Work for what?

Tony is a self-taught but respected carpenter. “Cabinetry,” he says. “I love building that stuff.” For the last five years he’s been imparting skills and smarts to his twentysomething live-at-home spawn, Ben. I know these guys, as they’ve worked on a couple of my endless reno projects.

When CERB came last year it meant $4,000 a month, no tax, coming into their household. That was too rich to pass up, and more than enough to pay the bills for a while. So they quit. Instead of being employed by the small-time contractor they’d been with, Tony and Ben started working piecemeal, for cash.

As noted here, Canada has been more generous than any other G7 nation during Covid. It’s why we have a $354 billion annual deficit and a bloating debt. We gave billions to people who lost work, or felt unsafe going to a job. We paid families more for having kids. Seniors got extra in OAS. Companies received rent subsidies, payroll subsidies and big loans that did not need to be paid back in full. The cash gush continues. Worker support payments have been extended to the autumn of 2021. Meanwhile everybody working from home for a tax break this year.

The question looms. What the hell have we done to the work ethic?

Now that the herd is achieving immunity, the health crisis is ending fast and the reopening is everywhere, there are indications the pandemic + government profligacy = a labour crisis. For example, a third of companies in the food/hospitality business are desperate for staff as indoor dining comes back.

Canada doesn’t have great stats, but the Yanks do. These days there are 9.21 million jobs available, unfilled and going begging in America. In May alone 3.6 million people quit their employment. Already the unemployment rate in the States has dropped close to pre-pandemic levels, and the economy is not even close to being in high gear again. Labour shortages are expected to be the biggest single challenge companies will face during the rest of 2021 and into next year.

Over 9 million more jobs than workers in US

Source: Bloomberg

US workers received $300 a week to stay home, but those benefits are ending in most states. New jobless claims have dropped by half since the beginning of the year and the jobless rate nationally is on its way to the 4% range by the fourth quarter. That’s considered to be essentially full employment – when everybody who actually wants to work can walk into a paycheque.

So the problem is not with the economy. It’s with attitudes. And things seem to be worsening.

In Canada the CERB payments, then enhanced EI benefits, have been big competition to minimum-wage jobs. So bars, eateries, clubs and retailers – traditional providers of entry-level employment – are desperate for workers.

The WFH pandemic phenomenon changed minds and behaviours. Surveys show up to 80% of people out of the workplace for a year and a half never want to return. They like the big cost savings of no commute, and they’re addicted to a more indy work-life balance routine. The most militant anti-office WFHers are women and those under 40.

This could be a big problem for major employers who just want to get back to pre-pandemic normality. But it’s also a social catharsis. Suddenly young workers are asking why they should worry about a career path at all when technology, AI, blockchain, DeFi, crypto and the Internet of everything are changing… everything. It’s a gig economy now. Longevity is so 1980s. Employees have no loyalty since they feel utterly disposable.

Besides, what’s the goal? Nobody outside of government gets a decent pension anymore. And crap houses in Toronto or Vancouver cost so much that you need impossible savings of five hundred thousand and the ability to swallow at least a million in debt. How is that a viable life strategy, especially if you want a spouse or kids?

This is where FOMO turns to YOLO. The pandemic, many people say, has shown them that life has more to offer than a career. ‘You only live once’ has been underscored not only by the deaths from virus of 26,000 people but also by the unshackling from routine that this pathogen brought. Suddenly it seems experience is more important than stuff, especially if those material things (like real estate) involve unrepayable debt and the surrendering of personal freedom.

This blog has said the world will likely revert to the way it was. Downtowns repopulated. Highways full. Workplaces bustling. Stores, malls and cities restored. That’s still the likely outcome. Covid didn’t change everything. But it changed enough.

About the picture: “I’ve been following GF forever,” writes LeeAnn. “Your advice has helped me over the years and I appreciate your wisdom and humour…my addictive blog as I tell friends. This is Jude, my rescue Black Lab/ Great Dane. He gets lots of attention everywhere we go because of his size and handsome looks. He loves dog parks, ripping apart stuffed toys to find the squeaker, and takes over couches and beds. It’s a wonderful life with him. Jude and I are packing up to have a new adventure, leaving Calgary for Nanaimo. I know life is better on the Coast, in a small city. Thanks for keeping us all grounded over the years.”

191 comments ↓

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 2:47 pm

yep.
Virtually impossible to get kids between 20 and 30 these days to work.

The Trudeau govt has seen to that.

#2 None on 07.08.21 at 2:48 pm

This labour shortage is a farce

These companies can’t get workers for what they want to pay. There are numerous examples of companies being able to fill positions once they offer reasonable compensation. Seems like what was considered reasonable before is not reasonable now.

Seeing that these jobs pay so little that few can afford rent that doesn’t seem all that bad. Something needs to change and a higher paycheck is likely one of those things.

#3 jimmy zhao on 07.08.21 at 2:54 pm

“Moderna co-founder says COVID-19 booster shots will ‘almost certainly’ be needed”

Of course he will say that. Vaccines are a HUGE revenue generator.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/moderna-co-founder-says-covid-19-booster-shots-will-almost-certainly-be-needed-1.5501545

#4 Goody Niosi on 07.08.21 at 2:55 pm

Why on earth would a worker return to a minimum wage job? You can’t live on that kind of money – not with any sort of joy or dignity. If a business pays a liveable wage, they’ll be able to hire people. If I were a single person, getting $2,000 a month, I would not be able to afford rent and food – not a chance. Try living on that. You can’t.

#5 ogdoad on 07.08.21 at 2:58 pm

Man,

Revolution in the making….This, is going to be interesting.

Og

#6 VGRO and chill on 07.08.21 at 3:01 pm

Employers can’t find workers, yet many people are unemployed?

Pay them more.

https://www.businessinsider.com/biden-labor-shortage-solution-pay-workers-more-job-market-hiring-2021-6

#7 Grandv!ew on 07.08.21 at 3:01 pm

As previously mentioned Canadian real estate has managed to devastate this country and fabric of the society.

And to top it off it is now systemic where structural damage to economy and society is already done. Because our national accounting does not distinguish between land inflation and capital appreciation, things look a lot better on paper than they really are.
Housing values are paper wealth distinct from capital wealth whose gains can be realized at any time. And while asset price changes in the stock market don’t have much of an impact on the real economy. . . Asset prices for property result in a higher cost of living, less disposable income, and directly siphon investment away from productive capital into unproductive property. Speculative property/land booms are the opposite of productive. They are parasitic and undermine capital formation.

Without serious blood letting(housing crash of 60-80 %) there will be no normalcy any time soon.
Look for the exit and place where million $ is still million $.

Hint…it aint here….

#8 "NUTS!" on 07.08.21 at 3:01 pm

While I agree with Garth’s prediction the recency bias will for the most part disappear and pre-pandemic activities will be restored. The one remnant that I think will prevail is the effect it’s had on work ethics, mostly on those who were not long into a career. I do believe the generosity of the Feds will have a lasting effect and be a drain on the system. It will also influence political agendas due to the demographics and voting power of the youth. But, I can just hear it now, “hey Boomer, its all your fault”.

#9 Woke From Home on 07.08.21 at 3:03 pm

Work so you can buy this $2.5M home! Amazing 1540 sqft of vintage 1923 built goodness, with Irpina kitchen! “You normally see Irpina kitchens only in $5m homes” says the listing agent. 2 outdoor parking spots in the driveway so you can scrape ice off windows and remove snow from your car 6 months of the year.

Now…off to work with you little kiddies! If you work hard enough you too can pay $100K in land transfer taxes, and with only $500K you can buy yourself a low-rate $2M mortgage this home comes with. Ponder it in the premium backyard garden!

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/real-estate/toronto/article-buyers-nab-renovated-home-in-affluent-community-in-hours-with-25/

#10 Fir$t on 07.08.21 at 3:04 pm

I love work, I could watch it all day

#11 Mean Proud Uncle on 07.08.21 at 3:04 pm

#127 Mean Guy on 07.08.21 at 12:52 pm

Niece 1: Didn’t go to school but super hard working, ambitious, self confident, not enough time in the day for her. She has a high risk career and makes tons of money. Paid her house off in 2 years. She’s not yet 30.
****************
Professional poker player or cocaine smuggler?

Soggy: All I know is, she could kick your butt and look good doing it

#12 Linda on 07.08.21 at 3:05 pm

Yes, the virus has & will continue to have an impact on how folks will live/work/play in future. As for the labor shortage, given the largesse handed out to the extent where even those who should NOT have received it in the first place were given a pass on paying it back, not a surprise that lots of folks are less than eager to return to work. I’d bet quite a few are betting the government will start handing out ‘basic’ income for life as an election goodie. Why work? Just tax ‘the rich’ to pay for everything & if that isn’t enough, just print more money. Great expectations & our federal government has not indicated any intention to stop the party. At the provincial level, Alberta is now calling for wage rollbacks for nurses because ‘they are paid too much’. So much for valuing those front line workers!

#13 Bankrupting Landlords = Good for the Economy on 07.08.21 at 3:07 pm

The solution to our “labour shortage crisis” is simple: Raise wages.

#14 SoggyShorts on 07.08.21 at 3:08 pm

#108 Wrk.dover on 07.08.21 at 7:43 am
45 years ago, I couldn’t get beyond gas, beer, cigarettes, rent and fast food on $4.50/hr., had no car insurance or plans beyond tomorrow. Ideas and dreams, yes, but no hopes of fruition.
Employers need to give their collective heads a shake!

************************************
I also made $4.50/h, but it was only 20 years ago. Same results: Beer, smokes, rent(multiple roommates) etc.

I also had no intention of being a busboy for very long, and I recognize that I only added maybe $5/h in value to the restaurant/customers.

That’s what “living wage” advocates like SunShowers don’t understand: Some jobs only exist because of low wages. They simply don’t add enough value to be paid more. When’s the last time you even saw a busboy? At $15 per hour, it’s just not worth having them. Hostess, gas pumper, grocery bagger etc. All gone or going away.

All of those are entry-level positions offering something as a first job or for the elderly or even for the disabled. They add a tiny bit of convenience for the customer that can be worked into the price of goods, but that’s all.

Sure, restaurants can be streamlined- but do you want to order with your phone, pick it up from the kitchen pass-through and bus your own table?
That or $40+ for a burger and a pint,if you want everyone in the building to be a homeowner.

I thought it was nice that a kid could carry out groceries for some old lady, but I guess it’s better for that kid to suck on the government/taxpayer teat if it doesn’t pay enough to raise a family and buy a house, right SunShowers?

#15 Prince Polo on 07.08.21 at 3:09 pm

The fire hoses of free cash can’t end until our dear Photo-op Minister has bought enough votes for his Liberals majority. Then there’s JWR who just said:

From my seat in the last six years, I have noticed a change in Parliament, a regression. It has become more and more toxic and ineffective while simultaneously marginalizing individuals from certain backgrounds. Federal politics is, in my view, increasingly a disgraceful triumph of harmful partisanship over substantive action.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-wilson-raybould-wont-seek-re-election-decries-toxic-partisanship-in/

#16 Zoomer on 07.08.21 at 3:10 pm

People work to get paid, so they can get stuff.

Maybe stuff is so expensive, what they get paid can’t buy it? Thus, why bother in the first place?

Or maybe people don’t value stuff as much anymore now that they got 18 months to think about death, with 24hr Death News?

Maybe by now people have realized that doing things the honest and smart way is not the way the really rich people do it?

Maybe by now people have realized that smart and selfish is how to get ahead?

Maybe by now people have realize that those who talk of virtues of work are the same ones skirting it through various means?

Maybe people have looked around and seen how SMBs have been treated, and figured – well, that’s risky. After all, it is just a matter of time before another pandemic cometh.

#17 Brett in Calgary on 07.08.21 at 3:12 pm

Threaten lives (i.e. COVID) and remove hope (i.e. expensive assets) and this is what you get.

I really empathize with the young, they got screwed hard over the past 15 months. Us elders will say “they got CERB, free money what are they complaining about”, but to that I say “big whoop” CERB it’s temporary.

The bigger question: if you are 20 to 30 years what should you strive for now? A house that costs 40% more money than last year? No way. A minimum wage job, or several gigs to make ends meet? I guess so, but that’s not terribly moving.

#18 Dolce Vita on 07.08.21 at 3:13 pm

pandemic + government profligacy = a labour crisis

———–

Bring in the immigrants. I can’t see anyone not wanting to come to Canada once the pandemic is over.

Lots of jobs. Lazy locals seeking Nirvana. And a well vaxd populace. They’ll rent and not buy to start with, still they will have a roof over their heads.

The profligacy will end after the Federal election.

-Enjoy the lull Canada. It’s temporary.

#19 Stoph on 07.08.21 at 3:16 pm

Isn’t this what the FIRE movement is all about? It’s not so much about retiring as it’s about doing what you want with your life. Kudos to those who can pull it off.

#20 some guy on 07.08.21 at 3:18 pm

Another thing I have noticed amongst the younger crowd is their sense of hopelessness about the world. The click-bait fear-mongering news cycle has been chipping away at their psyche for years.

I also get the sense that many people are feeling that the game is too stacked against them now and they would rather not play. The “American Dream” has become unattainable and there is no other narrative out there that inspires people en masse.

#21 Chris on 07.08.21 at 3:18 pm

If people lose hope, they can do one of three things. They can
1) Continue doing the same thing (eg: working and not getting ahead)
2) Revolt (Strikes riots, protests etc)
3) Give up

Not hard to see why the younger generation is falling into #3. Those of us doing okay, may not understand their situation. When I moved to Toronto in the 90’s, after college I could have afforded a condo, maybe even a house on my post college salary.

Today, they come out and unless they were born into it, there aren’t a lot of out of school jobs that allow you to think of buying, heck, not even afford your own apartment like I did in 1995. With all the tax breaks being given to big business, investors, maybe even rich people, I can see why some of them aren’t thinking long term.

The current game of capitalism isn’t working well for the average person any longer. The high paid auto manufacturing jobs for the high school drop out dont exist any longer. I sense a revolt coming as this concentration of wealth is continuing and eventually you will have enough people that will go into category #2.

