fish in the small pond…that is the road to work success.

The top 20% of Tradesmen run their own show and do very very well.

A “career” for most is now simply a device that businesses and managers can use as a motivation to get the deference and feigned enthusiasm that they want (and often feel they need) from employees.

For most people the workplace is indeed a soul killing tyranny. The FIRE movement Is about FREEDOM!, everything changes when you have financial freedom, you replace bad problems with good problems. I think we can all see that Garth long ago replaced bad problems for good problems (fulfilling challenges).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4taz6dfPQc

#28 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 3:12 pm

You grew up in a different era, Garth.

This is the era young people are growing up in:

The largest study of its kind shows that the environmental crisis is causing widespread psychological distress for young people across the globe. In a paper released Tuesday, researchers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Finland found that 45 percent of teens and young adults say climate anxiety is affecting their daily lives and ability to function. It’s the first study to suggest that young people’s emotional distress is strongly linked to their governments’ failure to respond.

“This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young people,” said Caroline Hickman, a co-author and a researcher at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, in a statement.

Three-quarters of those surveyed said that the “future is frightening,” with more than half believing that “humanity is doomed.” Nearly 4 in 10 said that they are hesitant to have children.

https://grist.org/article/climate-anxiety-study-young-people-think-humanity-is-doomed/

‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth

#29 some guy on 09.15.21 at 3:22 pm

When half of the youth under 25 think humanity is doomed, I can’t see them being motivated to work in the same way people of the past were.

#30 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 3:25 pm

#17 Boomer on 09.15.21 at 2:42 pm

I also addressed the issue of the model citizen you employed. Just because 1% rise to the top, doesn’t mean that is exemplary of a generational trends. Your generation would want work life balance if they were as blocked out of basic life stepping stones as this generation is. Boomers are THE most selfish and entitled generation, bar none.

They didn’t all “get after it” like you or your protege did. You are guilty of taking an anecdote and blowing it out of proportion.

============================================

Sorry, what are “basic life stepping stones” and how is the present generation blocked from them? Nothing is guaranteed to anyone – any generation. But I guess if your expectation is that you should obtain everything in life with ease, yeah, it must be a little disappointing to find that it doesn’t work that way. As Garth said: victimhood. It’s engrained in the culture now.

And note that the point of the story was not that everyone who “gets after it” will have wild success. It was that those without any work ethic – absolutely won’t. Expecting to win the lottery, but too lazy to even buy a ticket.

And this loser, entitled ethos has been driven into the current crop of young voters hard, by endless oceans of borrowed taxpayer money. See: “Moral Risk”.

The concepts of morality, ethics, and principles left the conversation long ago. But that doesn’t mean they don’t apply.

#31 CL on 09.15.21 at 3:29 pm

#19 Islandgirl on 09.15.21 at 2:47 pm
Everywhere I turn I see signs announcing staff shortages and to please be patient while the few employees left are scrambling to serve customers. And then on the next day I see postings on Facebook of people trying to find work without luck. *Not sure what the disconnect is*.
=====================

The hiring process and those performing the hiring process. HR/recruiting has become an empire and more cumbersome than any government at any level. When you see a posted job with pages of requirements, another account you have to open with that company to apply online, fill out yet more online forms with the same info, have to go through multiple interviews with people that were literally serving drinks the day before and are now recruiters, over several MONTHS timespan for a minimum wage job, it is pretty clear where the disconnect is.

There is no labour shortage other than one made by bureaucracy by the very companies complaining they cannot find people to hire.

#32 ogdoad on 09.15.21 at 3:31 pm

Hey, I will work for hugs for a couple hours a day!

OAN – FIRE is here to stay. With most people in Canada unhappy with their work anyway why not try to formulate a way to get out of the workforce as quickly as possible and strive for a life that aligns with your values?

Work your butt off for idiot, hubris bosses just so you yourself can become gossiped about and not liked in the office? For 5 weeks a year? Then be too unhealthy from prolonged stress at 60-65 to not be able to do much? Then, where you thought you were an important manager (or whatever) comes the sudden realization that you’re irrelevant? We’re already in the midst of a stress epidemic in some countries. And its not b/c of COVID.

No thanks. I’ll take my short life and irrelevancy the way I want it. Without the need or feeling to have to prove myself.

Og

#33 the jaguar on 09.15.21 at 3:32 pm

Sail Away….are those your other pooches? Very good looking dogs..

#34 IHCTD9 on 09.15.21 at 3:33 pm

#18 Vic on 09.15.21 at 2:42 pm
_____

“However the Liberals want to address these issues, looks like they will get the chance.”

My guess is they will be addressed via a few hundred Billion wildly flung dollars.

“Liberals now – 95% chance of victory

Liberals now – 75% chance majority”

Good news for my house and future building lots values Wooo!

Bad news is my quiet little backwater will likely become overrun by GTA escapees fleeing the future 2 Million dollar average SFD prices. Hey wait a minute – that’s good news for me too!! I’ll sell to one of these panic stricken evacuees for 1000% tax free profit and head North.

If T2 wins again, especially a majority, there really is not much analysis required as to the future state of Canada. All Metros will be wastelands of rich old-stock homeowners, broke government supported folks who rent, and a diminishing residual of middle class/youth/newcomers who haven’t quite figured out what they’ve got themselves into yet. They will in time though. The middle will want to leave the most.

I shudder to think what the GTA – hell, all of Southern Ontario – will look like in 20 years. Best to head on down the road before all the good that used to be here goes down the crapper.

#35 Dragonfly 58 on 09.15.21 at 3:33 pm

I admire the young woman’s work ethic. But given todays even barest cost of living that would put anyone today in a very deep hole.
Even back in the Eighty’s when my wife and I did our schooling ; about 6 and 8 years each in our case it put a further decade of our life of just barely scraping by to pay it all off. And that was with some student loan forgiveness, bursary money, a lot of part time work, and a couple of interrupt school for a year of work sessions.
And I was working as a licensed Auto Mechanic while not at school , so hardly a minimum wage situation.
Wife did several office and health care gigs.
It was the Lower Mainland, so not cheap living even in the 1980’s; but man did we ever learn to stretch a dollar.
Not sure it ever really paid off, delayed our getting into the real estate game so ended up paying { by the standards of the mid 90’s } a lot for not very bloody much. Wife’s wages sort of kept up, but she has a very high stress, health care supervisory position. Mine did not over time, hardly a change in take home over the last 15 years of my career despite ever increasing Transport Canada endorsements, and promotions.
And a pretty so – so pension. Not too bad compared to some, but can anyone more than just get by if they revert to a mid 1990’s income level ?

So why work your gut’s out ? You may not see very much return at all on all that education, diligent work ethic decades of shiftwork , and all the other things that grind you down during 40 years or so on the treadmill.
That next step property, you know , a house that isn’t turning back into rain forest compost , and a bit of land that used to be another $40,000- $75,000 15 years ago { back when every spare nickel went toward paying down the mortgage so the next move could be made } is now an additional $1,000,000.00 – $1,500,000.00 and never going to happen. So what was it all for ?
Yes , in my world the property IS everything. Garden, Shop space , peace , quiet and so much more. So close at one time, so far away today.
I don’t give a rip what the value is I just want some space for me. Like many of my ancestors I would expect to die on it so who cares what it is worth.
Long time farming family { 6 generations in Western Canada }. I am the first to not have at least a couple of acres and it is not working for me.

#36 I’m stupid on 09.15.21 at 3:34 pm

#18 Vic

Liberals now – 95% chance of victory

Liberals now – 75% chance majority

Stop making stuff up. Please present one poll that has the Liberals 75% chance of majority. Your own gut doesn’t qualify.

#37 pPrasseur on 09.15.21 at 3:34 pm

Fat asses millennials, the worse generation of primates that ever lived!

#38 R on 09.15.21 at 3:38 pm

Was the young woman Amanda Lang?

#39 jimmy zhao on 09.15.21 at 3:39 pm

Kids are resilient.

If the Boomers who practiced hiding under the desk in case of nuclear war survived okay with no ill effects, then wearing a mask at school should be equally non traumatic in the long term.

#40 AR on 09.15.21 at 3:43 pm

Garth I worry about the kids/grandkids. It’s hard to commit to a life-time grinding away with the climate crisis here and getting worse. They don’t want to sell out to some old, white guy or a corporation and get crap wages accumulating material wealth. They see what that has done to the world. On the other hand, they don’t have any answers either. My two millennials are happy to do fulfilling work when it suits them with people who care and actually do give hugs. They live day to day and try not to despair too much. It’s challenging at times.

Is “old white guy” a slur? Hope not! – Garth

#41 Dolce Vita on 09.15.21 at 3:47 pm

“…As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth”

You forgot to mention along with duck and cover there was:

Air Raid Sirens blaring away in the background for effect. Your hero Principal comes into the classroom with a tremulous voice.

No solace at home either.

Your WWII Partisan Italian parents scared dungless trying to put on a brave face all the while.

#28 XGRO and chill

Milquetoast intellectuals do not impress me.

If the climate warms up, so be it.

Go to Herculaneum or Aquilea or a dozen other places like them in the Mediterranean and observe the then beaches a good 500 m away from the beach today and 15 m above current sea level. And no, Herculaneum did not rise thanks to Vesuvius, 25 m of lava will attest to that.

Nothing about the “heat” back then written by obsessed Roman Gov chroniclers in those times. If the sea levels rise, they rise. AD 79 lesson not learned.

Your milquetoast intellectuals need to get out more. Observe the World for what it is and not ask other equally histrionic people about what they think it is.

#42 Woke up this morning... on 09.15.21 at 3:49 pm

#143 SoggyShorts on 09.15.21 at 3:48 am
#131 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.14.21 at 10:03 pm
#96 S.Bby on 09.14.21 at 6:59 pm
#85 Dragonfly 58
Canada generates only 2% of world carbon emissions
—————————
That’s quite a bit.
For 36 Mill people.
There are 8.3 7.7 billion souls on this planet.
Get out your abacus.
********************
My abacus is rusty and it’s late but here goes:
36m is 1/213th of 7.7b
2% is 1/50th of 100%

Canada is contributing 4.26x our “fair share”” of pollution?

And only now did I realize I should have just googled it:

https://www.worldometers.info/co2-emissions/co2-emissions-by-country/

Canada produces more than 2x the pollution of China per capita and that’s before we factor in how much of their pollution comes from making things we consume.

——————–

Is that factoring all the pollution China releases making stuff that ships to Canada?

My understanding is that we in North America, pollute 7x average of individuals elsewhere.

The main reason is our access to jet travel, a huge contributor to pollution.

But hey, don’t worry about it. Buy a TESLA and then you’re well on your way greenwashing your filthy image.
Others will look at you and be amazed at how green you are, overlooking the guy riding his bicycle to work completely.

#43 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 3:51 pm

#32 ogdoad on 09.15.21 at 3:31 pm
Hey, I will work for hugs for a couple hours a day!

OAN – FIRE is here to stay. With most people in Canada unhappy with their work anyway why not try to formulate a way to get out of the workforce as quickly as possible and strive for a life that aligns with your values?

Work your butt off for idiot, hubris bosses just so you yourself can become gossiped about and not liked in the office? For 5 weeks a year? Then be too unhealthy from prolonged stress at 60-65 to not be able to do much? Then, where you thought you were an important manager (or whatever) comes the sudden realization that you’re irrelevant? We’re already in the midst of a stress epidemic in some countries. And its not b/c of COVID.

No thanks. I’ll take my short life and irrelevancy the way I want it. Without the need or feeling to have to prove myself.

Og

==============================================

I’m totally fine with anyone “striving for a life to align with their values”, but that’s a complete contradiction of “not having a need to prove oneself” lol. I’ve a career when I have to prove myself over and over constantly and it’s most decidedly given me a life aligned with my values. (I’m fairly confident most people wouldn’t be cool with flying behind a pilot who is willing to be paid in hugs.)

I also have no problem with anyone choosing to be irrelevant on their own terms. Just don’t complain about those “missed life stepping stones” and expect everyone else to subsidize them for you, please. Freedom of choice comes with the consequences of said choices.

#44 I’m stupid on 09.15.21 at 3:54 pm

#25 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 3:03 pm

I agree with some of your statement but disagree with the income argument. $41 an hour is garbage, only a fool thinks that’s a fair wage today.

I do Hvac, run my own show but worked for others when I first started. I remember making 80k a year in 2001. That’s was good for the time the equivalent lifestyle of 80k in 2001 would be 150k.

I remember my first job paid minimum wage which was $6.25 an hour at the time a unionized labourer was making $22 an hour. Today minimum wage is $14.35 and a union labourer makes around $36. So before a labourer made almost 4x minimum wage and now it’s under 3x. That’s why a lot of people are finding it difficult to live.

#45 Retired now on 09.15.21 at 3:54 pm

Over the past few decades, I’ve noticed that corporate serfdom has become increasingly toxic and more political. ‘Leaders’ (as they like to call themselves) in these organisations don’t get ahead by bringing about the best in their teams, but rather by putting themselves and their egos first. In short, corporate culture has eroded to the point where there is little trust within large orgs, and the gaps between executive pay and middle manager pay has become too wide. I don’t blame mills for wanting no part of it. Today, there are tools to help launch a business quickly and efficiently. Why be part of the rat race when it is a race to the bottom?

#46 DON on 09.15.21 at 3:54 pm

#21 My Body My Choice on 09.15.21 at 2:51 pm
“Fifty-one years later, still bunk. Until human nature changes, human society will not. – Garth”

Change is being forced upon us in an attempt to change our human nature.

******
What exactly is the forced change?

#47 Rook on 09.15.21 at 3:54 pm

Counterpoint: all these folks unwilling to work, or seeking work-life balance, or basically goldbricking means plenty of opportunities for those willing to work, show up at the office for face-time, and learn/take on new things.

It ain’t all bad.

Garth, your advice to save, invest those savings, stay liquid (or have the ability to liquidate on short notice), and avoid unproductive debt seems to have worked out for me. I can confidently say that, since I graduated in 09, every 3 years since I have been doing better financially and career-illy, than the prior 3 years. So, thank you.

Only, with regards to today’s post, I can’t tell if you’re being sarcastic, or you actually have capitulated and believe everything’s different.

#48 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 3:58 pm

So I quit the network and started my own television production company.-GT

////////////

and today’s equivalent is starting a Youtube channel

And you save $5 million in equipment costs. Plus employees. And airtime. No equivalent. – Garth

#49 Grasshopper on 09.15.21 at 3:58 pm

Why work harder to earn more money?

Most of the extra money one makes gets confiscated by tax.

It’s good enough to earn less and have a better work-life balance.

No wonder Canada is losing its competitive edge: excessive tax on those who work hard.

Do you earn $1 million a year? At that level the average rate is 50%. Nobody in Canada loses “most of the extra money”. – Garth

#50 Kona on 09.15.21 at 4:00 pm

I feel sorry for every boss and what the next couple of years will bring. WFH and hybrid models are doomed to fail, but until then, bosses will have to deal with complaining employees. Look out for all the grievances and work place complaints as employees discover that being expected to actually work at a work place isn’t a hardship.

#51 AM in MN on 09.15.21 at 4:01 pm

The best way to get the job conditions you want, and to get promoted to the top job, is to start your own business.

Risky and lots of sleepless nights for most, but remember, 95% of “rich” people ($10M+ liquid net worth, not incl. house, inheritances, etc.), started a business, grew the business, sold the business.

You only have 2 hands and 2 feet. You need people and/or capital working for you to get rich.

Also, you can rise and adjust with the money printers. Does anyone believe today’s 4.1% inflation?

Plenty of hard workers still doing it, I meet many of them.

#52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 4:04 pm

@#204 XGROW
“The article I quoted is cited by Noam Chomsky when he is asked about Jordan Peterson. You may have heard of him.”

+++

Ahh yes Noam Chomsky
Who , ironically enough, denigrates Peterson’s “longwinded speeches that say nothing”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky

Perhaps “Philosopher and Libertarian” Mr Chomsky should read one his own anarchical post media diatribes.
He’s anti “everything”.
A long winded hack criticizing Peterson for his ideas..
Pot meet Kettle.
His heyday was 40+ years ago.
He’s long past his due date.
Perhaps his critique was one last gasp at free publicity for another book no one wants to read?

#53 TS on 09.15.21 at 4:13 pm

Those were “normal” times Garth. After 18 months of WFH with no social life, screaming little kids or depressed big ones, check list job with no leaders, innovation, or pinging ideas off one another, most of the population is barely hanging onto their day to day sanity never mind worried about feeding their long term ambitions.

