Burning

Martin and his squeeze are 38. Rent in Vancouver. No kids. No dog. But big ambitions.

We have a combined income of $165,000 and my wife works for a provincial agency. She will have a modest DB pension.  Currently we have $1,250,000 in savings, no mortgage/debt, and we rent.  If you don’t believe me I have the statements to prove it.  We plan to retire in our mid 40’s and we were discussing how much money we need for retirement.  We aren’t quite sure.  How much is enough?

Retire in six or seven years? Let’s crunch the numbers in a moment and see what’s feasible.

First, is FIRE a valid thing? That’s what the ‘financial independence, retire early’ movement brands itself. Not new – been around for years. The moustache guy in the US helped fuel the flames. In Canada the two posterpeople are Kristy and Bryce who hang out at Millennial Revolution (they may have to change the handle soon as the Mills slide into middle-age. Ouch.)

K&B admit to becoming my clients back when they toiled for the banks. They swallowed my doctrine, eschewed buying a house, doubled their portfolio and brought me champagne the day they passed seven figures while still in their 30s. FIRE achieved. So they went travelling, wrote a book and launched into the self-help biz for others who sharing their goal. (They don’t like me much anymore for calling them whiny and self-centred. Apparently I still need help with social interactions.)

So while other generations declared defeat and worked diligently until they dried up, the FIRE people refuse. Or at least try to escape. For serial entrepreneurs and those who think work-life balance is a plot (like me), it’s hard to understand how or why anyone would stop working at 45, then spend the next 45 years doing… what?

This is paleo, Boomer thinking, they say. It’s not about retirement, but about ceasing to do things you don’t want to do. Just for money. Instead the goal should be to be fulfilled. To measure things by experience, rather than material reward.

Well, being a dog guy, I get it. Canines survive in the moment, have no clear concept of future and live for the next liver treat or belly rub. No, I’m not likening Martin, the FIRE folk or my former clients to golden retrievers. But there are lessons. The goal of life is not the mindless accumulation of stuff, just as it’s not indebting yourself for all adulthood to own a house.

The goal, rather, is to maximize what we cannot buy, borrow, steal or create. Time. It’s why this blog has consistently warned against debt, reckless risk or sacrificing freedom, mobility and flexibility for a pile of sticks and bricks. If retirement means maximizing time, not just escaping labour, that’s good. If it involves efforts put into helping others, society, animals or the environment, even better. FIRE should never mean running away from the boss so you can stay in your underwear until 2 pm daily. Everyone needs a purpose.

For example, K&B retired from the jobs. But they’re working harder than ever on their big side hustle. Without a net.

Now, let’s do Martin. Is his a realistic path?

Sure. In simple terms a portfolio of $1.25 million invested correctly for another five years earning 6-7% should grow to about to about $1.8 without further contributions. So let’s assume that chunking some additional funds in gets them to $2 million. Staying invested and harvesting a 6% return thereafter (consistent with a B&DS portfolio over the last seven decades, minus a 0.85% management fee, tax-deducible) should yield ten grand a month.

Is that enough to live on, even in Van?

Should be. But while that strategy would preserve the principal amount over time, the nest egg wouldn’t be expanding. No growth money sloshing around to start a business with. Or acquire property down the road. Nor to fight inflation. Retiring at 45 with two mill might not look like such a brilliant strategy in, say, 2051 when Martin is 75. When private health care costs a fortune.

In other words, going FIRE and punting a career means embracing big risk. Hard to imagine that we’re not on the cusp of some ginormous global and economy issues, like a changing climate, record public and government debt, political tribalism and the revolution AI will bring. Old dudes like me can watch with bemused detachment and a shorter time frame. For those retiring in their 40s it’s pure roulette.

Solution: keep growing the pile. It’s the only insurance you’ve got after the job is gone. That means a serious income haircut. Or, you can go to work. Wal-Mart maybe. Or learn to dance and try TikTok.

Retire at forty? Go ahead. But know. You are playing with fire.

About the picture: “I’m thinking of you and the ridiculous theft of a symbol of a country, Canada,  that I love,” writes Mirek. “We came to Canada as refugees in December of 1968 after we drove past long  columns of Russian tanks on our way home from a shortened summer vacation. We had nothing, left everything behind. Didn’t speak the language, but we found a new life in Calgary.  I’m forever grateful that Canada took us on in 1968, after the USA refused my father. While I’m not a flag waver, I’m thinking I need one now.  This is Zed, six month old Brittany, a happy soul, taking a break from me.”

145 comments ↓

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 1:05 pm

1.250k invested. Nice.
38 and retired by 45?
Interesting.
Might work but most 55 year olds I know get bored after a few years of retirement and start working again at something.
Maybe work at something you like rather than the Gulag you’re in now?
Stick it out until at least 50 55

#2 Luddite on 07.02.21 at 1:05 pm

Wow, I am still going through more left overs from yesterday’s steerage section; that bugged a lot of folks!

Hope the fireworks captured awe in the many proud Canadians at ye ol’ bank.

Always grateful to read TGF, thanks aagain.

#3 Woke up this morning... on 07.02.21 at 1:06 pm

Hangover palette cleanser!

#4 Mean Guy on 07.02.21 at 1:06 pm

The thread about the flag had about 400 positive comments and about 3 opposed.

Kind of tells the story of society today.

A very small number of crazies have far more influence than they should have, as the rest of us are leading comfortable lives and can’t be bothered.

#5 SW on 07.02.21 at 1:13 pm

I agree with Mirek! Nice dog, too!

The people who ripped off Mr. Turner’s flag are, like others, trying to provoke a backlash from the larger community.

This is a kind of “asymmetric warfare” – a weaker group tries to get a massive crackdown on civil rights by provocation of a strong group, to encourage their “side” to have no choice but to let the extremists lead. Lots of examples throughout the world, that are messy and never ending.

Be strong. Don’t be provoked. It’s not funny what they do, but it’s laughable.

#6 TurnerNation on 07.02.21 at 1:18 pm

— Science in Ontariowe.

“”I do think a 21-day interval is prudent and I personally dont want to see that shortened because we need to be data-driven in the face of this new enemy [the Delta variant].””
https://www.blogto.com/eat_drink/2021/07/when-indoor-dining-allowed-in-ontario/

— Our new Kamp docktor. All indoor events, culture, gyms, dining still banned in Ontariowe.

.Randall Denley: Meet Ontario’s new health boss. Same lockdown energy as the old boss
https://nationalpost.com/opinion/randall-denley-meet-ontarios-new-health-boss-same-lockdown-energy-as-the-old-boss

.Brampton Mayor Slams Restrictions On Outdoor Sports In Step 2, Calls It ‘Illogical'(narcity.com)
————–
————–
– Control over our TRAVEL is the #1 goal. In the New System you have no right of being healthy.

.Up to 5,000,000 British holidaymakers could be barred from Europe because they were given Indian-made versions of AstraZeneca Covid jab (dailymail.co.uk)


– Some say the goal is taking away pets that small slice of happiness we are allowed. But how? Do pets ’cause climate change’? Do you really have to ask it….
The drumbeat begins….

https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-19-cats-more-likely-than-dogs-to-catch-virus-from-owners-studies-672625
“COVID-19: Cats more likely than dogs to catch virus from owners – study
“The main concern, however, is not the animals’ health, but the potential risk that pets could act as a reservoir of the virus and reintroduce it into the human population.”
By AARON REICH, JERUSALEM POST STAFF JULY 2, 2021 10:22″

#7 TurnerNation on 07.02.21 at 1:20 pm

Re. last blog.
This weblog told us to Live Quietly Among the masses.
Now is the time. If you pop your head up, you will get sniped.
This is WW3. The question is “do you feel lucky”? “Do you”?

There’s still some time. Delete all social medial accounts (never disclosure your position to the Enemy); sell all real estate, stay liquid and look to GET OUT of the country. It will not be getting better.

—-
– Ontario, Manitoba, NS: the war rages, as statues and flags are torn down.
Of course police are told to stand down. As they did in Feb 2020- the railway blockades threatened the supply chain. See the pattern? Add Churches to that list. The Globalists’ dream. (CV protocols is the new global religion.) Purify yourself using…Purell.

Canada Day is cancelled. It began slowly; changing of the Anthem lyrics a few years ago.
The CN Tower was lit up orange yesterday. This is official; it’s not going away.

From yesterday’s comments:
“Our town normally has a wonderful celebration but for the second year has been cancelled because of the virus”

No that’s not why it was cancelled. Kanadian have accepted their rights taken away. All old culture has been cancelled – in the Former First World Countries. It’s wartime rules and subjegation.
The Blue Jays, Leafs sports teams have been banned from the country, CFL cancelled. Cancel culture. Demoralize.

#8 Brian Ripley on 07.02.21 at 1:26 pm

One’s health is important. I’m surprised that during this Covid19 pandemic, not much media has given attention to the fact that nutrition is a big part of optimal physical and mental health and the better one’s health, the better one’s defenses are and the better one’s chances are for longevity and fruitful retirement.

My month end (June) data charts (4) of global pandemic stats are up: http://www.chpc.biz/history-readings/pandemic-update4822383

% Deaths of Total Cases = 2%
​% Recovereds of Total Cases = 92%

Increase M/M:
Cases up 7%
Deaths up 11%
Recovered up 9%

Increase Last 3 Months:
Cases up 20%
Deaths up 24%
Recovered up 30%

Increase Last 6 Months:
Cases up 77%
Deaths up 77%
Recovered up 123%

The Delta Variant is spreading quickly and unvaccinated people are at risk… so be mindful of kids especially under 12 who have not been vaccinated.

CTV News June 29th:
https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/where-is-the-delta-variant-most-prevalent-in-canada-1.5490578

#9 Flag on 07.02.21 at 1:28 pm

#4 Mean Guy

It could be that many haven’t thought it through.
It could be that many are fans and follow the leader.
It could be that it is an uncomfortable thing for Canadians to feel – that they infect have more in common with immigrants than they thought.
It could be the realization of the skewed play field. It’s not always clear to see, like you don’t feel the earth spinning.
It could be age and resistance to change.

There are many potential reasons, plus many I don’t list.

But know this: Minority is not necessarily wrong.