#22 twofatcats on 07.08.21 at 3:18 pm

The housing market insanity is alive and well. Rental buildings are being converted to condos:

https://www.niagarathisweek.com/news-story/10429669-niagara-tenants-are-feeling-the-squeeze-from-renovictions-/

#23 Lt. Commander Data on 07.08.21 at 3:24 pm

Already the unemployment rate in the States has dropped close to pre-pandemic levels, and the economy is not even close to being in high gear again.

Statements like this make my positronic brain return an error.

Surely unemployment rate is measured in some subjective non-scientific manner open to human interpretation.

US labor force participation chart shows a decreasing trend and is clearly lower than pre-pandemic.

#24 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 3:28 pm

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (a writer for the Atlantic said it before me, to be fair):

The job of the government is not to ensure a supply of workers at whatever wage rates businesses set, and workers having the power to say “no” is not a policy problem that the government needs to solve.

“Pre-pandemic normality,” as Garth put it, was hot garbage for the majority of Canadian workers. Real hourly wages flat for 4+ decades, disappearing private pensions, the precarity of gig work. All while productivity and GDP soared. It sucked. Why should workers want to return to that?

It’s one of the government’s jobs to protect workers from predatory companies who would pay as little as possible. That’s why minimum wage exists, it serves as a wage floor. UBI schemes and CERB also act as a wage floor, a much more powerful and effective one, because it actually gives a little smidgen of power to the workers: The power to say “no.” Workers should always have this power, not just during pandemics.

If you’re having trouble filling a position, offer more money; it’s that simple. It’s not that people don’t want to work anymore, it’s that people don’t want to work your dangerous and thankless jobs for your measly wages anymore, and you’re throwing a tantrum because you’re not used to being told “no.”

It’s a you problem.

#25 Doug t on 07.08.21 at 3:35 pm

Heck why bother getting a skill to be a tradesperson- get on YouTube, Instagram or tik tok and sell yourself – work is so yesterday

#26 Cheese on 07.08.21 at 3:39 pm

Today is my 40th birthday, surgery first thing this morning to make it memorable. Thanks to Garth’s advice and B&D portfolio, past 300k now while working near minimum wage, its possible to recover even from a late start. I’ll be on the lookout for some of these jobs, hospital work during the pandemic has drained me.

Thanks Garth!

Moisters get back to work!

#27 JMM on 07.08.21 at 3:41 pm

The WSJ says it very clearly: https://www.wsj.com/articles/jpmorgan-goldman-call-time-on-work-from-home-their-rivals-are-ready-to-pounce-11625563800

“There is a growing divide on Wall Street: firms calling employees back and firms telling people they can work from home.

Titans like Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. are taking a hard-line approach, beefing up in-person staff five days a week in New York even though it might mean losing talent. Rivals including Citigroup Inc. are touting flexibility, betting that a softer approach will help them poach top traders and deal makers.”

Want to force everybody back to the computer at your preferred location? Be prepared to lose some talent. The ones that have seen the opportunity can’t thank you enough.

#28 Brian Ripley on 07.08.21 at 3:41 pm

re: WFH

Is your boss ending remote work? As a CEO, let me tell you why they are wrong
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jul/07/is-your-boss-ending-remote-work-as-a-ceo-let-me-tell-you-why-they-are-wrong

Snippet: “Our credit card processing company, Gravity Payments, has worked remotely since the pandemic began. How was our productivity affected? This April, we set a record for revenue. In May, we broke that again. The extra revenue allowed us to grow past 200 employees for the first time, and remote work opened up our recruiting pool significantly: we now have workers in 24 states. Nationwide, research shows remote work has fueled a 5% increase in productivity, largely because people aren’t burnt out from commuting… Instead of making a top-down decision as a CEO, I asked our staff how they want to work. Just 7% wanted to go back to the office full time, while 31% wanted an office-remote hybrid and the remaining 62% wanted to work from home all the time. So I told them: sounds great. Do whatever you want. This stuff isn’t hard. Employees know how to do their jobs better than any CEO ever could. Said the CEO Dan Price of Gravity Payments”

Realtors work from home of course and look what they have going on in Vancouver and Toronto: http://www.chpc.biz/compare-toronto–vancouver.html

In June 2021
HIGHER PRICES
41% more for a SFD in VAN
(a Toronto detached seller needs to get on average another $571,772 to catch up to Vancouver)
19% more for a Townhouse in VAN
3% more for a Condo in VAN

1.0 more Inventory in TOR than VAN
3.0 x more Sales in TOR than VAN
Monthly Absorption Rate TOR:VAN = 2.8

Ratio of SFD to Strata
1 VAN SFD = 1.9 VAN Townhouses
1 TOR SFD = 1.6 TOR Townhouses
1 VAN SFD = 2.8 VAN Condos
1 TOR SFD = 2.1 TOR Condos

10 Year SFD Inflation Rate:
​VAN = 120% and TOR = 136%

VAN 1 bdrm rent down 7.1% Y/Y
TOR 1 bdrm rent down 17.4% Y/Y
VAN 2 bdrm rent down 9.0% Y/Y
TOR 2 bdrm rent down 17.1% Y/Y

APR 2021 Average Employment Earnings
BC = $57,762 /yr up 41% since MAR 2009 Crash
ON = $60,878 /yr up 42% since MAR 2009 Crash

#29 Dolce Vita on 07.08.21 at 3:43 pm

Garth 70% all vaxd by the August long weekend wish:

July 28
Single dose 81%, Double dose 71%

Even with a sh!tty 7 day avg vax rate of 471,226/day (lower Saturday, Sunday vaxing and Canada Day vaxing with only 46.2K doses). Lowest vax rate since June 26.

That date will be earlier tomorrow as Canada Day vaxing no longer in the 7 day vaxing average.

—————

Projections so far spot on. For example, for July 7, Wednesday (My Projection | Actual):

1st Dose 26,031,371 | 26,034,537
2nd Dose 14,627,414 | 14,659,128

Of course, let’s hope Cdns continue to be enthusiastic in their wanting to be vaxd.

As of July 7 Cdns ≥ 12 yrs old:

1st dose 78%
2nd dose 44%
Ratio of 2nd to 1st dose vaxing, virtually no change last couple of weeks = 10:1.

Supply is doing fine. Need 52M doses by July 28. 49.5M doses recv’d. Another 2.3M to be recv’d this week, Jul 5-11. Gov Canada expects another 4.5M doses Jul 12-25.

You will have a great August long weekend Canada.

#30 S.Bby on 07.08.21 at 3:46 pm

Yup. This says the same thing:

https://www.citynews1130.com/2021/07/07/i-quit-wave-of-resignations-prompts-concerns-over-labour-shortage/

#31 Shortymac on 07.08.21 at 3:55 pm

While there are lazy people who took advantage of CERB, I’m happy that the government was able to put together a comprehensive plan to handle the massive unemployment situation.

In the US, 44% of those who applied for benefits where denied or backlogged. This happened to my best friend in Georgia. She was eligible, applied, but the state website crashed on her. She has tried calling, e-mailing, showing up in person (gov offices all closed to public) to try and get her benefits. Absolutely nothing happened, some more conspiracy minded locals think this was on purpose to keep numbers low.

She did eventually get a new job, but it took about 7 months, she would have been homeless with 2 children if her husband was also unemployed during the time period. And the government wonders why the riots got so damn bad during the summer…

I work in IT procurement and I will push back on the laziest bit, I did in a post yesterday.

But the gist of my argument is a lot of the issue isn’t these benefits, it’s the pandemic generated a lot of jobs in and of itself and with the economy opening companies have job opportunities for projects that where initially delayed on top of normal work.

There was also an exit of older workers who took the pandemic as an opportunity to retire early, like my Mom.

My Mom decided to retire 5 years earlier than expected at 60. She got her full pension last year but originally wanted to wait until 65.

She reached her limit after her upper management falsely accused her and her team of being “lazy” during the initial WFH period, despite evidence to the contrary and was generally harassed the whole time.

A lot of her peers on her team either left for greener pastures or are retiring with her.

Source 44% percent: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/15/44percent-of-us-unemployment-applicants-have-been-denied-or-are-waiting.html

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/04/24/not-all-unemployed-people-get-unemployment-benefits-in-some-states-very-few-do/

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/big-issue-unemployment-aid-backlog-dire-millions-americans-n1256358

#32 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 3:56 pm

#13 SoggyShorts on 07.08.21 at 3:08 pm
Some jobs only exist because of low wages. They simply don’t add enough value to be paid more.

This is just laughably incorrect.
Consider a supermarket. Pretty much everyone there makes a crummy wage except the store manager. All the cleaning staff, cashiers, shelf stockers, receiving, etc.

Would you shop at a supermarket that was constantly dirty and broken down due to no cleaning or maintenance staff, had bare shelves except for expired meat/dairy products because nobody would be there to unload shipments and keep things stocked, and had to (attempt to) use malfunctioning self checkouts because there are no cashiers and nobody to fix the kiosks?

Of course not.
So would supermarkets cease to exist altogether if they had to pay their workers a living wage?
Of course not.

The pandemic did a great job of highlighting which workers were “essential”, and it’s time they were paid like it.

#33 Leanne on 07.08.21 at 3:56 pm

I had an interview today, big pharma job. The Recruiter pumped up the fact that once back in the office there would be a hybrid model, requiring a couple of days in the office per week. She said they’ve had an awful time recruiting for roles that want people in the office 4-5 times per week (no kidding)! People are aparently holding out and want more flexiblity. Not surprised at all.

#34 tkid on 07.08.21 at 3:57 pm

Wells Fargo has suspended all their personal credit lines.

#35 CM on 07.08.21 at 3:58 pm

As Tony Benn said: “The people in debt become hopeless, and the hopeless people don’t vote… an educated, healthy and confident nation is harder to govern” Perhaps with more people able to get out of debt during COVID, it is harder to get them to accept poverty wages out of desperation. They can afford a little hope and it allowed a break from stress, burnout and a clouded mind to rethink and reset. Maybe your guys working cash jobs may end up with their own business instead of working for someone else.

#36 Rook on 07.08.21 at 4:00 pm

Am I the only one who’s noodle-scratching about how many comments are going ‘just raise wages, and you’ll find workers!’

I mean, sure. But that means prices of everything else go up, too, to offset it. It’s that, or fewer jobs available because salaries are so expensive. Is there not a brain cell shared among the people saying this, understanding that whatever wage gains happen will be easily offset by cost increases?

On the flip-side, if you’re chomping at the bit to get back to the suit and the office, like me, then opportunities should abound. Plenty of room for motivated folks to rise. Let the useless mouths be useless, and give up the desk to someone who wants it and is willing to work.

Just like always, the people who have taken these covid lemons and turned them into lemonade will see rewards in a few years’ time, and these folks who are now complaining about what kind of raw deal they’re getting will still be complaining. So, business as usual.

Take your money. Pay your debts. Top up your TFSA then RRSP. Then B&D for your tax-protected assets. Then sit back and watch whatever happens, happen.

#37 Doug t on 07.08.21 at 4:00 pm

I agree with many comments today about the youth experiencing a feeling of hopelessness – social media, internet and news channels run on FEAR- society is being brainwashed and the effects are showing

#38 TurnerNation on 07.08.21 at 4:08 pm

I compose these stunning posts well before each weblog goes live.

1. Working? Why. Who would like wearing the CV Tracking/Shock collars? Better to take UBI.
If you get a Buzz will you be ordered locked down under House Arrest, as the data flows into the Health board’s hands? Need you ask??

Facedrive to provide TraceScan to TO Live staff
Pursuant to a sales and support engagement, Facedrive Inc.’s wearable contact tracing platform TraceScan will be deployed among staff members of TO Live, a City of Toronto agency managing and operating three of Toronto’s most iconic theatres. TO Live was seeking a comprehensive solution to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 among stage technicians and construction workers at its venues and to ensure the adoption of adequate safety measures

Our wearable AI solution helps trace interactions and limit potential COVID spread in all environments,” … “We see the TO Live deployment as a catalyst for many more applications within the entertainment and events industry.”

The TraceSCAN contact-tracing wearable solution is powered by a cutting-edge Bluetooth technology that works as a standalone device or in conjunction with mobile-powered solutions utilized by public health authorities.

2. WFH is HTS?

“The Globe and Mail reports in its Thursday edition that Sun Life Financial says it will not require its 12,000 Canadian employees to return to the office as pandemic restrictions ease, instead allowing them flexibility to decide their own work arrangements. …return-to-work plans on Wednesday, saying employees “using client and business needs as a guide, will choose where they work at any given time based on the activities they need to complete.” Employees will not be required to work from the office any minimum or maximum number of days each week…. 2021 Canjex Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.”


— No don’t plan on indoor dining this year in ON. Permanent rolling lockdowns.

https://www.blogto.com/city/2021/06/city-ontario-wont-be-allowed-reopen-step-2/

If only we’d been given a clue…a tip of the hand by our rulers. From NOVEMBER, regarding Toronto’s announcement:

“#74 Alphonse Kehaulic on 11.25.20 at 7:40 pm
28 days lockdown. Symbolism. Two 8s = 88 = double infinity. In other words: Endless, in perpetuity, no timeouts for your lockdowns. Put it to you this way: From now on there will never be a time of no lockdowns.


— Ready for our winter Economic Lockdowns – as the Great Reset rages on? Delta PLUS!!
Each country is playing their part then measuring the outcomes. What all those free social media apps are for. As the saying is: Marketing without metrics is madness.

.Sydney lockdown extended as Delta Plus outbreak spreads (bbc.com)

#39 wallflower on 07.08.21 at 4:19 pm

This story is so 2020 March … the stats were available even then when retailers could not hire people … my lad flew in from offshore, self-isolated for 2 weeks then got hired instantly “because nobody else will work and many of my regular employees won’t come in” per his boss … and most of THOSE employees were 20s age band.
AND THEY NEVER RETURNED!

I am no longer shocked.
I am purely disappointed.
So very disappointed in the value set we carved into the dna of a generation. Thank you, Chrystia.

If immigration proponents used the argument that we needed workers before 2020, what now?
“Canada needs bodies, preferably those that will work.”

#40 Graeme on 07.08.21 at 4:21 pm

Absolutely. This goes way beyond “kids are lazy”; the fact is the younger you are the more raw a deal you’re getting as debt/assets relentlessly inflate beyond incomes. We were already on this path, covid just stepped on the gas. I agree with another poster above that there is no labour shortage. The market is just sticky and refusing to pay people enough. It is what it is.. and what it is is the early stage of inflation. Most are in denial and believe it’s “transitory”. Obviously bouncing off the covid crash there’s some truth to this, but what matters is prices aren’t going completely back to where they were in 2019 and the rate of increase will also be higher, even after the so called relation runs its course.