#54 NOSTRADAMUS on 09.15.21 at 4:16 pm

OVERLOOKED BONUS, WORKING FROM HOME!
Almost daily there are reports of Sexual harassment allegations coming forward. All types of alleged harassment seem to eventually fall into the sexual dumpster. Women are waiting for years before bringing forth their allegations,( from the mist or memories of time). Why would a sane man today want to go back to the office and get involved in mixed team work or committees. One misstep taken out of context will result in you being fired. How do you defend yourself from allegations from the dark ages? Try getting a new job with this nightmare trailing you from interview to interview. Career over. Better still, try to explain it to your wife. Good luck , on both accounts. By working from home, there can be peace in the valley. I am on my throne and I will not step down.

#55 oops on 09.15.21 at 4:20 pm

To whoever said this:

I have guys that are 50+ years old and have zero savings, no motivation to take on new jobs or skills and bitch and moan about their “bad luck”.
Spare me.

Oops – You’re fired!

#56 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 4:20 pm

#204 Not Clear about Nuclear on 09.15.21 at 1:55 pm

Fukushima, the result of one of the greatest natural disasters in history, resulted in 1 death from radiation and about 2,200 from the evacuation.

Chernobyl, the result of an unnatural disaster called communist central planning, killed 50 people:

“According to the official, internationally recognised death toll, just 31 people died as an immediate result of Chernobyl while the UN estimates that only 50 deaths can be directly attributed to the disaster.”

Gen IV nuclear actually might use nuclear ‘waste’ as fuel. Read up on that instead of watching Netflix maybe.

As usual, the ‘greens’ still fear mongering about the safest and cleanest energy known to mankind.

——–

DUDE, did my previous posts at all give you an indication that I may know just a tiny bit about the Nuclear Power Industry? Enough to be dangerous?

Fukushima was supposed to be 30 meters above sea level instead of the 10 meters at which it ended up. Offer any excuses you want on that screwup, including construction machinery or other, but most likely bottom line is it probably would have cost WAY more to put it at 30 meters above rather than 10 meters it ended up in.

Did that have any impact on vulnerability against a tsunami you think?

Any condenser and cooling pipe stealthy redesigns that violated regulations and directly contributed to the outcome of the disaster should not be overlooked.

Do you really want to talk about Chernobyl? I think you should back off that one. I didn’t mention it, let’s chuck it to the good old USSR for your benefit, as if non-USSR has a better track record in the nuclear game of chance.

Look at Canadian reactors – Pickering and Bruce are going to be fun to observe next 5 years. I personally predict a significant incident occurring within that period.

That’s what you’re going to say to try to sell us? That it MIGHT use current nuclear waste as fuel? Didn’t I just say that I’ve seen the retreat from that sales angle on the molten salt reactors?

Sounds like a pipe dream promise to make people think it is going to be green energy, and then it magically turns out to not be the case at all. Also, what will be the waste from this new process? No one seems to be willing to be clear on it. As I said, promises and MIGHT is not enough by today’s standards. I’ve seen too much. Facts and proof of concept accepted only in discussion and budget approvals. Prototypes proof before it goes to construction. Guaranteed commitments to waste targets or withdrawal of license and damages to be paid – insurance policy must be held so that bankruptcy doesn’t enable operator to skirt damages.

Shall we talk about the crazy budget over runs? Nuclear Power Plants put the Olympics to shame on budget overruns.

What are you going to do? Not pay for the overruns? They know this, and so projects end up costing triple or more than budget.

And Nuclear Waste? Please – keep making the excuses on how that’s not a problem. We surely don’t have enough ACTUAL proof of what a problem that is, how long it lasts, the half life of the waste and the costs associated with it.
We’ll be on starships by the time this stuff reaches half-life.

You want me to identify a threat to the GTA Real Estate market for you? I give you Pickering Nuclear.

Remember when that warning went out on the phones a while back? One day it won’t be a mistake. Just think of the impact to RE values when that happens.

But hey…Nuclear Power – TOTALLY WORTH THAT RISK, right?

#57 Planetgoofy on 09.15.21 at 4:21 pm

‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth

We live in a nation of whimps. This is partly why we have T2 head hauncho…he will hold your hand and fix everything in this big scary world.

#58 Stoph on 09.15.21 at 4:24 pm

People are just playing the game – their quality of life can be better if they don’t work as hard even if that means they make less money.

As for Mills or Gen Z, the strategy that they were/are told of getting a university degree and then a cushy job isn’t working nearly as well as they had been led to believe. About 1/3rd of 25 to 34 year olds have a bachelor degree or higher, in comparison to 1/5th of 55 to 64 year olds.

https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/hlt-fst/edu-sco/Table.cfm?Lang=E&T=21&Geo=00&SP=1&view=2&age=6&sex=1

So no, I wouldn’t characterize these generations as lazy, more of them have put the first 4+ years of their working years on hold to further their education than previous generations. This education comes with a large cost, and an even larger opportunity cost, but not the money.

#59 Kim on 09.15.21 at 4:28 pm

What ‘Super Rich”??? This isnt the US. Canada has 25 Super Rich people… and I doubt any of them even live here. That is just a crock, tax the super rich who?

#60 willworkforpickles on 09.15.21 at 4:33 pm

#39 jimmy zhao
“Kids are resilient.
If the Boomers who practiced hiding under the desk in case of nuclear war survived okay with no ill effects, then wearing a mask at school should be equally non traumatic in the long term.”
………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

I’m a boomer…we never hid under any desk in case of nuclear attack.
We listened to chit like alice cooper with lines like “I need everything the world owes me I tell that to myself and i agree”
…drove the the old phobes (parents) near effin nuts.
…anyway…if any generation need be concerned with nuclear attack on North American soil, its this one.
Masks or no Masks

#61 Faron on 09.15.21 at 4:34 pm

#41 Dolce Vita on 09.15.21 at 3:47 pm
#28 XGRO and chill

Milquetoast intellectuals do not impress me.

Me neither…

You may want to be careful slinging the mud Dolce. I just brushed up on the papers that discuss the tectonics of the area and relative sea levels and, well, I suggest you do the same. Facts are that Herculaneum is a location of one of the highest uplift rates in Italy. One author on the paper was headed by the global expert in sea level fluctuations.

Additionally, when thinking about impacts of sea level on populations, it’s best not to conclude based on shoreline migration 2000 years ago that it’s NBD. Why? Consider the population and population density back then vs now.

If you have genuine questions about anything climate and many things geology, I am happy to answer them. Respect will be met with respect. Snark with snark.

#62 Satori on 09.15.21 at 4:35 pm

No one still living with me in their 30’s so let’s not Blame the Millennials. Blame the ones who raised em.

#63 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 4:36 pm

#204 Not Clear about Nuclear on 09.15.21 at 1:55 pm

By the way – fantastic idea to put Bruce on Lake Huron and Pickering right on Lake Ontario.

LOVELY PLANNING!

I’m sure there was no other solution possible at all than to put them right on these bodies of water. Not like the Great Lakes are 20% of the world’s fresh drinking water or anything.

“Don’t worry about it JimBob, nothing will go wrong. I’m near certain.”

#64 Faron on 09.15.21 at 4:43 pm

#42 Woke up this morning… on 09.15.21 at 3:49 pm

#143 SoggyShorts on 09.15.21 at 3:48 am
#131 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.14.21 at 10:03 pm
#96 S.Bby on 09.14.21 at 6:59 pm
#85 Dragonfly 58

The only way this gets solved is through a carbon tax/price and the end of the many $Billions in O+G subsidies in Canada alone. The remaining free market will do the rest. Innovation will come hot and fast when profitability is on the line.

Personal use is also important, but without economic motive, no meaningful change will happen. I ride my bike to work and shop. Basically the car stays in the driveway during the work week. I recently switched vegetarian. But I can’t and don’t expect others to do that.

Also, any and all infrastructure enhancements oriented toward cars should be shelved NOW. Looking at you Calgary and Edmonton. Those funds need to be redirected to making mass transit feasible for people immediately. Solving transport emissions is a huge piece of the pie.

#65 just a dude on 09.15.21 at 4:44 pm

“ ‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth”

Exactly. My recollections as well and I too got over it.

Every generation thinks it’s special or has it harder than previous generations. No one is special. Think about the anxiety being felt in Afghanistan now. Or in Syria. Or in North Korea. Etc, etc.

Some context might help today’s young who are living in this incredibly rich country of ours that offers freedoms and opportunities that so many around the globe would give anything for.

#66 Satori on 09.15.21 at 4:46 pm

AR – “My Millennials – They don’t want to sell out to some old, white guy or a corporation and get crap wages accumulating material wealth.”
—————————————————

Well, now we know why they don’t wanna work. Look what you taught them. Mine were taught early that $$$ = Freedom, both had lemonade stands, both doing great, love their work… never were taught about any ‘sell out’ and they haven’t given up on the world.

Yours are just reflecting your teachings. Mine are as well…. no burden to society and no worries to me.

#67 Kitty Kaboom on 09.15.21 at 4:47 pm

CREA with more word salad this month in their franken-press release.

Peak House?
March 2021 — 716000 Avg. 556000 without YVR/YYZ.

The Market Since:

April 2021 — 696000 Avg. 552000 without YVZ/YYZ.
A decline of 2.79% March to April.

May 2021 — 688000 Avg. 548000 without YVR/YYZ.
A decline of 3.91% March to May.

June 2021 — 679000 Avg. 544000 without YVR/YYZ.
A decline of 5.17% March to June.

July 2021 — 662000 Avg. 530000 without YVR/YYZ.
A decline of 7.54% March to July.

August 2021 — 663500 Avg. 533500 without YVR or YYZ.
A decline of 7.33% March to August.

What will October bring… more sticky prices and delistings? A holding pattern in price shifting averages? Devil’s in the details for anyone to determine.

Wouldn’t this mean… anyone who closed with 5% down high-ratio in March has effectively been underwater since April (CMHC at 3%, 2% equity?) at this point on the graph even without considering external costs?

-KKB

#68 yvr_lurker on 09.15.21 at 4:49 pm

Indeed it is problematic if many give up the desire to work hard and to innovate in order to start businesses or to be of value to their employer.

However, your assumption seems to be that in order to do this people need to be going into the office daily, chained at their desk, and be micromanaged by their employer. Many can work very productively in a WFH or hybrid capacity (coming in a few days a week to the office), and the time spent on office gossip/socializing with work colleagues and commuting can be better put to other uses, while still maintaining productivity and innovation.

I think it will be a real innovation if it becomes the norm in some industries for employees to have more freedom, yet have clearly defined milestones to achieve. This is no longer the 1950’s. Moreover, for people with high-level skills I see no ethical problem with them having less company loyalty than in the past, where they instead try to optimize their situation with regards to salary/flexibility/balance/potential for promotion.

There is no way that I would put my skills out there and work as a free intern. Ad agencies, marketing houses, and bogus startups (with no clear innovative edge) have long exploited free interns.

In this light, many businesses rather lobby the Gov’t to bring in very poorly-paid foreign service workers (from south-east asian countries typically), rather than pay a decent wage for locals. Understandable for certain industries like farming, child care, elder care etc…, but not so much for service workers in restaurants, janitors, cleaners, security, long-distance truckers, etc… pay a decent wage and you might attract locals.

#69 Calgary Rip Off on 09.15.21 at 4:52 pm

Work from home doesnt seem to be occurring much in Calgary now as the traffic gain since schools have opened is huge. As such data has not indicated vaccinating below 12 year olds, it is best for everyone to avoid kids as they are among the unvaccinated. The most vaccinated are the 65 year and older age groups. The least are the twenty somethings.

Jason Kenney’s party is a fail. By electing to not mandate vaccines, many people will be crushed by covid with the cost of a house to save these people. Currently four of my peers are in ICU trying to save these people. The antivaxxer crowd doesnt seem to understand the infection risk during a stay in ICU and post ICU potential risks to their health. Not to mention the risk that is someone gets sick, triage may soon occur due to age and comorbidities. Alberta Health Services has mandated vaccination. As of this morning I have registered my vaccination status with them and have registered for my vaccination card.

I keep noticing the irrelevant comments on youtube and gab postings by people citing evidence for Ivermectin along with clot risks of vaccines. All of this is nonsense. Data supports over and over vaccine safety vs. getting Covid.

Fortunately for Canadians, they have the liberty to get sick. In the USA Covid patients risk bankruptcy in addition to death.

I hope Alberta is locked down. People dont need to be out and about. And the Conservative party in Alberta is a financial and management disaster. Go NDP.

#70 Millennial Realist on 09.15.21 at 4:55 pm

#37 pPrasseur on 09.15.21 at 3:34 pm

Fat asses millennials, the worse generation of primates that ever lived!

_________________________

You’re lucky Garth so diligently does not allow ageism on this blog, dear paleo boomer.

Just get ready for what happens after next week.

Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

#71 yvr_lurker on 09.15.21 at 4:55 pm

#17
And I am not a victim, by the way. I am doing quite well for myself. But my eyes are open to the real challenges facing young people today that will not be resolved by taking an unpaid internship.

————
Exactly my sentiment. Many more obstacles for the younger generation than in the past.

#72 S.Bby on 09.15.21 at 5:00 pm

I’m sitting in my sweats right now.

Received two different large glossy brochures promoting Jagmeet in the mail today. The NDP really want him to retain his seat here in S.Bby. Apparently he is “fighting for me”.

#73 George S on 09.15.21 at 5:07 pm

I worked in a different world than most people that are reporting on their dissatisfaction with the millennials and their performance at work. In the world of scientific research I got to associate with millennials that were bright, driven, and true experts in their fields and fully equipped to transition into a rapidly changing world of research. My boss and I, two old guys educated in the 70s and early 80s were replaced by two really bright and happy young women that only needed to be shown where everything was. I was happy to see that they were fully capable of taking the reins, so to speak. I don’t really notice much difference between my wife and myself and our children (millennials) and their spouses other than that they seem to have much better jobs than we had at that age. They have a very good work ethic and are getting along very well.

Climate change is very real and causing all sorts of problems. It is not going to be easy to fix because it isn’t going to make much difference in the timeline for fixing climate change if as we reduce our GHG emissions per person we increase the world’s population by a couple billion people.
The real serious problem that nobody talks about is that there is only a fixed amount of fossil fuel in the world and it is not accumulating any more. At some point, much sooner than people are thinking, all the easily accessible fossil fuel is going to run out and the world is going to have to go back to using firewood and muscle to get their work done.
That is what there is to worry about. It makes the threat of nuclear war seem trivial, although at the time it wasn’t.

I remember the brochures for different types of bomb shelters. My parents were contemplating building one but then decided to spend the money renovating our basement and getting a ping pong table and a small pool table instead and having some fun. They thought it wouldn’t be worth surviving a nuclear war and having to exist in a post apocalyptic world.
It seemed that everyone enjoyed their jobs almost no matter what they were. I guess they didn’t have many expectations, or maybe they only expected to be paid for doing actual work. There really wasn’t very much to buy with the money they made. Advertising was mostly which brand of cigarettes was best. Branding hadn’t caught on yet. Advertising wasn’t everywhere. Social media was coffee time. (or listening on the party line) And coffee time was just coffee (or sometimes tea) not requiring a whole lot of expertise in pouring.

#74 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 5:09 pm

‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth

You practiced “Duck and Cover” Garth?

So you’re ready for “Mask and Cross Fingers”!

#75 Concerned Citizen on 09.15.21 at 5:11 pm

Many of the forums I go to frequented by young Canadians (such as the Canada sub-reddit) are filled with posts from hopeless people. Folks that have done the math and realized that, no matter how hard they work, they’re royally screwed.

Our system today rewards wealth, not work. The brain drain is going to get worse, and the folks left behind aren’t terribly motivated given what the government and Bank of Canada have done – and continue to do to them – in earnest.

The country is eating its young. Something needs to change, and soon…

#76 Climate Change fear on 09.15.21 at 5:13 pm

#28 XGRO and chill

I think the people who have terrified children by claiming the world will end in 10 or 12 years (which they have been doing every year since at least 1979) are criminally irresponsible.

But I also thought once they got older, the kids would figure out they were lied to. I guess not.

Yes the climate is changing.

No the world won’t end in 10 years, we will adapt, as we have for somewhere around 1 to 2 million years.

No I don’t have sympathy for anyone with paranoid fears about TEOTWAWKI.

If I was younger I’d be jumping on the bandwagon though, tons of money to be made in the green movement.

