Innocence

Dorothy was the promotion manager for a big company downtown. I was the editor of a suburban newspaper chain. One day a rad thought came to me. “I can do this.” So the next few months were spent on (a) planning to start my own newspaper somewhere and (b) talking my spouse into it.

Of course, that’s back when people killed trees, made paper, covered it with words and had 10-year-olds deliver a stack of it to your door. Papers were powerful, because everyone read them. They brought news, opinion and the latest Zeller’s sale into your home. They formed public opinion, created consensus and did that through the benevolent filter of newsmen or women, and their editors. Unlike this world of blogs, social media, Internet warfare and online echo chambers, newspapers coalesced society, rather than rending it. They were clumsy, expensive, labour-sucking behemoths, too.

But I wanted one.

The target was a small city that was home to a chain-owned daily with lots of history but barely a pulse. I talked a dozen co-workers into following me, rented a greasy former fish-&-chips store, bought a bunch of horrible purple desks from a Bank of Commerce surplus sale and built a composing room of plywood tables and leased equipment.

I was 26 and after selling every single possession we had, barely escaping divorce, I raised enough money to finance this venture for eight weeks. Yeah. Two months. If cash flow didn’t flow, I was toast. Because the paper would be free distribution, blanketing thirty thousand homes, every dollar had to come from advertising. So I became a salesguy as well as publisher. I cleaned the john, too. My skeptical, bemused, sporting, indulgent, adaptable wife quit her fancy career job and learned how to paste up pages to send to the printer plus typeset and operate the big vertical camera. We badly miscalculated on the first issue, and it took all night to get it out. This sacrifice helped forge a bond between us that has never been broken.

Well, we made it. In time the paper thrived, grew, moved into new premises. Then it expanded. There were eventually five publications, some weekly, some more frequent. I talked myself into buying a press, a giant, long rumbling thing that ate massive rolls of newsprint and cost a million dollars. At a time when nice houses were $60,000, this was a leap. The staff jumped to forty. The competition faded to nothingness.

Since I was now a master of the universe, at 27, I bought a new car. It was a 1976 maroon Oldsmobile Cutlass Brougham Supreme Coupe Something, about 18 feet long. Completely gross. I loved it.

The coup de grâce was the phone. No cell service then, of course, so I had a rotary phone installed in the thing that operated like a police radio and looked like, well, a rotary phone with buttons. Every call had to go through an operator and reception was dodgy. It also required a whippy aerial mounted on the top of the vehicle which bent and whistled obscenely in the wind. But a bonus was that it made my Cutlass look like an unmarked cop car so I could come up behind anyone, flash the lights twice and make them pull over. Loved that, too.

What happened?

Newspapering was a glam business in those days so a guy came along with a pile of money and bought our company. He took the building, the staff, the publications, the press, the receivables and the debt. We got a huge deposit cheque, paid something called ‘capital gains tax’ and retired. I was 29. It didn’t take.

What’s the point of this story?

There isn’t one. It’s just a slice of my life. Occasionally I hear from someone who worked for us and relished the cowboy capitalism we practiced. Sometimes Dorothy and I will remember moments. Like the night a slew of flyers had to be inserted into tens of thousands of papers as they flew off the press. Somebody arranged for a crew of high schoolers to do it, even though it turned out to be prom night. The kids showed up after midnight, in party clothes, with boom boxes. They danced, laughed and stuffed. Us too, as the trucks were loaded. Indelible.

Okay, you may return to r/wallstreetbets now. What a world.

242 comments ↓

#1 Trudeau's Cuban Style govt on 02.01.21 at 11:49 am

As of yesterday, Air India arrived and departed from Lester B Pearson International Airport (Toronto). Fully loaded inbound and outbound with passengers.
But according to Trudeau’s government, it’s Canadians traveling to sun destinations or “Snow Birds” who have to be stopped/punished for such audacity !?
This is full assault on Law abiding Canadians rights. If this where a true shut down of ALL flights in and out of Canada. Air India or any other foreign carrier would have been DENIED access to Canada !

#2 Faron on 02.01.21 at 12:00 pm

Thanks for that fantastic story Garth. Sweet ride. I think the Beastie Boys slid across the hood of one in their “Sabotage” video.

#3 Heregoesnothing on 02.01.21 at 12:02 pm

This was a fantastic walk down memory lane, Garth! Loved it, thank you for sharing!

#4 Captain Uppa on 02.01.21 at 12:10 pm

“Okay, you may return to r/wallstreetbets now. What a world.”

No, I think I’ll harp on the whole remote working thing.

Superstar Cities Are in Trouble

The past year has offered a glimpse of the nowhere-everywhere future of work, and it isn’t optimistic for big cities.

Link:https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/02/remote-work-revolution/617842/

#5 Wrk.dover on 02.01.21 at 12:13 pm

I’m proud to ‘know’ you Garth. A survivor of many era’s like a Felix with nine lives! All of them being maverick moves is the most impressive part of your legendary accomplishments.