#41 Ken on 07.08.21 at 4:27 pm

News story: ‘BC’s government debt stripped of its AAA rating due to rising debt.’ This is the beginning of ‘Hey, Canada. The rest of the world thinks you spent too much and you are too much in debt.’ Then it won’t matter who the governing party is: ALL belts will need to be tightened. Services get cut and taxes go up. All levels of government will have no choice. Goodbye easy money.

#42 The West on 07.08.21 at 4:28 pm

In university I didn’t Ayn Rand very seriously. Her post modern philosophy seemed out of touch with the western world’s financial mantra.

Turns out, she fundamentally understood the self destruction ferments under socialism. Now, the young who will be increasingly looked upon to carry the debt bestowed upon us by our forefathers are simply checking out.

“You will own nothing and you will be happy”

Atlas is shrugging.

#43 LG on 07.08.21 at 4:32 pm

The government is loaning you your own money and acting like you should be happy about it.

Government ‘handouts’ are NOT free money.

When you hear the word “handout”, think “loan”.

Every person in the country, even the unborn are responsible for the interest payments on these loans. Even if you don’t receive the loan, you still pay the interest.

Canada exists because the people who live have been productive and contribute to the success of the country.

Without productivity, the country flounders. Who will loan out money then?

#44 jal on 07.08.21 at 4:32 pm

The problems are well defined by the comments.
The proposed solutions are not solutions.
In the mean time, black market income will have to do.

#45 Leftover on 07.08.21 at 4:33 pm

CRB/UBI leading to people staying home instead of working? You bet.

Transitory inflation that’ll calm down on its own, just trust us? Don’t bet on that one.

Look at the commentators here saying, “pay higher wages and you’ll get employees”; they’re right and employers will raise wages to stay in business.

The full unemployment rate has probably increased from 4% to at least 6% though the central banks’ policies are stuck in the past as they continue to goose liquidity. Problem is wage inflation is just around the corner and they can’t ignore it the same way they’re ignoring the CPI.

Wage inflation > higher interest rates, and both lead to tighter credit because banks will notice their clients’ smaller margins.

Is that a virtuous or a vicious circle? Depends on your balance sheet and how much debt you have.

#46 Trojan House on 07.08.21 at 4:40 pm

Here’s an idea – instead of CERB or CRB or UBI or welfare or whatever other scheme they have why don’t we just give government jobs to all those people? Full government pay and benefits plus a pension. Even entry level government jobs pay quite well.

The pros are that everyone gets a job and is working, they are paying taxes they wouldn’t otherwise pay and they get a pension when they eventually retire. Not to mention no more government handouts for people to sit at home and do nothing.

Can anybody think of any cons?

#47 alexinvestor on 07.08.21 at 4:44 pm

Working for cash … I wonder if these guys declare their cash earnings.

Anyways, isn’t this the Marxist paradise ? Machines can do most of the work for us, so we’re free to pursue our own interests. For those that want a big house in the suburbs, they are now free to demand higher wages.

#48 Dr V on 07.08.21 at 4:46 pm

10 MPU – ooh let’s have A blog guessing competition. Firefighter? Downhill MTN bike rider? Sorry that’s two guesses. Soggy – your turn!

#49 Joseph R. on 07.08.21 at 4:47 pm

#2 None on 07.08.21 at 2:48 pm
This labour shortage is a farce

Seeing that these jobs pay so little that few can afford rent that doesn’t seem all that bad. Something needs to change and a higher paycheck is likely one of those things.

—————————————————————–

No.

Don’t expect them to offer higher wages; expect them to lobby the federal government to loosen the Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) program rules so they can even pay below minimum wage, as long as they provide housing.

After all, we need a Tim Horton’s at every stop signs.

A Liberal government will be hostile but a Conservative government would be more open to that suggestion.

#50 Rainman on 07.08.21 at 4:49 pm

It may change how much we all make. A company is offering 20K towards a down payment to work for them. What’s the next incentive? This could get interesting.
https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/ont-engineering-firm-giving-20k-to-each-employee-for-down-payment-on-first-home-1.5501598

#51 Somersby on 07.08.21 at 4:50 pm

#35 Rook
“Am I the only one who’s noodle-scratching about how many comments are going ‘just raise wages, and you’ll find workers!’

I mean, sure. But that means prices of everything else go up, too, to offset it. It’s that, or fewer jobs available because salaries are so expensive. Is there not a brain cell shared among the people saying this, understanding that whatever wage gains happen will be easily offset by cost increases?”
————————————————————–

Fine! The ability of the middle class (and above) to buy ever-cheaper burgers and consumer junk shouldn’t come at the expense of those at the lower end being able to buy food and pay rent.

#52 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 4:54 pm

#35 Rook on 07.08.21 at 4:00 pm
‘just raise wages, and you’ll find workers!’
I mean, sure. But that means prices of everything else go up.

Of course, but prices wouldn’t go up by nearly as much as the wages, since there are far more than just labor costs that go in to prices.

For example, Marketwatch did a study of US fast food chains in 2015, and found that raising minimum wage to $15 (a ~100% increase), would raise food prices by 4%. Raising the minimum wage to $22 (a ~200% increase) would raise food prices by 25%.

Would you take a 200% pay increase if it meant you had to pay 25% more for things? I sure would.

#53 No so on 07.08.21 at 4:55 pm

There are lots of kids making lots of big money – way upwards of six figures. Most of them focused early, got experience, and are now reaping rewards. Many were lucky too.

Opportunities for women are better than ever in Canada and they are pulling big coin. By 30, you can easily be doing close to $300k as a couple with no kids.

The ones that think they are influencers, dork around for years living in basements, taking cerb, poli sci degrees, smoking weed and playing hacky sac, are the ones that miss the opportunity and by the time they realize it, they are so far behind, they are screwed.

#54 Swanson on 07.08.21 at 4:56 pm

The Loblaw Superstore that I frequent just installed a dozen self-checkout stations, in addition to the dozen that have been there for a few years.

Some restaurants in Vancouver now have robots on wheels that bring the food to your table. It only takes one human to run the store front (makes me wonder if I should continue to tip).

The unskilled workers who feel smug about the current labour shortage, who think they’re sticking it to the man by not working, or that minimum wage should be $25, might not feel the same way for very long.

#55 Aftred on 07.08.21 at 4:57 pm

#12 Bankrupting Landlords = Good for the Economy on 07.08.21 at 3:07 pm

Nah the real solution to it isn’t higher wages, its higher immigration. Which means stagnant wages, rental and real estate going up, and more overcrowding in our major population centres for things like schools and after school activities. $$$

Govern yourself accordingly.

#56 Roial1 on 07.08.21 at 5:04 pm

All you “Dolts” who decry minimum wage raises need to get a new brain! Your old one is de-funked.
Australia has had $19.84 since 2020.
Their economy has not suffered. In fact it is booming. So much so that you can get a working visa from many countries.
They pay it to fruit pickers. Their farms flourish.
Over here, not so much.
Want good workers? PAY THEM!
Okay, prices go up but the economy just adapts.

#57 The Woosh on 07.08.21 at 5:15 pm

This blog has said the world will “likely” revert to the way it was. Downtowns repopulated. Highways full. Workplaces bustling. Stores, malls and cities restored. That’s still the likely outcome. Covid didn’t change everything. But it changed enough.

——————————————

There’s the break in the defences: “likely”
I remember when Garth wrote that things will revert back to how things were before. It’s not different this time. Apparently, it is different this time. Change is good!

#58 cuke and tomato picker on 07.08.21 at 5:18 pm

Dow and TSX both down why? slow recovery from covid
or profit taking ?

#59 Sail Away on 07.08.21 at 5:20 pm

#23 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 3:28 pm

If you’re having trouble filling a position, offer more money; it’s that simple. It’s not that people don’t want to work anymore, it’s that people don’t want to work your dangerous and thankless jobs…

———-

Actually, our solution if we can’t fill a position is to reevaluate, and in most cases eliminate the position. It’s worked very well so far- lots of cloud-based solutions out there have greatly improved our bottom line efficiency.

The truth is that a lot of jobs are helpful but essentially unnecessary and by mandating high pay, it results in many entry-level, non-credentialed jobs winking out of existence. Oh well. We don’t really need co-op students- it’s mostly to their benefit anyway.

#60 Sail Away on 07.08.21 at 5:22 pm

#10 Mean Proud Uncle on 07.08.21 at 3:04 pm
#127 Mean Guy on 07.08.21 at 12:52 pm

Niece 1: Didn’t go to school but super hard working, ambitious, self confident, not enough time in the day for her. She has a high risk career and makes tons of money. Paid her house off in 2 years. She’s not yet 30.

———

Professional poker player or cocaine smuggler?

Soggy: All I know is, she could kick your butt and look good doing it

———

Professional MMA fighter?

#61 Spinal on 07.08.21 at 5:22 pm

Will be interesting to see worker attitudes once inflation really kicks in.
Walmart is projecting 20 – 30% increases in consumer pricing next year for imported items from Asia, Dell is raising server pricing 25 – 30% next month. Let the games begin.

#62 S.Bby on 07.08.21 at 5:23 pm

There must be an election coming up. Spendy McSpender is at it again:

https://www.citynews1130.com/2021/07/08/trudeau-bc-child-care/

#63 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.08.21 at 5:37 pm

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 2:47 pm
yep.
Virtually impossible to get kids between 20 and 30 these days to work.

The Trudeau govt has seen to that.
——————-
Manual labor mostly.
Who wants to work outside in the heat?
The future big bucks are in intelectual work.
My kids attend University, WFH during breaks.
Trudeau has done a great job getting us through the pandemic. He can’t be holding hands of everyone.
Self responsibility, remember.
But I think CEF is just jealous of the PM.
Yes, he is.
Just check what’s going on the States.
Infections going up again.
My

#64 Yorkville renter on 07.08.21 at 5:39 pm

“Suddenly it seems experience is more important than stuff…”

No, this has always been true…

#65 Linda on 07.08.21 at 5:48 pm

Regarding increasing wages. The argument has been made that minimum wage should be at least $15 per hour. However, each province sets their own minimum wage. The Federal government has legislated a $15 MW to begin December 29th, 2021 but apparently that amount only applies to government related positions. In other words, those in service industries etc. are still only eligible to be paid whatever MW has been legislated by the province/territory they work/reside in. Further, youth workers can be paid less IF the number of working hours at any employer are less than 28 hours per week.

Regardless of the above, if universal MW was $15 per hour & an employee worked 40 hours per week the weekly gross is only $600. Once income tax/EI/CPP are deducted the estimated net is likely no more than $480. Could be less if there are other payroll deductions in addition to the basic 3. Note that CERB paid $500 per week. Yes, income tax is owing on that amount but it wasn’t deducted at source, so the CRA will doubtless be attempting to collect taxes owed from a whole bunch of recipients who didn’t think to set aside $ for the bill to come. Regardless, the irony here is that in order to get as much as CERB one must work at least 40 hours per week IF the work they are doing pays $15 per hour. So can see why positions paying MW are less than alluring.

#66 Craig Paneer on 07.08.21 at 5:51 pm

NDP’s British Columbia’s AAA credit rating stripped today because of high debt. When your mortgage rate is 4% to 5% in coming years pay up and shut up or sell the house, condo. Property taxes, strata, condo fees are going way up in coming years.

#67 Sail Away on 07.08.21 at 6:09 pm

#30 Shortymac on 07.08.21 at 3:55 pm

And the government wonders why the riots got so damn bad during the summer…

———

Antifa and radical leftists. Wonder no more. Troublemakers.

#68 Wrk.dover on 07.08.21 at 6:10 pm

#13 SoggyShorts on 07.08.21 at 3:08 pm
#108 Wrk.dover on 07.08.21 at 7:43 am
45 years ago, I couldn’t get beyond gas, beer, cigarettes, rent and fast food on $4.50/hr., had no car insurance or plans beyond tomorrow. Ideas and dreams, yes, but no hopes of fruition.
Employers need to give their collective heads a shake!
************************************
I also made $4.50/h, but it was only 20 years ago. Same results: Beer, smokes, rent(multiple roommates) etc.

I also had no intention of being a busboy for very long, and I recognize that I only added maybe $5/h in value to the restaurant/customers.

That’s what “living wage” advocates like SunShowers don’t understand: Some jobs only exist because of low wages. They simply don’t add enough value to be paid more. When’s the last time you even saw a busboy? At $15 per hour, it’s just not worth having them.
__________________________________

When I was a lazy 16yr old bus boy, the brilliant waitresses woke me up with a serious percentage of the tips because they grew when I was game on.

In an eatery where I am ignored by a waitress busily bussing tables and eventually I even have to await the cheque for a long long time, I stiff the tip and don’t come back.

I pay for service, and expct the same.

I know a man that built, owned and ran a fast food franchise location, and he let me in on an industry secret.

10% OF YOUR BILL IS LABOUR!

If wages are doubled, your $5.00 burger will cost $5.50.

Now, come the Tory commenters disputing this….

#69 Peter Pickles on 07.08.21 at 6:12 pm

Garth why do you always focus on cerb and working class employees?

Perhaps you should write more about small and large businesses who have made out like bandits on government welfare. The CEWS and small business grants have been far more generous than any individual support. The rich have become far richer in this pandemic. Why focus on the workers? The real story is about the people at the top and their hoovering government money like pigs at the trough.

#70 Dr V on 07.08.21 at 6:13 pm

45 Trojan house – google “federal job guarantee”

#71 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.08.21 at 6:15 pm

#126 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 12:16 pm
@#121 SandyR

Well done.
If you keeping going the way you have.
Easily $1,000,000 invested by 65
———————
And then what?
Party like hell?
A couple of observations:
If the meek shall inherit the world, why are they saving so much?
If every Canadian would live like this Lady, Canada’s GDP would be on par with Swasiland’s.

#72 Barry on 07.08.21 at 6:19 pm

So many ppl on this blog wanting higher min wages or higher wages in general… let see how they feel when the price of their happy meal goes to $20 and jobs get cut. It not the companies that are going to lose in the end. It’s also not the shareholders. It’s you!