#77 cramar on 09.15.21 at 5:14 pm

Ain’t it ironic! FIRE is the rage among Millennials. They want to retire at 40—or less! Yet they are clueless about financial matters. Most want to buy a house. FIRE and million-dollar mortgages are mutually exclusive. Go figure!

#78 facts on 09.15.21 at 5:20 pm

Any financial advice on how to live in Toronto arriving from another country, working for nothing for 6 months to prove work ethic to a Canadian dude?

Stick your hand out. Justin will surely put something in it. – Garth

#79 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.15.21 at 5:24 pm

#175 Faron on 09.15.21 at 11:23 am
#149 the Jaguar on 09.15.21 at 8:06 am

All you anti oil types can now just climb back into your SUV’s or Tacoma’s and drive the two blocks to the Cannabis store for your daily supply. Don’t forget your woolly toque and be sure to address everyone as “Dude”.

Wow. You need to work on sharpening those stereotypes. Currently they reveal much about what you are afraid of. May I jump on my bike and politely address people as sir or ma’am or is that too confusing?
————-
Ouch, that must have hurt.
Hope there’s more were that one came from.

#80 Ok boomer... on 09.15.21 at 5:27 pm

No idea what you are talking about…

All the millennials that apply to work for me having stunning CVs with tons of volunteer experience and broad skills… they are amazing, dynamic, with tons of energy, ideas and goals.

Who cares where they work….they do amazing things.

#81 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 5:31 pm

By the way, I bet you guys didn’t know there is a nuclear facility right smack in the heart of Toronto, did you?

1025 Lansdowne, right at Lansdowne and Dupont.

It is actually a nuclear facility licensed to produce nearly 2,000 tonnes of radioactive uranium dioxide pellets each year.

But the real fun part is that The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the nuclear industry’s regulatory agency, permits the plant to release up to 9,000 kilograms of uranium waste into the sewer system and 760 grams into the air annually.

You think the people about to buy this house have any idea?
https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/23634584/1322-dupont-st-toronto-dovercourt-wallace-emerson-junction

How bout people buying this one?
https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/23625944/212-brandon-ave-toronto-dovercourt-wallace-emerson-junction

Or one of the condos in the hood?

Nuclear is so much fun. Especially when Bush Jr. says it.

How did he say it?

#82 For all Green Energy zealots on 09.15.21 at 5:33 pm

Take it from an Msc in Electrical Engineering, green energy is a scam, it’s dirty it’s unreliable it’s expensive and it will not save us..

The Green Apostle of the Left and Green Church Grand wizard Michael Moore says it, not me. He is your saint not mine.

I am just an engineer.

If you don’t understand why please go back to school, engineering school, that is.

Ditto

#83 VanGirl on 09.15.21 at 5:33 pm

A lot of immigrants are willing to work free to get Canadian experience . At least it was at 2000 + when we immgrated.

#84 Fear Fear Fear on 09.15.21 at 5:35 pm

#56 Not Clear

Fear fear and more predictions of fear. Yawn.

Anyway, good work, as here are some commodity price moves (YOY) recently as coal and fossil fuel fired plants roar back to life:

Australian Thermal coal: +236%
S African export coal: +140%
Crude oil: +57%
Heating oil: +59%
Nat gas: +76%
Propane: +120%
Russian Nat gas: +441% (!!!!)

Keep up the good work man, you are saving the planet!

#85 The Republic of Oilbertastan on 09.15.21 at 5:35 pm

#64 Faron on 09.15.21 at 4:43 pm

#42 Woke up this morning… on 09.15.21 at 3:49 pm

#143 SoggyShorts on 09.15.21 at 3:48 am
#131 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.14.21 at 10:03 pm
#96 S.Bby on 09.14.21 at 6:59 pm
#85 Dragonfly 58

The only way this gets solved is through a carbon tax/price and the end of the many $Billions in O+G subsidies in Canada alone. The remaining free market will do the rest. Innovation will come hot and fast when profitability is on the line.

Personal use is also important, but without economic motive, no meaningful change will happen. I ride my bike to work and shop. Basically the car stays in the driveway during the work week. I recently switched vegetarian. But I can’t and don’t expect others to do that.

Also, any and all infrastructure enhancements oriented toward cars should be shelved NOW. Looking at you Calgary and Edmonton. Those funds need to be redirected to making mass transit feasible for people immediately. Solving transport emissions is a huge piece of the pie.

The biggest traffic jams I see are in Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver….

#86 Inflation on 09.15.21 at 5:36 pm

Great Post Garth, picture a 30 year old guy/gal in Toronto they making 60k per year. They see there is a great change they will never own a house in the city or even have kids, everything costs too much. So now they value freedom and remote work, maybe now they can start a side gig on the side. Thirty years ago you could work at a department store and have a house in the city and a family, try that now, things have changed because of the massive increase in housing/rent costs, They think maybe I can never buy a house but a least I will choose my job and my daily life on how I want to live, no more jobs with a clock-watching boss or awful co-workers or stressful work with low pay, it’s not that the work ethic has changed it’s that the goal posts have moved to another stratosphere.

#87 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.15.21 at 5:40 pm

#64 Faron

Also, any and all infrastructure enhancements oriented toward cars should be shelved NOW. Looking at you Calgary and Edmonton. Those funds need to be redirected to making mass transit feasible for people immediately. Solving transport emissions is a huge piece of the pie.
——————
Pang on.
It will take a little while, but it’s coming.
A couple of more summers like this, and everyone will be climbing on the Environment bandwagon.
And, Btw, lots of new jobs in the new ecomomy.
Better paying and more challenging.

#88 Faron on 09.15.21 at 5:41 pm

#204 Not Clear about Nuclear on 09.15.21 at 1:55 pm

W/re Chernobyl the doc. Made for a great drama. But, I ran it past a nuclear engineer I know and he laughed long and hard about the many errors in the documentary. There are so many tropes about nuclear energy out there that are dead wrong.

Anyhow, I’m pro nuclear energy. The public perception is about 40 years behind the reality and the fears are way way overblown. Great way to load balance a renewable grid given that it can be ramped up in a heart beat. Nuculer on the other hand I will not abide by.

#89 ogdoad on 09.15.21 at 5:43 pm

#43 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 3:51 pm

Hi BB, definitely appr. your view but my idea is that I would rather put work (giving hugs) into myself than put work into perceived butt kissing. I’ll fly a plane for hugs but people should know that I don’t have the skills to fly. You say you’ve proved yourself over and over AND its aligned with your values…to you or to someone else? If its to you (or if you are rare and have found a career that aligns and satisfies) then, you’ve won! Congrats! Hug on the house!

I’m sorry, but the ‘missed life stepping stones’ comment to me is a culturalized and predetermined viewpoint brought on by years of influence – Please expand. Who’s being subsidized? Or who do you mean?

Og

#90 Soviet Capitalist on 09.15.21 at 5:47 pm

Not sure whether it is the ethic or rather the tax/monetary systems that are being increasingly dialled in the direction of ‘who doesn’t work, eats’; meaning, the more you work, the more money Justin will get from you.

#91 Crossbordershopper on 09.15.21 at 5:50 pm

I accept that I am a little lazy. I learned in high school all I needed was a c average. I didnt really try to get higher grades since it didnt mean anything. I used that insight in my life and I am happy to do as little as possible to get ahead. Mu daughter on her own at 15 has come to the same conclusion. It’s not biology it’s in the water once you have a paid off house a rental or two a go no where job is all you need. Canada has created a lot.of lazy people like me I see the wheel continuing too once my parents pass on I’ll hold the keys till my daughter continues to do nothing for the rest of her life. I never understood why people get up early get coffee travel to work seemed like a big waste of time

#92 Bob in Hamilton on 09.15.21 at 5:51 pm

More of the same coming in the next 4 years…it’s trending to a T2 majority…thanks GTA and island of Montreal.

#93 KLNR on 09.15.21 at 5:54 pm

the hyperbole is top notch in here tonight.
stay classy folks.

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.15.21 at 5:57 pm

Hiding under desks?
Well, looks like Biden just declared a new Cold War, against China.
He’s forging an alliance with Australia and UK (AUKUS) to take on the Yellow Menace.
Nuclear proliferation is one of the sticking points.
ICHTC, how’s the bunker coming along?

#95 Wrk.dover on 09.15.21 at 6:06 pm

#56 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 4:20 pm
#204 Not Clear about Nuclear on 09.15.21 at 1:55 pm

Fukushima, the result of one of the greatest natural disasters in history, resulted in 1 death from radiation and about 2,200 from the evacuation.
______________________________

Let’s save some money here, when the back-up generator arrives by barge, we’ll just pull it ashore above the high tide line.

What can go wrong? No one will ever notice…

#96 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 6:08 pm

#28 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 3:12 pm
You grew up in a different era, Garth.

This is the era young people are growing up in:

The largest study of its kind shows that the environmental crisis is causing widespread psychological distress for young people across the globe. In a paper released Tuesday, researchers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Finland found that 45 percent of teens and young adults say climate anxiety is affecting their daily lives and ability to function. It’s the first study to suggest that young people’s emotional distress is strongly linked to their governments’ failure to respond.

“This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young people,” said Caroline Hickman, a co-author and a researcher at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, in a statement.

Three-quarters of those surveyed said that the “future is frightening,” with more than half believing that “humanity is doomed.” Nearly 4 in 10 said that they are hesitant to have children.

https://grist.org/article/climate-anxiety-study-young-people-think-humanity-is-doomed/

‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth

——

The threat of nuclear war is still with us, but yes, we have learned to cope with it psychologically. The cold war is over. But, the threat of nuclear war was never a scientific certainty. The collapse of a global civilization is scientifically certain should climate change escalate to the point that we destabilize planetary systems that we depend upon to have regular sources of freshwater, regular and decent harvests, etc.

Every day we don’t take drastic action to reduce emissions, we go one day further towards that scenario.

Young people still work (hard to survive without an income). Understand that young people are raised, generally, to be smart, work hard, get educated. This enables a prosperous life, that allows a high standard of living – lots of material possessions, exotic trips, financial security, etc. Simultaneously, we read news articles saying that the high standard of living in the developed world is unsustainable. Materialism, too many international plane trips, excessive consumption in general is destroying the planet. How do you reconcile these two things?

For the echo-boomers, and many conservatives, ignorance is the way out. Avoiding uncomfortable truths is their security blanket. Very difficult to say, start a business that sells plastic widgets made in sweatshops in China if you know basic environmental and climate change facts.

Most young people just live with this deep anxiety about the future. We know everything is going bad, but what are we to do? We were raised to expect a certain standard of living, and to fit in, we need to maintain it. So we still work (but not too hard), spend and travel (but feel bad about it later). So lots of young people have zero children (it’s always a complicated decision – but future outlook on society plays a role).

——

#52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 4:04 pm
@#204 XGROW
“The article I quoted is cited by Noam Chomsky when he is asked about Jordan Peterson. You may have heard of him.”

+++

Ahh yes Noam Chomsky
Who , ironically enough, denigrates Peterson’s “longwinded speeches that say nothing”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky

Perhaps “Philosopher and Libertarian” Mr Chomsky should read one his own anarchical post media diatribes.
He’s anti “everything”.
A long winded hack criticizing Peterson for his ideas..
Pot meet Kettle.
His heyday was 40+ years ago.
He’s long past his due date.
Perhaps his critique was one last gasp at free publicity for another book no one wants to read?

——

And what are Peterson’s ideas, exactly? Can anyone attribute any original ideas, or influential academic work to him?

You seriously think man is.. smart?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QO9j1SLxEd0#t=4m40s

#97 Quintilian on 09.15.21 at 6:16 pm

#75 Concerned Citizen:
“The country is eating its young. Something needs to change, and soon…”

We don’t often hear from enlightened people like you.

Most of the beer gut sporting boomers blame our latte spending habits for the mess we are in, which they created through avarice, political and economic ignorance.

How do insults fix anything? – Garth

#98 Reximus on 09.15.21 at 6:17 pm

i’d say today’s post goes a long way to explain the popularity of bitcoin speculation and meme stock ‘investing’ among millennials

#99 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 6:25 pm

#48 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 3:58 pm
So I quit the network and started my own television production company.-GT

////////////

and today’s equivalent is starting a Youtube channel

And you save $5 million in equipment costs. Plus employees. And airtime. No equivalent. – Garth

/////////////////

So you get my point, it can be much easier these days.

#100 Do we have all the facts on 09.15.21 at 6:30 pm

The connection between work ethics and moral principles appears to have changed considerably since I graduated from university in 1975. When I began my search for full time employment my primary concern was not how much money I could earn but how my employment might contribute to society.

My first full time job involved a ‘Neighbourhood Improvement Program’ funded by all three levels of Government. The primary goal was to work closely with residents of a neighbourhood to improve their physical, social and economic environment. Over three years 320 units of lower density affordable housing were constructed on vacant or underdeveloped lands, four parks were created, twelve commercial buildings were renovated and a community centre was constructed.

My second job was to involve community residents in the planning and construction of over 2,000 units of affordable housing under the National Housing Act.

All levels of government are still funding programs to improve the quality of life within urban areas but active participation by members of a community has all but disappeared.

The increase of apathy has allowed funding for important issues such as the development of affordable housing for residents of a community as they age to be eliminated. All levels of government must find ways to expand involvement by their citizens in all issues that are might improve their quality of life.

The collective work ethic of citizens living in a community or neighbourhood has been eroded to the point where most residents expect all important issues to be resolved by their governments.

The last 18 months has provided proof that the priorities of governments do not always match the priorities or best interests of their constituents.

Not one party in the current election campaign has recognized the potential of involving Canadian citizens in
the decision making process. If you really want to increase the supply of affordable housing in Canada the best place to start might just be the neighbourhood level.

The need for increased participation by Canadian citizens has never been more important.

#101 Linda on 09.15.21 at 6:33 pm

Work ethic is so old school. After all, our gracious godmother of a government will wave the magic wand, create UBI for all who don’t want to deal with the hassle of 9 to 5 – or as I like to think of it, how working for a living became the next cruel & unusual punishment that MUST be ended at any cost. Being able to stay home isn’t just staying at home – owning a home is a right, not a privilege. And while we are at it, why do we/I ‘have’ to work for a living? Shouldn’t it be my ‘right’ to be able to receive $ for doing nothing? After all, those old geezers get to do that so why can’t I? This obviously misses the point that said geezers worked for decades before they retired, but it is a better world now. No need to work for decades to get that retirement lifestyle!

#102 RL on 09.15.21 at 6:35 pm

“Suddenly a whole gen thinks everything just changed. Workplaces are tyranny. Careers are gone.”

I don’t know if that’s entirely the truth. I think some people have seen that it can be done differently, and in many cases, quite successfully. Sure, it will never work for everyone. Some employers are going to have to learn to adapt if they want to retain talent. It’s a brave new world :)

#103 KLNR on 09.15.21 at 6:42 pm

@#96 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 6:08 pm
#28 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 3:12 pm
You grew up in a different era, Garth.

This is the era young people are growing up in:

The largest study of its kind shows that the environmental crisis is causing widespread psychological distress for young people across the globe. In a paper released Tuesday, researchers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Finland found that 45 percent of teens and young adults say climate anxiety is affecting their daily lives and ability to function. It’s the first study to suggest that young people’s emotional distress is strongly linked to their governments’ failure to respond.

“This study paints a horrific picture of widespread climate anxiety in our children and young people,” said Caroline Hickman, a co-author and a researcher at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, in a statement.

Three-quarters of those surveyed said that the “future is frightening,” with more than half believing that “humanity is doomed.” Nearly 4 in 10 said that they are hesitant to have children.

https://grist.org/article/climate-anxiety-study-young-people-think-humanity-is-doomed/

‘Climate anxiety’ is debilitating young adults and rendering them distressed & unable to work? Seriously? As a kid we had to practice hiding under our desks because of the threat of nuclear war. Seemed consequential. Got over it. – Garth

——

The threat of nuclear war is still with us, but yes, we have learned to cope with it psychologically. The cold war is over. But, the threat of nuclear war was never a scientific certainty. The collapse of a global civilization is scientifically certain should climate change escalate to the point that we destabilize planetary systems that we depend upon to have regular sources of freshwater, regular and decent harvests, etc.

Every day we don’t take drastic action to reduce emissions, we go one day further towards that scenario.