#6 Steel City Kid on 02.01.21 at 12:14 pm

Zellers…yeah. Remember the lunch counter at Kresges department stores? And the weekly coloured comic strip inserts that came with the papers, used to roll my silly putty over those to pick up the images. Very much enjoyed this origin story, thanks Garth!

#7 Faron on 02.01.21 at 12:15 pm

#125 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 11:22 am
#120 Penny Henny on 02.01.21 at 10:21 am
#103 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 12:21 am

Nice to see you are whiling away your hours in Hawaii ignoring your family whilst bantering with utter strangers on the internet. And to think you once sailed there and solo return. Get a freaking life bud.

#1 Trudeau’s Cuban Style govt on 02.01.21 at 11:49 am

As of yesterday, Air India arrived and departed from Lester B Pearson International Airport (Toronto). Fully loaded inbound and outbound with passengers.

A) Many of them Canadians.
B) Travel ban isn’t in effect yet.

#8 Dr V on 02.01.21 at 12:15 pm

Garth – you shoulda waited one year on the olds. The 78-80 cutlass were restyled, with a squared off rear window. Get the 5.0L (305ci) engine, replace the stock
shocks to firm up the floaty ride, modify with dual
exhaust, and you had a wonderful cruiser at 25mpg highway, that had a great surge from 70kph that would kick back to first gear and open up the big secondaries on the 4 barrel carb.

#9 KLNR on 02.01.21 at 12:19 pm

Garth man, you truly are an inspiration.
thx for this.

#10 Dr V on 02.01.21 at 12:19 pm

something like this

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1980_Oldsmobile_Cutlass_Supreme_coup%C3%A9,_black.jpg

#11 the Jaguar on 02.01.21 at 12:20 pm

OMG! Are you sure that isn’t one of Fishman’s cars? Quick! Someone check and see if there is a body in the trunk.
What a great story. Like Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland “We’ll put on a show”, stuff. ( yes, I know many won’t get that reference).
Dorothy is quite a gem. But even without knowing her, everyone that reads this blog knows that. Was it Hollinger that bought you out?

What an interesting life. So full of everything that is real and meaningful. Not this naked short crap. It’s kind of ruined the whole meaning of naked for me. Well…maybe not.

#12 Were you driving the ... on 02.01.21 at 12:21 pm

Olds around in cowboy boots? Did you have “paper shacks” like out here in 604? Those were the days …

#13 Drill Baby Drill on 02.01.21 at 12:21 pm

Ah yes today’s article is a reflection on the exuberance and energy of youth. Good on you blog God.

#14 Bill on 02.01.21 at 12:25 pm

I’m on a plane now.

#15 Me on 02.01.21 at 12:29 pm

I had a car like that once. When driving I constantly hummed Theme From Shaft.

Funny cause it’s true:
https://www.thebeaverton.com/2021/01/financial-sector-aghast-the-poors-are-gaming-system-designed-to-be-gamed-by-the-rich/

#16 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 12:34 pm

#7 Faron on 02.01.21 at 12:15 pm
#125 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 11:22 am
#120 Penny Henny on 02.01.21 at 10:21 am
#103 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 12:21 am

Nice to see you are whiling away your hours in Hawaii ignoring your family whilst bantering with utter strangers on the internet. And to think you once sailed there and solo return. Get a freaking life bud.
————————.
Let’s all play:
Where in the World is Sailo?
I think he’s in his mom’s basement waiting for her to let him out for lunch.
First one to guess right , gets to write a guest blog on my imaginary blog.

#17 Phylis on 02.01.21 at 12:44 pm

So tell the truth, were there fuzzy dice?

#18 Keen Reader on 02.01.21 at 12:53 pm

Well done, quite the story and bragging rights! Always risky to choose adventure over comfort and safety, but so rewarding, indeed. I’d be far richer in other career paths but gained multiple lifetimes of memories from the military: buzzing treetops, rescuing survivors, test-flying the latest and greatest aircraft, weapons and systems. Top-notch teams and truly remarkable colleagues became my family, although far too many died during flying operations. Another bunch of my office mates got shot in Kabul, during a routine meeting that I fortunately missed. Retired young to travel, later jumped on invitation to join a world-class flight-test team, flying at companies from four continents, each time facing new cultures and environments. Likely making half what my airlines counterparts get (those not laid-off), but definitely no regrets. Willingness to hit the re-do button is one’s true indicator of success, as it sounds like for Garth. Cheers!

#19 Dolce Vita on 02.01.21 at 12:57 pm

“What’s the point of this story?

There isn’t one.”

Well. You could of told me that at the start you know.

Good story Garth. I enjoyed it. Dorothy a trooper. Lucky guy (and vice versa).

———————-

Pfizer-BioNTech, AstraZeneca LAZARUS DOSES – Let’s see Trudeau try and explain this one away.