#10 Flag on 07.02.21 at 1:35 pm

I’m forever grateful that Canada took us on in 1968, after the USA refused my father.

———————

So…Canada was your father’s 2nd choice Mirek?

And who exactly accepted you(us) in Canada?

I had the same experience. I was a minor. I didn’t care. I’m not sure I shouldn’t care now.

End of the day, the reality is we’re all visitors in this country. And it’s a fair question to ask who our hosts are.

#11 Dr V on 07.02.21 at 1:57 pm

1 fartz – I agree

#12 Ken on 07.02.21 at 1:58 pm

I retired at 50 with no regrets. A boring day retired is better than the best day I had at work. To each his own, but if they are going to retire at that age they better be comfortable living simply and continue to grow that portfolio for the landmines the later years have yet to expose.

#13 604sam on 07.02.21 at 1:58 pm

Good advice to stay busy in retirement. I hate my job (high paying construction) and can’t wait till I retire. I’m 34 and have about 300k. I would love to just volunteer at an SPCA as a retirement gig.

#14 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 1:59 pm

The Woke minded vs the Weak Minded.

Trudeau’s pipeline loses him votes.

https://www.burnabynow.com/local-news/trans-mountain-opponents-protest-outside-liberal-mps-burnaby-office-3926216

#15 Ganerations on 07.02.21 at 1:59 pm

#8 Brian Ripley

——–

Oh no! Watch out for those germ filled children!

Lock them up! Take away their freedom! Take away their education! Put them in front of a screen more! Make sure they don’t socialize or play together!

Load them up with MORE DEBT! …before they even know what debt is.

#16 jenna on 07.02.21 at 2:04 pm

hmmmm….sounds like inheritance money !!

#17 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 2:07 pm

#10 Flag on 07.02.21 at 1:35 pm

End of the day, the reality is we’re all visitors in this country. And it’s a fair question to ask who our hosts are.

———-

Wrong. We are citizens and integral members of the country in our own right, not visitors. Our hosts are the ones who provided the necessities to survive, i.e.: the economic, social and logistical network.

As a dual citizen, my hosts are Canada and the US. They work for me, I work for them. Symbiotic.

Unresolved historical issues are important, yes, but they do not by any means negate or overvalue our rights as citizens.

#18 Dogman01 on 07.02.21 at 2:08 pm

“Inflation is taxation without legislation”

Taking from the poor and increasing the wealth of the rich, the Liberal Party of Canada way….by deception of an uninformed electorate.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35tvAeTTY3k

Worst Government ever…..

Interesting read:
https://www.mawer.com/the-art-of-boring/blog/on-modern-monetary-theory/

#19 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:11 pm

I see another R/E article in the Globe stating R/E is about to take off hugely with over a million new immigrants flooding in by 2023.

#20 Hilroy on 07.02.21 at 2:15 pm

What happened to the Sabbatical? Only for teachers now?

#21 Howard on 07.02.21 at 2:16 pm

Latest Ipsos poll shows the Liberals trouncing the Conservatives among voters aged 55+.

Lib 40
CPC 29
NDP 13
BQ 9
GP 6

Liberal plan worked. Shower taxpayer-funded and backstopped riches on the Boomers and drive young people to despair. Older people will thank them at the ballot box, and young people either won’t show up to vote or refuse to engage their brains and educate themselves on why they own 4% of wealth in society versus the Boomers’ 21% at a similar age in 1989.

It’s looking very much like a Liberal landslide.

Young Canadians need to ask themselves whether they really want to pay for this. If the answer is no, emigrating is the only way unless Canada adopts the US policy of taxing citizens wherever they live (and if that occurs, I’d sooner renounce my citizenship frankly).

#22 Ardbeg on 07.02.21 at 2:19 pm

A lot of us want to FIRE because we simply don’t enjoy work – the endless email chains, the 8AM (or 5PM Friday) meetings, the politics, the annoying clients, micromanaging managers… etc etc. Not to mention the actual work (when you actually have time to get down to it) that is mostly a grind.

Even if you’re lucky to find yourself in the best of corporations you will be dealing with many of these issues weekly.

Why not set yourself up for a life of leisure instead? Why spend $500 on a Jacobs steakhouse and wine dinner when you can rent for a month in Eastern Europe for that? Why do we need a wardrobe of $2500 Canali suits, when you can get fresh mortadella in Tuscany instead?

I see nothing wrong with retiring at 45 and travelling the world to your hearts content. You can always be a consultant on the side if you don’t burn all your bridges.

#23 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:19 pm

We recently had a byelection in Burnaby to fill two empty city council seats. The editor Chris Campbell of the local rag Burnaby Now community “newspaper” was complaining that “we don’t need another old white guy” (Mike Hillman) on city council and the Editor said it’s ok to slag “old white guys” because he (the Editor) is one (which he is not) as if that excuses him. This is how far we’ve sunk when the media has also bought into this narrative of slandering the very generation of people who built up this country and enabled these goofs to get where they are today.

I emailed this editor directly to call him out on his irresponsible remarks and he basically responded to me to get lost.

#24 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 2:20 pm

Gee 10 more churches vandalized in Calgary.

https://www.citynews1130.com/2021/07/01/ten-churches-vandalized-overnight-across-calgary/

And the Woke perps may get charged with “Hate Crimes” because they targeted only Christian churches…..

#25 Chris L. on 07.02.21 at 2:21 pm

The biggest risk of achieving FIRE is going back to work… yawn.

Been going back to work since 23.

Do FIRE. worse case you hit the moon. – 3 mil at 43, working on 4.

#26 SailEXIT on 07.02.21 at 2:23 pm

Garth
First time poster, long time lurker.

I offer you my Canada Flag.
It flew on the Peace Tower on December 4th, 2002.

Thanks for all you do.
Shaun

#27 My Body My Choice on 07.02.21 at 2:23 pm

They should move to France, buy a fancy, luxurious, 3 bedroom chateau with botanical gardens, vineyards, acreage, nature, peace and quiet, for $750,000.

(If you don’t believe me, check out the rural France real estate websites).

Open a B&B, learn a little French, sip wine in the evenings and watch the sun set by your private pool. Laugh at all the suckers paying double or triple that for a tiny, slanty-semi in the GTA or YVR or the many other overcrowded, overpriced, overhyped Canadian cities.

#28 Duffy on 07.02.21 at 2:39 pm

Regarding yesterdays post —- with the number of cameras around, these offenders will likely be caught. Community service should be the reward for them, giving them the opportunity to work in the community, meeting and working with citizens that built the town. Assuming they aren’t psychopaths, and depending on their maturity level most will come out the other side much better people. I feel some of the these souls deep down, feel left behind financially, sometimes caused by poor career choices. Lets be honest here, a degree in the selection of quills Shakespeare used for writing his music sheets, doesn’t fill the TFSA.
Then there are the woke who have or will inherit their parents wealth, this group can cause problems for society much longer as maturity and common sense is avoided until later in life. We see a good example of this in Ottawa right now.
When I was young I made a lot of mistakes too, but I found hard work can be a great maturity accelerator.

#29 My Body My Choice on 07.02.21 at 2:40 pm

Homework assignment for everyone. Watch 2 movies:

Seven Years In Tibet – great movie starring Brad Pitt, based on true events, stunning scenery, beautiful Tibetan culture, and then … the ugly twist at the end.

A Man Called Horse -starring Richard Harris, filmed in 1970, relatively unknown and not easy to get a copy. But I recommend it to everyone and especially to all the cultural relativists and historical revisionists.

#30 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 2:40 pm

#4 Mean Guy on 07.02.21 at 1:06 pm
The thread about the flag had about 400 positive comments and about 3 opposed.

Kind of tells the story of society today.

A very small number of crazies have far more influence than they should have, as the rest of us are leading comfortable lives and can’t be bothered.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Blame the media. They seek out the crazies who are off their meds and say the stupidest things and make it front page news.

#31 Flop… on 07.02.21 at 2:43 pm

Well,I guess it’s time to announce my new business venture.

Flop’s Flag Security.

The phone should start ringing any day now.

Any day now…

M47BC

#32 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 2:49 pm

@#23 S.Bby
“I emailed this editor directly to call him out on his irresponsible remarks and he basically responded to me to get lost.”

+++
The Burnaby Now free “fish wrapper”.
The editor Chris Campbell has peaked in his journalistic abilities.

Have you noticed that he’s has removed the Comment sections from about 95% of his stories?
And the other 5% that he allows comment aren’t usually agreeing with him.

I dont think you’re the only one calling him an idiot.

#33 SoggyShorts on 07.02.21 at 2:50 pm

FIRE’d 7 months ago with under 2m and I’m very comfortable.

Is living in Van full-time post-retirement a must?

Instead, spend a couple of years traveling SEA for ~60k per year and grow that pile by another ~60k per year while doing it!

For reference, we spent 4 months traveling Vietnam eating out 3 meals a day, taking local flights, and staying in nice hotels and the total tab including the international flights came to $14K.
The goal for our 3rd trip there was to spend recklessly and see how much we needed to budget if we didn’t set a budget.

That’s 42K per year for a couple, so if your 2m PF is gaining 120K per year you’ll easily beat inflation.
If you choose to keep living in one of the most expensive cities in the world… well, YMMV.

#34 ogdoad on 07.02.21 at 2:50 pm

Man, if we had 1.25M, no kids, no house, no debt, 30’s…we’d be off like a rocket. There are amazing countries in the world that are easy navigated with a low daily budget (if you can set aside your feelings of entitlement..fat chance) while my investments grow (a little slower – but who cares). Then, we would move back to Canada with our new found insights and take the time to find a passion to pursue and see us through to the light…

Wait, we already do that…hahaha. Except for the no mortgage, no kids part. Lol! Oh and 30’s…

Nah, stay working ’till you’re 60 and miserable b/c of it and retire with 5M. Take up golf, buy an Infinity and look smug…haha

Og

#35 Drew on 07.02.21 at 2:52 pm

Garth, seems to me you are retired in the FIRE sense. It doesn’t appear like you have to do the daily grind to make money to live. You’re doing what interests you.

#36 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 2:54 pm

There’s some outrage about the rich becoming richer over the last two years.