Young people still work (hard to survive without an income). Understand that young people are raised, generally, to be smart, work hard, get educated. This enables a prosperous life, that allows a high standard of living – lots of material possessions, exotic trips, financial security, etc. Simultaneously, we read news articles saying that the high standard of living in the developed world is unsustainable. Materialism, too many international plane trips, excessive consumption in general is destroying the planet. How do you reconcile these two things?

For the echo-boomers, and many conservatives, ignorance is the way out. Avoiding uncomfortable truths is their security blanket. Very difficult to say, start a business that sells plastic widgets made in sweatshops in China if you know basic environmental and climate change facts.

Most young people just live with this deep anxiety about the future. We know everything is going bad, but what are we to do? We were raised to expect a certain standard of living, and to fit in, we need to maintain it. So we still work (but not too hard), spend and travel (but feel bad about it later). So lots of young people have zero children (it’s always a complicated decision – but future outlook on society plays a role).

——

#52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 4:04 pm
@#204 XGROW
“The article I quoted is cited by Noam Chomsky when he is asked about Jordan Peterson. You may have heard of him.”

+++

Ahh yes Noam Chomsky
Who , ironically enough, denigrates Peterson’s “longwinded speeches that say nothing”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky

Perhaps “Philosopher and Libertarian” Mr Chomsky should read one his own anarchical post media diatribes.
He’s anti “everything”.
A long winded hack criticizing Peterson for his ideas..
Pot meet Kettle.
His heyday was 40+ years ago.
He’s long past his due date.
Perhaps his critique was one last gasp at free publicity for another book no one wants to read?

——

And what are Peterson’s ideas, exactly? Can anyone attribute any original ideas, or influential academic work to him?

You seriously think man is.. smart?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QO9j1SLxEd0#t=4m40s

like joe rogan, Jp is smart enough to know how to make big $$$$’s off a certain segment of society. often referred to as the dumb guys smart person.

#104 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 6:43 pm

#84 Fear Fear Fear

I’m saving nothing.

Who am I to save anything? I’m trying my best to consume less. Use things fully until their are useless. I teach the young to not be wasteful. It’s the biggest impact I can make. I turn off the lights when I leave the room too. I put on a sweater before turning up the heat, and I don’t subscribe to A/C – I feel we have so few hot days here, soak every single one of the up to the maximum.

This blog will go to archive in a few hours. None of this will make any difference.

No one will care about what I said, and certainly nothing I said will change what the nuclear industry will do and what the politicians will allow it to get away with.

At the end of it all, what can a politician really do? Go ahead…go on TV and say how you had to shut down a nuclear power plant, and now the people like me can’t power up their devices to be social warriors from their sofa. No Netflix? WHAT?!

They will fold like the cheap suits that cover their repulsive integrity-compromised lying bodies. They will allow exemptions for operation of nuclear power plants even though their own internal test on a VERY limited number of tubes show hydrogen concentration that are double the twice raised limit already. They will renew the licenses on these aging plants for a few more years. Plants, which get more and more fragile by the day.

Because what choice do they have?

#105 Austruck on 09.15.21 at 6:44 pm

Stagflation, related job losses, and a 60-80% correction in the stock market all happening in unison will straighten out the prevailing attitude. Don’t worry, be happy and party on….it’s coming.

Why? – Garth

#106 Faron on 09.15.21 at 6:44 pm

#87 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.15.21 at 5:40 pm

#64 Faron

I want to correct myself: instead of “solving” I should have said “making progress on”. Doing nothing until complete “solutions” are readily available is one of the things that has put us in this mess. Progress not perfection.

“#82 For all Green Energy zealots on 09.15.21 at 5:33 pm

The Green Apostle of the Left and Green Church Grand wizard Michael Moore

They used out of date data and footage from abandoned film projects decades or more old and got roasted for their inaccuracies. Nothing is an end-all be-all technology. But there is certainly a role for green energy and spreading inaccurate information about it isn’t helpful. The only thing that is useful in that film is expressing a need to be critical of new tech and players. Elon Musk is one of many scammers who are greenwashing their ponzi schemes.

#107 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 6:44 pm

#81 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 5:31 pm
By the way, I bet you guys didn’t know there is a nuclear facility right smack in the heart of Toronto, did you?

1025 Lansdowne, right at Lansdowne and Dupont.

It is actually a nuclear facility licensed to produce nearly 2,000 tonnes of radioactive uranium dioxide pellets each year.
///////////////

My mom worked at the GE plant there but across the street

#108 Faron on 09.15.21 at 6:47 pm

#100 KLNR on 09.15.21 at 6:42 pm
@#96 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 6:08 pm
#28 XGRO and chill on 09.15.21 at 3:12 pm

like joe rogan, Jp is smart enough to know how to make big $$$$’s off a certain segment of society. often referred to as the dumb guys smart person.

Elon Musk is on that list as well. Interesting that the venn diagram of supporters of each is almost a circle.

#109 Reximus on 09.15.21 at 6:49 pm

So there’s a federal election next week and I will, as usual, stay home. Actually I have NEVER voted federally in my life and plan to go to my grave with that record intact. I am NOT partisan by nature.

I absolutely despise our parliamentary election system. I cant vote against or for the leaders, as he/she isnt on my ballot. Whatever partisan rubber-stamping backbencher I have to cast a vote for locally who wont even represent my views anyway, not doing it.

I’m happy to go with whatever you partisan guys decide anyway.

tell me why I should change my mind.

#110 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 7:00 pm

#89 ogdoad on 09.15.21 at 5:43 pm
#43 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 3:51 pm

Hi BB, definitely appr. your view but my idea is that I would rather put work (giving hugs) into myself than put work into perceived butt kissing. I’ll fly a plane for hugs but people should know that I don’t have the skills to fly. You say you’ve proved yourself over and over AND its aligned with your values…to you or to someone else? If its to you (or if you are rare and have found a career that aligns and satisfies) then, you’ve won! Congrats! Hug on the house!

I’m sorry, but the ‘missed life stepping stones’ comment to me is a culturalized and predetermined viewpoint brought on by years of influence – Please expand. Who’s being subsidized? Or who do you mean?

Og

==============================================

My job requires proving myself to regulators formally several times a year (2x in a flight simulator, 1x in a doctor’s office). I also need to “prove” myself every time I go to work: no one cares that someone had 1000’s of safe flights previously if he/she crashes. A pilot’s only as good as their last flight.

And that’s as it should be, aligns just fine with my personal values of professional excellence. I do not see proving myself to others as incompatible with improving myself, quite the opposite. No butt-kissing required. You meet the standard, you get the respect. (and to keep working).

And yeah, I thoroughly enjoy what I do and it pays well. But if I’d sat around in the early, very difficult years moaning about how much harder it was for me than in days past, it never would have happened. It certainly didn’t happen overnight and without a lot of hard work.

“missed life stepping stones” was a phrase used by a previous poster without clarification as to what those are.

Who’s being subsidized? Well, from the billions handed out to those who didn’t actually need it, I’d say quite a few people out there.

#111 Entrepreneur on 09.15.21 at 7:06 pm

And we can all thank T2 for all this mess, six years in power, and cannot blame anyone else. It will only get worse with T2 especially with his track record.

No safe drinking water for the FN children, really, shameful.

Proportional Representation (Electorial Reform) is being ignored by T2, he said 18 times he would, shameful. PR are for the people with economy, environment, health benefits.

The list goes on as T2 talks, talks, talks, talks.

Why would we vote for him. He has divided the country into anti-vaxers with vaxers, pushing the mandated law, now the passports.

Voters are seeing their country in a mess, where is our leader. “Leaving On A Jet Plane” Peter, Paul, & Mary.

Affordability is thrown around like the word science, used in a general term. Time to dig deeper in both of these overused words to find out the real root causes.

Science uses actual scenarios that work.

Ron DeSantis, Govenor of Florida has a huge success in antibodies, opening up another clinic.

Herd immunity, hearing large numbers of covid but very few death. I would call that herd immunity at play.

I have to look into Take Action Canada, see what it is all about. More anxiety to add to the mix.

Feels like WWIII, but stand for your Freedom, your Rights, get out and vote.

#112 Reximus on 09.15.21 at 7:12 pm

besides there’s no Rhino or Marijuana party anymore…

#113 Austruck on 09.15.21 at 7:13 pm

Garth,

Why? Because reality bites! Because free everything will eventually end. And because getting a job won’t always be so easy. So right now, it’s a sellers market (employees dictate terms) One day it will be a buyers market. And employers (buyers) will dictate the terms. And when employers aren’t flush with strong earnings and feeling fat, they won’t be so generous with the “I want everything’ crowd. Then changes will occur and choice feel good strategies will flush…

#114 Brian on 09.15.21 at 7:19 pm

Excellent post debate discussion with Rex Murphy and Jordon Peterson.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3mZn5nimaU

#115 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 7:32 pm

#88 Faron

#204 Not Clear about Nuclear on 09.15.21 at 1:55 pm

W/re Chernobyl the doc. Made for a great drama. But, I ran it past a nuclear engineer I know and he laughed long and hard about the many errors in the documentary. There are so many tropes about nuclear energy out there that are dead wrong.

Anyhow, I’m pro nuclear energy. The public perception is about 40 years behind the reality and the fears are way way overblown. Great way to load balance a renewable grid given that it can be ramped up in a heart beat. Nuculer on the other hand I will not abide by.

——————

Of course Faron, some dramatic license was taken. What were they do to? Make a show for a nuclear geeks only? The show had to have appeal to the broad section of viewers. It had to flow.

The production quality of this show was incredible. And the last episode dramatic license after he is “allowed to finish” is extremely powerful and I understood why it was taken. Strange that a nuclear engineer would not, considering the event being documented.

Did you know there was a companion podcast that addressed many of the details that had to be left out of the show for sake of not stalling momentum? I thought it was extremely beneficial to listen to the podcast episodes with Craig Mazin, and I’m sure you would enjoy it also.

It is here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUeHPCYtWYQ

What is the cost of lies? When it comes to the nuclear industry that is a really powerful question Faron, and it is is very valid one.

It is not clear how long we’ll have to house, cool, protect all this nuclear waste. No one counts the cost of that carbon requirement. Or the countless other gambles. What is the CO2 cost of the Fukushima cleanup? Anyone care to give us this number?

Clearly nuclear technology can be amazing and has achieved a lot for human kind. But human greed has been as present as ever. Lies have had a very high cost. Stakes are getting higher as the fleet ages. Did you know there are still 9 RBMK-1000s in operation today? And many if not most of these will operate likely for another decade.

#116 KLNR on 09.15.21 at 7:35 pm

@#111 Entrepreneur on 09.15.21 at 7:06 pm
And we can all thank T2 for all this mess, six years in power, and cannot blame anyone else. It will only get worse with T2 especially with his track record.

No safe drinking water for the FN children, really, shameful.

Proportional Representation (Electorial Reform) is being ignored by T2, he said 18 times he would, shameful. PR are for the people with economy, environment, health benefits.

The list goes on as T2 talks, talks, talks, talks.

Why would we vote for him. He has divided the country into anti-vaxers with vaxers, pushing the mandated law, now the passports.

Voters are seeing their country in a mess, where is our leader. “Leaving On A Jet Plane” Peter, Paul, & Mary.

Affordability is thrown around like the word science, used in a general term. Time to dig deeper in both of these overused words to find out the real root causes.

Science uses actual scenarios that work.

Ron DeSantis, Govenor of Florida has a huge success in antibodies, opening up another clinic.

Herd immunity, hearing large numbers of covid but very few death. I would call that herd immunity at play.

I have to look into Take Action Canada, see what it is all about. More anxiety to add to the mix.

Feels like WWIII, but stand for your Freedom, your Rights, get out and vote.

deep breaths dude, it’s gonna be ok.

#117 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.15.21 at 7:38 pm

@#103 ExGrow and chill
“And what are Peterson’s ideas, exactly? Can anyone attribute any original ideas, or influential academic work to him?

You seriously think man is.. smart?

********

I think he’s brilliant but that’s only my opinion.

I’ll see your comedian youtube video and raise you….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wLCmDtCDAM

#118 willworkforpickles on 09.15.21 at 7:45 pm

#81 Not Clear
“By the way, I bet you guys didn’t know there is a nuclear facility right smack in the heart of Toronto, did you?

1025 Lansdowne, right at Lansdowne and Dupont.

It is actually a nuclear facility licensed to produce nearly 2,000 tonnes of radioactive uranium dioxide pellets each year.

But the real fun part is that The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), the nuclear industry’s regulatory agency, permits the plant to release up to 9,000 kilograms of uranium waste into the sewer system and 760 grams into the air annually.

You think the people about to buy this house have any idea?”
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

I used to get my beater cars painted at Johns auto body and garage back in the 70’s & 80’s before i moved back to my hometown. He was on the SE corner…the building you speak of was on the NW corner. Toxic dumping was no joke in that area back then. Just up the road in the Junction i had a friend who lived right by the old pittsburg paint factory…we thought he was joking when he told us that occasionally smoke and flame would well up in his backyard where he played in the 60’s as a kid.
I’ve always considered that whole area a bit of a toxic dump zone even without the stories I’ve heard.

#119 Flop… on 09.15.21 at 7:52 pm

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.15.21 at 5:57 pm

Hiding under desks?
Well, looks like Biden just declared a new Cold War, against China.
He’s forging an alliance with Australia and UK (AUKUS) to take on the Yellow Menace.

Ponzie, haven’t you heard?

Australia has pulled out of that alliance with the UK and the US.

Replaced by Finland.

New group to be called FUKUS, apparently…

M47BC

#120 45north on 09.15.21 at 7:53 pm

Governments stepped up to take the edge off things with massive cash transfers to individual bank accounts, enhanced child care money and – as this election is showing – a crop of politicians who ask nothing but give everything. We’ve all learned to eschew responsibility today by borrowing from the unseen future. Way easier.

We’re living in a world of illusion. Politicians who promise everything but ask for nothing. The biggest part of the illusion are the people who believe them.

Jesse Snyder writing in the National Post Sean Speer, professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and former policy advisor to prime minster Stephen Harper, said political platforms in Canada have for years become more focussed on direct spending measures as a way to appease various categories of voters.

“That has become a core question in recent campaigns, and questions around how we sustain higher rates of growth, how we sustain a growing economy, seems to be deemphasized. It’s almost like it’s taken for granted,” he said.

It’s exactly like it’s taken for granted.

#121 One Mill on 09.15.21 at 7:57 pm

There’s a huge gap between what people are achieving with home ownership, and what people are achieving with income and a B&D portfolio. The average home owner in YVR made 400K tax free last year – and no party leader will say there’s anything excessive about that.

At the same time, income over 230K is taxed at 53% (26% for cap gains)

It’s no wonder that kids are trying to make it rich quick – since being rich is the only way to achieve what used to be the expectation of the middle class.

#122 Flop… on 09.15.21 at 8:01 pm

Put the sangria on ice, Spain is where to go for a property not going to the moon with Branson and Bezos…

M47BC

/////////////////////////////////////

“Melbourne’s median house price has surged $175,000 in the space of a year, according to the nation’s top data boffins.

Latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show the city’s typical home piled on $491 a day in the 12 months to June 30, including a $45,000 lift to $895,000 in the final three months.

It comes as global property giant Knight Frank predicts Covid-19 restrictions could launch renewed activity in the city’s property market and help drive Australia up global standings, after it ranked seventh in the world for growth in the past financial year.

Knight Frank’s latest Global House Price Index, released yesterday, ranked Australia’s property market the world’s seventh best with a 16.4 per cent increase in the firm’s house price index.

The list was topped by a 29.2 per cent increase in Turkey, followed by a 25.9 per cent rise for New Zealand.

The USA, Slovakia, Sweden and Luxembourg also outranked Australia in the list of 55 nations. Spain was ranked last after its index slipped down by 0.9 per cent.”

#123 Wrong on 09.15.21 at 8:14 pm

I am sorry, but i don’t think you know what you are talking about in this case.
Family life balance is a huge thing for families with two working parents that want to actually know their children and not have them raised by nannies or tv. You probably don’t understand this, as you are not a parent. But i find nothing to appreciate in a person that sacrifices family for a job. You find this is a lack of work ethic, i find that it is a change in priorities.
Then, many jobs these days are done in front of the computer. For many of us, there is absolutely no difference between working from a desk in an office building, or working from home. You get promotions by completing your projects on time and well, not by sucking up to your boss over lunch. Those days should be done, together with all the mess that came with it, like harassement and sexism.
Then, with internet came the opportunity of making it on your own, and not having to climb a ladder in the traditional way. This should be particularly true for fields such as journalism and writing. Good writers can get much more visibility than before when they had to impress the gatekeepers.
I think that the emergence of widespread work from home is a very positive impact of this otherwise very unfortunate circumstances. It is good for the environment, it is good for mental health and i believe it can only be good for productivity in the long term.
And about the young woman that worked for free. I doubt you’d feel the same about this if that woman were your daughter. I know i hope my daughter won’t have to go through that. But people without children cannot relate to parents, just like people with no dogs can never understand dog owners.