#73 OK, Doomer on 07.08.21 at 6:20 pm

#41 The West on 07.08.21 at 4:28 pm

“You will own nothing and you will be happy”

Atlas is shrugging.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ayn Rand understood what modern progressives don’t: human nature.

I’ll add to your statement:

“You’ll own nothing and you’ll have achieved the equity of misery”

Under Capitalism, people force the government to do the peoples bidding. Under Socialism the government forces people to do the government’s bidding.

Ever has it been so.

#74 the Jaguar on 07.08.21 at 6:22 pm

“This could be a big problem for major employers who just want to get back to pre-pandemic normality. But it’s also a social catharsis.” – GT

The social catharsis has been on a steep decline for some time now. Crowdie posts little tidbits of news about ‘Life at the Bottom’ from the streets of Vancouver, but certainly every city has the same problems to a greater or lesser degree. We are a divided society on many levels these days. But never mind the musings of of a jungle cat. Here is an excerpt from an interview back on April 2, 2020 when the Pandemic first began and the world was plunged into crisis:

Kevin Warsh ( who is wicked smart and not hard to look at ) said this about people going back to work:

“But in the design of these policies, it appears as though in many states, once people find their way onto the sidelines, and they’re getting unemployment insurance, we have to ask ourself in economics a rather cold hearted question, are they getting paid more for leisure than they are for work? What we wanna do is we want there to be a generous safety net for people who find themselves in harm’s way through no fault of their own, but when the world, when the patient comes out of that induced coma, we want them to reattach themselves immediately to the labor force, want them to come back and be part of the American dream, be part of their employer, be part of this dynamic economy. In the last crisis, what we ended up with for nearly a decade was a generation of workers that suffered from bouts of despair. They had detached from the labor force. And if we learned anything from the post crisis era of ’09, we don’t want to commit that same sin again because it’s not good for those workers, and it’s certainly not good for our economy.”

Here’s the whole piece for those who are interested.

https://www.hoover.org/research/kevin-warsh-and-long-road-back-economic-recovery-0

#75 Nat on 07.08.21 at 6:25 pm

Only reason I (mid-20s) am still working my bum off is because I see my career path getting to a place where I can meet my goals. I have a good job and cheap rent.

If I were making 50k a year in toronto, f yea I’d be gone travelling and having fun, the value equation is not worth it at that income. Many of my friends have taken this route and I’m sometimes jealous!

#76 Greg Ellis on 07.08.21 at 6:29 pm

I guess the Canadian government threw a lot of money around. I got all of $300 as a senior. As a US Green Card holder, I received over $3000 with
different stimulus checks. I guess in Canada it went to all the teens which makes sense. After all, their employment time is limited. Lol.

#77 My Body My Choice on 07.08.21 at 6:31 pm

Canadian patriot Michael Arana Nation (Youtube) suggested in one of his videos a few days ago that the best way we can protest against the globalist Trudeau medical tyrannical takeover of our country is to not support the current economy:

– refuse to work, stay on CRB/welfare
– don’t shop, don’t go to restaurants/bars/services
– pay cash, support the underground economy
– avoid paying taxes whether it’s sales tax or income tax
– do the opposite of what the government wants you to do

In other words, punish the current federal Liberals and their provincial tyrants with the hopes of creating/triggering some kind of financial crisis in Canada. Eventually the current tyrants will be blamed for their terrible policies and be replaced with fiscal and social conservatives who will clean up the mess (as usual).

#78 Chalkie on 07.08.21 at 6:35 pm

Save your Money: Once you have saved up just sky of buying your home, purchase a life lease, No Lawyer Fees, and No land transfer Tax fees. Great deal for our seniors, see you on the Golf Course.

#79 Comrade on 07.08.21 at 6:37 pm

#14 Prince Polo on 07.08.21 at 3:09 pm

The fire hoses of free cash can’t end until our dear Photo-op Minister has bought enough votes for his Liberals majority. Then there’s JWR who just said:

From my seat in the last six years, I have noticed a change in Parliament, a regression. It has become more and more toxic and ineffective while simultaneously marginalizing individuals from certain backgrounds. Federal politics is, in my view, increasingly a disgraceful triumph of harmful partisanship over substantive action.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-wilson-raybould-wont-seek-re-election-decries-toxic-partisanship-in/

———–

And all of that happened during the most diverse, inclusive, and equitable government. Go figure!

#80 wallflower on 07.08.21 at 6:39 pm

#68 Peter Pickles on 07.08.21 at 6:12 pm
Good point.

I know dude with own biz claims 2020 BY FAR best year ever.
I looked up his company name at the government website that offers that searchable feature… bingo!
He is getting those freebies and zero requirement for them.
(Doesn’t even have an office – all the workers always WFHd.)

Massive disappointment to me.
At both the personal and biz level, Canadians fail the smell test.
(Well, I guess they are not all Canadians. I recall reading that international students had their entitlements, too.)

#81 so sad on 07.08.21 at 6:53 pm

you still haven’t figured out that government is the problem. government and central banks that have enabled their behaviours.

you trash the previous monetary system that worked for centuries, without flaw. but praise this one that leads to the wealthy getting wealthier and the poor getting poorer.

before Nixon ended convertibility in 1971, US productivity continued rose in real terms, and WAGES rose in tandem. more productive workers got paid more. real wages went up ..

after 1971, productivity continued to rise, but real wages did not. they flat lined. literally since 1971.

from 1948-1973 productivity rose 96.7%. wages 91.3%
from 1973- 2013 productivity up 74.4%, wages 9.2%
see the link?

the evils in society stem from government and central bank interference in the free market. you can’t continue to print money forever, and redistribute those funds to your friends, leaving the majourity of people in society behind.

and now we have an economy that simply CAN NOT function without MORE MONEY PRINTING. governments are keeping zombie companies alive, when they should be washed out. because the minute it stops, the game of musical chairs ends.

#82 KLNR on 07.08.21 at 7:05 pm

folks throwing around ayn rand tripe when really the working class has just discovered Henry David Thoreau.

#83 Mattl on 07.08.21 at 7:13 pm

As I’ve stated here for months there is no going back to pre-pandemic WFOffice normality. Employees are flat out telling employers they will not be returning, and smart employers are using this leverage to scoop up top talent.

Absolutely massive opportunity for forward thinking employers to build their bench and gobble up the best people from companies that are dead set on forcing their people back into a cubicle 5 days a week. That’s what we are doing and I’m finding better talent then I’ve been able to attract in ages. The right model will have no issues getting fully staffed up.

There is no putting this cat back in the bag.

#84 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 7:17 pm

@#70Paternalistic Ponzie.
“If every Canadian would live like this Lady, Canada’s GDP would be on par with Swasiland’s.”

++++

Errr.
No.
If every Canadian lived like her and actually saved money our GDP would be on par with Switzerland….

#85 Cici on 07.08.21 at 7:18 pm

What a truly magical country this would be if restaurant owners and retail businesses could just “pay you more!”

Some people here don’t seem to realize how cut-throat many businesses are. It’s damn hard to make money in restauration, and even when you do build up a successful, trendy restaurant or franchise, a few bad employees can seriously tarnish your reputation and bottom line, or you can lose a good part of your business to the new restaurants and chains that are always popping up close by.

The costs are already high, and the margins are for the most part sparse. And in my city, a decent burger and beer is already an easy $40 at most dine-in restaurants. Heck, even that price of a combo at McDonalds has gotten to the obscene level of what it used to cost me for a dine-in equivalent meal just a few years back.

I suspect that there’s going to be a lot of crying when the UI extension ends. But if it doesn’t and a basic income is introduced, it won’t be long before a bunch of restaurants shutter and the remaining ones are charging $60 bucks or more for a burger and beer so their employees can earn a “living wage.” But ironically, that “living wage” won’t be enough for the workers themselves to be able to afford a dine-in burger or a beer in any other restaurant. And the UBI crowd will definitely have to take on under-the-table side hustles if they expect to be able to dine out from time to time in the future.

In fact, if all this government largesse keeps growing and being extended, at some point the inflation will no longer be labelled “transitory.” It will get very ugly and a huge policy shift will need to be ushered in. At that point, a recession, spending cuts and asset crashes will be in the cards, and at that point people without jobs will be happy to get back to work whatever the pay. However, those whose resumés only list UBI as recent “work experience” will probably have a hard time getting hired.

#86 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.08.21 at 7:18 pm

Signs of the times that things are back to normal:
Line ups at Costco to save a few cents on gas are about 1/2 hour again.
Was walking by there today, and saw an Escalade Tank with a contraption on the back that held about 6 twenty litre containers.
I guess a monster like that needs about 120 litre for a fill up.
So the 6 containers are one fill up.
So this guy spends about an hour in a smelly gas station in the heat just to save a few bucks.
I pity the guy behind him, having to wait all that time.
And many people don’t turn off the engine, probably burning more gas than they are saving.
Stupid is as stupid does.

#87 Quintilian on 07.08.21 at 7:23 pm

#61 S.Bby
“There must be an election coming up. Spendy McSpender is at it again”

S.Bby: whatever the price it’s worth it, if it keeps the evil and corrupted BC liberals out of power.

Policies such as these will create more distance between the likes of Christy Clark & Rich Coleman and political power.

And although both filthy wicked creeps will never hold office again, there are many amoral hillbillies in their party ready to take their place.

#88 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.08.21 at 7:24 pm

#73 JAG
Here’s the whole piece for those who are interested.

https://www.hoover.org/research/kevin-warsh-and-long-road-back-economic-recovery-0
————————
Not interested.
I don’t buy any Hoovers.
They just pull too much to the right for my liking.

#89 Fruit Vendor on 07.08.21 at 7:24 pm

Work attitude is a major problem as far as I am concerned. We are a small orchard in Okanagan, BC. We struggles last year during the picking season because of covid and the lack of pickers. This year after struggling through historic high temperatures, many lost their crops while others lost trees. We find ourselves in a fortunate position of having a very nice set of cherries ready for picking in 10-12 days. Should be great news, however, I cannot find pickers. Continued covid cash benefits are not encouraging employable individuals to work. So sad, our view of life, in my opinion, has deteriorated significantly. No long term vision, energy to move forward with plans for the future, na, its all about now and how I can do nothing and still have some money in my pocket.

#90 OK, Doomer on 07.08.21 at 7:28 pm

#81 KLNR on 07.08.21 at 7:05 pm
folks throwing around ayn rand tripe when really the working class has just discovered Henry David Thoreau.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ayn Rand wrote thick books with lots of words and they take effort, focus and challenge to understand.

Not the kind of thing that Mills get into because there’s no Tik Tok version.

What do you call a Millenial who’s read 1984?

No idea…. none of them are allowed to…

#91 Sail Away on 07.08.21 at 7:34 pm

#68 Peter Pickles on 07.08.21 at 6:12 pm

Perhaps you should write more about small and large businesses who have made out like bandits on government welfare. The CEWS and small business grants have been far more generous than any individual support. The rich have become far richer in this pandemic. Why focus on the workers? The real story is about the people at the top and their hoovering government money like pigs at the trough.

——-

Yep, we’ve done okay with the wage subsidy and interest-free/partially-forgiveable business loans, haha.

The wage subsidy was sort of a wash, since one option was to dismiss staff and let them go on CERB and the other was to keep them on and act as the government’s pogey supplier. My companies didn’t necessarily make money from the wage subsidy.

The loans were very nice. $60k interest-free until December 2021 with $20k forgiveable. Yes, please, serve it up.

I wouldn’t go as far as ‘far richer’. A little richer maybe.

#92 Ustabe on 07.08.21 at 7:37 pm

#71 Barry on 07.08.21 at 6:19 pm
So many ppl on this blog wanting higher min wages or higher wages in general… let see how they feel when the price of their happy meal goes to $20 and jobs get cut. It not the companies that are going to lose in the end. It’s also not the shareholders. It’s you!

Min wage in France, adjusted to US currency: 12.35
Cost of a Big Mac in France: 4.84

Min wage in Australia: 14.80
Big Mac there: 4.71

Min wage in US: 7.25
Big Mac: 5.80

How about Denmark…min wage at 22.00 per plus 6 months vacation/paid leave/medical days if needed.
Big Mac: 4.87

And how come the pittance paid to minimum wage employees is so harmful to the bottom line that it can not be done while the billions spent on the CEO plus share buybacks has no apparent effect on the bottom line?

How can Walmart operate in Canada when minimum wage is so much higher than in the US, taxes are higher, general cost of doing business is higher….anybody feel like telling Walmart they are fools for coming into Canada?

I ran hospitality stuff for decades, its what most folks think I did and I can tell you an across the board 10% COL bump is barely felt even without new menu prices.

I offered company paid dental, health and extended health too…sometimes at 50/50 sometimes at 100%. not unusual for me to have a salad chopper or a dishwasher at double minimum wage.

Solid COL raises, solid performance review raises and solid guidance as to how to improve and grab a bigger raise next cycle. I never had issues making money. Of course each and every month wasn’t profitable but we just dug in and weathered the recession or the downturn or the whatever.

If your business can’t afford to pay living wages its not much of a business.

#93 Cici on 07.08.21 at 7:39 pm

#25 Cheese on 07.08.21 at 3:39 pm

Happy Birthday Cheese!

And congratulations… your net worth is awesome for your age, especially since you claim to make not much over minimum wage.

I don’t know how you’ve managed it, but whatever you’re doing, keep doing it. And if you find a higher paying job while you’re at it, you’ll be in an even sweeter spot sooner.

#94 Km on 07.08.21 at 7:39 pm

It is everywhere even the well paid trade jobs cannot keep people not just the lower wage ones. Too many people double dipping and as you said doing the cash side jobs. Now is the time to make a big move career wise for those smart enough to do it. For all those who rather not work much they must be fools to think their employers will not remember their lack of loyalty and worn ethic when winter comes and all the benefits have run dry.

#95 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm

@#89 Ok Doomer
“What do you call a Millenial who’s read 1984?”

++++

An ill Literate?

#96 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm

#23 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 3:28 pm
I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (a writer for the Atlantic said it before me, to be fair):

The job of the government is not to ensure a supply of workers at whatever wage rates businesses set, and workers having the power to say “no” is not a policy problem that the government needs to solve.

———————————–

True, but they also shouldn’t be messing with the market by offering ludicrous “free money, no work” schemes either. That also is a market distortion.