Well… of course that happened. The rich became rich in the first place by learning how to catch, retain and nurture money. So when government $ faucets open, it should surprise nobody that this continued.

For example, the US govt in their infinite wisdom sent my wife and me a $4,200 check labeled ‘Economic Impact Payment’. We had no need for more kitschy tourist art at the moment, so bought a fancy lunch for the office and gave the remainder a job in the Sail Away family portfolio.

#37 Dogman01 on 07.02.21 at 3:00 pm

Prepared for FIRE

Even if you do not have a dream of FIRE, being prepared to FIRE gives you control and options in the workplace….Freedom

In my experience: it is has been the Sociopaths that get to the top of human organizations, the conscientious and competent staff do the good work but the Psycho’s move up.

One day, often when you are in your 50’s and they know you are at your peak of competence and ability managing more work then several other staff. Your psychopathic boss, at war with his psychopathic executive rival, will volunteer you for a massive project doomed to fail and draining what is left of your soul and collapsing your reputation.

Instead if you are ready for FIRE, well you can say “Frig You!”, retain you dignity and stand up to the ego driven loon.

—————————————–

“Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.” –
Frederick Douglass

#38 Rook on 07.02.21 at 3:03 pm

I took yesterday off the internet and went outside to enjoy the holiday.

Sorry to hear about your flag, Mr. Turner. I know it was important to you.

Given the statues of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth were toppled in Manitoba today, I wonder how soon the maple leaf becomes a hate symbol?

Folks mock, but symbols are important. They’re part of our history and represent who we are. What happens to the nation if all the statues get torn down/vandalized and the flag gets treated like a far-right symbol?

#39 IHCTD9 on 07.02.21 at 3:04 pm

#19 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:11 pm
I see another R/E article in the Globe stating R/E is about to take off hugely with over a million new immigrants flooding in by 2023.
— ——

This is exactly what Canada needs, ie: hardship. Loads of folks moving in who put getting a life on the go as priority #1, and never heard of woke issues. Major government revenue problems in parallel with huge demands on the social net. Gigantic debt, followed by even more gigantic debt. Cuts, austerity, suffering. It’s the only way perspective can come back into focus. It has to hurt bigly, and it surely will in post-Trudeau Canada.

It sucks for the youth born here, but they may have the resources to leave, and if so, they really should give that option some honest consideration given what the Trudeau Liberals have done to this country. The median sfd price in the USA is 287K, in Canada you’re looking at north of 700k. Then you get to live with woke young women who get to vandalize your property consequence fee. At least in the USA – you’d have some very far reaching legal means of dealing with this kind of stuff…

The turning point in Canadian prosperity was Trudeau, the year was 2020, and it can not be reversed. Things were bad enough already before he pumped our debt into the 12 figures. Ask yourself as an individual what it will take to achieve the lifestyle you want in Canada, then compare that to the US or elsewhere. The sooner we have hoards of smart young kids gtfo of here, the better, eventually our governments will have to belly up to the bar and drink some hard, exceedingly inconvenient facts.

#40 Bob on 07.02.21 at 3:07 pm

#27 My Body My Choice on 07.02.21 at 2:23 pm
I was thinking something similar but with Greece or Spain, where you can buy a mini hotel for 300k EUR, live near the amazing sea and rent the rooms on AirBnb for about 4 months a year to cover all your costs and more.
Plenty of choices.

#41 Flag on 07.02.21 at 3:15 pm

#17 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 2:07 pm

Unresolved historical issues are important, yes, but they do not by any means negate or overvalue our rights as citizens.

—–

I’m fascinated that others, who proclaim themselves to be our leaders, are given the power to grant us rights, and by the same token take rights away from others.

Of course those who are granted rights wrap themselves in the shield of those rights. But you know what they say, every going has 2 sides.

#42 IHCTD9 on 07.02.21 at 3:21 pm

#24 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 2:20 pm
Gee 10 more churches vandalized in Calgary.

https://www.citynews1130.com/2021/07/01/ten-churches-vandalized-overnight-across-calgary/

And the Woke perps may get charged with “Hate Crimes” because they targeted only Christian churches
——

Didn’t think it’d take to long before any denomination was fair game.

Hopefully these violent extremist thug activists get caught and tossed in jail for a good long time. In fact, it is absolutely critical that they do…

#43 Habitt on 07.02.21 at 3:22 pm

#27 Howard me thinks it was the liberals Covid response. Btw women and younger voters ranked the liberals first. That’s how they got elected duh. Who collected cerb and corn? Nice child tax credit now. Talk of universal day care and more ain’t for the boomers. Perhaps you’ll cash in when your parents pass. Won’t that be nice. For now kindly whine elsewhere good grief

#44 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 3:24 pm

I’d like to posit feedback on the Canada Day celebration discussion (it take me a long time to think through issues!), and I’ve come up with a little thought experiment.

First let me state it’s totally wrong to vandalize, steal, bully or intimidate people into taking your point of view of any given topic. Period.

But here’s the experiment. Let’s say that Canada’s birthday was September 15th, instead of July 1st. I suspect that on September 15th 2001, we would have seen a lot of flags, both Canadian and US, but not celebrations and fireworks. It would have been perceived as poor taste and insensitive to our American neighbours (and Canadian victims) after the devastating Sept 11 attack.

I understand that position of those who did not want to see a celebration happen in light of the mass graves being discovered.

There are no ‘mass graves’ being uncovered. Deceased have been found in cemeteries, many of which have been in Indigenous care for several decades. – Garth

#45 Dr Prepper on 07.02.21 at 3:25 pm

The UN is now the governing body of Canada . Our property rights are gone with the passage of UNDRIP.
read article 26

Article 26
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands,
territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise used or
acquired.
2. Indigenous peoples have the right to own, use,
develop and control the lands, territories and
resources that they possess by reason of traditional ownership or other traditional occupation or use, as well as those which they have
otherwise acquired.
3. States shall give legal recognition and protection
to these lands, territories and resources. Such
recognition shall be conducted with due respect
to the customs, traditions and land tenure systems of the indigenous peoples concerned.

https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2018/11/UNDRIP_E_web.pdf

#46 Damifino on 07.02.21 at 3:26 pm

#21 Howard

I’m a retired boomer and I’m trying to figure out what riches specifically the Liberals have showered upon me. I support myself almost completely by my own self made resources.

I personally detest the PM and his party and view them as a scourge upon the land. I will also concede that there’s not much in the way of a viable alternative other than to suck it up and prepare for much more of the same.

#47 ElGatoNerodeYVR on 07.02.21 at 3:32 pm

Others on this blog get it as well ,FIRE is not all about stopping work and sitting at home doing nothing. It is about finding a better purpose in life then working a job you more or less hate just to own material things.
I admire all that have been fortunate and driven to make their FI number and said no more.
My generation’s dream (X) was Freedom55 and while I will not make that a couple more years should do it.
There are so many things to do in life ,I would rather travel ,volunteer, pursue a small consulting career, write a self publishing book, work for less money in a job I enjoy then put up with woke HR and clueless executives in a cut throat corporate environment…or work in a family owned business(shudder at the thought of having to make a living in a company like that).
Wishing all the best to all who choose the FI path…you have it right.

#48 Hilroy on 07.02.21 at 3:36 pm

If you retire in your 40’s – expect to be lumped in with the Trust Fund Babies socially. Especially in big cities. TFB’s are generally looked down upon by people the same age and older. Your friends – still working, raising kids – won’t want to hear about your fabulous adventures also.

#49 The West on 07.02.21 at 3:39 pm

#17 Sail Away

“Unresolved historical issues are important, yes, but they do not by any means negate or overvalue our rights as citizens.”

Be careful.

There is a reason the Constitution of the United States grants their citizens the unequivocal right to bear arms.

You may feel secure in the pieces of paper that “grant” you value and standing in society. One trip through history proves they are irrelevant.

The state is something to be captured. Have a really long, hard look at what is happening in Canada. If it doesn’t scare you; you’re not paying attention.

#50 Ustabe on 07.02.21 at 3:44 pm

To me work/life balance doesn’t mean no work, it means work at what you love…or at least like.

Personally I got lucky early. Directly out of high school I found myself on an impoverished northern Manitoba reserve and two years later I returned home with more money than most middle class of the day earned in 3 years. (Fur trading).

So I bought a house, bought a 3 year degree, met my (still same one) wife and put her through a 5 year stint. She popped out as a veterinarian, I spent that 5 years buying, running, selling laundromats, pick up pizza joints and the odd coffee shop.

Still had money left over…my credit union offered 18% certificates of deposit at the time.

Side hustle, my brother and I began acquiring rental houses in Calgary. Started with 2 trailers in a shabby park, ended up with a real property management company 35+ years later. What really kicked that venture into gear for us was when we decided that we wouldn’t own or rent anything we wouldn’t be prepared to live in ourselves. Commie talk I know but it sure worked out for me.

Meanwhile spouse worked up from locum to salaried staff to partner to building and owning her own veterinary hospital. Hospital is a far different (and more profitable) entity than a vet clinic.

All the while I picked up and ran small cafes/diners and the like. Built them up and then sold them to retired florists from Alberta who thought they could do better. Always held the paper so there was one I sold four times!

My wife sold her practice to the employees, even loaning money at no interest to the vet techs and receptionists who wanted in, so they could compete with the veterinarians. I sold our real estate in Calgary after the untimely death of my brother and we both can honestly say we loved every minute of it all and I can say I didn’t “work” a lick for the last 20 or so years.

And here we are today…my wife goes to Curves so when I die she is in shape to date, I piddle around trying to be helpful to folks who need a little push. Had four “deals” in the past couple of years…one went south before due diligence even started, one went way south just after they got my money and my lawyers tell me it is a fool’s job to pursue further, cost more to attempt recovery that we would ever hope to see.

But two are going gangbusters. fun, extremely profitable for all.

Now, our jam isn’t a trip to Florida each winter. Instead we chase glaciers in Yukon, northern BC. We acquire native art and crafts mostly from Northwest Territories. We camp in the old fashioned sense, no RV, no adventure van. Winter is a different story…we used to end up in north Africa a lot but the flights over even in business class are getting old and older each year.