You would probably be a better role model for your children if you stopped justifying your decisions by diminishing and stereotyping others. – Garth

#124 ogdoad on 09.15.21 at 8:26 pm

#110 BillyBob on 09.15.21 at 7:00 pm

…Oh

Og

#125 Stahom on 09.15.21 at 8:40 pm

Wowie, lotsa bashing today. One love, people. There is an absence of gratitude for the simple things today.

A reminder that billions of people had to poop in a ditch today and struggle for clean water has my teenagers on a balanced understanding of what’s what…me too.

There are motivated and talented young people that will carry the future and rise to the challenges. I refuse to buy into the doom despite some of the same experiences in our recent past business with a few employees, good ones come along eventually. There has always been dead weight in the economy and those that make stuff happen when needed.

#126 Yuk Yuk on 09.15.21 at 8:41 pm

“One day a young woman showed up with TV experience back home (Israel) and asked for a job. But we were tapped out. “I will work for nothing,” she said. That caught my attention. And so she got a desk and went on air. Six months later she was on salary. Soon she was hosting one of the shows. Eventually I sold the operation, lost my mind again, and was elected.

That woman moved on to become a senior reporter on a big-city station. Then she went national on network prime time. All because she’d asked for nothing but a chance to prove herself.”

So, who was she?

#127 Sara on 09.15.21 at 8:46 pm

#107 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 6:44 pm
#81 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 5:31 pm
By the way, I bet you guys didn’t know there is a nuclear facility right smack in the heart of Toronto, did you?

1025 Lansdowne, right at Lansdowne and Dupont.

It is actually a nuclear facility licensed to produce nearly 2,000 tonnes of radioactive uranium dioxide pellets each year.
///////////////

My mom worked at the GE plant there but across the street
=================

That explains a lot.

#128 Nonplused on 09.15.21 at 8:55 pm

The machine has already won.

It took 200,000 years for mankind to evolve from something similar to what we have now. The modern army? Perhaps 5,000. A modern hospital? Perhaps 100. A diploma mill? Let’s say 300. The bureaucracy is evolving much faster than we are.

Wars are no longer scrimmages over land and cows, but for the very right to establish the bureaucracy. No subject is rejected, just stuffed in their hole.

Eventually the bureaucracy will become all encompassing, and equality will be achieved. It will be a little like 1984 but hey. Everyone will be equal.

—————————

When my dad was in his 20s he had a 1970 Ford wagon (power windows), a small house on a large lot that he built himself, and his friends from church. He though he had it made and I never heard him complain.

#129 Doug t on 09.15.21 at 8:58 pm

It’s not a bad thing BUT it also is – there is an awakening taking place, people have had their lives turned upside down and their mortality laid out before them on a cold slab of FEAR – this is changing this country and the future ??? We shall see

#130 Medic on 09.15.21 at 9:27 pm

Nalini Sharma, I think. I remember that show quite well.

Nah, she ran the place. – Garth

#131 the Jaguar on 09.15.21 at 9:42 pm

Alberta has just declared a ‘State of Public Health Emergency’. Like a storm warning across television screens. Fasten your seat belts.

#132 Doug t on 09.15.21 at 9:44 pm

Just as in the 20th century governments established massive education systems for young people, in the 21st century they will need to establish massive reeducation systems for adults. But will that be enough? Change is always stressful, and the hectic world of the early 21st century has produced a global epidemic of stress. As job volatility increases, will people be able to cope? By 2050, a useless class might emerge, the result not only of a shortage of jobs or a lack of relevant education but also of insufficient mental stamina to continue learning new skills.

Yuval Harari

#133 Name Withheld (I hope) on 09.15.21 at 9:46 pm

Do you have Peasant Mentality?

40 years ago, I was bad and coined the term Peasant Mentality. A mindset and behavior pattern that led to being a peasant in this rich country.

It was a descriptive but politically incorrect term and that was probably before the term politically incorrect itself had been coined. So I never really used that term. It is admittedly rather rude. I do try to help people get ahead. But many are not interested. They prefer being victims.

I think it’s self explanatory.

Sorry to say, there seems to be an epidemic of Peasant Mentality these days.

#134 45north on 09.15.21 at 9:49 pm

Wrong You get promotions by completing your projects on time and well, not by sucking up to your boss over lunch. Those days should be done, together with all the mess that came with it, like harassment and sexism.

my post from April 29

If you’re working from home you’re not going to see the new technology. You complete your assignments using the old technology – after all you’re good at it. If you’re in the office you see things you’re not going to see at home. At Agriculture Canada, I learned Digital’s VAX technology. Then we moved into satellite image analysis. Because I was in the office, they asked me to buy the equipment. Performance of the unix systems was twice that of the VAX systems. At least twice. I learned unix. A year later all our work was on unix. A year after that I cancelled all our VAX accounts.

you put working from the office, harassment and sexism in the same pot. It’s a stretch.

#135 Michael in-north-york on 09.15.21 at 9:51 pm

Work ethic matters. Always did, and always will. But, how much of it is related to being physically present in the office?

The most meaningful measure of work ethic is the work output. If you are very productive, it doesn’t really matter if you are working from home, or even wearing your pyjamas all day.

Conversely, more than a few people excel at spending their requisite 40 hours a week in the office, looking very busy at all times, and yet producing nothing of value.

Essence vs appearance .. not office vs WFH.

#136 CalgaryCarGuy on 09.15.21 at 9:57 pm

Re #23 by My Body My Choice
If the Conservatives win, the Canadian oil and gas producers should skyrocket … to the moon! (SU,CVE, ENB,PPL).
—————————————————————-
If the Conservatives win I’m hoping to see Alberta erupt into a massive fireworks show. Hopefully they will also light the flame on top of the Calgary Tower which is done for special occasions. Hell, as long as Trudeau loses I don’t really care who wins at this point.

#137 Wackedbc in BC on 09.15.21 at 10:01 pm

Pants… just realized it has been 18 months and I have not bought a pair. Sweats for work and a pair of jeans on the one day a week I go out. Who needs a passport. Good news is I saved a ton of money, Reno’d the house and as soon as the door opens, have the means to flee the steep tax increases about to hit.

Thanks pandemic.

#138 TurnerNation on 09.15.21 at 10:04 pm

On the Economic Shutdowns:
USA – leads to…

Restaurant group sees sales drop 30% since NYC vaccine mandate enforcement | On Air Videos (video.foxbusiness.com)

which…leads to Kanada:

Nova Scotia no longer will be moving to the “next stage”. Like Ontario there is no plan for FULL re-opening. Hint hint.
As always flip what our rulers tell us by 180 degrees to make sense. Ontariowe’s “Re-opening Act” is a
RE-CLOSING act. Get it?


— Kanada. As the wags say, a heath crisis so DIRE they will be firing the nurses…

.COVID-19: B.C. nurses fear health-care system could ‘crash’ due to vaccine mandate for workers | Globalnews.ca(globalnews.ca)

https://cfjctoday.com/2021/09/14/some-nurses-are-already-starting-to-resign-bc-nurses-union-doesnt-support-mandatory-vaccines-for-healthcare-workers/
‘Some nurses are already starting to resign’: BC Nurses Union doesn’t support mandatory vaccines for healthcare workers


— USA; the fall of an Empire? With the stroke of a pen?

http://www.beckershospitalreview.com
.Texas hospital faces closure over vaccine mandate, CEO says
.Henry Ford hospital closes 120 beds due to staffing shortage
.11 employees resign from New York hospital over state vaccine mandate
.It’s ‘flat out hard’: California hospital leader addresses staffing challenges after travel nurses’ departure

#139 Re: Calgary Rip Off on 09.15.21 at 10:30 pm

Your roads are jammed again because everyone is back from vacationing and spreading covid in the Okanagan.

Funny how Kelowna cases have taken a backseat to areas like Fraser Health and Alberta again, now that August has come to an end.

It looks like Alberta is trying to finish off the health care sector once and for all. And a rollback in wages for all of the hard work.

Amazon workers in Alberta are getting bigger wage increases than RNs.

I mean, 20,000 active cases in Alberta now is a massive failure.

Damn rights they should be locking down and not allowing people in AB anywhere. Until the numbers get under control.

#140 Holy Cow Town on 09.15.21 at 10:45 pm

I just read that Alberta might run out of hospital staff and ICU beds within 10 days.

Pray for Alberta. This is a wake-up call for the rest of the country.

#141 Keith on 09.15.21 at 10:47 pm

@ 38 R

Amanda Lang is the daughter of Otto Lang, a Liberal cabinet minister in the sixties and seventies, the step daughter of another Liber cabinet minister.

Garth tells a charming tale of an intern who could afford to work for no pay for six months, but the who you know background of the Amanda Langs of this world is the more usual hiring criteria. The online networking site Indeed is founded on the concept of how the job market really works, certainly for the quality employment opportunities.

The apprentice model, which goes back hundreds of years is sadly not embraced by employers, probably because they fried 30 to 40 year careers with the same employer decades ago. Why invest in training, far easier to recruit someone from a competitor.

Call it what you like, not a meritocracy anymore. Garth was right to go business owner/self employed and embrace reinvention. Loyalty to the boss is a poor investment.

Amanda Lang is an excellent journalist, but the name opened doors. Many don’t get a shot.

Not her. – Garth

#142 TurnerNation on 09.15.21 at 10:49 pm

PERMANENT Rolling Economic Shutdowns. Gee an Alberta passport system. Who’d have thunk it.
Question for Albertans, know anyone sick at all?

Every human must be put into the Blockchain with a digital identity. Why they even give you your own QR code.
This will be going on until 2025. Ready for 2022? P.s. no new hospitals will be built.

.Alberta imposing provincewide COVID-19 restrictions, vaccine passport system amid surge in cases, hospitalizations (edmontonjournal.com)


— Control over travel. The Long Game soft sell begins…
This ‘study’ hits it all. CV. A.I. All part of the Long Game.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-021-00756-w?mc_cid=dc7fc541b2#ref-CR29
“Perspective
Published: 16 August 2021
Personal carbon allowances revisited
Here we discuss how personal carbon allowances (PCAs) could play a role in achieving ambitious climate mitigation targets. We argue that recent advances in AI for sustainable development, together with the need for a low-carbon recovery from the COVID-19 crisis, open a new window of opportunity for PCAs.”


—Ruining the young peoples’ lives over what.

.Duke University has set new restrictions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as cases are rising on the Durham campus despite its vaccine mandate.

In the first week of classes, 304 undergraduates, 45 graduate students and 15 employees tested positive for COVID-19. All but eight of these individuals were vaccinated, and the vast majority of them are asymptomatic. A small number have minor, cold- and flu-like symptoms, and none have been hospitalized, according to the university.

#143 Faron on 09.15.21 at 11:08 pm

#115 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 7:32 pm

Those are all valid points. I agree that the show was fantastic. It was good to get a different picture than what trickled over the iron curtain back then.

Regarding waste lifetime — it’s effectively eternal. Order tens of thousands of years. Hundreds of thousands for some isotopes. I did a paper on the Yucca Mountain repository and had to consider that, at those lengths, one has to protect against volcanic activity, earthquake and glacial cycles.

What people miss or grasp poorly is the comparison between point source pollution and a widely distributed and subacute one. Nuclear waste and nuclear accidents are high impact but very local issues. CO2 on the other hand has had a hand in more death and destruction even after considering the causality. Failure to grasp that is why people knee jerk away from something that has killed far fewer but in a much more graphic and emotionally charged fashion.

Politics and greed are a problem in any industry. Might be worth looking into who would have the motive to fund anti nuke groups. There’s way more money in O+G thus massive motive to smear a technology that could easily supplant a major part of the demand.

#144 Jane24 on 09.15.21 at 11:17 pm

Employment application process here in England has gone back one generation, thank the Lord. My niece has escaped from Alberta and is looking for basic work here as she says there is nothing in Edmonton. She printed out her CVs, I drove her around the larger local employers and told her to knock on the doors and introduce herself. She is now swamped by job offers based on those 10 mins at the door. She also says that job applications in Canada are all on-line and take half a day each to complete followed by many levels of interviews. Applying for work seems to be a whole industry in itself in Canada.

Britain has 1.5 million vacant jobs right now. The reasons are firstly that EU citizens returned home to sit out Covid which will never finish as service industries are the first ones shut down. Secondly our 50% of young people who went to university consider themselves too good for regular jobs, even though there are not enough management jobs for them to fill. Thirdly many older people, especially women who worked part-time, tasted freedom with lockdown and have now decided that they can do without the part-time income and enjoy staying home.

We are closing our own little hair salon on Oct 9th for all the above reasons. Luckily we are retirement age so it doesn’t matter for us but I am sorry for all those new young business owners who will be struggling to open up.

#145 How things should be on 09.15.21 at 11:19 pm

#134 45North Not sure who said this: “You get promotions by completing your projects on time and well, not by sucking up to your boss over lunch. Those days should be done, together with all the mess that came with it, like harassment and sexism”

It reminds me of a buddy who was very smart and successful but dressed like the nerd he was and refused to listen to me when I tried to get him to buy some nice clothes and get contacts.

“No he said, women should see through that and value me for my intelligence and good job prospects and not my appearance.”

Well, good luck I said, maybe you’ll get to talk to one and impress her with your IQ score.

A few lonely years later he finally came around, got the nice clothes, contacts, good haircut and was dating like a maniac.

Looks like some people are still out there who think the world ‘should’ be the way it isn’t.

Out of sight, out of mind. Appearance matters. First impressions matter. It shows good judgement if you know how to dress well and make small talk.

Although if you just want to sit and write code all day, the nerdier the better. Just don’t expect to run the company.

#146 cuke and tomato picker on 09.15.21 at 11:32 pm

So many people are up to their ears in housing debt. Also
you can now pay for small things quarterly according to this evenings news = more debt. When does this end and how badly will it be somewhat like the big short.

#147 twofatcats on 09.15.21 at 11:38 pm

This place sold in Feb 2021 for $410K. No physical changes except the buyer applied to the city for building variance, now back on the market for $649K.

Nothing was created, nothing was produced, nothing was built, nothing of any value was added to the community or to the economy – this is how wealth is made in the ‘economy’ in Southern Ontario.

https://www.zolo.ca/port-colborne-real-estate/104-catherine-street#sold-history

#148 Not Clear why water is needed on 09.15.21 at 11:46 pm

#64 Not Clear

By the way – fantastic idea to put Bruce on Lake Huron and Pickering right on Lake Ontario.

LOVELY PLANNING!

I’m sure there was no other solution possible at all than to put them right on these bodies of water. Not like the Great Lakes are 20% of the world’s fresh drinking water or anything.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Self proclaimed nuclear expert doesn’t understand that water is needed for cooling *eye roll*

#149 AM in MN on 09.15.21 at 11:48 pm

#73 George S on 09.15.21 at 5:07 pm

Climate change is very real and causing all sorts of problems

———————————————————

What problems has it actually caused for you?

Some big wildfires caused by bad forest management for the last few decades by urban leftists? They can’t even properly manage the forest in Stanley Park.

What kind of Scientific research do you do? A big part of the problem with “science” these days is it’s all about how you feel. The conclusion to the research gets written first, that’s how the grants get apportioned.

———————————————-

The real serious problem that nobody talks about is that there is only a fixed amount of fossil fuel in the world and it is not accumulating any more.

————————————————–

Nonsense, there’s more than we could possibly use, and research keeps finding it faster than it gets used. Check out the price of oil in inflation adjusted dollars over the last 100 years.

Grade 10 science, energy cannot be created or destroyed. There cannot ever be such a thing as an “energy shortage”, just different forms and price points as long as markets are left free to work.

Learn about the carbon cycle.

The earth will be fine, not so sure about all the little ones who’ve been scared all their lives about the monsters under the bed.

BTW, I do well selling electrical equipment and design work for solar and battery storage projects. If they want to buy it, the least I can do is sell it. I do see it as a big part of the energy mix going forward as the prices come down and the capabilities go up.

I have worked with distributed power for many years and still see natural gas as having a big future. No need for large scale blackouts if you don’t want them.