75M more Pfizer doses.
9M more AstraZeneca doses.

to the EU by March, latest. Just like that.

This comes the DAY BEFORE Germany’s Vax Summit which includes threatening to buy Russian and Chinese vax’s to fill any shortfalls (Hungary planning on buying a Chinese vax to fill the gap).

All of a sudden, wonder of wonders, TODAY:

“We are continuing to work on increasing deliveries from the week of February 15th to ensure the contractually agreed delivery of the full amount of vaccine doses in the first quarter,” said Sierk Poetting, CFO and COO of Biontech.

What Canada gets in Feb from Pfizer (Trudeau needs to get on the phone, again):
https://i.imgur.com/ZRnNYbt.jpg

AstraZeneca wants to deliver more vaccine to the European Union in the first quarter than announced. There would be nine million doses, for a total of 40 million. Von der Leyen wrote that AstraZeneca wanted to start deliveries A WEEK EARLIER than planned. The company also wants to EXPAND its production capacity in Europe.

Above from DER SPIEGEL (they hate everyone equally, but I love them).

—————–

The EU finally wakes up and realizes it is the proverbial, when it wants to throw its weight around:

300 lbs Canary wandering back alleys at night saying “Here kitty, kitty, kitty, kitty.”

Yup, just another Covid-19 day in the European Union.

#20 Dr V on 02.01.21 at 1:02 pm

7 Faron

Before you poop on sail away consider this.

It’s very good that your partner can go on an 8 hour trail run with you.

How would having kids affect this?

Sail is doing nothing different than what a lot of
business people do. Take the family someplace nice,
but stay connected.

#21 Penny Henny on 02.01.21 at 1:11 pm

#125 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 11:22 am

Where have you read that being vaccinated gets you a ‘free out of jail/quarantine card’?

————-

I admit assuming that, eventually, a small whisper of reason may worm itself through the ramparts of bureaucratic tar.

If not? Que sera sera. We could always stay here another month if needed. Hope the $600/day Van hotel/jail at least has good food and wifi!

//////////

At $600/day in quarantine it’s pretty easy to make a case for staying in Hawaii

#22 Dolce Vita on 02.01.21 at 1:12 pm

Checking up on Novavax share price (bought a few days before the hordes swept in) and saw this:

https://i.imgur.com/ZBbTsnl.png

And you know Garth it immediately reminded me that you were SO right about average financial literacy of people, I just never believed you. A believer now.

[Crayon scratches in image by myself – hey, tough to have a steady hand with Snip & Sketch and a wayward mouse]

#23 Steerage Sled on 02.01.21 at 1:17 pm

What…. no fuzzy dice from the mirror?

#24 Millennial Realist on 02.01.21 at 1:22 pm

Loved the story!

Boomer-Moisters are so cute!

Being “a master of the universe, at 27” is pretty much a pipe dream today, as well as getting a home for $60,000, or about 2-3 X income.

Zellers? Whodat?

1976 average income = $21,400. Average house price = 3x income. Average mortgage = 12%. See a pattern? – Garth

#25 Mike in Airdrie on 02.01.21 at 1:22 pm

Great blog today Garth. Makes it all the more sad to think of all the small businesses getting plowed under right now by COVID.

#26 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 1:25 pm

#18 Keen Reader on 02.01.21 at 12:53 pm

Well done, quite the story and bragging rights! Always risky to choose adventure over comfort and safety, but so rewarding, indeed. I’d be far richer in other career paths but gained multiple lifetimes of memories from the military: buzzing treetops, rescuing survivors, test-flying the latest and greatest aircraft, weapons and systems. Top-notch teams and truly remarkable colleagues became my family, although far too many died during flying operations.

———–

Ye gods- flying nap of the earth has forever cured me of helicopters!

And yes- more accidents from flying than anything else. On full blackout/infrared night training maneuvers in Louisiana, a full platoon from our unit was deployed by fast rope rappel from a Chinook into the treetop rather than the ground:

https://apnews.com/article/c5ab1d4f2d5769305b053e8de84e53ed

Gruesome. Ended the military career of many of my buddies… however, and contrary to popular outrage, the Army has treated them very well. Some good friends we still visit.

#27 Trudeau’s Magic Money Machine on 02.01.21 at 1:28 pm

The uranium pay day started today.

CCO up bigly.

It’s only gonna continue in line with the no carbon green future.

Buy in before the Reddit crowd bubbles it up.

#28 tbone on 02.01.21 at 1:29 pm

I had a 77 cutlass supreme like yours . It was a gold colour with that funky landeau vinyl roof . am-fm radio and ac .Seats were vinyl though and were hot in summer and cold in winter. Ate gas like crazy with the 350 v8 4 barrel .

#29 Penny Henny on 02.01.21 at 1:37 pm

#26 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 1:25 pm

///////////////

On the link you provided there was a ad for some German hearing aids. How dumb. I don’t even speak German.