Sorry for the Nonpulsed length here but my point is stop trying to be the biggest fish somewhere and start being the medium fish anywhere. Big fish need a big lake, medium fish work well in any sized lake and are far happier.

And don’t get divorced, just as staff churn is bad in business, spouse churn is bad for your pocketbook.

#51 ElGatoNerodeYVR on 07.02.21 at 3:46 pm

#48 Hilroy on 07.02.21 at 3:36 pm
《》 Your friends – still working, raising kids – won’t want to hear about your fabulous adventures also.
≈=============
Take it from someone who had an extremely diverse life(as I moved a lot and other life challenges).
Friends are like the ocen tide, they come in,enjoy the moment together, they go away and new one comes in ,repeat for as long as you stay on the beach we call life.
Once you leave the beach and settle 6ft under it won’t matter.

#52 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 3:48 pm

#41 Flag on 07.02.21 at 3:15 pm
#17 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 2:07 pm

Unresolved historical issues are important, yes, but they do not by any means negate or overvalue our rights as citizens.

——–

I’m fascinated that others, who proclaim themselves to be our leaders, are given the power to grant us rights, and by the same token take rights away from others.

——–

I proclaim myself leader.

Will someone deliver the power, or was it automatically instilled upon proclamation?

#53 Howard on 07.02.21 at 3:48 pm

#27 My Body My Choice on 07.02.21 at 2:23 pm
They should move to France, buy a fancy, luxurious, 3 bedroom chateau with botanical gardens, vineyards, acreage, nature, peace and quiet, for $750,000.

(If you don’t believe me, check out the rural France real estate websites).

——————————–

Speaking from personal experience, France is a frustrating, aggravating place to live. Very few Canadians have the emotional maturity to take the many irritants in stride while enjoying the many pleasures that come with it. Their first experience with The Administration (as the French call their public service) to apply for long-term residency will see most Canadians scurrying back home to the comfort of their Tim Hortons, $2M townhomes, and conversations about Harry and Meghan.

#54 Prince Polo on 07.02.21 at 3:48 pm

My plan was to FIRE as a geriatric milquetoast Millennial by the ripe old age of 45 (2027). My mid-life crisis will lead me to side-hustle as a lowly-paid TI Prairies correspondent, but I may need to brush-up on my witty repartee….now the rebuttal from the bearded one: But it’s Winnipeg!?
Ok ok – winters in the tropics/Central Europe.

#55 David Prokop on 07.02.21 at 3:49 pm

A new wave of buyers expected to hit B.C. real estate market

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/real-estate/vancouver/article-a-new-wave-of-buyers-expected-to-hit-bc-real-estate-market/

‘Mr. Chan says a lot of buyers are Canadians returning from Hong Kong. Vancouver is the favoured destination for the 300,000 or so passport holders who want to escape political instability in Hong Kong, as well as the high numbers of newcomers to Canada.’

I’m sure it will reach GTA too

#56 SoggyShorts on 07.02.21 at 4:05 pm

#48 Hilroy on 07.02.21 at 3:36 pm
If you retire in your 40’s – expect to be lumped in with the Trust Fund Babies socially. Especially in big cities. TFB’s are generally looked down upon by people the same age and older. Your friends – still working, raising kids – won’t want to hear about your fabulous adventures also.
******************
This is real. Many in FIRE recommend “Stealth Wealth”. No one wants to hear about how well you did/are doing.

I actually lie and say that I am able to work remotely for a few hours a week. Only a handful of friends know that we’re totally retired.

#57 Howard on 07.02.21 at 4:11 pm

#43 Habitt on 07.02.21 at 3:22 pm
#27 Howard me thinks it was the liberals Covid response. Btw women and younger voters ranked the liberals first. That’s how they got elected duh. Who collected cerb and corn? Nice child tax credit now. Talk of universal day care and more ain’t for the boomers. Perhaps you’ll cash in when your parents pass. Won’t that be nice. For now kindly whine elsewhere good grief

—————————————-

CERB was collected in significant numbers by all age groups. The youngest cohort, Gen-Zers aged 15-24, took by far the greatest proportion, that is true. But from 25 onward there wasn’t a massive difference aside from a slight gradual decline up the age groups.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/45-28-0001/2021001/article/00021-eng.htm

Seniors also received non-means-tested Covid income supplements, as you may recall.

What child tax credit? You mean the CCB? Most of the middle class has been means-tested out of it. Under Harper the child care payments were universal. Now only the poor get it.

#58 Hilroy on 07.02.21 at 4:39 pm

#51 ElGatoNerodeYVR on 07.02.21 at 3:46 pm

“Friends are like the ocen tide, they come in,enjoy the moment together, they go away and new one comes in ,repeat for as long as you stay on the beach we call life.”

I’m in 100% agreement. With a few million dollar retirement fund at age 40 your new friends are going to be trust fund kids.

You won’t be partying in Monaco with that little money. You’re still flying economy.

#59 Loonie Coder on 07.02.21 at 4:43 pm

FIRE’d 2 years ago at 43. My father-in-law was unexpectedly diagnosed with cancer shortly after. The extra time available allowed us to take him to every doctor’s appointment, and be there for every treatment. Same story for being able to spend regular time during the week with another relative suffering from Alzheimer’s. The most valuable thing FIRE gives you is your time back. Use it for what’s most important to you.

#60 Roial1 on 07.02.21 at 4:51 pm

#13 604sam on 07.02.21 at 1:58 pm

If retirement to volunteer at an SPCA or rescue, is your plan, I highly recommend that you read “A bear a dog and a kangaroo” I have been laughing my way through these 3 books about “volunteering at an animal rescue site”

#61 Squire on 07.02.21 at 4:52 pm

#7 TurnerNation on 07.02.21 at 1:20 pm
————————————————

As crazy as it may be, it seems to make more and more sense as the weeks go by.

#62 Cici on 07.02.21 at 4:52 pm

44 Lead Paint

Garth is absolutely right. The story here is not of “mass graves” it’s of “unmarked graves” of children.

In the wake of these findings, certain indigenous leaders have issued news releases (one was posted here the other day in the comments section) urging people to remain calm and non-violent and to be sensitive towards those in the community who are suffering due to the discoveries until more is known about the actual origins of the findings. The indigenous leaders of the community also stated that as of the date of the release, there was no evidence of wrongdoing, and that it was quite possible that the graves were initially marked, but had disappeared over time due to the fact that the indigenous used wooden crosses to mark their graves. Now, this is not to say that no wrongdoings did happen either… they are still conducting investigations.

However, the media and the Woke have already jumped the gun and proclaimed the unmarked graves are “proof” of “monstrocities,” “atrocities,” “abuse” and “neglect.” In Quebec media, the comment sections of local newspapers are abound with accusations proclaiming that the above-cited, but as of yet uncorroborated wrongdoings, are all the fault of “Anglos” (because only Anglos colonized and settled in Canada?) and “the Queen.” This was particularly devastating to me, because I usually find that Quebec media is much less racist towards Anglos than certain (especially Ontario-owned) media are towards Quebecers.

It’s sad and terrifying to see how fast false allegations can spiral out of control, leading to defamation, senseless violence and destruction.

It’s a scary world where we can accuse people of wrongdoings in situations where we don’t actually know what happended, especially when the people we are accusing might not actually have been the ones involved, and where the referenced wrongdoings may not actually have happened.

In the last few weeks and months I have seen huge crevices and divisions forming in we currently call “Canada.” Sensationalist English-media articles jumping on and accusing Quebecers and the Quebec Government of being racist; then Quebecers retaliating by accusing all Anglos of being this, that and the other (as if we all agree with, for example, Warren Kinsella etc.). And now, churches burning, flags beings stolen and statues being toppled in retaliation for “crimes” that may or may not have actually happened.

Emotions are high but patience and comprehension is low, and the cracks and divisions continue to grow. I get the feeling we are all played like marionnettes, but by whom and just what exactly are their ultimate goals?

#63 Pylot Project on 07.02.21 at 4:55 pm

Three weeks ago, Mad Max Bernier was arrested and held in custody for 12 hours simply for holding a rally in Manitoba. Today, the enraged Woke toppled statues of Queen Elizabeth II and Queen Victoria on the Manitoba legislature. The cops simply watched, and shrugged their shoulders. Like him or hate him, that just seems wrong. Welcome to your New Canada.

On a lighter note, Monty Python had the Woke nailed way back in 1979.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlo7YZW8vPA&ab_channel=profbaratinha

#64 The Woosh on 07.02.21 at 4:56 pm

Or, you can go to work. Wal-Mart maybe.

———————————

How insulting! Just because they decide to retire early they suddenly lose all their skill sets? They put aside $1.25 million. Please! Give it up already.

How’s that sense of humour training going for you? – Garth

#65 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 4:56 pm

There are no ‘mass graves’ being uncovered. Deceased have been found in cemeteries, many of which have been in Indigenous care for several decades. – Garth
+++++++++++++++++++++++++

Bravo for stating the obvious truth. So many people out there believe the false narrative in the media. I really wonder about the mental health and cognitive powers of the average citizen.

#66 IHCTD9 on 07.02.21 at 4:57 pm

#38 Rook on 07.02.21 at 3:03 pm

What happens to the nation if all the statues get torn down/vandalized and the flag gets treated like a far-right symbol?
——

About then, it’s time to look at finding somewhere else to live. Why would any even semi-patriotic Canuck hang around when the country that made them prosper is being systematically erased – consequence fee?

The future is global, zero Canadians are obligated to remain here against their will if things are allowed to get stupid. If they do, our boneheads in Ottawa are to blame. There is absolutely no reason why the trouble makers can’t be rounded up and incarcerated, and it better happen…

#67 Linda on 07.02.21 at 4:58 pm

I think those who promote FIRE do so for exactly the right reason – to maximize their time on this planet. Carpe diem. Financial advice columns these days all mention planning to live to age 90 – age 95 if you are female. This despite the published age tables available on the government website, that shows less than 1% of all Canadians achieve age 90+.

Regardless of actual age upon death, there is little doubt that doing stuff like travel is much more likely to be enjoyable when one is still young/healthy. Travel related health insurance becomes much more expensive once one is age 75+, if you can get it at all. Seems to me that if folks have the ability to achieve FIRE they are well equipped to figure out how to keep the party going for as long as they do.