The labor market, like all markets, is best left to the “invisible hand”. Wages will automatically rise until supply equals demand. But if supply is reduced due to government intervention in the form of something like the CERB, the market will become distorted.

Your simplistic answer of simply “pay them more” will not work to overcome this distortion, because many of the jobs are not “worth more”. If the economic productivity of a job is less than the salary demanded by the employee the economy cannot raise the wage because there is no productivity (can be thought of as money) being produced to generate the extra value (also can be though of as money).

Let’s take a simple example of a guy operating an ice cream truck. One of his biggest expenses will be the kids he hires in the summer to dole out the ice cream. If his labor costs suddenly increase by 50%, where is he going to get the money? He can trim his profit margin but there is only so much there. He will have to raise prices. But what if the customers are not willing to pay more for a discretionary item like an ice cream cone? His sales will drop. So he tries to make up the difference with a further price increase. Sales drop even more. The cycle will continue until he is out of business. The kids will lose their jobs.

Labor markets cannot be artificially manipulated successfully any more so than any other market (without a cartel). If we take money out of it for a moment, each and every job out there has a certain economic value as expressed by purchasing power of other goods and services. If the wage being paid exceeds the value of the work being done in terms of other goods and services, the job must be eliminated one way or another. If that means shutting down the ice cream truck and scrapping it for parts, so be it.

Paying people not to work is doubly destructive to the economy, because now a whole bunch of people have money (purchasing power), but they are not contributing to the supply of goods and services in the economy. The goods and services aren’t going to magically appear if nobody is working. Those shelves aren’t going to stock themselves. So what you end up with is shortages throughout the economy in the face of spiraling inflation.

If there were a way to solve the problems of economics by simply handing out money, I am sure somebody somewhere would have perfected it by now. Lord knows it has been tried many times. It always ends in economic collapse.

The fact is that there are many jobs that aren’t worth much money. People can’t be paid more to do them, because the value isn’t there.

#97 KLNR on 07.08.21 at 7:50 pm

@#89 OK, Doomer on 07.08.21 at 7:28 pm
#81 KLNR on 07.08.21 at 7:05 pm
folks throwing around ayn rand tripe when really the working class has just discovered Henry David Thoreau.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ayn Rand wrote thick books with lots of words and they take effort, focus and challenge to understand.

Not the kind of thing that Mills get into because there’s no Tik Tok version.

What do you call a Millenial who’s read 1984?

No idea…. none of them are allowed to…

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

#98 Hurtin' Albertan on 07.08.21 at 7:52 pm

Re: JWR not running again.

Sad that we seem to be losing people of this caliber in politics.

She cites “The privileges we give political parties. The out-of-date norms of our first-past-the-post electoral system. The lack of inclusiveness. The power of the prime minister and the centralization of power in the hands of those who are unelected. The erosion of governing principles and conventions to the point where there are limited or no consequences for wrongful acts undertaken for political benefit. The lack of courage to speak the truth—and the failure of bystanders to support those who do.”

I suspect Garth can relate to her reasoning.

Not a fan of Trudeau. God help us if he gets a majority.

Even less of a fan of O’Toole, most of the Conservatives (except less partisan ones like Michael Chong), or the NDP.

Here in Alberta the UCP is the worst government we’ve ever had, and the upcoming municipal election candidates in Calgary and Edmonton range from uninspiring to downright scary.

Partisan politics is a cancer. I fear for the state of democracy at all levels of government in Canada, but particularly at the Federal and Provincial levels.

#99 Nic on 07.08.21 at 7:56 pm

Problem is not attitudes. Problem is wages are too low. If companies can keep giving their executives massive bonuses while their employees get nothing or reduces time/wages this will continue. Why work?

#100 Saul Pennington on 07.08.21 at 7:58 pm

It looks like someone is thinking interest rates will be much higher in the next 12 to 18 months. Tandia Credit Union has 2.30% 4 year and 2.50% 5 year term deposit/GIC rates.

#101 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:58 pm

#45 Trojan House on 07.08.21 at 4:40 pm
Here’s an idea – instead of CERB or CRB or UBI or welfare or whatever other scheme they have why don’t we just give government jobs to all those people? Full government pay and benefits plus a pension. Even entry level government jobs pay quite well.

The pros are that everyone gets a job and is working, they are paying taxes they wouldn’t otherwise pay and they get a pension when they eventually retire. Not to mention no more government handouts for people to sit at home and do nothing.

Can anybody think of any cons?

————————————

It’s the same problem as any other “just pay them more” scheme. If the new government employees aren’t producing something of benefit at least equal to the wages they are being paid, it just causes inflation and scarcity. It is the same thing as paying people not to work, even if they do a little work here and there. All the non-productive hours have to be paid by somebody, and it will show up in price levels.

The economy is not money, although we have come to measure everything in dollars. The real economy is the net total of goods and services produced. If you increase the amount of money people have without a corresponding increase in the amount of goods and services available, all you accomplish is higher prices.

#102 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 8:09 pm

#51 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 4:54 pm
#35 Rook on 07.08.21 at 4:00 pm
‘just raise wages, and you’ll find workers!’
I mean, sure. But that means prices of everything else go up.

Of course, but prices wouldn’t go up by nearly as much as the wages, since there are far more than just labor costs that go in to prices.

For example, Marketwatch did a study of US fast food chains in 2015, and found that raising minimum wage to $15 (a ~100% increase), would raise food prices by 4%. Raising the minimum wage to $22 (a ~200% increase) would raise food prices by 25%.

Would you take a 200% pay increase if it meant you had to pay 25% more for things? I sure would.

——————————————-

Everybody has a study. I am sure this one only looked at the store front.

There are only 2 real costs that go into anything: Energy and labor. Energy itself is mostly labor.

So if wages go up at the store front, you can bet they are going up all down the line. The cost of everything from building the store to raising the cows will also go up. The net result will be a great repricing and everyone will end up more or less where they started compared to the cost of living.

If they raise the wage of fast food workers to $20/h, do you think people will still go into the trades for $30/h? Nope, probably not. So that wage is going up to $60/h. Once the trades are making $60/h, is anyone going to suffer through 4 hard years of school to become an engineer for $60/h? Nope, that wage is going to $120/h. And eventually we end up back where we started, only with bigger numbers in front of everything.

You can’t tinker with one part of the economy without affecting it all.

#103 Mean Guy on 07.08.21 at 8:22 pm

#59 Sail Away

Professional poker player or cocaine smuggler?

Soggy: All I know is, she could kick your butt and look good doing it

———

Professional MMA fighter?

——-

Not an MMA fighter. But she has had more broken bones in a week than I have had my whole life.

She gleefully displays her mangled limbs on social media. A lot of that was more in her moto x days though. She’s more careful now, but people do die in her line of work.

I don’t want to be too specific, but her experience as a former pro-moto x racer, martial arts student and gun nut is much more important than her lack of a degree.

Looking like a tall Charlie’s Angel helps some too.

She sometimes works in remote locations and often most of her living expenses are covered too.

She doesn’t have a million dollar house, she lives in a smallish town after all, and 2 years paying it off is a bit of an exaggeration as she spends a lot on horses and motorcycles. It was probably more like 4 years.

But she’s pretty well set up and I was amazed when she told me how much she makes.

It’ll be a relatively short career though.

#104 Sunshowers on 07.08.21 at 8:24 pm

#95 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm
Actually, UBI similar to what CERB is, is the ONLY way to achieve a free market. A market cannot be free if one side is compelled to transact with another. That’s called slavery. Employees are compelled to work for an employer, because if they don’t, they starve on the streets and die. UBI gives employees the freedom to say “no”, enabling them to truly make the free choice if they want to participate in the market.

#100 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:58 pm
Higher prices which will be more than offset by the increased wages, as studies have shown. Sign me up.

#105 Linda on 07.08.21 at 8:35 pm

One thing I’m wondering about it what our actual inflation numbers are. Can’t help but think when looking at the cost of utilities, groceries, building materials etc. that our official inflation numbers are not reflecting current reality. Methinks the ‘basket’ of goods/services is being rearranged to present the lowest possible numbers. If that means removing ‘anomalies’ that would normally be included in order to make the picture look good – well, sooner or later the truth will out.

As for how increasing wages will impact prices/inflation, of course those numbers will increase. Or should as the cost to provide is passed on to the consumer. Prices are set by what the market will bear.

#106 Yukon Elvis on 07.08.21 at 8:36 pm

#84 Cici on 07.08.21 at 7:18 pm

. And in my city, a decent burger and beer is already an easy $40 at most dine-in restaurants. Heck, even that price of a combo at McDonalds has gotten to the obscene level of what it used to cost me for a dine-in equivalent meal just a few years back.
+++++++++++++++++
Back in the day, I bought hamburgers at MacDonalds for.19c and cheese burgers for .24cents. I would buy 30 at a time and freeze them to heat up later in the oven for my dinners. No microwaves then. Sometimes I had an egg on a piece of toast. Later on I got a job in a sawmill pulling green lumber off a chain and piling it for $2.92 1/2 per hour. I lived well after that. I think it was 1968.

#107 MT87 on 07.08.21 at 8:39 pm

Is this a harbinger for something?

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/wells-fargo-infuriates-customers-abruptly-shuttering-personal-credit-business

#108 Steve French on 07.08.21 at 8:40 pm

Another Canadian historical church burned to the ground.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/former-landmark-catholic-church-northwest-of-saskatoon-burns-to-the-ground?__vfz=medium%3Dstandalone_content_recirculation_with_ads

The extremist left woke must be resisted by every sensible Canadian.

Enough of this!

“The Culture War Must Go On: The woke are angry, humorless, and—worst of all—vindictive. Surrender is not an option.”

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-culture-war-must-go-on-11625608694

#109 I’m stupid on 07.08.21 at 8:44 pm

Hi Garth

I don’t know if you know this but I had an interesting experience today. I just had a baby girl and went to the government website to get her birth certificate, sin # etc. Well on the very last form it’s mandatory for new parents to be contacted by a financial institution for resp advice. Basically I must provide my contact info so I can be called to sold Resp investments.

Am I the only one that thinks this is wrong? All the usual players are listed.. all big banks, the grimy people trying to sell plans etc. I had a child 5 days ago an I filled in the form today so I can get sin # for Sebastien, I’ll let you know how long it takes to be contacted. How many new parents would be capable of making good decisions when dealing with a life changing event?

This smells rotten and a govt partnership to take advantage of people. It’s pathetic and disappointing.

#110 Steve French on 07.08.21 at 8:46 pm

A map of every church burnt or vandalised in Canada by woke terrorist extremists.

https://tnc.news/2021/07/02/a-map-of-every-church-burnt-or-vandalized-since-the-residential-school-announcements/

#111 Dale on 07.08.21 at 8:46 pm

Saul, 2.5% for a 5 year GIC is not that bad and if I choose to put my registered accounts RRSP’s, TFSA’s they would be fully insured through FSRAO Ontario’s deposit insurance. I figure $65,000 in compound interest over 5 years is no so bad and it is equivalent to 18 months of my total monthly CPP, annuity income.

I could live pretty well off my $3,600 a month early CPP and monthly LIRA lump sum annuity payments while still having $500 a month left over.

#112 mike from mtl on 07.08.21 at 8:52 pm

#91 Ustabe on 07.08.21 at 7:37 pm

If your business can’t afford to pay living wages its not much of a business.
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Nothing is wrong with the points brought up, but one huge admission, that’s from the perspective of a megacorp.

Walmart (as in example) pays slave-labour prices for their product so has an automatic generous profit margin. At such a scale the actual employees wages at the stores are not a deal breaker, land accusation costs, logistic rates and so on are of importance. They, like my own employer, pay single digit % at worst in business taxes – all the end sales taxes are borne are to the local consumer. Another example is Ikea where it is simpler to boat raw wood to China/Vietnam to do all the labour for slave wages only to sell it back to us at +100x profit. Great gig.

Most restaurants/bars/chains are essentially GFS and Sysco product despite their claims otherwise.

Mom and pop local SMB bear all the local taxes and regulations which if you’re them, well is too bad so sad. Could I set up a draperies shop locally employing Sylvain & Jean-Guy to only be the tax mule and all round evil scrooge or just buy from India at 1/100th of the price…hard choice?

Do I agree with this no, but this is the insane world we live in. Again Canada is a terrible uphill battle to be an SMB fabricating physical product.

#113 SoggyShorts on 07.08.21 at 8:56 pm

#51 SunShowers on 07.08.21 at 4:54 pm
Of course, but prices wouldn’t go up by nearly as much as the wages, since there are far more than just labor costs that go in to prices.

For example, Marketwatch did a study of US fast food chains in 2015, and found that raising minimum wage to $15 (a ~100% increase), would raise food prices by 4%
*******************
That study makes no sense:

If current sales are $626,000
and current labor is $126,000
how can
increasing the labor by another 126,000
only require a 4% markup?

The labor costs shown are 20%.
How the heck does 20% become 4%?!

It shows right at the bottom of their chart that if they increase wages by $126,000 they will need $27,500 to cover it. Ummm… huh?

Also 20% is really low for food industry labor costs, the normal range is from 25% to 40%

No wonder you think companies should “Just pay more”. You actually think that labor is just a tiny fraction of costs.

I would LOVE to see you try and open a company that is so profitable and with such amazing margins that your labor is only 4.3% of costs.

Link to your “study”
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/raising-fast-food-hourly-wages-to-15-would-raise-prices-by-4-study-finds-2015-07-28

#114 Damifino on 07.08.21 at 8:57 pm

#97 Hurtin’ Albertan

Not a fan of Trudeau. God help us if he gets a majority. Even less of a fan of O’Toole
———————————-

Trudeau and O’Toole are not comparable.

T2 is the de facto king of Canada. The remainder of His government is filled with automatons.

I don’t believe O’Toole has such conceited ambition. He would likely create a cabinet that has some efficacy outside the Prime Minister’s Office. One would hope.

Unfortunately, he won’t be given the chance.

#115 Howard on 07.08.21 at 9:08 pm

S&P just downgraded BC’s credit rating.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-07-07/british-columbia-s-aaa-rating-is-stripped-by-s-p-on-rising-debt

#116 Bottoms_Up on 07.08.21 at 9:23 pm

There will be a new normal and we haven’t found it yet. When someone gets a new job the first question will be “is it WFH, flex, or a hellish daily commute to a jail cell”.
Buy ZM

#117 FriedEggs on 07.08.21 at 9:31 pm

18 months paid vacation from serving beer and chicken wings – and one wonder’s why people arent going back to work.