#30 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 1:41 pm

Hart work and perseverance.
Not really my strengths. But as an immigrant raising a family from scratch, I had my challenges.
And I learned that in hard times relationships can flourish or falter.
Depends on many things, and some are not under our control.
Thanks for sharing.

#31 YVROptimist on 02.01.21 at 1:41 pm

Thanks for posting this, Garth. It’s something I really needed today.

#32 BlogDog123 on 02.01.21 at 1:41 pm

FFWD your entrepreneurial story to starting a newspaper in 2021:

– Try setting up a biz, all sorts of red tape you did not have back then in 70’s 80’s.
– Google and Facebook steals your newspaper/online advertising channels and money before you begin.
– Hire staff, but need complex lawyered up employee offer/contract paperwork. Then you give up and switch to using temp agencies to shield you from all that employment law hassle.
– Your online newspaper gets cyber bullied because you don’t conform to marxist views of the local university mob. The mob then finds your home address and you are doxxed with junk mail and things you did not order.
– Liberal ‘newspaper subsidies’ don’t apply to you because you don’t meet their criteria for funding.
– CBC starts up a news website that duplicates your content, paid for by their $1B+ public subsidy.

Then you throw in the towel and move to a more hospitable business climate.

#33 Ottawan on 02.01.21 at 1:41 pm

I was the 10 year old delivery kid, also master of the universe,

#34 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 1:41 pm

#24 Millennial Realist on 02.01.21 at 1:22 pm

Loved the story!

Boomer-Moisters are so cute!

Being “a master of the universe, at 27” is pretty much a pipe dream today

————

MR, becoming a master of the universe is, and has always been, available to the extraordinary. Don’t minimize the accomplishment by insinuating it was made possible by something other than gumption.

Think Zuckerberg, Musk, Bezos rather than normal people. Garth is one of the extraordinary.

You could also choose to try to be extraordinary, but the truth is that only a very tiny percentage are willing to take the risk.

#35 KNOW IT ALL on 02.01.21 at 1:49 pm

Very Cool story!
Very Cool car!

What is that “Zeller’s” you mentioned?

#36 AW on 02.01.21 at 1:50 pm

Thank you for sharing Garth!

#37 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 1:54 pm

#29 Penny Henny on 02.01.21 at 1:37 pm
#26 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 1:25 pm

///////////////

On the link you provided there was a ad for some German hearing aids. How dumb. I don’t even speak German.
————————
Sailo sometimes forgets that not everybody speaks as many languages as he does.
He is what we call in German “Ein zerstreuter Professor”

#38 Trudeau's Cuban Style govt on 02.01.21 at 1:55 pm

If Trudeau’s idiocy with the travel ban and forced confinement continues unabated, he and his handlers probably forget that more than 50% percent of the “Canadians” have a second passport and FREEDOM is a one way flight away…ROTFLMAO

Obviously, if he pissed people enough, they will do this after maxing out all the credit cards, HELOCs, etc, etc..

These people all have relatives/ties to the old country, whatever that place may be (India/Central South Am/Europe/Africa)…etc.

In his deluded and twisted worldview, he is pissing off more than just the “rich boomers” wintering in Florida.

#39 jess on 02.01.21 at 2:00 pm

the thirty somethings of today when they talked “under the hood ” while in their teen years, they were referring to their computer

#40 Craig Tesh on 02.01.21 at 2:00 pm

Millennial Realist, you young, naive Canadians wanted and liked, cheered on the low to lower interest rates.

Now, you have the most speculative, out of control, manipulated, artificially, pumped up real estate prices, property markets. If you ever understood or was ever interested any real basic economics, you would of known that interest rates go down, housing real estate prices go up. Let’s see, a $60,000 house at 12% fixed rate 5 year mortgage rates in 1976 versus today $850,000 to $1.1 million at 1.3% to 1.6% fixed rate mortgage rates.

Housing, real estate prices mainly went up with inflation maybe another 1.5% to 2.5% on top of that depending on the location so even at 5.0% to 5.75% annual price increases and employment, wage, income levels. The $60,000 house should maximum be $750,000 today at most. The other big factor is the out of control Liberal, NDP, left debt, tax, spending policies which make it near impossible to pay and live in Canada anymore.

Look at property taxes, water, electricity, utilities bills, gas prices, taxes, rent, food prices, tuition, school fees, medical other cost of living, GST/HST, carbon taxes, income taxes etc. etc.

The bottomline is government and socialism through cheap money, high taxation, other destructive, economic policies will end badly as it always does. Good luck putting all your faith and belief that government will solve most if not all your problems. It always ends up the opposite.

#41 under the radar on 02.01.21 at 2:01 pm

I had a 75 Cutlass Supreme I bought in summer 1985 for $500.00. Got me through 3 years of law school in the frozen tundra at Osgoode. That car never failed me.