If you really care about global warming, then support closing all the gas stations for cars and jet fuel supply for airplanes, and natural gas to heat your house…and enjoy your life.

#150 meslippery on 09.15.21 at 11:59 pm

Back in the days before the internet truck drivers while
not working from home did not have direct eyes on them IE. supervision.
You could still tell how well they did there job.
So lets put that wfh can not be analyzed to bed.
Its nice to see that so many understand that wages and benefits have stagnated to the point that is hard to find workers. I suspect the answer will be to import labour for the jobs that cannot be exported. Both should not be allowed as it not a level playing field in a free market.
Not free trade … Free market Canada

#151 fishman on 09.16.21 at 12:05 am

Its tough getting crew all right. A general malaise abounds in our fair far flung land. Analogous to Soviet life. Men gave up, hung around the Krushevkas & got drunk. The women did all the hard work. Looks like we gotta go through a spell of Sovietization. Instead of Vodka we got heroin, crack, fentanyl & crystal meth. Instead of Babushkas we got girls from China, Vietnam,Philippines, Korea & Punjab. Hard workers, keeping the train on the tracks. Party on! Think like a criminal, keep your head down & drive an old Honda. Keep a 6G portfolio of Garden, Guns, Gold, Girl, God, & Garth. A post modern Canada means nothing except shared values. Lil potato’s values. If they aren’t your values, join a tribe that emboldens your values. Make sure its a tough tribe.

#152 Diharv on 09.16.21 at 12:29 am

It’s different this time? Is it different that life costs money and bills still need to be paid and paid on time?

#153 Damifino on 09.16.21 at 12:54 am

#132 Doug t

By 2050, a useless class might emerge
—————————

Already here. You know who they are.

#154 S.Bby on 09.16.21 at 1:15 am

It is illegal to employ someone and have them work for free, at least that’s the case nowadays.

#155 BigAl (original) on 09.16.21 at 1:19 am

There has been a general work life exhaustion since before the pandemic.

I reject the belief that the steady productivity gains over the last 40 years were technology driven. All computers have done is give the bean counters their numbers almost real time. Most jobs have become so overburdened with extra tasks, duties, rules, policies, meetings, record keeping, etc that makes it almost impossible to do a job well – the ubiquitous ‘multi-tasking’ qualification. Gone is the sea of lower level clerks and secretaries who used to organize everything. The standard explanation for their disappearance is that computers have replaced them. This is nonsense. Most of their tasks have just been shifted to everyone else in workplaces. Computers in workplaces have either done nothing or added more work for everyone else.
-A few years ago I worked in a decision maker role. I had so many software programs to find info on, and others to enter info into, that most of my time was data entry or searching databases and directories and sub directories for files that I spent very little time for the due consideration the decisions needed, and the bureaucracy’s myriad of policies and procedures required that I complete about 9 checklists (20-30 items each) as well as a detailed narrative for my rationale, with citations. An old timer had told me that 20 years before, the exact same job had been done by reviewing one simple complete paper file handed to you, and simply handwriting ‘Approved’ or ‘Denied’ on the last page, with a one line reason.
-I used to book hotel rooms in the same or even less time with a simple phone call to a reservations desk than I can do online now.

The only sector where computers have made life easier is banking.

Beyond job exhaustion, this overburdening has led to a massive decline in civility, ideas, and service levels.

#156 Dmitry on 09.16.21 at 2:29 am

“recalibration of society”- interesting choice of words!

#157 Maxima on 09.16.21 at 2:50 am

I note some armchair economists here extolling the virtues of the Conservative party platforms. Take a good look at the state of the medical system in Alberta right now which is run by talentless, poorly educated and skilled Conservatives. That’s the medical system you’ll be paying for if the Conservatives form govt. I’m not thrilled with the NDP either. As it stands now I’m sending one of my kids to the States for urgent surgery and paying minimum $40,000 for timely treatment to ease the suffering. This was a sudden, unexpected injury that happened in June. Think about these situations when you vote

#158 Howard on 09.16.21 at 4:42 am

DELETED

#159 Shaggy Zill on 09.16.21 at 4:54 am

The Smart Money disagrees with you on reopening Garth.

https://www.facebook.com/316731163205/posts/10161390004338206/

Whaddya say? Personally, I’ve avoided all penetration by Trudeau Media.

#160 under the radar on 09.16.21 at 5:22 am

Work ethic.
When I started I took every file I could get and never sought to get rich off a single transaction or client. I was hungry for work either chasing it or creating it.
30 years later, I take the files I want and work a few days a week. If the phone does not ring I do not worry like I once did.

#161 Good Luck Pipe Dream on 09.16.21 at 6:00 am

Garth, young and naive people probably other, older naive people too will learn the next few years that the cost of living and taxes will damper there supposed coming utopia of working less and living well.

They don’t get it. The government and policy makers, central banks is a system of inflation rising and the more money they promise to give for nothing in the economy backing it up in GDP, productivity, production always leads to inflation, much higher taxes, higher cost of living.

We have seen now Canada with a 4.10% inflation rate and the $250 billion money printing, bond buying from the Bank of Canada, ever increasing Federal, provincial debt, municipal deficits. When their rent is $3,000 a month soon and their total monthly mortgage, property tax payments is $6,000 to $7,000, carbon taxes, GST/HST and other taxes are going up and up, they have no choice but to work more to produce more income. Don’t forget, these are the same Canadians that piled on more debt to finance their lifestyles and think they can work less and live in a higher tax, higher inflationary, higher cost of living environment. Good luck living in fantasy land.

The only way to work part-time, contract work or work with more flexible, employee friendly hours and having more money at the end of the day is to give up everything and live in a shack or under a bridge.

#162 Jay (Not that one) on 09.16.21 at 7:20 am

One thing to note is that this pandemic has made 3 kinds of people:

1. The people who don’t work at all and rely on the labors of others entirely paid for by making our grandchildren into slaves through government debt

2. The people who work nice easy work from home jobs where they don’t have to wear pants

3. The people on the front line actually making the world work.

The first group of people has no expectations whatsoever of them. The second group has limited expectations because “it’s covid”. The third group? Well despite all the hurdles of covid they’re not only expected to maintain their productivity from pre-covid, they’re expected to do more. Try calling a contractor in any field — they’re booked solid.

I think all but one of those groups are in for a rude awakening, because you can play a shell game for a while but eventually the truth hits hard: “If you don’t work, you don’t eat”

The rule was in the bible millennia ago, but even Lenin agreed with it. It needs to be true, because otherwise you’ve just got slavery — a class that does not need to work, and another class working incredibly hard to make society run.

#163 Wrk.dover on 09.16.21 at 7:26 am

So, a CBC journalist saw a 2X4 for $4.00

My guess is utility grade. (fire wood)

On the Squawk crawl it says lumber closed at 595USD yesterday!

$500 is the new $350 floor.

#164 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 7:52 am

@#131 the jaguar
“Alberta has just declared a ‘State of Public Health Emergency’. Like a storm warning across television screens. Fasten your seat belts.”

+++

Yep.
The idiot premier who opened everything and ignored the concerns of medical professionals.
Now the ICU’s are overloaded and the nurses are quitting.

The anti vaxx’ers can unite…in the ICU.

Alberta is the bell ringer for the rest of Canada if the nurses start quitting everywhere.

Looks like Trudeau’s handlers were listening to the virologists….they called that snap election just in time.

#165 Phylis on 09.16.21 at 7:55 am

#7 Boomer on 09.15.21 at 2:21 pm
…..
Kids these days… imagine, wanting to be able to feed their family and see them once in a while too. Lazy bastards, should just start a TV empire like everyone else in my generation did.
Xxxxxxx
Funny, we do have many influencers, tic toc’rs and youtubers today. Thanks for pointing that out.

#166 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 8:01 am

@#148 No Clear why water is needed
“Self proclaimed nuclear expert doesn’t understand that water is needed for cooling *eye roll*”

++++

I worked as a Power Engineer for 20 years.
I understand exactly why Cooling water is needed.

It still doesnt explain why Nuclear Power plants are built in Earthquake zones right on the ocean ( Japan, California, New Brunwick).

Perhaps they could, gee, I don’t know, build them a mile or two inland on higher ground and run pipes with pumps to provide cooling water?
If they can build a multi billion dollar nuclear power plant….. I think a few more millions for pipes and water tanks might be a worthwhile investment no?
Might have help avoid the meltdown in Fukashima.

A nuclear power plant, on the Great Lakes, where 50 million people get their drinking water?
What could possibly go wrong?

#167 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 8:17 am

@#jane24
“applications in Canada are all on-line and take half a day each to complete followed by many levels of interviews. Applying for work seems to be a whole industry in itself in Canada.”

++++

Canada excels in bureaucracy.
Its our number one industry.

Canadians used to be hewers of wood and drawers of water.
Now?
Canadians are hewers of paperwork and drawers of emails.

I had the Dept of Transport visit the other day.
Audit.
A govt van. One worker was sitting in the back seat for Covid protocols.
Two men with hardhats, safety vests, safety boots, safety glasses, uniforms, clipboards. ( if they were allowed to carry guns I’m sure they would have proudly worn them)
They came into our office to look at…paperwork.
We infrequently ship dangerous goods.

One item we were red flagged on was.
Our EXPIRED Dangerous Goods qualification shipping certificate was missing….
Seems the little wallet sized card you are required to carry when transporting dangerous goods is so valuable you are required to file it away for two years after it expires.
I asked them, ” I dont have to keep my drivers license or my gun license after it expires. Why do I need to keep an expired Dangerous Good card?”
No reply.

The next day I had an audit from the private sector for “quality control”.
Our company has worked for over 50 years with this other company and now their “quality control dept” want an ISO9000 required explanation of what we do and how we do it……..

These same customers will bitch and moan about how expensive we are and how their own productivity is down.

Canadians used to know how to work.
Now?
We know how to paperwork.

#168 westcdn on 09.16.21 at 8:43 am

My father and mother had a heated argument – I think I was 4 because I did not have Rex yet. She walked out the door and proceeded to walk down the lane. I followed her about 10 meters behind. I was concerned she would get attacked by a bear. What was I going to do? Throw rocks at it? I was stressed too that is when I stuck the rock up my nose. Mom, Mom I have rock stuck in my nose. It did come out and my parents made up.

My mother was challenged by a monster of a cast iron stove whose temperature she could not control. It also served as our furnace. My father was fussy about his meals after work and she struggled. I remember her throwing half baked bread into the chuck behind us, the gulls were thrilled.

I took an Alaskan cruise. I went with a bike cruise in Skagway if my memory is any good. So I asked my guide if he run into trouble. Yeah. There was a grizzly on the trail. He was told to stand his ground and not look the bear in the eyes. He asked his guests to back slowly. A woman grabbed his legs and cried she did want to die. He thought neither do I so be quiet. It charged him 3 times. It got so close he could smell it’s breath. Then it wandered away. I asked where are you from? Kentucky.

I read a story about a Kentucky couple camping at Lake Louise. The husband was attacked by a bear. The woman came out with her broom. An axe or bat would have been better. She said her husband was on the ground crying for his mother. I whooped the bear several times and it wandered away. I bet that guy had a tough time explaining that to his buddies.

Meanwhile, I am waiting for a correction.

#169 Do we have all the facts on 09.16.21 at 8:52 am

The hubris exhibited by our current Prime Minister is growing with each passing day. Responsible debate of issues by the Canadian Parliament has all but disappeared over the past 18 months and if the election results in a Liberal majority the current level of arrogance will only increase.

As citizens we have an opportunity to elect a political party that supports democratic principles including the examination of policies and legislation before and after they are implemented.

After incurring an additional $550 billion in debt the Liberal party restricted efforts by the Auditor General and the Parliamentary Budgetary Officer to evaluate details as to how this massive increase in public debt was spent.

We discovered that $900 million was earmarked for distribution to the WE organization to supervise the distribution of grants to post secondary students without a detailed examination. When almost $1 billion can be approved for transfer to an organization without involvement by our elected Parliament our democracy is in serious trouble.

Canadians have a right to know how many other transfers were made to organizations and companies without detailed scrutiny by our Parliament during the past 18 months. The Covid 19 virus should not be used as an excuse to circumvent the Parliament elected to represent the collective interests of all Canadian citizens.

We have the ability to protect democracy.

#170 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 8:58 am

#148 Not Clear why water is needed

Self proclaimed nuclear expert doesn’t understand that water is needed for cooling *eye roll*

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Spoken like someone who doesn’t understand how to google MAP Ontario and see there are plenty of smaller lakes to use for cooling, ones which provide the benefit of separation from Great Lakes. After all, Great Lakes provide drinking water for tens of millions…just to name one reason why it would be a good idea not to put nuclear reactors on them.

Unless you’re unique and don’t need drinking water?

But as I said, my argument is mute. The facilities are here, along with many many more from the American side, only increasing potential issues going forward.

However, this is one clear example of humans crapping where they live. Except, all the people who are benefiting financially from these power plants always live elsewhere. They come into a region as precious as Great Lakes with the most important resource, and put oh…dozen or so nuclear powerplants on the shores of the lakes with multiple reactors each of course…because…well…WHY NOT! Long term thinking is so over rated!

And that’s the beauty of nuclear. The nuclear waste is so long terms….whatever, let the grandkids worry about it.

What did I do with the power they generated from this nuclear waste that no one wants anywhere and costs crazy amounts to store safely? I charged my TESLA with it, MacBook, oh…I watched Netflix too. Oh…I used it to air condition my house in the summer, because I am offended when it is hot in the summer.

#171 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 9:01 am

#166 crowdedelevatorfartz

A nuclear power plant, on the Great Lakes, where 50 million people get their drinking water?
What could possibly go wrong?

EXACTLY!

Imagine the kids looking at all that water, thirsty, not able to drink it.

Bet you Coca Cola would be VERY happy about that.

You think the kids hate boomers now?

Just wait a little while.

#172 the Jaguar on 09.16.21 at 9:08 am

@#164 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 7:52 am

On August 1st (weeks after Stampede) we had 19 people in ICU. We now have 218. As an FYI, BC currently has 137 in ICU. Even offering to pay people to get vaccinated hasn’t put a dent in our numbers.
When the forensic is done it will be revealing to see exactly who did not get vaccinated . The demographics of each province are very different. Quebec provided a good example of that when the pandemic first took hold. ‘We are united” is just a fairy tale we tell ourselves because we want to believe in it like Santa Claus. Doesn’t make it true.

#173 Woke up this morning... on 09.16.21 at 9:11 am

Did you guys watch the news yesterday? I unfortunately caught a nugget of it before laughing myself to sleep.

Confused business owners, handling vaccine passports? Being told to identify fraudulent ones when they don’t even know what to look for? Printouts validated against ID? Business owner talking about how his proof of vaccination from Costco is not on the list of examples, so he doesn’t know what to tell his employees in terms of spotting what they should?

Making a point that he can’t spare losing employees by forcing them to get vaccinated? Pointing out the irony of Unvaccinated employees checking for vaccine passports.

But the punchline was the health official/politician on TV saying that Business Owners should CALL 911 if customers don’t have vaccine passports!

Did I wake up this morning? Or is this all still just part of a bizarre dream?

“Toronto police reminded residents Tuesday that 911 should only be used for emergencies after provincial health officials suggested businesses being harassed be anti-vaccine passport customers should call for help.”

https://dailyhive.com/toronto/toronto-police-911-patience-vaccine-passport-harassment

#174 Dharma Bum on 09.16.21 at 9:18 am

#25 crowdedescalatorfarce

Becoming financially successful isn’t easy or fun but people can do it if they are willing to try new things, change, have patience and devote extra time to get there.
Sadly its easier to bitch and moan.
—————————————————————————–

The methane man speaks the truth.

His flatulent facts are irrefutable.

The bitching and moaning amongst the rank and file has reached epidemic levels. People (working folks) piss away their opportunities over a lifetime, then cry about how unfair everything is.

They spend money like drunken sailors.
They borrow money like it’s going out of style.
They rack up credit card expenses like nobody’s business.
They never develop the discipline to save any of their cash.
They don’t have the brains or the patience to work out a financial plan.
So, even though they make decent coin, and have steady work, they enter middle age broke and in deep debt.
Then, it’s always the other guy’s fault.