#68 Lawless on 07.02.21 at 4:58 pm

Martin and squeeze,

I have always disagreed with Garth on this one and tend to view “retirement” more as freedom to do what you want to do and less about sitting around on a beach… although I would probably do some sitting around on a beach for a few months. I plan to get an early taste of this kind of freedom next year with my family (wife and 2 young kids) on a sabbatical travel year. If this pandemic has taught me anything, it’s that tomorrow is not guaranteed. Going to try to enjoy today (or next year)… bringing things forwards a bit while the kids are young and school for them is less of an issue.

I’m a big fan of a lot of the lower cost destinations (Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Portugal, etc.) where you can live very well on a few grand per month. The key number is the difference between what your portfolio is churning out and what you are spending. Living in any of the above destinations helps ensure that you won’t spend through your portfolio in the early years and help you to build more buffer into your portfolio/reduce risk. With $2+ million provided it continues to expand with inflation, I think you’re in good shape.

Given how well you’ve saved so far (as a fellow 38 year old I’m very impressed), I’d be surprised if you didn’t easily exceed $2 million in 7 years. As with anything, how you expect to live (and spend) in “retirement” is key. I suspect that there will be endeavors and pursuits that could even earn your family some money while “retired”. What I will say is that I plan to “retire” (probably the wrong word for what I envision for myself) with a lot less than $2 million to support 2 adults and 2 kids. My wife and I have 4 masters level/professional degrees between us, so most of our money in our 20s and early 30s went to schooling, so we are rapidly saving now to make up for the lost ground.

Best of luck. And don’t let fear paralyze you – worst case is you go back to work briefly.

#69 cuke and tomato picker on 07.02.21 at 5:01 pm

We retired at my age 62 and my wife at 58. I was a
workaholic as described by my perfect wife and her
parents. Yes chasing the dollar paid off. We now enjoy
the laid back life of south Vancouver Island. We downsized from a 54 hundred sq. ft. house on a large
cherry acreage to 1830 sq. ft. on an average lot size. Saw everything in the world we wanted to see and plan on more trips.We have been retired for 16 years.

#70 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 5:06 pm

#44 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 3:24 pm

I’d like to posit feedback on the Canada Day celebration discussion (it take me a long time to think through issues!), and I’ve come up with a little thought experiment.

First let me state it’s totally wrong to vandalize, steal, bully or intimidate people into taking your point of view of any given topic. Period.

But here’s the experiment. Let’s say that Canada’s birthday was September 15th, instead of July 1st. I suspect that on September 15th 2001, we would have seen a lot of flags, both Canadian and US, but not celebrations and fireworks. It would have been perceived as poor taste and insensitive to our American neighbours (and Canadian victims) after the devastating Sept 11 attack.

I understand that position of those who did not want to see a celebration happen in light of the mass graves being discovered.

There are no ‘mass graves’ being uncovered. Deceased have been found in cemeteries, many of which have been in Indigenous care for several decades. – Garth

———————————————————–

To your point this article on BBC article states “…the remains were found on the grounds of the ʔaq̓am cemetery, which dates back to 1865. Burial plots used to be marked with wooden crosses that crumbled over the years.

However most news sites are reporting these as discoveries (including other sites in the same BBC article), and most Canadians are just learning of this for the first time, and are rightly horrified. I’m a product of Canadian public school (80’s) and CBC brainwashing for decades, and knew nothing of this.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-57674682

In May, the remains of 215 Indigenous children were found in unmarked graves in Kamloops, British Columbia. Then last week, leaders for the Cowessess First Nation said the remains of 751 bodies, most of them children, were discovered at the former site of another school in Saskatchewan.

As stated, there are no mass graves, but there are graveyards. There have been no unearthings. There are no forensics. Ground-penetrating radar located bodies in well-known historic cemeteries. It is a bit of a mystery why people are freaked out at having found human remains in burial plots. This does not diminish the crime of residential schools, but this ghoulish aspect appears to have been a media creation. – Garth

#71 Dolce Vita on 07.02.21 at 5:10 pm

Off topic Garth if you will let me.

Italia 2 – Belgio 1

Belgium #1 EU 2020 ranked team.

Ciao Belgio, España you are the next we will send home to your lovely beaches (if you like lots of wind, sand in your eyes, ears, elsewhere).

Cheering for England tomorrow (sorry Ukraine).

Forza Azzurri.

————————–

$2M, DFB, no debt, they read your Blog yet need assistance.

Either eating the Blog book covers or preening.

#72 Steve on 07.02.21 at 5:20 pm

That’s the hardest question is how do you need? The longer you are not working the higher the risk. the longer you spend retired, the higher risk of market fluctuations and cost living. I have zero debt, a house and cottage and about 1.5 in investment. I live a simple lifestyle and yet I am St
ill concerned about retirement

#73 Ken R on 07.02.21 at 5:21 pm

S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:11 pm
I see another R/E article in the Globe stating R/E is about to take off hugely with over a million new immigrants flooding in by 2023.

Canada has fresh water, 20% of the worlds supply. Hundreds of millions people are heading here in the next 20 years. Real estate is the least of our worries.

‘Hundreds of millions.’ Sure. – Garth

#74 Aftred on 07.02.21 at 5:31 pm

I was one of those freedom 45 millennials. I realized the same thing around 32 years old you pointed out Garth, you’re taking enormous risk going into retirement early without a Plan B like a side hustle. And often the side hustle ends up being nearly full time anyway, without the benefit of paying into CPP or EI benefits if you’re self-employed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsLhNxzwK1Y

#75 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 5:37 pm

@Garth

“As stated, there are no mass graves, but there are graveyards. There have been no unearthings. There are no forensics. Ground-penetrating radar located bodies in well-known historic cemeteries. It is a bit of a mystery why people are freaked out at having found human remains in burial plots. This does not diminish the crime of residential schools, but this ghoulish aspect appears to have been a media creation. – Garth”

+++

Are you sure the “Woke” can handle the icky truth?

#76 Loonie Doctor on 07.02.21 at 5:51 pm

I danced with FIRE a bit. In the end, the financial independence part, I think is a worthy goal. That basically hinges on living beneath your means, working hard to make some dough, and investing it wisely. The danger is going extreme to sacrifice the present for the future. Honestly, it was easier for us to work hard when young (energy is high and work is novel and exciting). It is also easier to be happy with less material baggage. Investing can be super easy now with ETFs.

I agree that the retire early part is more questionable. A few specific points that I found:
1) Sense of purpose is huge. If FI, you may simply switch the work that you do, but to do nothing or live a life of total leisure is a recipe for unhappiness.
2) You change as a person over time. Young me thought having a mansion and travelling the world would be amazing. Current me would rather live in a more modest house and travel in the RV with my family and dogs. I have learned enough to not predict what 10-20 year from now me will want to do.
3) Your relationship with work changes when you are FI. I was burnt out. However, cutting back hours, focusing on the work that I enjoy and think is useful, and jettisoning the parts that I don’t – makes a big difference. So does the sense of control. Futility, lack of control, and overwork are major contributors to burn out. When you hit FI that changes and RE is suddenly not as pressing an issue.
4) If you have kids, do you really want to model for them that you can sit around and live a leisure life? You can tell them how you worked and saved to get there, but that is meaningless for most kids. They didn’t see it nor remember it much. Of course with FI, you can work less and spend more time volunteering/working with purpose, exercising, building your relationships, and balance that with your work.
5) People are happier working towards a goal than actually realizing it. There is research to back that up. Working towards FI and seeing the progress was satisfying. Now the goal has become how to make the most of that power to progress towards new goals. Trips are great – destinations can be boring.

Just my thoughts.
-LD

#77 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 6:05 pm

#23 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:19 pm
We recently had a byelection in Burnaby to fill two empty city council seats. The editor Chris Campbell of the local rag Burnaby Now community “newspaper” was complaining that “we don’t need another old white guy” (Mike Hillman) on city council and the Editor said it’s ok to slag “old white guys” because he (the Editor) is one (which he is not) as if that excuses him. This is how far we’ve sunk when the media has also bought into this narrative of slandering the very generation of people who built up this country and enabled these goofs to get where they are today.

I emailed this editor directly to call him out on his irresponsible remarks and he basically responded to me to get lost.
—————–
I gotta agree with the editor.
Lots of Chinese in the area.
Time to get with the time, right CEF.

#78 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 6:17 pm

#30 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 2:40 pm
#4 Mean Guy on 07.02.21 at 1:06 pm
The thread about the flag had about 400 positive comments and about 3 opposed.

Kind of tells the story of society today.

A very small number of crazies have far more influence than they should have, as the rest of us are leading comfortable lives and can’t be bothered.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Blame the media. They seek out the crazies who are off their meds and say the stupidest things and make it front page news.
————–
Sure blame the media.
If that does not whork, then blame Trudeau,
If that does not work, blame the FNs etc.
Lots of blame to spread around.
But first check out the pole in your eye.

#79 NOSTRADAMUS on 07.02.21 at 6:25 pm

MYSTERY SOLVED!
Why are house prices going up? The answer to this perplexing unknown. Median, middle of the road houses are appreciating by leaps and bounds because a house that used to be a ” single family home” is now a private sanctuary, a multi-office worksite, an online remote learning institution, a quarantine hotel, a Netflix Movie Theatre and a prepper storage warehouse. But as is often heard on late night commercials promoting new cooking gadgets, ” Wait, there’s more”. Well, that’s all I have to say on that for now.

#80 Bezengy on 07.02.21 at 6:36 pm

#72 Steve on 07.02.21 at 5:20 pm
That’s the hardest question is how much do you need?

——————————-

Nope, it’s a valid question but there are plenty of other questions, like will I enjoy retirement?, will I feel a loss of identity?, will I still have a social life? The money thing isn’t that hard really, basically set a budget and stick to it.