#42 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 2:07 pm

26 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 1:25 pm
#18 Keen Reader on 02.01.21 at 12:53 pm

Well done, quite the story and bragging rights! Always risky to choose adventure over comfort and safety, but so rewarding, indeed. I’d be far richer in other career paths but gained multiple lifetimes of memories from the military: buzzing treetops, rescuing survivors, test-flying the latest and greatest aircraft, weapons and systems. Top-notch teams and truly remarkable colleagues became my family, although far too many died during flying operations.

———–

Ye gods- flying nap of the earth has forever cured me of helicopters!

And yes- more accidents from flying than anything else. On full blackout/infrared night training maneuvers in Louisiana, a full platoon from our unit was deployed by fast rope rappel from a Chinook into the treetop rather than the ground:

https://apnews.com/article/c5ab1d4f2d5769305b053e8de84e53ed

Gruesome. Ended the military career of many of my buddies… however, and contrary to popular outrage, the Army has treated them very well. Some good friends we still visit.
—————
Comparing starting a business with serving in the military is quite a stretch.
I served a mandatory 9 months in the military.
Mostly what I learned was to follow orders.
Yes, Sir, No, Sir.
But I became good in peeling potatoes and cleaning latrines.
Good comradeship, though.
And came out fit as a fiddle.

#43 "NUTS!" on 02.01.21 at 2:14 pm

“1976 average income = $21,400. Average house price = 3x income. Average mortgage = 12%. See a pattern? – Garth”

The message here can’t be overstated. The answers as to why we find ourselves in this mess are all right there, read carefully.

#44 LP on 02.01.21 at 2:15 pm

Your wonderful story brought back two memories I hadn’t thought of in years. The first, newspaper related, occurred when I was about 11 years old. The newly minted Etobicoke Guardian ran a contest in our neighborhood for children who wanted to become paid carriers. I won our local contest by signing up potential customers: I enlisted 41 households and won $10 I think.

The second memory is prompted by your prom night story. When our kids were teens and I was the co-leader of the church youth group we were having some trouble holding and keeping the kids engaged. Our solution one late winter? We held a formal bowling night. The girls arrived in floor length gowns, borrowed or thrift shop, and the boys in jackets and ties. I took a couple of silver candelabra and candles and my colleague arrived with lace tablecloths. After the bowling watched by bemused patrons also at the lanes, we went to McDonald’s for “dinner”, tablecloths, candles included. Luckily the manager allowed us to light the candles. We had a great time!

#45 binky barnes on 02.01.21 at 2:18 pm

Life used to be a lot simpler back then. Nice story, Garth.

BB

#46 BillyBob on 02.01.21 at 2:19 pm

18 Keen Reader on 02.01.21 at 12:53 pm
Well done, quite the story and bragging rights! Always risky to choose adventure over comfort and safety, but so rewarding, indeed. I’d be far richer in other career paths but gained multiple lifetimes of memories from the military: buzzing treetops, rescuing survivors, test-flying the latest and greatest aircraft, weapons and systems. Top-notch teams and truly remarkable colleagues became my family, although far too many died during flying operations. Another bunch of my office mates got shot in Kabul, during a routine meeting that I fortunately missed. Retired young to travel, later jumped on invitation to join a world-class flight-test team, flying at companies from four continents, each time facing new cultures and environments. Likely making half what my airlines counterparts get (those not laid-off), but definitely no regrets. Willingness to hit the re-do button is one’s true indicator of success, as it sounds like for Garth. Cheers!

===============================

Agreed! Wouldn’t change a thing, from the earliest days to present. Never would have thought the path would go as far and wide as it has. Looking forward to the next pendulum swing.

Whose flight test team was this? Aircraft and weapon types? I have a former colleague, went on to RCAF then retired and did the double-dip too – depending on age you’ve probably met.

Hell, you could BE him! Phil, is that you?

Great story, Garth.

#47 Tron Light on 02.01.21 at 2:20 pm

We had the exact same car, except that it was a 73 and baby blue! Long trips to Toronto with a family of five, us three kids in the back with a rather large golden retriever on our laps. No A/C, windows fully down on the 401. The memories…

#48 binky barnes on 02.01.21 at 2:20 pm

My first vehicle was a ’69 Buick Skylark. Metallic green with black interior. And man, could it fly down the highway.

Good times.

BB

#49 Bear on 02.01.21 at 2:25 pm

I love it! Great story! Entrepreneurship should be celebrated and encouraged, instead today it is demonized. Congrats on the two of you making it.

#50 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 2:32 pm

I bet that cutlass rode like a cloud and had some great notes coming from under the hood at WOT. Dad had a 78 Pontiac Parisienne when I was a teen. Smooth, quiet, and just enough power to smoke the tires via a brake torque. Mint green with a velvety green interior. Had the nice 5 spoke Rallye wheels too. Also had those “half-covers” over the rear wheel wells.

Two plus tons of family car :).

#51 Kiril Peev on 02.01.21 at 2:36 pm

I posted a chart here showing median sale price vs listing invenrory for Ottawa.