No worries though, just keep electing governments that tell you that you’re right – it IS the other guy’s fault, and you shouldn’t feel bad because it isn’t fair. The government feels bad for you, so they will find ways to just give you free money because life in Canada is so hard and unfair. Imagine, having to work for a living. Horrible. So, the government will tax the rich (because the rich don’t think things are unfair – they are smart, and hardworking, and save, and invest, and do what they gotta do to stay out of debt and make more money, and keep it) and make them give their money to you, so you won’t feel bad, and have to work hard, and figure things out for yourself.

Great country, Canada. Safe spaces. Woke humans. Easy Peasy.

#175 Dharma Bum on 09.16.21 at 9:30 am

#151 Fishman

Think like a criminal, keep your head down & drive an old Honda. Keep a 6G portfolio of Garden, Guns, Gold, Girl, God, & Garth.
———————————————————————————-

I feel better already. I now know that I’m doing the right thing. Well, except maybe not the god part.

I stick to reality.

#176 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 9:31 am

@!68 westcdn

Two elderly British Hikers at Waterton Lakes National Park in southern Alberta about ten years ago.
A grizzly on the trail charged them.

The man quickly opened and closed his….umbrella, several times.
Grizzly stopped, stood on its hind legs , turned, and ran away.

#177 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 9:52 am

@#172 The jaguar

yep.
Alberta now has 42 % of all of CANADA’S new covid patients.
Tons of Alberta cars in BC this summer.
I expect BC ICU numbers through the roof this Nov.
BC has just ordered all nurse, doctor’s , etc must be vaxxed….so nurses are quitting in protest.

Nurses in Quebec were given the summer off to relax after 18 months of forced overtime and (surprise, surprise) many are not returning.
They have quit because they know what is coming.

The fourth wave is going to be huge and the majority of the infected and dead will be the stubborn, protesting until the day they die, anti vaxx’ers

#178 Not Clear about how water flows on 09.16.21 at 10:00 am

TIL from the nuclear experts that lakes and rivers in Ontario are isolated from other lakes and rivers and that Ontario is earthquake prone.

I also learned that relying on pumps and generators and many miles of tubing to provide cooling is an excellent idea during natural disasters. Being right next to the source of cooling is just short sighted, and no one ever thought about pipes breaking or generators failing.

Think I’ll buy some coal futures, the demand for it will obviously keep rising as it has since at least the 70’s.

#179 KLNR on 09.16.21 at 10:02 am

@#173 Woke up this morning… on 09.16.21 at 9:11 am
Did you guys watch the news yesterday? I unfortunately caught a nugget of it before laughing myself to sleep.

Confused business owners, handling vaccine passports? Being told to identify fraudulent ones when they don’t even know what to look for? Printouts validated against ID? Business owner talking about how his proof of vaccination from Costco is not on the list of examples, so he doesn’t know what to tell his employees in terms of spotting what they should?

Making a point that he can’t spare losing employees by forcing them to get vaccinated? Pointing out the irony of Unvaccinated employees checking for vaccine passports.

But the punchline was the health official/politician on TV saying that Business Owners should CALL 911 if customers don’t have vaccine passports!

Did I wake up this morning? Or is this all still just part of a bizarre dream?

“Toronto police reminded residents Tuesday that 911 should only be used for emergencies after provincial health officials suggested businesses being harassed be anti-vaccine passport customers should call for help.”

https://dailyhive.com/toronto/toronto-police-911-patience-vaccine-passport-harassment

been crystal clear from day one that the ford gov has no idea what they’re doing. guessing they won’t see another term.

#180 KLNR on 09.16.21 at 10:09 am

@#164 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.16.21 at 7:52 am
@#131 the jaguar
“Alberta has just declared a ‘State of Public Health Emergency’. Like a storm warning across television screens. Fasten your seat belts.”

+++

Yep.
The idiot premier who opened everything and ignored the concerns of medical professionals.
Now the ICU’s are overloaded and the nurses are quitting.

The anti vaxx’ers can unite…in the ICU.

Alberta is the bell ringer for the rest of Canada if the nurses start quitting everywhere.

Looks like Trudeau’s handlers were listening to the virologists….they called that snap election just in time.

looks like alberta will be back to an NDP gov in no time.
wonder how the anti-vax-hesitant dopes will feel about that.

#181 TurnerNation's Fan on 09.16.21 at 10:12 am

#164 crowdedelevatorfartz

@#131 the jaguar
“Alberta has just declared a ‘State of Public Health Emergency’. Like a storm warning across television screens. Fasten your seat belts.”

+++

Yep.
The idiot premier who opened everything and ignored the concerns of medical professionals.
Now the ICU’s are overloaded and the nurses are quitting.

The anti vaxx’ers can unite…in the ICU.

Alberta is the bell ringer for the rest of Canada if the nurses start quitting everywhere.

Looks like Trudeau’s handlers were listening to the virologists….they called that snap election just in time.

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

Don’t worry, this wave will burn out soon, like all others did before it.

But in this 4th sequel the vaccine passport will be the hero that made it all happen. It could have never burned out without it.

Regarding nurses quitting – did you catch any of the stuff out of NY State? Shortages as nurses in hospitals as they quit due to vaccine mandate. They are simply moving to other regions where nurses are needed, without vaccine mandate, AND where the pay is better!

That’s right, we don’t need your service, skill and experience if you’re not vaccinated, nurse.

Nurses who have put themselves at regular risk for years, decades…but this risk with a 98%+ recovered (according to 219M cases and 4.55M deaths) is JUST TOO MUCH for these experienced veterans to tolerate.

I know, I know…but somehow something seems to be just a touch out of whack in all of this.

#182 Slim on 09.16.21 at 10:14 am

At last evening’s Covid-19 news conference; Kenney, forever apologetic to his rural antivaxxer base, may have just sunk any possibility of Erin O’Toole becoming Prime Minister. Meanwhile yesterday, another twenty-four covid deaths in ICU.

#183 Jesse on 09.16.21 at 10:17 am

#11 Dave on 09.15.21 at 2:36 pm
Canada’s economy runs on real estate. Federal, provincial and municipal….they live and breath because of real estate.

Government can not allow Prices to drop…the economy would collapse. Sure the will be interest rate increase a year but minor increases. To compensate…new government policies to keep prices moving higher.

There will be NO major correction…small blips followed by prices increases
****************************

The thing is, the Bank of Canada sets it’s rate by following the Federal Reserve. When the US recovers and starts raising rates again and Canada doesn’t raise, the Loonie will fall in value… eventually meeting par with the Mexican Peso. Canada is finished.

#184 millmech on 09.16.21 at 10:30 am

Waiting for the Evergrande fallout to come to Canada.

#185 Penny Henny on 09.16.21 at 10:32 am

#127 Sara on 09.15.21 at 8:46 pm
#107 Penny Henny on 09.15.21 at 6:44 pm
#81 Not Clear on 09.15.21 at 5:31 pm
By the way, I bet you guys didn’t know there is a nuclear facility right smack in the heart of Toronto, did you?

1025 Lansdowne, right at Lansdowne and Dupont.

It is actually a nuclear facility licensed to produce nearly 2,000 tonnes of radioactive uranium dioxide pellets each year.
///////////////

My mom worked at the GE plant there but across the street
=================

That explains a lot.

????????????????

That she is a survivor of two separate bouts with cancer, is that what you mean?

Oh and Sara or Blackcat, which ever you prefer today, I could of taken the low road but that would been too easy.

#186 MORE INFO on 09.16.21 at 10:39 am

#182 Slim on 09.16.21 at 10:14 am
At last evening’s Covid-19 news conference; Kenney, forever apologetic to his rural antivaxxer base, may have just sunk any possibility of Erin O’Toole becoming Prime Minister. Meanwhile yesterday, another twenty-four covid deaths in ICU.

——-

Any detailed data on deaths?
Age? Habbits? Pre-existing conditions? BMI?

#187 Quintilian on 09.16.21 at 10:44 am

#140 Holy Cow Town

“I just read that Alberta might run out of hospital staff and ICU beds within 10 days.”

If it were a Shakespearean play, it would be a message about the dangers Conservatives can and do pose.

#188 Boomer ... bust ... echo on 09.16.21 at 10:50 am

#7 Boomer on 09.15.21 at 2:21 pm
Kids these days I tell ya.

Ever consider your work ethic is and was rare Garth? Maybe that individual was also rare? Maybe for most people, work involved clocking in and out on a regular basis with a steady job they knew they had for life with a union to back them up?

Kids these days… they have shit paying jobs, wages that have not increased in forty years, dead and dying unions, global competition for talent, ever-increasing unaffordability, no chance of building a life together with a spouse in a home that they own together.

Kids these days… imagine, wanting to be able to feed their family and see them once in a while too. Lazy bastards, should just start a TV empire like everyone else in my generation did.

**************************************
My example was of a young person willing to sacrifice for career advancement. No empire involved. And she made it. But feel free to remain a victim. Like I said, it’s easier. – Garth

*****************************************

Or … they could focus on an education in something meaningful … so that wherever they ended up, their skills would be always be in demand … and they would be compensated fairly … and they would enjoy their employment so much it would not even seem like work decades later, it wouldn’t even feel like a sacrifice was being made… and eventually they would be in a position to call the shots themselves.

Lazy bastards is right … how many of them have ever worked a real job in their life? You know … the type where you get dirty and are sore from head-to-toe the next day? That’s as much a reflection on the parenting as it is on the “kids” themselves! Look in the mirror and you’ll see where the problem is… stop your nonsense!

#189 SunShowers on 09.16.21 at 10:52 am

“You would probably be a better role model for your children if you stopped justifying your decisions by diminishing and stereotyping others. – Garth”

I intend to be a role model for my children by teaching them that their time is not worthless, and that anybody who says that it is typically does not have their best interests at heart.

#190 Fourth wave nonsense on 09.16.21 at 10:56 am

#177 CEF “The fourth wave is going to be huge and the majority of the infected and dead will be the stubborn, protesting until the day they die, anti vaxx’ers”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

85.8% of eligible Canadians have received at least one dose of the vax. Another 4% of the population have had Covid and recovered.

Please explain how a huge 4th wave happens when only 10% of the population could be possibly considered anti-vax, with most of those being young and healthy and at almost zero risk of dying?

Please use math and assume vaccines are effective, because they are.

#191 Jesse on 09.16.21 at 11:00 am

#187 Quintilian on 09.16.21 at 10:44 am
#140 Holy Cow Town

“I just read that Alberta might run out of hospital staff and ICU beds within 10 days.”

If it were a Shakespearean play, it would be a message about the dangers Conservatives can and do pose.
********************************

T2 has raised Canada’s debt:GDP to the 2nd worst in the world… who will pay for all this debt? How are you going to fell when tax dollars have to be diverted to paying off the debt from things like health care? LOL. Liberal spending ruins nations.

#192 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 11:04 am

Here is a little tidbit of info for you.

Please, ignore the dollar amounts, these are sure to be fluff and forecasts will probably quintuple by end of 2022 just as a result of recent spending and devaluation of CAD. At current trends, this whole cost of decommissioning DNGS will cost 2 BitCoin. Focus instead on the timelines for decommissioning of Darlington, and the assumptions. you know what we say about those of course.

“As of December 2016, the Dismantling & Demolition of DNGS is assumed to commence between 2083 and 2086. Site Restoration of DNGS is assumed to occur from 2090-2093. After the Site Restoration phase is completed, OPG will apply to the CNSC for a Licence to Abandon. The cost associated with decommissioning the DNGS was estimated at $3.36 billion (2015 CAD).”

Crazy fuel storage costs and CO2 footprint.
Insane decommissioning costs and CO2 footprint.
Spare a DeLorean for these timelines?

How long before people realize that there is no silver bullet. In the end, we’re just pushing it out for the kids to handle. Or pulling it forward form the kids.

Either way, it is just theft from the future. Plain and simple.

It is how we show “growth”. Congratulations. Great job.

#193 Mattl on 09.16.21 at 11:05 am

All my staff are WFH. This shift is a goldmine for us and we are recruiting great talent right now. We know how to manage remote employees (hint, it’s pretty easy with the right tech) so this an amazing time. Have never seen this many talented people respond to our requisitions.

These are not deadbeats that want to work in their jammies, these are fast movers that have realized how much of a drain on productivity the traditional office.

Not every motivated employee wants to talk about their families, go for lunch with colleagues, talk sports around the water cooler. Believe it or not some of us want to get up early, knock out 8-10 hours of work and then spend time with family. Travel as required, get into the office 25 days a year, and team build through events.

And lots of companies today, like ours, with tens of thousands of employees, can provide that employee a career path that doesn’t have to end in an office tower. We aren’t all going to make C suite so why work from a cubicle?

#194 Quintilian on 09.16.21 at 11:05 am

#183 Jesse:
“When the US recovers and starts raising rates again and Canada doesn’t raise, the Loonie will fall in value… eventually meeting par with the Mexican Peso. Canada is finished.”

NO Jesse, the Fed will not be raising rates anytime soon.

The US Reserve, lends money to banks, (Different in Canada) the FED Chair and, most of the rest of the Federal Reserve Board, for some strange reason are repulsed by the idea of raising rates.

It has worked very well for them and their buddies so far.

#195 Calgary Rip Off on 09.16.21 at 11:51 am

@#190:

You are correct that the fourth wave likely will not be “huge”. At issue is ICU bed capacity. Already 4 coworkers have been deployed to the ICU. One nurse is undergoing training this morning on how to prone the patient. If more ICU beds were not opened up, ICU capacity in Alberta would be around 147%. That is the equivalent of no beds. This would lead to no beds for anyone when needed. That is the issue.

Consequently the Alberta government has issued some strange protocols yesterday evening. Given that vaccines induce T cell immunity which is long lasting and are a form of education to the immune system, it is worth the risk of a vaccine vs encountering covid “untrained”.

I dont know anyone personally with Covid. I do know of a patient right now in the ICU that is 47, 350 lbs, and on ECMO and inbutated, this costs around $50K per day.

The next patient I am seeing today is anti vax with symptoms. She had covid in April and is showing shortness of breath in addition to symptoms.

People think that Covid is a farce until they themselves have wrecked lungs, plenty of those people walking around, or they drop dead.

The bottom of line is to protect yourself. Vaccines, and around 5000-10000 units D3 daily and moderate vitamin C. And masks(everywhere).

Luckily vaccines still work mostly against Delta. Mu from Colombia, another variant now prevalent smally in British Columbia apparently is unaffected by vaccines. Pray that a more virulent strain does not arise.

#196 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.16.21 at 11:53 am

186 MORE INFO on 09.16.21 at 10:39 am
#182 Slim on 09.16.21 at 10:14 am
At last evening’s Covid-19 news conference; Kenney, forever apologetic to his rural antivaxxer base, may have just sunk any possibility of Erin O’Toole becoming Prime Minister. Meanwhile yesterday, another twenty-four covid deaths in ICU.

——-

Any detailed data on deaths?
Age? Habbits? Pre-existing conditions? BMI?
——————-
Yep.
Pre-existing condition: 90% non vaxxed.

#197 Shawn Allen on 09.16.21 at 11:55 am

Does Federal Reserve Lend Money to Banks? And who prints Money?

#194 Quintilian on 09.16.21 at 11:05 am said:

“The US Reserve, lends money to banks, (Different in Canada)”

******************************
I suspect most or all central banks lend to banks in times of crisis when needed.

But from looking at bank balance sheets in the U.S. and Canada I see they have money on deposit with the central bank and no loans from the central bank.

What central banks have of course been doing is buying bonds from banks and others and pushing interest rates down.

The vast majority, (not that you brought this up) of money printing occurs when governments, corporations and individuals borrow money.

I’ve gone over this before and BlackSheep who is knowledgeable about banking has concurred. Borrowing money from a bank creates new money. Repaying a loan destroys money (reduces the money supply.

The finger of blame for most of the money printing should be pointed to deficit government spending, corporate borrowing and certainly mortgage borrowing.

The central bank’s main role has been to push interest rates down and that has prompted a lot of the borrowing. So indirectly they are driving money printing that way.

Also when central banks buy bonds from anyone other than banks that increases the money supply. When they buy from banks that actually does not put money in anyone’s bank account. And banks don’t use the added cash to lend more because they usually don’t need it.

I have not heard who the central banks are buying the bonds from – mostly banks or mostly pension funds and such.

#198 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.16.21 at 11:58 am

190 Fourth wave nonsense on 09.16.21 at 10:56 am
#177 CEF “The fourth wave is going to be huge and the majority of the infected and dead will be the stubborn, protesting until the day they die, anti vaxx’ers”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

85.8% of eligible Canadians have received at least one dose of the vax. Another 4% of the population have had Covid and recovered.