#81 raisemyrent on 07.02.21 at 6:39 pm

missed yesterday’s post. sorry to hear about the flag. that is sickening.
FWIW, it’s kind of silly that this is NOT the same flag that flew on those residential schools. This is our second flag; the flag of compromise. The flag of unity. Not British, not french, not colonial. sigh…
the first one was taken away to appease people; angering some who fought and almost died for it. the second one has been fought and died for (albeit in different kind of conflicts). and it is everyone’s flag, and we all do things for it according to our ability and capacity. it’s the flag of police, fire brigade, social workers, teachers, entrepeneurs, etc. We all contribute, we all want a better Canada.
anyway, what’s the point? no one is listening; everyone is afraid to do anything. They will look back with regret is all that consoles me.
and no I am not “white”.

#82 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 6:42 pm

#69 cuke and tomato picker on 07.02.21 at 5:01 pm
We retired at my age 62 and my wife at 58. I was a
workaholic as described by my perfect wife and her
parents. Yes chasing the dollar paid off. We now enjoy
the laid back life of south Vancouver Island. We downsized from a 54 hundred sq. ft. house on a large
cherry acreage to 1830 sq. ft. on an average lot size. Saw everything in the world we wanted to see and plan on more trips.We have been retired for 16 years.
—————
Congratulations.
Sounds a little bit like my story.
But I have not decided yet where I finally retire.
Somewhere beautiful in Europe, most likely.
Somewhere, where English is not the first language.
No, Dolce, not moving in with you.

#83 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 6:45 pm

#78 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 6:17 pm

If that does not whork, then blame Trudeau,
If that does not work, blame the FNs etc.
Lots of blame to spread around.
But first check out the pole in your eye.
+++++++++++++++++++++

Check your spelling. It doesn’t “whork” either.

#84 ogdoad on 07.02.21 at 6:46 pm

“If you don’t believe me I have the statements to prove it”

There’s your tell…It seems new to him and there’s a certain…insecurity. I vote inheritance, possibly even winnings of a lawsuit. Anybody who has earned this much so fast would have spread sheets out the ying-yang.

OR at 38, 165k between them in earnings, renting in Van, have been living under a rock for 16 years.

HI, Martin and Sig. Shower first then hugs all around!!

Og

#85 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 6:57 pm

@#78 Patronizing Ponzie’s Perturbed
“Sure blame the media.
If that does not whork, then blame Trudeau,
If that does not work, blame the FNs etc.
Lots of blame to spread around.”

+++

I think I’d blame Trudeau first for letting this lawlessness escalate.
I’d blame the media second for literally fanning the flames though sensationalist reporting.
Third, I’d blame the idiots that blindly follow the drivel spewed forth by the first two.

Thats about it.
The rest of us are blameless and sleep soundly at night.

#86 mark on 07.02.21 at 7:03 pm

I think they will have “enough”. I mean what’s the alternative. By looking around social media and where I live, you can pretty much tell when the kids have left or there’s been a raise or there’s more money floating around for whatever reason.

There’s a caravan, boat, new cars, or pictures of renovations that really don’t seem to be needed. Of course the cynic in me notes the caravan and boat sit in the driveway 99% of the time, so most people are just chaining themselves to work for consumption purposes. If they’re getting off that hamster wheel, more power to them.

#87 8M3RCT3P on 07.02.21 at 7:05 pm

I’m semi-retired at 33 with >10M CAD net worth. Fun story on how I accumulated this but we will save that for another day.

I tried the full retirement thing…it’s fine for the first little bit, but eventually golf every morning with a bunch of old guys gets boring.

I had to go back to work.

#88 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:20 pm

I was hoping to see at least one photo of the fireworks and maybe a note as to how it went. On the other hand I’m not sure I would be in the mood to treat my fellow citizens to a dazzling display on my own dime after they stole my flag and canceled my Canada Day party. What a weird world we live in.

I think it is proper to acknowledge the past and work towards reconciliation with the Indigenous people, but cancelling Canada Day over something that happened 100 years ago and is well understood probably isn’t going to win them as many friends or as much support as they are hoping. Neither is stealing flags or burning churches. I don’t think those responsible are really considering what sort of a negative reaction that sort of thing can cause, even if it is silent. Think of what the BLM riots did to the BLM movement in general. Pretty much killed it, or at least the good side of it. Every riot was followed by a significant loss of support from the general public.

#89 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 7:26 pm

@#82 Ponzie Ponders the perfect place

“Somewhere, where English is not the first language.
No, Dolce, not moving in with you.”

+++

Sooooo…you’re moving to Newfoundland?

#90 Bezengy on 07.02.21 at 7:28 pm

#75 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 5:37 pm

——————-

With all this talk about cemeteries the wife and I took a drive out to a little community that used to have a population of eight hundred, when the three mines were operating in the thirties. Now there are about twenty remaining old folk. I happen to know one of the remaining residents. So last weekend we drive up to her farm, the old lady is sitting in her rocking chair, chickens running free, grandkid picking flowers, scene straight out of a movie. Her house was built in 1922, and still draws from the local river, “its’ a little yellow, but it doesn’t bother me” she says. I ask her, “would you know where the cemetery is located?” She replies, “ we never had one”, but she does have a few stories to share of kids being buried here and there. Then her son (fresh off the tractor) tells me he does know of one cemetery close by, but it was for Chinese railway workers only, they’re unmarked of course. He says there is a cemetery about every ten miles down the line for the Chinese railway workers.

#91 Cici on 07.02.21 at 7:29 pm

#50 Ustabe

Wow, thanks for sharing your personal story. Congratulations to you and your wife on your many successes and for helping to support others within your companies and in your community. Man, you two have accomplished a lot: very, very inspiring!

However, I must say that you both appear to be gigantic fish in my eyes. In comparison, I’m quite the little minnow! But on the other hand, minnows can survive in puddles, right?

I also got a good chuckle at the comment about your wife and Curves. Very cute, but I’m sure she’s staying in shape for you and just you, nobody else ;-)

#92 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:31 pm

#7 TurnerNation on 07.02.21 at 1:20 pm

“The Blue Jays, Leafs sports teams have been banned from the country, CFL cancelled. Cancel culture. Demoralize.”

Cancelling the CFL affects Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba disproportionally, (and maybe Hamilton), because as a percent of population BC, Toronto, and Montreal don’t really care about the CFL anymore. They used to. Don’t know what happened.

#93 History Guy on 07.02.21 at 7:33 pm

#9 Flag on 07.02.21 at 1:28 pm

“But know this: Minority is not necessarily wrong.”

That’s what Hitler, Stalin, and Mao said.

#94 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 7:46 pm

#62 Cici on 07.02.21 at 4:52 pm

Thanks to you and Garth for your feedback. As you’ve outlined,it’s sad to see this terrible legacy be used to attack one another. I’m not sure who benefits, but I’m sure it leads to lots of clicks for news outlets.

Garth is right. The people who chose to mourn this Canada Day are also right, that is what was right for them.

The people who tried to bully Garth and stole from him are wrong.

I think the recent investigation of the unmarked graves makes the horror tangible to people who were unaware of, or hadn’t grasped the full reality of the residential school system. I know it has shaken me. But trying to force people to ‘feel and think like me’ must be close to the root of all evil.

#95 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 7:46 pm

#32
Have you noticed that he’s has removed the Comment sections from about 95% of his stories?
And the other 5% that he allows comment aren’t usually agreeing with him.

Yes I have noticed that as well.
They have banned me from the comments because I posted that females should not be front line firefighters.

#96 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:48 pm

#44 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 3:24 pm

“I understand that position of those who did not want to see a celebration happen in light of the mass graves being discovered.”

There are no ‘mass graves’ being uncovered. Deceased have been found in cemeteries, many of which have been in Indigenous care for several decades. – Garth

————————————–

Well, his handle is “Lead Paint”. Lead can mess with the noggin.

It really is a testament to the power of the media that they have managed to convince dang near a whole country to be shocked, SHOCKED I say, that they are finding bodies in….. graveyards.

And then shocked, SHOCKED I say, that these graves are unmarked, when 100 years ago you were lucky to get a wooden cross which would have long returned to the earth by now.

The residential school are a whole another matter, but the graves are not shedding any new light on that tragedy. Perhaps drawing renewed attention to it, but that is all.

#97 Yuus bin Haad on 07.02.21 at 7:57 pm

so many statues; so little time

#98 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 7:59 pm

#88 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:20 pm

Respectfully, this attitude is part of the problem. If FN’s have been victims of our government, the church, etc. for generations, why is it their job to ‘win friends’?

And please, don’t conflate people asking that their tax dollars not go towards a celebration during a period of mourning (for some) is the same thing as stealing flags or burning churches.

“I think it is proper to acknowledge the past and work towards reconciliation with the Indigenous people, but cancelling Canada Day over something that happened 100 years ago and is well understood probably isn’t going to win them as many friends or as much support as they are hoping. Neither is stealing flags or burning churches.”

And a lot of this happened a lot more recently than 100 years ago, and no, it’s not well (or widely) understood as you are proving.

#99 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.02.21 at 8:00 pm

DELETED

#100 WTF on 07.02.21 at 8:03 pm

Graveyard, some of the headstones are pretty good

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=boot+hill+tombstone+photos&t=h_&iax=images&ia=images&iai=https%3A%2F%2Fupload.wikimedia.org%2Fwikipedia%2Fcommons%2F7%2F76%2FTombstone_Boot_Hill%252C_FSA%252C_1940.jpg

#101 Flop... on 07.02.21 at 8:06 pm

So I spent a month or so in Nova Scotia once, did the grand tour.

Lunenburg is off the retirement list now.

I remember feeling quite at home in Lockeport…

M47BC

#102 Felix on 07.02.21 at 8:21 pm

Happy Feline Friday!

Did you know:

The cheetah is the only cat that doesn’t sheathe its claws while at rest.

Most kittens are born with blue eyes.

Cats can be left-pawed or right-pawed (or both).

Domestic cats can sprint at speeds of about 30 mph over short distances.

Bad luck? Black cats are considered good luck in many places around the world.

#103 Sail Away on 07.02.21 at 8:22 pm

#96 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:48 pm

It really is a testament to the power of the media that they have managed to convince dang near a whole country to be shocked, SHOCKED I say, that they are finding bodies in….. graveyards.

And then shocked, SHOCKED I say, that these graves are unmarked, when 100 years ago you were lucky to get a wooden cross which would have long returned to the earth by now.