Looks like it’s reaching an extreme.

https://www.facebook.com/101873805145629/posts/120323483300661/

#52 Mr Happy on 02.01.21 at 2:37 pm

My friend in Calgary posted this….unreal…

It’s time to wake up. I can’t be silent any longer.
I have honoured the C0VID process, I have kept silent when I’ve wanted to disagree and I have have chosen to take the high road when I haven’t agreed with policies or procedures but tonight something has happened that is wildly concerning and I can’t stay silent anymore.
My wife was in the States for work, she left 4 days ago. There were precautions she needed to take in order to travel safely, which she was more than willing to do, and did. Canada introduced a rapid test program in December which made traveling safe and easier during the ‘pandemic’.
She was free to travel as long as she had a negative test before she left for the states, and another one before she came home. Canadian airlines will NOT let you board if you do not produce a negative result before boarding. She produced her negative result before boarding the flight home tonight on January 28th, 2021.
She arrived in Calgary tonight and when she got there she was greeted by a Police Officer and a health official. They rejected her results and told her she needed to go immediately to an isolation facility. She was told if she resisted she would be arrested. She called me, and I immediately asked to talk with the officer. I talked with both a Police Officer and the AHS official, they reiterated what she had said to me. I asked for the address of where she would be, they said they could NOT give me the location address as it was confidential. I asked for their names, again they would not give me any information or their names. I pushed, I questioned, I tried to fight but they said they would arrest her if she resisted. They would NOT give me any information on where they were taking my wife. She was not allowed to get her vehicle from the airport, she was immediately put in a white van surrounded by police escorts and taken to an unknown facility that is under full surveillance and has security at every entrance and exit. You can imagine I am barely keeping myself together wondering what in the world has happened in our country in what seems to be overnight.
Will you pray with me to that my wife would be kept safe, and our family and children would be kept in perfect peace while this continues to unfold. She’s an incredibly strong women who is full of faith, but she is still a young woman and mom who is traveling alone.
Our rights are slipping right before our eyes and our freedoms are being stripped. It’s time to wake up.

Fiction. – Garth

#53 Canuck Entrepreneur on 02.01.21 at 2:42 pm

Great story, Garth!

Now we know how you made your millions. Like so many entrepreneurs, cashing out to the right buyer at the right time is a lottery ticket hard to resist.

#54 Phil Indablanque on 02.01.21 at 3:11 pm

My first ride was the Buick version, the Regal. Got it when I started my machinist apprenticeship. Tried the independent business route in the early 90’s, building automated machinery. I severely underestimated the resources I’d need and found myself in a bad cash crunch at the end of a job. A couple months behind in rent , I got an eviction notice for me, the wife and 3 under 7. One month later and the job finished, I unlocked the door to our newly aquired,100 year old fixer upper. Mortgage was a handshake with an old developer for 68k at 10 per cent. The feast or famine of self employment was a bit too much and I moved west and now work for Club Fed. Sold the car to pay for more college and had to watch the new owner drive passed me with the fancy Cragar SS upgrade and me on my way to the bus stop. Good times.

#55 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 3:13 pm

#7 Faron on 02.01.21 at 12:15 pm
#125 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 11:22 am

Nice to see you are whiling away your hours in Hawaii ignoring your family whilst bantering with utter strangers on the internet. And to think you once sailed there and solo return. Get a freaking life bud.

——–

Aw, strangers nothing – I consider everybody on this blog family.

Here’s a little advice: A comfortable mix of shared and independent activities are beneficial to a relationship.

Similar to taming a beaver or training dogs: judicious absence makes the heart grow fonder.

#56 Gene Kruper on 02.01.21 at 3:18 pm

Cool story about the past, many thanks for sharing.

#57 Millennial 1%er on 02.01.21 at 3:19 pm

Today, instead of papers, kids are shoveling software. Same thing.

#58 tkid on 02.01.21 at 3:20 pm

Rumour is it the WSB furore has saved both American Airlines and AMC from bankruptcy.

#59 UCC on 02.01.21 at 3:21 pm

I was 26 and after selling every single possession we had, barely escaping divorce, I raised enough money to finance this venture for eight weeks. Yeah. Two months. If cash flow didn’t flow, I was toast.

What’s the point of this story?

Risk. You took the risk, you scarificed much, and you won. But you could of easily lost.

This is the type of drive we need in our country now— to get us out of the funk Canada is in. Unfortunately, risk is now punished rather than rewarded, since that is the socialist way. Mr. Socks would rather you take all the risk and just hand over the cash…

#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

A trip down memory lane Garth. We were a blessed generation. A 4 year degree @ U of T for $2,000 total in tuition. Class of 74. Then renting a beach house in Spain for $56 Canadian a month. Staying their till the money ran out a few years later, return to the family Real Estate Biz. A quick haircutt and a walk down the Danforth to get out-fitted by Saul @ Korry’s (May he rest in peace) Owning a prime detached house in the Beach by age 26.
No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

#61 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 3:38 pm

#16 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 12:34 pm

Let’s all play:

Where in the World is Sailo?