Great way to get sloth like people interested in UBI.

#118 SW on 07.08.21 at 9:40 pm

#57 cuke and tomato picker on 07.08.21 at 5:18 pm
Dow and TSX both down why? slow recovery from covid
or profit taking ?

Fretting about the next wave of Covid.

#119 Moses71 on 07.08.21 at 9:45 pm

Hmm to blaming Trudeau for work ethics of Zed’ers & Millers. I can remember some blaming work ethics and borrowing from Baby Booms mudders for houses for these people in the recent generations, etc.
Trudeau just exasperated an existing issue, non?
And cheap mortgage rates were a problem many years prior to him.
Go to the source. Let inflationary controls come to play and when stuff comes back to normal (I.e. WFH not the majority), the lazy’ers will need to learn the hard way, like the generations before. Sorry if some lack insight and get burned

#120 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 9:48 pm

@#114 Howard.
“S&P just downgraded BC’s credit rating.”

++++

Yep.

Only a matter of time before the idiots in Ottawa get a reality slap in the face with a Credit Rating drop.

Watch our interest rates climb baby.

Trudeau has absolutely no control on what foreign money lenders decide we will pay.

Time for the school teacher to get schooled.

#121 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 9:51 pm

@#102 Mean Guy

Movie stunt woman.
Great money.
Destroys the body.
Like pro football players.

#122 CalgaryCarGuy on 07.08.21 at 9:51 pm

As a person in front line retail I have got to say how absolutely stunned I am at how many people are still wearing masks in a city (Calgary) that no longer has a mask bylaw. At first I thought it was because maybe they hadn’t had their second shot yet but that’s not it. There are a ton of people who are scared to death to take their mask off! Now I have got an email from management saying I have to ask customers who are wearing a mask if they are comfortable with me not wearing one. Well, ok I guess. But for how long? A week or two?, a month?. This virus will never go away completely…not ever. Are you going to wear a mask for the rest of your life? Grow a set and get on with your life.

#123 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.08.21 at 10:05 pm

@#108 I’m Stupid.
“Well on the very last form it’s mandatory for new parents to be contacted by a financial institution for resp advice. Basically I must provide my contact info so I can be called to sold Resp investments.”

+++++

Gee.
Disgusting doesnt even begin to describe that mandatory info requirement.
The feminist “Mommy State” being a bit too intrusive?

Go to the media and ask why this question is on a govt form.
Total BS.
What’s next?
You’ll have to tell them what Bank, what University ( PC brainwashing facility) you plan on enrolling them in?

#124 Barb on 07.08.21 at 10:06 pm

We know a high-level local government employee who bought an old motorhome several years ago.

He paid a contractor CASH to renovate it bumper to bumper.

#125 Cici on 07.08.21 at 10:30 pm

#103 SunShowers

Quit being an entitled flake and learn the true meaning of slavery.

Practically EVERYONE who works is COMPELLED to do so, regardless of how high or low their wage is.

Don’t like it? Go try to survive on your own in the wilderness. Or go try to open your own business and turn a profit.Too difficult? You want to remain salaried yet also want to be paid higher than minimum wage? Open your eyes and look for opportunities, then get any training needed if you don’t already have what’s needed for the position.

Those options are all available to you. The slaves didn’t have access to any of the above opportunities.

#126 Dirty Dan on 07.08.21 at 10:37 pm

DELETED

#127 Cici on 07.08.21 at 10:39 pm

#108 I’m Stupid

Hey Stupid, congratulations on the new baby! Babies are one of the best, most sweetest things left in this crazy world.

But did you seriously name your baby girl “Sébastien” because if so, you are really are aptly named! Sabrina would have been fine. Or Sabine. Or anything but “Sébastien”!

Sorry, I’m opinionated. Can’t help it.

#128 Faron on 07.08.21 at 10:58 pm

#132 Repurchase Disagreement on 07.08.21 at 9:40 pm
#87 Sara and Faron

A few things:

“Back in the day”, Dr.s promoted cigarettes.

Even if adiabatic heating was the cause of Lytton’s ATH, how do you explain almost identical magnitude record breaks from Southern Oregon to central BC to Idaho etc. as well as aloft? There was a record shattering 5C anomaly at 700 hpa and an all time high 1000hpa-500hpa thickness.

Regarding station moves, we used homogenized data.

Keep in mind that scientific uncertainty can work against your view. I think it’s likely that this adds up to a more severe event than we documented.

Go read our paper before you make a further ass of yourself. I’m open to discussion, but mere posturing will be met with laughter.

Cheers
Faron

#129 Steven on 07.08.21 at 10:58 pm

Big inflation is going to hit 18 months from now. If employers cannot hire people they have to pay more. If they have to pay more then they have to raise prices to cover costs. This will cause inflation to soar. Then interest rates will climb to control inflation. People with debt will feel the squeeze. I believe we will hit a wall in about 18 months. So much for the Roaring Twenties.

#130 Irish Stew on 07.08.21 at 11:05 pm

My 2 children are under the age of 20.
They have limited experience and both applied for 5 jobs
They received calls from each company w/ an offer.

Business is struggling for people.

#131 yvr_lurker on 07.08.21 at 11:09 pm

I have a sense that there is a growing underground economy with many people starting side gigs. My 16 year old is working at Buy-Low stocking shelves this summer, but is actually making a good deal less than his gardening business + online grade 7–8 tutoring in math and science that he was doing last summer on zoom (that I back-stopped a bit). Is now trying to get the tutoring gig going again to supplement his earnings.

There is my neighbour down the street with an MSc in Chemistry, originally from Beijing, who runs a highly profitable business in tutoring for kids in grade 11 and 12 (mostly wealthy Asian families) whose kids are trying to maintain 95%+ averages to get into top schools. She was laughing with me the other day that one family she works pays her 2K per month to have her essentially on speed dial whenever there are tests the next day. This is just ONE family. She works with many families. Is the income reported to T2? Who knows, doubtful but not my business..She has offered to refer me to her clients for tutoring in a subject I can do…. am way too busy for that, but when I retire I can certainly see the appeal to bring home extra $$ as needed.

Over the past 15 months I have never seen so many people dropping off business cards for power washing, painting projects, gardening, home repairs. Many have come right up to the door as they canvas the neighbourhood for projects. Likely all cash and carry type services offered (and possibly since last summer still collecting CERB or whatever from the GOVT for their previous low paying jobs). Another neighbour just hired a bunch of college students to paint the trim on their rancher. Perhaps they would have been working in retail or waiting tables in a previous year.

If you are in school part time and trying to acquire higher skills, why not work for yourself in the interim. Many people I think have figured this out, backstopped by the CERB money last summer that allowed them to explore other options.

When you can get some gig going under the table (and have had the time to set it up) the incentive to go work for minimum wage in the food service industry for some A-hole abusive boss who confiscates all the tip money is pretty low.

The appeal in our household of frequenting the restuarants in our neighbourhood is essentially zero as we have really learned how to make many more interesting dishes over the past year. Can’t say that we are going back to our pre-COVID ways of wasting our hard-earned cash in these places.

It would be interesting to see how much the underground economy has grown over the past 15 months. All the while those employed in high paying jobs can continue paying their 54% marginals, which will likley increase after the T2 budget.

#132 cuke and tomato picker on 07.08.21 at 11:09 pm

Number 88 fruit vendor I have been out of the business you are in for 16 years. Yes these are different times we were were very lucky we were in cherries always paid more per pail then any other grower and a bonus for those who picked the whole season. We had pickers coming back for 25 years. In the business first with my parents then on our own for 37 years. Now living on south Vancouver island.

#133 Sunshowers on 07.08.21 at 11:14 pm

#112 SoggyShorts on 07.08.21 at 8:56 pm
I like how your immediate assumption is that Purdue University published a nonsensical study that literally makes zero sense to the extent that it can be debunked by random internet commentators, and not that you simply read the chart wrong.

By the way, you read the chart wrong.

#124 Cici on 07.08.21 at 10:30 pm
Stop being ill-informed and learn the true meaning of wage slavery. Abolitionists like Frederick Douglass were decrying it right alongside chattel slavery.

“Experience demonstrates that there may be a slavery of wages only a little less galling and crushing in its effects than chattel slavery, and that this slavery of wages must go down with the other.”

#134 BobC on 07.08.21 at 11:31 pm

Worse in the states then what you said. The US$300 is a federal add on to the state unemployment amount. I have grandkids collecting $635 a week because they were layed off from a part time job. On top of that they got the stimulus of $3000.
What a joke! Grandpa telling them to get a job was laughed at! The globalist are winning. Glad I’m 72. I won’t have to see it.

#135 Dosouth on 07.08.21 at 11:32 pm

Yada, yada, yada….pay them more and they will come. So what is not enough for one is enough for another. Does not education, time in the job…heck experience count.

I doubt it. They all feel they’re worth whatever they can squeeze out of that GED…..and for free, no student debt.

#136 Roial1 on 07.08.21 at 11:40 pm

91 Ustabe on 07.08.21 at 7:37 pm

Min wage in Australia: 14.80
Big Mac there: 4.71

Better check your numbers.

2020 min wage $19.84 Au. dollar.

It’s on their web site. look it up.

#137 Zen Investor on 07.08.21 at 11:59 pm

Freeland had already announced that the EI Bonus would be extended past September. Likely to buy votes for an October election. If that’s the case then it will expire December and hang the kids out to dry starting Jan 1/22 ? That’s a good bet. By them the Mills won’t matter and it will be too cold to protest. Trudeau is already campaigning so plan accordingly. Brief window for an opening , stats hidden, massive lockdown shortly thereafter.

Meanwhile, big stuff on sale on target. Keep ‘ track’, hint hint. Sell when they yell, buy when they cry. That stocks are a forecasting indicator has never been more obvious. Making out like a bandit, in spite of the growing body count.

#138 T-Rev on 07.09.21 at 12:09 am

Turnover in my firm is at a 15 year high. It’s not people quitting to collect government cheese, it’s people quitting to take jobs with better pay or work life balance. Good talent that works hard and takes accountability is in increased demand and short supply, and their price is going up.

#139 Nonplused on 07.09.21 at 12:21 am

#103 Sunshowers on 07.08.21 at 8:24 pm
“#95 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm
Actually, UBI similar to what CERB is, is the ONLY way to achieve a free market. A market cannot be free if one side is compelled to transact with another. That’s called slavery. Employees are compelled to work for an employer, because if they don’t, they starve on the streets and die. UBI gives employees the freedom to say “no”, enabling them to truly make the free choice if they want to participate in the market.”

You cannot achieve a free market via government intervention in prices. And people can say “no” to work now. The problem is that people want to be able to say “no” to work but also receive all the benefits of a modern society without contributing to the production thereof. That just isn’t going to work until the robots take over everything but I see big problems with the robot world too.

(Those being why would the owners of the robots pay for the capital to buy them and the electricity to run them if if they have to give away the products for free? They would only buy enough robots to look after themselves.)

And it isn’t “slavery”. You don’t have to work if you don’t want to, and you can quit any job you don’t like. But it is quite another thing to think you should get paid enough to enjoy all the things modern society has to offer without having to work. That makes a slave of whoever is doing the work. Your slave. Sure it is all sleeved through the government via taxes and handouts, but if you are getting handouts from the government and not working whilst someone else is working and paying taxes, you are the slaver my dear, not the slave.

—————————————

“#100 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:58 pm
Higher prices which will be more than offset by the increased wages, as studies have shown. Sign me up.”

All higher wages must be embedded in the price of goods and services sold, so prices will on the whole go up by the exact amount wages go up, leaving you right where you started in terms of purchasing power.

I know that there is a common conception out there that every wage must be a “living wage” or something just isn’t right. But says who? Teenagers living at home don’t need a “living wage” to serve coffee at Tim Horton’s. They only need enough to buy the latest Xbox and many are willing to work for that amount. If a living wage is what you are after, perhaps flipping burgers isn’t for you. You have too much competition from folks who do not need a living wage. Armies of teenagers who are just looking for some money to go to the movies on the weekend or maybe a used car are your competition.

Now I have been frequented several times recently by various tech’s in the HVAC, roofing, and appliance repair businesses, because my house is at the age where it all has to be replaced. Yikes! $$$$$ But I assure you these people do not make minimum wage. They have houses and cars and sometimes even camping trailers. My mechanic also looks to be doing ok but he knows how to fix modern cars which are all computerized, and I don’t, so I pay the money.

Now I suppose not everyone can get a minimum wage job as a teenager and use that money to go to a trade school and move up the wage ladder as they get older. But anybody who is planning to make a career of flipping burgers or serving coffee should not expect to make a lot of money. The job just isn’t worth it.

——————————————

Another misconception people have is this whole thing about productivity going up by yada yada percent while wages stayed flat, after inflation. It is easy to lie with statistics. That is exactly what is supposed to happen when productivity rises. Sure your wages didn’t go up after inflation, but what you can buy with them certainly did.

Mechanization, factory reforms such as the assembly line, and of course more recently automation lead to great improvements in productivity. But what happened? Henry Ford was able to produce a car for such a low price even his factory workers could afford one. More for less. That is what productivity is about.

Take for instance the TV. My grandmother had a I think it was 24 inch but might have been 32 CRT color TV that was such a big deal that it came in a lovely wood cabinet and buying such a thing at the time was a major investment. So much so that they actually repaired them if they broke. It had 14 channels but eventually you could get a cable box for it.

Compare to today and $140 will get you a decent 32 inch flat screen with 99 channels and HDMI inputs for your various gaming devices and other inputs.

Computers did the same thing. When I was a young man the computers of the day weren’t nearly as powerful as an Apple iWatch is today, but they were a major investment. Now we throw them away if the hard drive goes.

The cost of food seems to be always on the way up. But it makes a much smaller dent in the average budget than it did before the farmers got tractors. Did the farmers get to translate all those productivity gains into wages? No. The cost of food went down inflation adjusted.

Houses are another matter, especially in YVR and YYZ, but they were always a major expense that took the better part of a working career to pay off. There have been many improvements to productivity there too, everything from plywood to nail guns, but they are still basically built by hand by skilled tradesmen, so not cheap.