———-

It is indeed shocking. Oh my. I, for one, am irreparably shocked. Where is a statue I can decapitate? Any statue will do.

#104 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 8:27 pm

#96 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:48 pm

Well, his handle is “Lead Paint”. Lead can mess with the noggin.

I blame the rum.

#105 puzzled in Mtl on 07.02.21 at 8:29 pm

There is still hope. Some people here in Mtl are celebrating today. I just heard some neighbors sing O Canada in their backyard. A few quebecois families with the kids singing along.
Let’s not give up and give our country to the woke crowd.

#106 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 8:31 pm

I think the problems facing the USA are much worse than what we are facing in Canada.
Lame duck President. House and Senate in disarray.
Judges and lawyers running the show.
Unfortunately, it will all spill over into Canada.

#107 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.02.21 at 8:35 pm

#95 S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 7:46 pm
#32
Have you noticed that he’s has removed the Comment sections from about 95% of his stories?
And the other 5% that he allows comment aren’t usually agreeing with him.

Yes I have noticed that as well.
They have banned me from the comments because I posted that females should not be front line firefighters.
————
Jeez,
Were you born in the Middle ages?

#108 fishman on 07.02.21 at 8:41 pm

Well they just tore down a statue of my hero in Victoria. Captain Cook. The 2nd greatest english sea captain. Drake was #1. These kids just have no idea. Cook was a great & good man. Like Garth’s flag they stole & defiled. It’s not the flag, it’s the provinence. That flag flew while our Queen honoured us with a visit to our parliament. On top of the Peace Tower. Its sacred. It was our blogs colours. Like losing regimental colours, we were all visited a great humiliation on its loss. And now a statue of our Queen pulled down surrounded by screaming chimpanzees. If you don’t understand the hurt some feel now you’ve never had a father & uncles that put their right hand on the bible & swore to defend King & Country. QOR. Queens Orders & Regulations

#109 Damifino on 07.02.21 at 8:41 pm

#87 8M3RCT3P

I tried the full retirement thing…it’s fine for the first little bit, but eventually golf every morning with a bunch of old guys gets boring. I had to go back to work.
———————————-

In 2007 my company (which was on the downhill slide after it came under the control of a much larger concern) bought in some suits from head office who installed a software tracking program that forced all employees to monitor themselves and report their “progress” in 15-minute increments. It was the final straw for me.

Fortunately, I’d anticipated something like that coming and had been financially preparing to exit for the previous few years. The sale of two paid off properties (one residential, and one recreational) plus exercising some lucrative share options a few years earlier together with other life savings gave me the means to invest B&D (a la Garth) and exit working life forever.

So, at 56, I was done, permanently and by my own choice, without having to wait around for the date of my own redundancy. I’m now 70 and I’ve never looked back.

With money being no real object, I’ve found no shortage of pursuits and amusements. Yet still, I enjoy most the little things in life and found them generally inexpensive. My only wish is that I couldn’t have done it all even a bit sooner.

One thing though… most of my old working buddies are still ensconced in their careers, going well past 65 to pay for ever expanding needs (as if they were still starting families like back in their twenties) and wondering how & when they can ever possibly retire.

One might need to seek some new friends because the old ones won’t have much time to spend with you on weekday off-hours, which are by far the best times to go out and see what’s on offer out in the free world.

#110 Feline dreams of yesteryear on 07.02.21 at 8:45 pm

#102 Felix on 07.02.21 at 8:21 pm

Happy Feline Friday!

Did you know:

The cheetah is the only cat that doesn’t sheathe its claws while at rest…..
….
Much like a certain ex as I recall…………. but I wish not to dwell….

#111 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 8:46 pm

Residential schools. The Federal Government and the churches, Catholic, Anglican, United, and Presbyterian. Their intentions were good. To educate all children regardless of race or economic circumstance. They did not set out to commit genocide nor did they as the narrative today suggests. Some good things happened. Some bad things happened too. Not all kids were abused. Some had it better at school than they did at home. We are not being presented with a balanced view by the media or by those who stand to make a buck from this historical event.

#112 Out Of Work CEO, Will Travel on 07.02.21 at 9:11 pm

Life is so short. We don’t know when the gig is up so “cutting loose” and grabbing as much as you can while you can still breathe and grab beats deathly inertia from the tyranny of our crushing routine.

#113 Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves! on 07.02.21 at 9:17 pm

#107 fishman on 07.02.21 at 8:41 pm

Well they just tore down a statue of my hero in Victoria. Captain Cook. The 2nd greatest english sea captain. Drake was #1. These kids just have no idea. Cook was a great & good man. Like Garth’s flag they stole & defiled. It’s not the flag, it’s the provinence. That flag flew while our Queen honoured us with a visit to our parliament. On top of the Peace Tower. Its sacred. It was our blogs colours. Like losing regimental colours, we were all visited a great humiliation on its loss. And now a statue of our Queen pulled down surrounded by screaming chimpanzees. If you don’t understand the hurt some feel now you’ve never had a father & uncles that put their right hand on the bible & swore to defend King & Country. QOR. Queens Orders & Regulations
….

The Empress Hotel is surely next…. and “City of Victoria” had better start changing its name!

But I do hope T2 is going have that native inspired tat of his lasered off… cultural appropriation at its best.. such a woke leader will surely do the right thing

#114 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 9:28 pm

#98 Lead Paint on 07.02.21 at 7:59 pm
#88 Nonplused on 07.02.21 at 7:20 pm

“Respectfully, this attitude is part of the problem. If FN’s have been victims of our government, the church, etc. for generations, why is it their job to ‘win friends’?”

I’m not sure how much of the vandalism can be blamed on FN’s. It seems to me their “allies” are doing most of the damage. Most of the tribe elders are calling for support and understanding, not cancelling Canada Day or burning churches. I don’t mind reflection inserted into the day, even a moment of silence like we do for Nov. 11th.

“And please, don’t conflate people asking that their tax dollars not go towards a celebration during a period of mourning (for some) is the same thing as stealing flags or burning churches.”

FN’s don’t pay taxes on the reserve. Part of the treaty. I don’t know if some tribes tax their members, they can I suppose since the are self-governing, but the Federal and Provincial governments do not. It is only if they earn money off the reserve that they are subject to tax.

The residential school system turned out to be a horrible idea. We have to learn the lessons and never repeat the mistakes. But what else can be done?

#115 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 9:48 pm

I am posting these links in hope that some of you will click and read. It may give you a more balanced perspective on what actually happened in our past.

https://williamgairdner.ca/balancing-the-biased-genocide-story-about-residential-schools/

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/12/15/tomson-highway-residential-schools_n_8787638.html

#116 Damifino on 07.02.21 at 9:51 pm

#111 Out Of Work CEO, Will Travel

I love routine. But only when I set my own.

#117 Carlyle on 07.02.21 at 10:04 pm

Hi Garth,

Long time. Sorry to hear about the disgusting theft of your flag.

Proud Canadian Patriots need to stand up for the nation more than ever before.

#118 Phylis on 07.02.21 at 10:13 pm

#9 Flag on 07.02.21 at 1:28 pm
That’s about the mushiest thing I’ve heard. What do you really think?

#119 TalkingPie on 07.02.21 at 10:17 pm

I’m no doubt a small fish in the company of this blog – in career accomplishments, income, and net worth.

But my modest job, with my minimum of 13 days off a month, 30 days a year vacation, and ability to travel, has let me appreciate a lot. Brother has real estate in the GTA worth 7 figures (and the income to afford it), but I’m the one who gets to relax out in my backyard, watch the neighbor’s horses and float around in the pool with the girlfriend. I’m the one who’s been to over 20 different countries (and gained the perspective that comes with it). I’ve gotten to go out on sunny days and learn to fly a plane. I putter around at home, learn to do small repairs and get the exercise of doing a little landscaping – things that I enjoy doing and which also save me money.

I’ve been around people with big money and appreciate it, but the big money doesn’t mean very much if you don’t have the time and freedom to enjoy it. I’d rather my 22 year old Mazda convertible and time to go for a scenic drive than a Porsche that I only drive to work.

Keeping busy regardless of your age is important, but running yourself ragged at a job when you don’t have to isn’t my idea of the ideal way to live.

FIRE is one way to give yourself options to be able to get off the hamster wheel. It might not be the only way – it’s not my current goal – but it strikes me as a pretty good one.

#120 Here for Sail Away and Nonplused Absurdity on 07.02.21 at 10:18 pm

I never leave disappointed.

#121 Tbone on 07.02.21 at 11:05 pm

I’m retired and moving to another continent has never crossed my mind . Being distant from my kids and grandchildren is not an option for me .

#122 Mrs. Fool on 07.02.21 at 11:51 pm

I’m very sorry for the assault you, Dorothy and your team suffered yesterday. It’s painful to witness this violation to someone who has done so much for this country. Sadly, I’m not surprised. I work in an academic environment and see how the cancel culture has taken over logic and reason. University campuses aren’t places where one can speak and debate ideas openly anymore.

@#82 Marcia M on 07.01.21 at 11:58 am
I’m a racial minority (and yes, discriminated for my ethnicity), working class deplorable, who has benefited hugely from the free advice giving on this blog. So ignorant generalizations like yours, are the ones fueling hate and division.

F37QC

#123 yvr_lurker on 07.02.21 at 11:52 pm

To each their own. I happen to really enjoy my job, and still have the flexibility (pre-COVID) to take interesting eco-tourism backpacking adventures each year with my wife and kid. I would have too much time on my hands to completely quit now. Perhaps it would be different if we did not have a kid. Then, the urge to save would be greatly reduced as there would be no next generation to leave an estate to. Would certainly not be of the mindset (sans-kid) to work until I was 70 and leave a large estate to some charity to mis-manage.

#124 baloney Sandwitch on 07.03.21 at 12:07 am

When can we stop growing the pile? How much is enough? 10 mill? 20 mill. It becomes an addiction. I admire the kids, who can say enough. Let go and enjoy and we will deal with it come what may. If we have die broke then so be it.

#125 TheDood on 07.03.21 at 12:17 am

#73 Ken R on 07.02.21 at 5:21 pm
S.Bby on 07.02.21 at 2:11 pm
I see another R/E article in the Globe stating R/E is about to take off hugely with over a million new immigrants flooding in by 2023.