I think he’s in his mom’s basement waiting for her to let him out for lunch.

———-

Hmmm… I did spend a lot of time at your mom’s place a few years back…

#62 cuke and tomato picker on 02.01.21 at 3:44 pm

Once again a great post. Enjoy the posts as while as the comments. Did you meet your wife at university?

No. In a rock band. Another story. – Garth

#63 Jake on 02.01.21 at 3:47 pm

Love the story and those wheels! I had 25+ years in publishing … started in ’89 designing full colour print media on a 9″ black and white Macintosh SE display that I bought used for a bargain for $3000 lol. Before that Macs were too pricey, so rented computer time by the hour. Hustled for a job, then drove downtown to College Street to rent the time to mock it up.

#64 Lefty on 02.01.21 at 3:47 pm

Aah good memories Garth… I remember delivering flyers back in the 1980s door-to-door. My back has never fully recovered.

As predicted, looks like the WSB GME meme is dying off. The people at the top got out, the lucky remaining shareholders are realizing they own stocks in a failing B&M business hawking DVDs during a pandemic.

#65 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 3:55 pm

Garth – that was a great story, thanks!

Millennial Realist – you’re an embarrassment!

Sail Away – hope you’re enjoying all of Faron’s silly little stereotypes on “the” Islands.

Jaguar – if you’re interested in some images of our life down south checkout don.williams.1029 on Insta. Oops, I hope they don’t confirm Faron’s stereotypes ;<)

#66 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 4:04 pm

Talking about innocence:
The End of the Innocence / Don Henley
Remember when the days were long And rolled beneath a deep blue sky Didn’t have a care in the world With mommy and daddy standing by When “happily ever after” fails And we’ve been poisoned by these fairy tales The lawyers dwell on small details Since daddy had to fly  
Oh, but I know a place where we can go Still untouched by man We’ll sit and watch the clouds roll by And the tall grass waves in the wind You can lay your head back on the ground And let your hair fall all around me Offer up your best defense But this is the end 
This is the end of the innocence
  O’ beautiful, for spacious skies But now those skies are threatening They’re beating plowshares into swords For this tired old man that we elected king Armchair warriors often fail And they’ve been poisoned by these fairy tales The lawyers clean up all details Since daddy had to lie  Oh, but I know a place where we can go And wash away this sin We’ll sit and watch the clouds roll by The tall grass waves in the wind Just lay your head back on the ground And let your hair spill all around me Offer up your best defense
 But this is the end This is the end of the innocence  

Who knows how long this will last Now we’ve come so far, so fast But somewhere back there in the dust That same small town in each of us I need to remember this So baby, give me just one kiss And let me take a long last look Before we say good bye  Just lay your head back on the ground And let your hair fall all around me Offer up your best defense 
But this is the end This is the end of the innocence

#67 John Dimas on 02.01.21 at 4:06 pm

Looking at this story and past stories, history, family, friends etc. if in 1976 12% mortgage rates were there and we are now at 1.29% lowest I could find 5 year rates, fixed we are in for a real hurting in coming years.

Maybe it will not be 12%, 10% or even 7.5% just back like in 2000, remember Y2K and that crap but 5% to 6% mortgage rates will be a few years here. The problem is there will also be the high taxes on housing already here and more coming on top of these 5%+ mortgage rates by 2025-2027.

#68 truefacts on 02.01.21 at 4:13 pm

This story is not going to help me in any way, but….

GREAT STORY! My hats off to your drive and ambition!
Kudos to you for taking the leap.
Double kudos to Dorothy for sticking by you – not easy at times, I’m sure.

#69 B on 02.01.21 at 4:13 pm

Great story Garth. I have done the big corp and gov’t thing, and hated every second. Been working at a small company where I have some skin in the game and learning what I need to start my fully-owned shop some day. And yes, I also clean the toilet from time to time! Much more rewarding to work for yourself even if it is a royal pain sometimes.

#70 truefacts on 02.01.21 at 4:14 pm

To clarify, the “not easy at times” comment is directed at how hard it is to start a new venture – it’s not aimed at you Garth!

#71 S.Bby on 02.01.21 at 4:16 pm

That Cutlass was a nice car, our neighbour had one. I love those 70s barges; nothing like them now and they rode like a magic carpet ride and the seats were so comfy. My uncle had a 1977 Oldsmobile Toronado and that thing was massive and the hood must have been 8 feet long. He had a radio phone in it too.

#72 Sask to AB on 02.01.21 at 4:18 pm

LOVE the car!!!!!!!!
My husband’s first car was a 1984 Oldsmobile Delta 88 we called Betsy. Same beautiful maroon colour as yours, same headlights, red plush interior. That car was a beast…….cost $2500 in 1997 when we bought it. So comfortable to ride in. We drove it till it died. They don’t make cars like that anymore……..