#140 Nonplused on 07.09.21 at 12:28 am

PS for all you “productivity vs. wages” folks out there, this is sort of how it works:

Give 100 men a shovel and eventually they can build a road, maybe in a few months. Give one man a bulldozer and he’ll have it done by dinner time.

#141 Dr V on 07.09.21 at 12:36 am

112 soggy – good work finding that article

Here is a link to the referenced study.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/figure/10.1080/15378020.2016.1159889?scroll=top&needAccess=true

I have not paid the $45US to download it.

I see the article shows a table but the current wage column shows no info.

The article states the MW in certain jurisdictions, but makes no claim as to the current average wage for FTE employees.

So journalistic hype at work. By highlighting the MW,
lead the reader to believe the average food worker makes MW. Then don’t show current information, and jump to the finding of 4%.

Prorating and working backwards, that is something like a $13.37 average wage.

I also find the $41k shockingly low as net business income, so the typical owner may pay themselves a wage included in the costs. Again, this info is not provided. If this wage is included, it would typically be higher than other employees, and may have to be
reduced in order to raise others to $15/hr.

#142 Keith on 07.09.21 at 1:03 am

Call it fake news, from 2014. I’ll take double the wages for a modest price increase.

https://www.businessinsider.com/denmark-mcdonalds-pays-20-an-hour-2014-9

#143 VicPaul on 07.09.21 at 1:08 am

#108 I’m stupid on 07.08.21 at 8:44 pm
Hi Garth

…I had an interesting experience today. I just had a baby girl…

*********

Dad, you’ve just begun on a road of interesting experiences with her – congratulations for taking on the lifetime responsibility of being a model to emulate – by your positive and fruitful interactions with life. She’ll be watching.

My sweet baby girl turns thirty in a few weeks…zoom!

M57BC

#144 Jane24 on 07.09.21 at 1:15 am

30 years ago my husband, my 3 kids and myself left Canada and moved to the south coast of England for better quality and lower cost lives. We could see where Canada was going and we didn’t like the signs and we hated winters. My parents and in-laws couldn’t believe it as they had left England and Italy respectively in the 1960s to ensure that their kids (us) had better lives! But times change.

Today I note that all our kids aged in their 30s and all of their friends own their own English homes. All of them. I am talking about 30/40 kids here. In comparison none of my Ontario or Alberta nieces and nephews and none of their friends, with the exception of one girl, own their own homes. They are all resigned to renting for life.

The exception is our Montreal family. There our 30 year old generation do have their own homes.

What does it take for human beings to move to brighter futures? We really don’t understand why they are all there in the snow. We visit Canada every two years and on our last trip were so blown away by grocery prices we were taking photos of the prices.

If I was relocating for a better life personally again now I would move my family to Cyprus or Northern Spain! Lovely weather, lots of English speaking and a nice villa with pool for $275,000 Cdn.

#145 Nonplused on 07.09.21 at 1:26 am

I’m going to try one more thought experiment to see if I can make it clear why people who don’t work shouldn’t eat:

Let’s say we have 10 people that want 2×4’s. Well, the trees don’t cut themselves and show up at the Home Depot on their own. So many people labored to get that lift of 2×4’s in the yard. A cost is associated with that.

9 of the people show up with cash, having work various and sundry jobs to come up with the money. But the 10th person declares “I deserve 2×4’s too because everyone else is getting some!”. She calls herself “SunFlowers” and wants free 2×4’s. But Home Depot can’t get them for free. In order to give “SunFlowers” her 2×4’s for free HD must add the cost onto the other 9 purchasers. The 9 pay more, and work more, so that 1 can ride for free.

This is how socialism works. Only it is a slippery slope because once word gets out that “SunFlowers” got her 2×4’s without working and without paying, everyone expects to get 2×4’s for free. Eventually the Home Depot closes down and all the forestry and mill workers are unemployed, and also looking for free 2×4’s. But there are no 2×4’s, because nobody is making them. The trees stand safely in the forest awaiting the next wildfire. At that point all is lost, and there can never be any more 2×4’s even if you could convince people they have to work to make them.

#146 Balmuto on 07.09.21 at 2:09 am

Labour shortage = higher wages = inflation. Something the central banks have been trying to revive unsuccessfully for over a decade with failed monetary policy. I say bring on the fiscal stimulus so CBs can fix their monetary policy. Sick of garbage interest rates. Sick of the absurdity of negative interest rates.

As for the return to office, it’s a pipe dream. The experiment is over; the results are in – most office work can be done as efficiently if not more so from home and most employees prefer the flexibility that WFH offers. Sure, there’s talk of a “hybrid” model – this kind of talk reminds me of those slide-out keyboards on cellphones when the writing was on the wall for physical keyboards. The office is over. Adapt.

#147 SoggyShorts on 07.09.21 at 4:05 am

#103 Sunshowers on 07.08.21 at 8:24 pm
#95 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm
Actually, UBI similar to what CERB is, is the ONLY way to achieve a free market. A market cannot be free if one side is compelled to transact with another. That’s called slavery. Employees are compelled to work for an employer, because if they don’t, they starve on the streets and die. UBI gives employees the freedom to say “no”, enabling them to truly make the free choice if they want to participate in the market.

************
More nonsense. If no one is “compelled” to work why should anyone else be “compelled” to feed them?

Just like how communism is fun until you run out of other people’s money, UBI is great until you run out of other people’s labour.

Imagine 20 of you stranded on an island. You’d all starve in the whiniest reality TV show in history.

#148 Wrk.dover on 07.09.21 at 7:02 am

#91 Ustabe on 07.08.21 at 7:37 pm
_____________________________

Thank you!

#149 Immigrant man on 07.09.21 at 7:23 am

The answer to a labour crisis will be more immigration. You can bet on that. The Libs aim at 300k annual numbers. Even the “ultraconservative” PPC proposed something like 50-100k annual intake. So all politicians in Canada see the answer to the labour ethics/labour supply – just import ppl that want to work!

I have heard from my contractor (doing some renos around the house) that he can’t get guys (pogie is better), and the ones he can get – quit and don’t even bother calling to say “I’ve found a new job”. I’ve heard the same from other small business owners. Meanwhile, ppl from where I am from would literally kill for an opportunity to earn a living wage doing construction work in Canada!

#150 B on 07.09.21 at 7:37 am

I work for a small engineering consulting company – we have 10 employees or so, and 7 of us have small children under the age of four. Saving two hours of commuting per person per day is a huge benefit to our team members, even if it means that collaborating and mentoring is a bit tougher on zoom. We won’t be returning to a commercial office.

#151 Another Deckchair on 07.09.21 at 8:01 am

SunShowers is great at cherry-picking.

“For example, Marketwatch did a study of US fast food chains in 2015, and found that raising minimum wage to $15 (a ~100% increase), would raise food prices by 4%.”

This is likely absolutely true, assuming the wage change is ONLY at the fast food business.

What happens if the WHOLE supply chain ups minimum wages?

Everything is built on % profit, like compound interest, a 4% increase compounded over 20 -30 steps… The miracle of compound interest works in other things than a TFSA.

#152 Asaro on 07.09.21 at 8:01 am

Definitely a wage issue, not a gov handout issue. So many companies are blind to reality. Mine can’t get entry level people for manual labour positions because they’re paying only a dollar an hour more than what one can make stocking shelves in a clean, cool environment. They can’t even get applicants from temp agencies. Of course they moan about Trudeau messing everything up for them… yeah, nothing to do with the poverty level wages you’re offering for brutal work.

#153 Asaro on 07.09.21 at 8:07 am

Also worth noting that many of the service industry workers surveyed in the US are seeking to get out of that line of work partly due to wages but mostly due to not wanting to deal with an aggressive public. Anti-maksers unloading on some poor student just trying to earn a few bucks, couldn’t pay me enough to put up with that.

#154 I’m stupid on 07.09.21 at 8:07 am

126 Cici

Thank you… no I didn’t name my daughter Sebastien. Sebastien works for Garth, I wanted to add her to the family Resp but need a sin#

#155 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 8:33 am

Is that “hyperactive multitasking”?
Or are you just glad to see me?

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/liberal-mp-william-amos-says-he-appeared-naked-on-camera-twice-because-of-hyperactive-multitasking-lack-of-focus

Those Liberal male feminists are getting more creative with their excuses just before an election…..while the female Cabinet members quit.

https://www.climatechangenews.com/2021/06/29/canadian-minister-catherine-mckenna-quit-politics-focus-climate-change/

#156 Another Deckchair on 07.09.21 at 8:34 am

Cancel Cultures’ next target?

“The most militant anti-office WFHers are women and those under 40.”

Jordan Peterson: Why Cancel Culture is Feminine Bullying.

https://youtu.be/KrXDzFlyzx0

I’m always open to listening to all points of view. I found this video quite enlightening, and he has more creds in psychology than I. FYI, for whatever that’s worth!

#157 TurnerNation on 07.09.21 at 8:41 am

On the Economic Lockdowns. With 2 months of summer remaining there’s a reason why Ontario is heavily locked down, ditto the Least Coast.
Will our winter be like this? (Hey at least none of them have the seasonal flu.)

Total caseload 164,028 — there are 51 Million people in S. Korea. That’s quite the outbreak.

.S. Korea: COVID-19 cases break record for 2nd day, wider Seoul under semi-lockdown (m-en.yna.co.kr)


— Barely worth mentioning again but the global control over our Travel/Movements is a main goal of this New System, since March 2020 that fateful cold week when we fell.

.Unvaccinated tourists won’t be welcome in Canada for ‘quite a while,’ PM Trudeau says

————-
What’s really going on in Kanada. More than a few times I opined that the invasions in the middle east were like a test, training for what’s coming to our cities. Door to door raids. Bag ’em and tag ’em. Encircling, cutting off cities. (We got armed provincial checkpoints this year, one step closer)

-Global News https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZD9NXmSVshI
Community outreach teams in conjunction with the city of Toronto are getting ready to the take to the streets to go door to door to find those who have yet to take the COVID-19 vaccine shot.


— Australia: is moving toward permanent Lockdown. Like an open camp with roaming guards, guard dogs (everything old is new again). But why? Numbers indicate a majority of them refuse the Big Pharma. See nobody gets a free ride in the New System, it’s on now. .

.NSW COVID: South-west Sydney police operation to curb Delta variant spread (smh.com.au)

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/police-launch-major-operation-targeting-delta-spread-in-south-west-sydney-20210708-p5880d.html
“The operation, which will also use traffic and highway patrol officers, dog units and police helicopters, will see the extra personnel sent to patrol the areas to ensure compliance and issue fines for breaches.”

#158 Barb on 07.09.21 at 8:49 am

Wishing Rona Ambrose would have let her name stand. Canada would probably be in a better place now if she had.

#159 milly on 07.09.21 at 8:59 am

“Besides, what’s the goal? Nobody outside of government gets a decent pension anymore. And crap houses in Toronto or Vancouver cost so much that you need impossible savings of five hundred thousand and the ability to swallow at least a million in debt. How is that a viable life strategy, especially if you want a spouse or kids?”

This is the exact sentiment me and my peers are having. We are all professionals, but the motivation is just…gone. You can work your butt off and still not get the life our parents had, and with little to show for it (renting a small condo).

#160 Dharma Bum on 07.09.21 at 9:03 am

The labour situation certainly looks dire.

There are less and less opportunities to make any serious money.

I predict a resurgence in prostitution. Old reliable.

Don’t believe me?

Look it up.

#161 Steve Crotty on 07.09.21 at 9:26 am

Garth, Are you trying to convince me to quit my job? You almost have me convinced.

Those employers having a hard time finding people should try paying more. Is paying a dollar or so more for a hamburger not a good trade off for paying people a living wage?

#162 Sail Away on 07.09.21 at 9:46 am

Things are pretty good where we live.

2 months until bird season.

#163 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 9:47 am

@#157 Barb
“Wishing Rona Ambrose would have let her name stand. Canada would probably be in a better place now if she had.”

+++

Yep.
O’Toole doesnt resonate with anyone but his backers.

It would have been great watching a “meminist” Prime Minister being ripped apart by a smart gal in the debates.

#164 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 9:49 am

@#159 Dharma
“I predict a resurgence in prostitution. Old reliable.”

+++

Sorry,
I’m too old to buy a new wardrobe.

#165 Sara on 07.09.21 at 9:56 am

I am fortunate, or should I say my 20-something kids are. The oldest is quitting her federal government job to move on to something better (med school). The middle daughter is a year into her federal government job that she got right out of uni. The youngest is entering her fourth year in nursing and had to pick and choose which summer job to take this year (decided on working for the city of Ottawa giving COVID-19 vaccinations). All are doing better than I and my husband were at their ages.

#166 SunShowers on 07.09.21 at 9:58 am

#138 Nonplused on 07.09.21 at 12:21 am
The idea behind UBI is that it would cover all the basic necessities of life (food, shelter, public transportation, healthcare, education, etc). I can guarantee 100% of people will choose to work in some capacity because they want a standard of life that goes beyond “the basic necessities of life.”

And if a slave can choose their master, are they no longer a slave?

Prior to the 1980s, the quality of products increased along with productivity AND wages. Yet since then, only the quality of products has increased along with productivity. Why have wages stopped increasing?

And the increasing in quality of products has more to do with technological advances and R&D than overall productivity. Using your Henry Ford example, he sold the Model T for $260 back in 1925. Adjusted for inflation, it would cost $4000 in today’s dollars.

Can you build an authentic Model T from the ground up in 2021 for $4000? It’s got fewer features than a new 2021 Ford sedan, after all. All the productivity increases we’ve had since then should make building a rudimentary car like the Model T trivial, right?

#167 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 10:30 am

#103 Sunshowers on 07.08.21 at 8:24 pm
#95 Nonplused on 07.08.21 at 7:41 pm
Actually, UBI similar to what CERB is, is the ONLY way to achieve a free market. A market cannot be free if one side is compelled to transact with another. That’s called slavery. Employees are compelled to work for an employer, because if they don’t, they starve on the streets and die. UBI gives employees the freedom to say “no”, enabling them to truly make the free choice if they want to participate in the market.
——

Pre-CV, labour participation in Canada typically hung around 60%, so plenty of folks have the freedom to say no to working, without UBI.

FWIW, the freedom to say no to work itself must be earned. I’m working on it myself.