Canada has fresh water, 20% of the worlds supply. Hundreds of millions people are heading here in the next 20 years. Real estate is the least of our worries.

‘Hundreds of millions.’ Sure. – Garth

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I highly doubt it. The cat is out of the bag where Canada is concerned. It’s too expensive, too cold, and we pay far too much tax for not much in return. Even worse, the resource based economy has been destroyed by the Libs for at least a generation. No outside Investor (and I mean nobody) is going to invest a dime into this country.

Some will immigrate for sure. But you need to subtract a few zeroes from your figures.

#126 NSNG on 07.03.21 at 12:39 am

It looks like all the lying and propaganda are finally starting to catch up with corporate media. Let’s hope the same is befalling the even-worse Canadian propaganda industry:

CNN’s Top-Rated Show Came In 22nd Place In Cable News Ratings

https://www.dailywire.com/news/cnns-top-rated-show-came-in-22nd-place-in-cable-news-ratings

#127 George on 07.03.21 at 12:48 am

Garth,
Just wondering why you are assuming a management fee of 0.85%… in the previous posts in this blog you always mentioned 1% for management fees..?
Thanks

Portfolios $1 million+ get a break. – Garth

#128 DON on 07.03.21 at 1:12 am

This does not diminish the crime of residential schools, but this ghoulish aspect appears to have been a media creation. – Garth

**********
A media gift for Trudeau prior to the election so he can appear to save the day? Too much Turner Nation?

#129 Ustabe on 07.03.21 at 1:56 am

Bill Cosby, fresh out of prison, hops on a bus, goes a long way, gets out at a long stone wall, finds a big tree, finds an envelope, reads it, looks for a cache of money and goes to Mexico where he finds Epstein working on a boat. The end.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Once you get to a point in amassing real estate you no longer deal in residential mortgages. Any loans we ever had against assets/real property had lending covenants in them. Those are sort of like the Commandments, thou shall not type stuff. Our boy Trump has broken a significant number of those and the banks will be punishing him probably more so than the NY Attorney General. Interesting times ahead.

#130 VicPaul on 07.03.21 at 2:17 am

Nah, stay working ’till you’re 60 and miserable b/c of it and retire with 5M. Take up golf, buy an Infinity and look smug…haha

Og

*********

Sold the Infiniti G35 (family deal, but the young one still needs to learn that nothing’s free) – I’m driving the old Lexus Dad gave me (OK, let me explain…).

The look is not smug…it’s gastric bloating.

I like the idea of FIRE…I just chose to raise three kids and live in a pricey city (where I can golf year ’round) – could never reconcile one with the other, so I’ll wait ’til 61 and then join Soggy in Vietnam – I’ll bounce between Dalat and Nha trang…both have a selection of quality courses.

M57BC

#131 Wiggleroom on 07.03.21 at 6:00 am

Garth, you have previously poo-poohed the 4% SWR touted by the FIRE community. How is “Get to 6% WR and then work longer” any different from working till you get to a 3-4% WR as the FIRE people recommend?

The reason people work to these sub 4% rates is not because they suck at investing and don’t have B&D portfolios – it’s all the unknowns you mention. Future spend. Health care. Climate change. Etc.

Does this mean you’re starting to agree with the 4% rule?

#132 Wrk.dover on 07.03.21 at 6:02 am

No repair or maintenance bills since retiring 37 years ago.

Have never held an i pad or cell phone either.

#133 Millennial 1%er on 07.03.21 at 7:32 am

I did the math and I can retire at 35 :P

Not that I’m going to retire. I think I’m just going to move to the woods and write open source software for free, maybe pick up some contracts from our government and build a camping booking system that can actually handle a large influx of visitors.

#134 Prince Polo on 07.03.21 at 7:47 am

#45 Toronto on 06.30.21 at 2:21 pm
You CAN do both. It’s possible to acknowledge that while we have much to be proud of in Canada, we also cannot ignore the hurt that is still being caused to Indigenous communities today.

I understand it’s a joke, but hanging more flags in response to these messages from the community is akin to shouting “No, ALL lives matter!” to the BLM crowd. Yes, of course they do. Is that a productive response? No. It just serves to further divide.

I agree that for grown-ups, it is possible to have both thoughts in one’s brain. However, the BLM analogy is not even a valid comparison. BLM’ers weren’t shouting for all lives to not celebrate their own country on Independence Day! This is where the feet-stompers lose all credibility.

#135 Dharma Bum on 07.03.21 at 9:09 am

“FIRE should never mean running away from the boss so you can stay in your underwear until 2 pm daily. Everyone needs a purpose.” – Garth
—————————————————————————-

But, but, but….that IS my purpose!

Works for ME!

#136 Sail Away on 07.03.21 at 9:20 am

#113 Yukon Elvis on 07.02.21 at 9:48 pm

I am posting these links in hope that some of you will click and read. It may give you a more balanced perspective on what actually happened in our past.

https://williamgairdner.ca/balancing-the-biased-genocide-story-about-residential-schools/

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/12/15/tomson-highway-residential-schools_n_8787638.html

———-

Thanks YE, it’s always nice to read different perspectives.

#137 ogdoad on 07.03.21 at 9:53 am

#127 VicPaul

“…I just chose to raise three kids and live in a pricey city (where I can golf year ’round)…”

Heard that. Vic Golf Club was one of the nicest tracks I’ve golfed. Cedar hill was nice too. Henderson was great after a few with the buddies…not sure if its free anymore.

Vietnam? Now you’re talking!

Og

#138 Sail Away on 07.03.21 at 10:05 am

Tesla delivers over 200k cars in quarter for first time!

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/02/tesla-tsla-q2-2021-vehicle-production-and-delivery-numbers.html

https://insideevs.com/news/503794/tesla-2021q1-final-deliveries-outlook/

And this when plagued with supply chain issues. From here on, they’ll be just printing money. And all this in addition to energy storage, giant NASA contracts, Starlink. Wow. That Elon. A force of nature.

#139 Sail Away on 07.03.21 at 10:35 am

Hmmm…. be careful of blind spots when investing in ESG ideals. Fraudsters abound:

He Convinced the Elite He Invested for Good. Then the Money Vanished. https://www.wsj.com/articles/he-convinced-the-elite-he-invested-for-good-then-the-money-vanished-11625238031

#140 JOHN BEARDSMORE on 07.03.21 at 11:43 am

Started earning a pay cheque at 13 ,retired at 39 1/2—get 2 pensions now(started CPP at 60 and company pension at 55)It can be done and sure beats punching a time clock for a living.Don’t need no 1.25 mill though even though TFSA is pretty healthy will get another $1150 a month through OAS/GIS at 65.Just under$2400 a month ain’t too shabby plus all the RRSP/TFSA/non registered income that is drained basically tax free.All about planning and it works when I don’t have to.

#141 Don John on 07.03.21 at 12:13 pm

GIC, going increasingly cheap. This is my lifestyle for 35 years now. I accumulated $2 million and no house and job to keep me attached. I just have my net after all taxes coming in $59,000 a year from bonds, GIC’s, term deposits through RRSP’s, TFSA’s, non-registered.

#142 Tantrum on 07.03.21 at 12:37 pm

#135 Sail Away on 07.03.21 at 10:35 am

#134 Sail Away on 07.03.21 at 10:05 am

“Somebody please pay attention to me. I’m neeeeeedy.”

#143 Diamond Dog on 07.03.21 at 1:17 pm

There are too many stories of abuse in residential schools to think widespread abuse wasn’t common, at least in some schools:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep7AW2K4Xww

I took an hour or more to acquaint myself:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SFfMnmR-b0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdR9HcmiXLA&t=1002s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FydzIzkndA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUTfeDtgBx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DU5zTwZdv1I&t=153s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OuTuTG5liQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FydzIzkndA&t=5s

The duration of residential schools going back to the 1870’s and the poor records… it’s thought that 150,000 FN’s went to residential schools but I think the numbers are higher, possibly double this number but that’s just my uneducated opinion. As for unmarked graves, we are probably looking at somewhere around 4500 or more?

How many of these deaths could be defined as murder could be quite high, perhaps as high as 800 to 900. Why so high, again a personal guess? Runaways. If repeated abuse was the legitimate reason for running away, the deaths that occurred from running away could then be considered as acts of murder.

One of the things that I was surprised to learn in taking the time to familiarize myself with the issue of residential schools was the distance between the schools and their parents. 500, 1,000 miles, these are not short distances to try to run away back home. This also explains why parents didn’t bury their own children. Most simply weren’t notified. In the school’s defense, it might not have been so easy if the schools had tried.

Lets remind, the times predating the 50’s were not easy times. World wars and the depression, no vaccines, shorter lifespans, it was a struggle for the majority of us to survive to put it mildly. The ideology of compulsory education was also sound judgment, there is no question in my mind about that but the way compulsory education was implemented left a great deal to be desired. The federal government could have, for example, tried to make it work with existing public schools. Was discrimination involved in the decision making process, not just from government but from the parents in the other schools?

It was up to our federal governments back in the day to provide a decent education for these children and they choked from what I can tell, relying on a church to feed, cloth and provide an education for them for what seemed like a century without the necessary oversight to see it through to success.

7 out of 10 on the reserve today are high school dropouts, which is an appalling number. Socially, the numbers of abuse and crime on reserve, we don’t want to know. Go back a few decades or more? High school drop out rates were 9 out of 10 or higher. There is little doubt in my mind that ongoing discrimination creeped into the mindsets of low expectations. It’s a dark chapter in Canadian history, no doubt about it.

#144 Grunt on 07.03.21 at 4:37 pm

Pixie dust Garth.

Columns of tanks rolled right here in Canada during the October Crisis. We’re far from perfect with an overpriced housing market, an excessive debt. Top this with archaic, bloated government structures that date from colonial times. Which many here don’t even realize or understand.

It’s a sad fact that on a national holiday in 2021 the focus has to be on child graves.

#145 J on 07.03.21 at 9:21 pm

golden years wasted in a job that they both hated.

be an employee and look forward to retirement, typical hamster wheel mindset.