Please explain how a huge 4th wave happens when only 10% of the population could be possibly considered anti-vax, with most of those being young and healthy and at almost zero risk of dying?

Please use math and assume vaccines are effective, because they are.
————————
Please forgive our friend CEF.
Sometimes he gets a little ahead of himself.
A couple of weeks ago he predicted that there will be a Conservative majority.

#199 Auntie Vacks on 09.16.21 at 12:02 pm

The reason why work attitudes are shifting is directly related to the asset bubble. Why bust your butt at the office when your investment choices have a bigger impact on your net worth than what you do between 9 and 5. People are just making rational financial decisions.

#200 The West on 09.16.21 at 12:20 pm

Any financial advice on how to live in Toronto arriving from another country, working for nothing for 6 months to prove work ethic to a Canadian dude?

Stick your hand out. Justin will surely put something in it. – Garth

I don’t know whether to laugh or cry…the situation is beyond saving now

#201 Anyone but Trudeau but not Jagmeet.. on 09.16.21 at 12:35 pm

Any detailed data on deaths?
Age? Habbits? Pre-existing conditions? BMI?
——————-
Yep.
Pre-existing condition: 90% non vaxxed.

Bull shite…called

#202 KLNR on 09.16.21 at 12:35 pm

@#183 Jesse on 09.16.21 at 10:17 am
#11 Dave on 09.15.21 at 2:36 pm
Canada’s economy runs on real estate. Federal, provincial and municipal….they live and breath because of real estate.

Government can not allow Prices to drop…the economy would collapse. Sure the will be interest rate increase a year but minor increases. To compensate…new government policies to keep prices moving higher.

There will be NO major correction…small blips followed by prices increases
****************************

The thing is, the Bank of Canada sets it’s rate by following the Federal Reserve. When the US recovers and starts raising rates again and Canada doesn’t raise, the Loonie will fall in value… eventually meeting par with the Mexican Peso. Canada is finished.

finished lol.
you remind me of those cult leaders always calling for the end of times.

#203 Sara on 09.16.21 at 12:39 pm

@Penny Henny

That is not what I meant. Sorry to hear about your mother’s cancer experiences.

#204 ICU Beds on 09.16.21 at 12:40 pm

#195 Rip Off

“If more ICU beds were not opened up, ICU capacity in Alberta would be around 147%”

***************************************

But more beds are opened up, because an ICU bed of course is just a bed with equipment like a ventilator and monitor added.

A little surprised to hear someone who claims to be a doctor imply things are worse now, with the extremely high vax rate, than they were before, when we did not run out of ICU beds or ventilators.

Really makes one wonder how that could be true.

#205 IHCTD9 on 09.16.21 at 12:49 pm

#191 Jesse on 09.16.21 at 11:00 am
#187 Quintilian on 09.16.21 at 10:44 am
#140 Holy Cow Town

“I just read that Alberta might run out of hospital staff and ICU beds within 10 days.”

If it were a Shakespearean play, it would be a message about the dangers Conservatives can and do pose.
********************************

T2 has raised Canada’s debt:GDP to the 2nd worst in the world… who will pay for all this debt? How are you going to fell when tax dollars have to be diverted to paying off the debt from things like health care? LOL. Liberal spending ruins nations.
____

When Harper ran up a 50+ Billion dollar deficit during the GFC, the Libs were popping eyeballs and going ape $h!t.

Trudeau does 300 Billion in a single year, and Libs be like: but… but… but…

Enjoy renting forever kids, SFD’s will be over 2 million average in YVR/YYZ, and about 900K average Canada wide by the time Trudeau finishes round three! You can bank on it – won’t even take the whole term!

Good for old stockers like me and Quint’s lucky home owning buddies, but totally bad for just about everyone else.

The most hilarious thing ever, is that the kids who are getting it up the wazoo on RE are the same voters who keep putting Trudeau back in power. Wut? LOL!

#206 jess on 09.16.21 at 1:10 pm

trump is finished

Hear the calls Trump made as he tried to steal the election
Former President Trump and his inner circle were using all the powers of the presidential office to wage a high-pressure campaign, CNN’s Drew Griffin reports — not to stop the steal but to start it.

https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2021/08/27/trump-circle-coup-attempt-election-steal.cnn

#207 Penny Henny on 09.16.21 at 1:10 pm

#203 Sara on 09.16.21 at 12:39 pm
@Penny Henny

That is not what I meant. Sorry to hear about your mother’s cancer experiences.
///////////////

I know. I overreacted.

#208 IHCTD9 on 09.16.21 at 1:12 pm

#44 I’m stupid on 09.15.21 at 3:54 pm

I remember my first job paid minimum wage which was $6.25 an hour at the time a unionized labourer was making $22 an hour. Today minimum wage is $14.35 and a union labourer makes around $36. So before a labourer made almost 4x minimum wage and now it’s under 3x. That’s why a lot of people are finding it difficult to live.
____

I made 3.25/hr working at a FF restaurant back in the 80’s. Gas was .40-.50/litre.

Today, my kids make 14.75/hr working at a FF restaurant, gas is about 1.25

Did union wages drop off a cliff, or did student/minimum wages just go through the roof?

BTW, 36.00/hr ain’t bad for a job sporting a Gr.12 education requirement. 75K/yr should be enough to get by.

#209 Outrage on 09.16.21 at 1:16 pm

I think the breaking point may approaching. Another few more years of higher inflation and small wage increases will make people move to a cheaper country to live. The Canadian dream of owning a home and raising a family is coming to an end. I plan on leaving in November to a place where living costs will be less than half. The quality of life is eroding every year in Canada unless your coming from a third world country to escape extreme poverty. Then those people will have working poverty life in Canada if their wage is low.

#210 jess on 09.16.21 at 1:23 pm

anti-consumerist trend ?

The new “lie flat” social protest movement
opting out of getting married, having children, purchasing a home or car, and joining the corporate money-making machine, …

#211 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 1:45 pm

Talked to a friend that’s got a pile of bachelors Degs.
Councilor for 35 years. Worked in high level gov. I have a tone of respect for her.
Her family are lawyers and in politics and all grew up in Ottawa.
Says JT is a ERROGANT Trust fund baby that is clueless.
He just got better at talking and lying over the last 6.
He gave the boot to someone that had some integrity, Judy.
She says gets all his rich buddies in, and off loads all his work to the newbie financial illiterate Chrystia.
He’s been in 4 major conflicts of interest cases. (nothing happened to the crook)
She says to why are people voting for him? A rhetorical question but I said most are clueless to the big pic…unaware as to how things can fail in time, under his and others never ending promises. (Mr Jagg super scary)..But she know that.
Peeps that vote for this FAKE clown are pretty clueless or have free money for now.
She says we are broke….her kids cant afford homes now.

Stick a fork in us we are done. Banana republic’s on its way. Either way this debt is huge and their promising more of that.

I asked her why she thought no real leader / business person wants to run?
THE MEDIA she said, their trash now. Manipulated and or owned like CBC.
She is saddened as I am where this country can end up and we got one foot in the ditch already.
We get it, MOST don’t.
I’m just glad I bought ALOT of RE years ago. I’m ok for now but that piece of $#$# has me in his cross hairs.
Its war for me, I didn’t work 12×7 days wk for 25 years to put up with this crap.
If these idots thought ahead further than their reelection we wouldn’t be having this chat.
JT is the biggest #%[email protected] I seen ever.
Ill take harper any day…at least had a brain and knew how to run a business.

#212 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 1:52 pm

Chernobyl: Nuclear waste clean-up is scheduled for completion in 2065.

44 years from now.

ZERO CARBON EMISSIONS NUCLEAR ENERGY!

#213 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 2:04 pm

My example was of a young person willing to sacrifice for career advancement. No empire involved. And she made it. But feel free to remain a victim. Like I said, it’s easier. – Garth
——————————-
Its a epidemic Garth.
SO many waiting for FREEEEEEEEE or boohoo.
My body hurts from busting ass since I was 13.
At 13 Dad dropped a logging truck full of logs up the drive. Said, the power saws in the shed. Mix the gas 50:1.
I cut it, I split it, and wheel barrowed it down to the wood shed and stacked it. Or we froze.
MARSHMELLOWs now. We know how that ends.

#214 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 2:21 pm

#212 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 1:52 pm
————————————————–
Did you mention ancient bogus engineering?
Same as going into space Mr. Nuke expert.
Good chance you were going to die on a trip back in the day. Soon to be a ride at the fair.
Chernobyl was a super sad F-up….poor design…like others.
I won’t even go into the Japanese sad story.
We have technology and wisdom from our past stupidity.
Some of this old crap should be decommissioned. Build back new way better and its doable.
If clown ball like T2 can make $100bil disappear. We can waist some money on fire detection drone fire fighting technology?? ect ect
I’ve got’s some great ideas on hi tech fire fighting tech but to busy on this blog. lol
Fact is I would be ignored…That’s what we call leadership. Their more interested in keeping power than being effective.
Back to nukes…
You know how much it cost to build a modern air craft carrier? You know what propels them? Also nuke subs? Ya I do. Do ya see them melting down?
Get off your soap box.
Politics is destroying everything and the medias there with a helping hand.

#215 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 2:29 pm

We need completely different thinking on going forward to do BETTER.
It ain’t going to happen with cheese balls like we have looking for more power.

Not Clear guy, your living in the review mirror.
Tell me what ya don’t know…or what is possible…
Because the fact is, if you can dream it you can create ANYTHING if the intension and commitment is there.

#216 Faron on 09.16.21 at 2:32 pm

#212 Not Clear on 09.16.21 at 1:52 pm

Chernobyl: Nuclear waste clean-up is scheduled for completion in 2065.

44 years from now.

ZERO CARBON EMISSIONS NUCLEAR ENERGY!

That was shrill. Do you have any clue how much CO2 is belched out of a coal fired plant’s stack every second? Yeah, way more than driving some earth movers around even for 44 years. So, is it Suncor? TC Energy? You may as well tell us.

#214 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 2:21 pm

I agree with you here. I would have loved to see a US WPA style effort in Canada to employ people during the pandemic to build needed infrastructure like nuclear plants but also solar and wind farms.

#217 James on 09.16.21 at 2:51 pm

#211 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 1:45 pm

Talked to a friend that’s got a pile of bachelors Degs.
Councilor for 35 years. Worked in high level gov. I have a tone of respect for her.
Her family are lawyers and in politics and all grew up in Ottawa.
Says JT is a ERROGANT Trust fund baby that is clueless.
He just got better at talking and lying over the last 6.
He gave the boot to someone that had some integrity, Judy.
She says gets all his rich buddies in, and off loads all his work to the newbie financial illiterate Chrystia.
He’s been in 4 major conflicts of interest cases. (nothing happened to the crook)
She says to why are people voting for him? A rhetorical question but I said most are clueless to the big pic…unaware as to how things can fail in time, under his and others never ending promises. (Mr Jagg super scary)..But she know that.
Peeps that vote for this FAKE clown are pretty clueless or have free money for now.
She says we are broke….her kids cant afford homes now.

Stick a fork in us we are done. Banana republic’s on its way. Either way this debt is huge and their promising more of that.

I asked her why she thought no real leader / business person wants to run?
THE MEDIA she said, their trash now. Manipulated and or owned like CBC.
She is saddened as I am where this country can end up and we got one foot in the ditch already.
We get it, MOST don’t.
I’m just glad I bought ALOT of RE years ago. I’m ok for now but that piece of $#$# has me in his cross hairs.
Its war for me, I didn’t work 12×7 days wk for 25 years to put up with this crap.
If these idots thought ahead further than their reelection we wouldn’t be having this chat.
JT is the biggest #%[email protected] I seen ever.
Ill take harper any day…at least had a brain and knew how to run a business.
_________________________________________
I would agree with your statements about JT. “Says JT is a ARROGANT Trust fund baby that is clueless”.
“He just got better at talking and lying over the last 6 years”.

He is a sly piece of work and his wealthier friends will float his lazy ass when he finally has to bail on this current position.

#218 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 3:02 pm

#216 Faron on 09.16.21 at 2:32 pm
———————————
Depending on climate, rain fall, sun ect a combo of systems integrated is totally doable. First is to be as efficient as possible on what energy we consume. We getting there slowly..I sure as hell don’t need a 5000sq ft house but some do apparently. Thats a choice
To bad the powers that be are always in a pissing match where no real ingenuity can take place. Talks cheap as they say and when they speak it doesn’t get any cheaper.
Its truly up to us entrepreneurs.
These clowns have zero solutions.
Covid is the perfect example of HUGE mismanagement.
If say 25% of Canuckle heads could see this we could really get some traction and turn this gong show country around.
At present not a hope in hell. Fake promises rule the day.

#219 Sara on 09.16.21 at 3:31 pm

#207 Penny Henny on 09.16.21 at 1:10 pm
#203 Sara on 09.16.21 at 12:39 pm
@Penny Henny

That is not what I meant. Sorry to hear about your mother’s cancer experiences.
///////////////

I know. I overreacted

——————
That’s OK. :)

#220 Planetgoofy on 09.16.21 at 3:32 pm

#217 James on 09.16.21 at 2:51 pm
——————————————-
Yes Ive been ranting here….I don’t have socilal media.
Steam off as they say.
I could give a rats if MY RE went up but for the average person trying to start a fam (My kid) Her kid their toast.
T2 has preached over and over he care about affordability. Hes going to fix it.
It was funny for a while now I’m beyond sick of it.
How many times do people need to be lied about before they get it? He IS the epitome of arrogance.

Problem 1 is saving a large down these days, with rocketing prices on everything. Never even mind the price of the shed your looking at. Even if you stretch out and could buy you would be a slave to the Mortgage and bills.
He’s kicked the shit show into overdrive.

The 60% in RE costs in 6 years gained me millions.
Don’t care…I got kids and now one grand kid. This was a great nation….These guys for decades wholesaled our natural resources out the door also.
Nothing done that ever creates sustainability for the population.

Like my friend said the “the sad thing is he’s going to squeak in again”
Ill act accordingly. CYA
I wish I could rally say what I think….

#221 Calgary Rip Off on 09.16.21 at 4:17 pm

#204 ICU beds.

I am not schooled in data on how ICU capacity works. The reality is that beds always need to be dormant. Why? Car accidents and emergencies. Therefore, due to budget constraints, massive numbers of beds are not open due to staffing costs, equipment costs. The beds are always limited. Due to a similarity of covid and a snowball, or avalanche, once the trend starts, the scary thing is not knowing when it will stopped. This concept is similar to traffic: If the person ten cars ahead slows, it is additive for each car in front of you, so by the time you are slowed, you must stop.

I do not work directly in ICU. Four of my coworkers do, who I have not seen except for one, this morning. I have no idea how bad it is because I am not there.

At issue is the expense of caring for people who likely if they had taken vaccines would not be wasting time, money and risk, not to mention the after effects of an ICU stay, assuming they survive.

Rather than trying to understand the ICU, people should keep it simple, easy and less hassle for them by being vaccinated.

It may happen soon that unvaccinated are not allowed in stores to buy food.

#222 Tony Edward on 09.16.21 at 10:01 pm

Premier Kenny
In this plandemicEverything is working as planned
The people in this country eat it up it was a bait and hook!
He has changed his tune and feels bad what he did so convenient even Justin Trudeau and the Toronto Ontario health system want to help him I’m sure a lot more people are scared what a joke they will stop at nothing

#223 Jason on 09.17.21 at 11:57 am

Incredible changes seem to have taken place within our workplaces. Loads of employees where I work not wanting a return to traditional workspace. Tons of stressed out individuals who won’t have the flexibility of WFH. Oh, to be the dogs pictured above with nothing to be concerned about.

#224 Island Gal on 09.17.21 at 12:54 pm

My son found online university last winter soul-sucking. By April he was depressed, had sleep disorders, hardly left his bedroom, and dropped out of his classes. With our strong encouragement, he got a job lifting bags of dirt into little old ladies’ cars at a garden center, even though he is still flush with last year’s CERB money and the job only paid minimum wage. Then he was recalled to his pre-pandemic part-time job at the airport. By July he was working 55 hours a week. Guess what? He was happy!! He was able to interact with real people who appreciated him and be physically active. He started leaving the house to see his friends. His sleep became normal. I think 55 hours a week is too much. He only did it for 6 weeks before leaving for in-person university. However, sometimes a good work ethic is a healthy thing and something you do for yourself. Canada does have a decreasing work ethic. It is not healthy for the economy or individuals. My advice is to be selfish – have a good work ethic.