So you think working to feed yourself is slavery? You’re going to do it one way or another either by earning cash, or hunting/fishing/farming/foraging etc. Guess which option is less work? There are very good reasons why we got away from all that.

#168 SunShowers on 07.09.21 at 10:33 am

If it makes people feel any better, I’m not UBI or bust. I’d also support UBS (Universal Basic Services).

That would be where instead of giving people cash to buy the necessities (post #165) , the government simply treats all these necessities the same way it already treats healthcare and K-12 education: free at the point of service through either a single payer system or a public option, funded by taxes. We’re already 40% of the way there, just got to extend it to food, shelter, post-secondary education, and public transporation and we’re set!

There are pros and cons to UBI and UBS both from functional and precedential standpoints, but either would be ideal.

#169 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.09.21 at 10:37 am

TOP OF THE WORLD

The achievement comes as the country leads the world in the share of national populations vaccinated against the novel coronavirus, with close to 65 per cent of Canadians now having received at least one dose.
Monday’s 945 new infections marked the first time daily cases were under 1,000 since Sept. 20 of last year.

#170 Sail Away on 07.09.21 at 10:41 am

Buy the dip

It’s not exactly rocket surgery, but buying the dips can supercharge returns.

When the broad market dips, certain sectors will dip much more. When this happens, review your holdings in those sectors to ensure no fundamental problem has cropped up and consider adding. Let’s use a yesterday example: markets dipped, transport dipped more: buy more CP Rail at -6.5%, watch it gain 2% over the day and open today up another +2.5%.

It works.

#171 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 10:42 am

@#164 Sara
” All are doing better than I and my husband were at their ages.”

+++

Shhh.
God forbid the kids of today hear that things might be easier now than their parents day.
That goes against the “wokesters” philosophy.

#172 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.09.21 at 10:44 am

121 CalgaryCarGuy on 07.08.21 at 9:51 pm
As a person in front line retail I have got to say how absolutely stunned I am at how many people are still wearing masks in a city (Calgary) that no longer has a mask bylaw. At first I thought it was because maybe they hadn’t had their second shot yet but that’s not it. There are a ton of people who are scared to death to take their mask off! Now I have got an email from management saying I have to ask customers who are wearing a mask if they are comfortable with me not wearing one. Well, ok I guess. But for how long? A week or two?, a month?. This virus will never go away completely…not ever. Are you going to wear a mask for the rest of your life? Grow a set and get on with your life.
——————
Tough guy, eh.
Afraid of a little mask?
Yes, I will continue to wear the mask in crowds, and during flu and allergy seasons.
Usually, I get a lasting cold and allergies in spring.
Nothing this year.

#173 Axehead on 07.09.21 at 10:45 am

IMO, If you are able to work and choose not to, then you don’t eat.

#174 Mean Guy on 07.09.21 at 10:46 am

SunShowers thinks everyone is a slave because they are forced to breathe to stay alive.

Fun to debate totally illogical people but recognize it’s a total waste of time.

#175 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.09.21 at 10:57 am

#159 Dharma Bum on 07.09.21 at 9:03 am
The labour situation certainly looks dire.

There are less and less opportunities to make any serious money.

I predict a resurgence in prostitution. Old reliable.

Don’t believe me?

Look it up.
—————————-
No need to look it up.
I trust you’re talking from your own experience

#176 Damifino on 07.09.21 at 11:04 am

#139 Nonplused

Give 100 men a shovel and eventually they can build a road, maybe in a few months. Give one man a bulldozer and he’ll have it done by dinner time.
————————————-

And don’t forget, bulldozers need to eat too. They have a steady diet of hydrocarbons. All of them.

#177 Sara on 07.09.21 at 11:48 am

#163 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 9:49 am
@#159 Dharma
“I predict a resurgence in prostitution. Old reliable.”

+++

Sorry,
I’m too old to buy a new wardrobe.

=====================

No worries. Your paid dates don’t care that much what you wear. Just make sure you shower and tip well.

#178 Phylis on 07.09.21 at 12:14 pm

#165 SunShowers on 07.09.21 at 9:58 am

Yes. Just not here.

https://www.globalcarsbrands.com/cheapest-car-in-the-world-tata-nano/

#179 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 12:14 pm

#111 mike from mtl on 07.08.21 at 8:52 pm

…Mom and pop local SMB bear all the local taxes and regulations which if you’re them, well is too bad so sad. Could I set up a draperies shop locally employing Sylvain & Jean-Guy to only be the tax mule and all round evil scrooge or just buy from India at 1/100th of the price…hard choice?

Do I agree with this no, but this is the insane world we live in. Again Canada is a terrible uphill battle to be an SMB fabricating physical product.
———

It’s not insane, it’s the logical future and the last increase in economic efficiency wrt to human labour we will undergo. All resources will be sourced from where they can be produced at the lowest cost. This was once done on a regional scale, then territorial, then later national, then more recently with other nations, and now on a global scale. The cost of consumer goods will continue to plummet via competition for sales which has never been higher as it is also now also scaled globally.

As wage demands, red tape, and costs of living increase in the West, more jobs will move where they can be done for less. Quality of life will continue to drop here in the West, and increase where the jobs are flowing. Wealth inequality will also skyrocket during this transition.

In the end, human labour requirement will eventually drop globally as technology takes over, and we’ll all be in the same boat where consumer goods are ridiculously cheap, and most folks don’t have a job as we currently understand them (maybe…).

I think it’ll be alright somehow. Every time humans have decreased their labour requirement to provide the basics (freeing up time for civilization building) things have got better for most people. Only 200 years ago, it took almost every hour in the day, (and 10 kids) to provide just the bare minimum.

#180 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 12:20 pm

My my.
Seems that even private security contractors dont get paid enough from the Canadian Foreign affairs dept.
They have to moonlight as mercenary’s and assassins…..

https://www.reuters.com/world/americas/us-probing-american-ties-assassination-haitian-president-sources-2021-07-09/

#181 Wrk.dover on 07.09.21 at 12:37 pm

#151 Asaro on 07.09.21 at 8:01 am
Definitely a wage issue, not a gov handout issue. So many companies are blind to reality. Mine can’t get entry level people for manual labour positions because they’re paying only a dollar an hour more than what one can make stocking shelves in a clean, cool environment. They can’t even get applicants from temp agencies. Of course they moan about Trudeau messing everything up for them… yeah, nothing to do with the poverty level wages you’re offering for brutal work.
___________________________

Some people need their nose rubbed in this message, though I’d never do that with a dog.

#182 Keith on 07.09.21 at 12:58 pm

#138 Nonplused

“Mechanization, factory reforms such as the assembly line, and of course more recently automation lead to great improvements in productivity. But what happened? Henry Ford was able to produce a car for such a low price even his factory workers could afford one. More for less. That is what productivity is about.”

You forgot the part where Ford paid his workers $5 per day, double the going rate. When asked why, he said he wanted them to be able to afford what they were building. Increasing productivitiy (since 1980) without raising wages benefits capital much more than labour.

#183 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.09.21 at 1:22 pm

@#176 Smug Sara
“No worries. Your paid dates don’t care that much what you wear. Just make sure you shower and tip well.”
++++

Err.
Why are you being so sexist?.
Never heard of male prostitution?
Get with the times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kkrb4h4weW4

I’ll give you the Greaterfool discount….

#184 Ustabe on 07.09.21 at 1:36 pm

#135 Roial1 on 07.08.21 at 11:40 pm

91 Ustabe on 07.08.21 at 7:37 pm

Min wage in Australia: 14.80
Big Mac there: 4.71

Better check your numbers.

2020 min wage $19.84 Au. dollar.

It’s on their web site. look it up

current currency conversion has $19.84 Aussie dollar pegged at $14.84 US. So I’m out .04

Currency conversion charts are available on the Internet, look it up. Maybe you missed the “converted to US currency” part?

missing or ignoring the entirety of the post to spring one “gotcha” on me when you are so very wrong is lame. Just like the current iteration of the Conservative Party of Canada…lame.

#185 Brett in Calgary on 07.09.21 at 1:37 pm

Regarding:
#171 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.09.21 at 10:44 am
121 CalgaryCarGuy on 07.08.21 at 9:51 pm
—————————–
I like that masking is now optional, let Ponzi where one and CarGuy and I, not.

I have had comments on the CBC banned for referencing the WHO’s 2019 non-pharmaceutical interventions document where 10 randomized control trials showed NO decrease in viral infection from wearing a mask. These are NOT ‘observational’ or ‘anecdotal’ papers, these are single-blind randomized control trials. Actually there is an eleventh RCT showing the same if you count the Danish study from last year addressing COVID.

It is my belief that propaganda (i.e. CBC) has scared the living crap out of most people, and that you will see masks on mugs for years. Honestly, that’s fine with me, as long as it is optional. In the meantime get vaccinated (actually supported by science), wash your hands (supported) and stay away from others when your sick (supported).

#186 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 1:47 pm

#165 SunShowers on 07.09.21 at 9:58 am

Can you build an authentic Model T from the ground up in 2021 for $4000? It’s got fewer features than a new 2021 Ford sedan, after all. All the productivity increases we’ve had since then should make building a rudimentary car like the Model T trivial, right?

——-

It would cost way less than that. In China, the steel required to built a 1200 lb Model T runabout amounts to $382.00, modern means of automated mass production will typically run under 20% of the cost of materials. So 1K would likely cover the the entire cost of making a model T today from drawing board to dealership – not including any markup, or any red tape modern mfg. has to deal with. Keep in mind that HF paid famously high wages, an ability he was allowed thanks to inventing the production line. He had almost zero competition at the outset.

Eventually, the labour component of building a car will drop to an insignificant number due to near 100% automation.

Wages no longer increased post 1980 because the labour market began globalizing, plus increasing production technology. Before GM Oshawa packed up and moved to the USA, workers were getting 35.00/hr to bolt on fenders. In the southern USA, workers get 20.00/hr CAD to do the same job, with no union. Workers in India get less than 2.00/hr CAD, with no nothing.

If you flipped the toys over I had as a kid, they would say “made in Hong-Kong”, and “made in Japan” – in the 70’s already.

#187 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 1:52 pm

#181 Keith on 07.09.21 at 12:58 pm

You forgot the part where Ford paid his workers $5 per day, double the going rate. When asked why, he said he wanted them to be able to afford what they were building. Increasing productivitiy (since 1980) without raising wages benefits capital much more than labour.
——-+

Wages for Ford employees/supply chain employees are still increasing just fine. Just not in Canada.

#188 TheDood on 07.09.21 at 2:14 pm

#143 Jane24 on 07.09.21 at 1:15 am
30 years ago my husband, my 3 kids and myself left Canada and moved to the south coast of England for better quality and lower cost lives. We could see where Canada was going and we didn’t like the signs and we hated winters. My parents and in-laws couldn’t believe it as they had left England and Italy respectively in the 1960s to ensure that their kids (us) had better lives! But times change.

Today I note that all our kids aged in their 30s and all of their friends own their own English homes. All of them. I am talking about 30/40 kids here. In comparison none of my Ontario or Alberta nieces and nephews and none of their friends, with the exception of one girl, own their own homes. They are all resigned to renting for life.

The exception is our Montreal family. There our 30 year old generation do have their own homes.

What does it take for human beings to move to brighter futures? We really don’t understand why they are all there in the snow. We visit Canada every two years and on our last trip were so blown away by grocery prices we were taking photos of the prices.

If I was relocating for a better life personally again now I would move my family to Cyprus or Northern Spain! Lovely weather, lots of English speaking and a nice villa with pool for $275,000 Cdn.
___________________________________________

“What does it take for human beings to move to brighter futures? We really don’t understand why they are all there in the snow.”

LOL! Happens in every country in the world except Canada. Canadians in general don’t get that concept – moving for economic opportunity. Most are so mired in debt, they can’t afford to even think about moving due to the cost. And heaven forbid that they have to sell their precious real estate – are you joking??!!!

#189 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 2:20 pm

#175 Damifino on 07.09.21 at 11:04 am
#139 Nonplused

Give 100 men a shovel and eventually they can build a road, maybe in a few months. Give one man a bulldozer and he’ll have it done by dinner time.
————————————-

And don’t forget, bulldozers need to eat too. They have a steady diet of hydrocarbons. All of them.
———-

As a dozer owner, I sometimes wonder which is cheaper to feed? Last spring I dug out my 80’ drive way 10” deep, and refilled it with two tandem axle loads of crusher run. That’s about 190,000 lbs of stone moved out/in total. I also had to rip it 12” deep before I could shovel it out. Start to finish, it was less than 2 tanks of fuel (25 to fill), for my old 30hp track loader.

How much of this job would have got done via Manpower for say, 40.00 worth of food and drink? :)

#190 IHCTD9 on 07.09.21 at 2:46 pm

#143 Jane24 on 07.09.21 at 1:15 am

What does it take for human beings to move to brighter futures? We really don’t understand why they are all there in the snow.
———-

I believe the general consensus on that is “the pain of staying the same has to outweigh the pain of making a change”

The pain of staying the same is definitely increasing in Canada.

#191 Linda on 07.09.21 at 6:50 pm

#121 ‘Calgary’ – actually, quite a few folks I’ve spoken to intend to keep wearing the mask going forward. First, the virus isn’t ‘over’. In fact most are expecting a 4th wave to occur as things reopen & vaccinations level off at maybe 75%. One in four without a single jab provides plenty of opportunity for the virus to mutate – possibly enough to do an end run around any vaccine already received. Second, not a few folks have noted the lack of any influenza since mask wearing, hand washing etc. has become the norm. The theory is that continuing to wear a mask plus hand washing etc. will have a positive effect vis a vis any flu going forward. Influenza can kill – the Spanish Flu outbreak in 1918 had an eye popping death toll. Estimates vary, but insofar as those who study such things can determine the Spanish Flu had a death toll of at least 40 million. Some speculate it might have been as much as 100 million, but 40 million is the generally agreed upon world wide death toll. To date as per Worldmeter Covid has racked up over 4 million, so the Spanish Flu is in no danger of losing its first place position for carnage in modern times. I’d add the stellar speed with which vaccines were developed for Covid wouldn’t have done much if a virus like the Spanish Flu was what we were up against. That sucker acted fast – as in, you’d feel fine in the morning, head home mid-day due to feeling crappy all of a sudden & be dead by nightfall. And unlike Covid, the Spanish Flu had no trouble taking out ‘the young’ including the healthy young adults.