F57AB

#73 Oracle of Ottawa on 02.01.21 at 4:21 pm

I guess what your saying is…I took a gamble. So you understand what the kids are doing with this latest buying phenomenon.

#74 Maggie the Teck Writer on 02.01.21 at 4:25 pm

Loved this, Garth. Loved it. And it brought back bitter-sweet memories.

I spent 25 years with a writer–dead now–who was wildly creative and wildly prolix. At the same time. Both.

For the last 10 years of his life I edited all his stuff to get it to the word length the editor had asked for. (And made it better in the process.)

When you work with someone, you find out what they’re made of. If it turns out to be gold, wild horses couldn’t drag you away. Even when it doesn’t end well.

#75 BC Doc on 02.01.21 at 4:28 pm

Hey Garth,
I learned to drive in my old man’s four door baby blue Cutlass Supreme. Great car to cruise in and man the hood was long. I remember loading the Boston Globe Sunday edition into the trunk before dawn with my brother soon to be followed by tossing them out the window. The Sunday Globe was a hefty paper— thick and full of great journalism (versus the Boston Herald which is a rag).
Thanks for the trip down Memory Lane.
Cheers,
BC Doc

#76 SoggyShorts on 02.01.21 at 4:28 pm

#24 Millennial Realist on 02.01.21 at 1:22 pm
Boomer-Moisters are so cute!
Being “a master of the universe, at 27” is pretty much a pipe dream today

**************************
The formula I used starting just 13 years ago is still available:

♦Started in a trade with no experience
♦Got good at that trade and developed a reputation
♦Left job to become a contractor directly for clients
♦Eventually hired & trained workers
♦Saved and invested income

When I started it in 2008 about half of millennials had graduated high school, so any one of them could have done it too.
None of the above is generation-specific and all of it is still possible today.

Or just keep crying about how easy others have had it, I’m sure that’ll pay off.

M41AB

#77 Frenchfrie on 02.01.21 at 4:29 pm

Nice post. I too worked hard and smart. Progressed my career and after 30 years at 56 years old was bumped out of my corporate job. No guarantees for hard work. The liberals only support those that cry and want a free ride. It’s time that government stops the ageism abuse inflicted on decent employees. Yes I am fine. The point is I could have enjoyed a few more years working honestly and allowed to retire when I wanted. This is another form of abuse based on age. Long term care in this country full of abuse. Government should better protect those long serving citizens.

#78 S.Bby on 02.01.21 at 4:30 pm

Dr. V said:
The 78-80 cutlass were restyled, with a squared off rear window.

Those downsized versions with the smaller engines weren’t nearly as good IMO. They looked ugly and cheap to my eyes.

#79 crossbordershopper on 02.01.21 at 4:30 pm

no kid today would ever entertain something like that. A lost generation, and lost growth at so many levels.
Canada is a socialist basketcase. lazy kids, no risk takers, and very little money to go around. In the usa daily raises of of 400 million us in a spac.(no assets no business). In Canada we have no visionairies or risk takers. Musk today announces civilian space travel and Canada airlines cant fly to Moncton. Then again there isnt much in Moncton to see.

#80 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 4:35 pm

#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

————-

Bullshit. Self-defeating apologist attitude. What was done then can be done now, probably easier.

#81 paulo on 02.01.21 at 4:38 pm

Anybody have an idea of how many hundreds of millions of dollars worth of drugs the Ontario Government has purchased from Pfizer for the trillium drug benefit plan …….. ok dougie time for some good old fashioned cabage town knuckle shinning

#82 Faron on 02.01.21 at 4:39 pm

#106 BillyBob on 02.01.21 at 7:11 am

Someone considering bringing a child into a world of rapidly depleting resources and exploding population should hardly be lecturing about personal responsibility and entitlement, hmm?

Whoa man, I guess now that I’m not gay (or am I?) I’m offending you by expressing consideration of having a reproduction rate of 0.5? And you know as well as I do that real leverage on tamping down population growth only comes from improving the status of women globally. Oh, maybe you don’t know that. No, of course you don’t.

Anyhow,commenting on resource consumption as a commercial pilot is pretty rich.

There’s no way of knowing people’s needs for travel. The argument that a financial incentive is needed to stop people from heading to the beach is obtuse

Hmmmm, really? One way to know people’s “needs” for travel is to read their words:

#82 the Jaguar on 01.31.21 at 7:53 pm

I am anxious to fly again. WestJet emails regularly telling me they await my return. There are places I would rather be right now.

and

#103 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 12:21 am

Come join the party at Kona Tiki.

And Don Guillermo who will like to come back to Canada one day when Mexico becomes uncomfortable.

I’m not a Trudeau apologist. There’s plenty I don’t like about his policy-making. But, I have a hunch the gov’t is too busy having to hold the hands and direct people who:

(1) can’t quite understand that 20,000 people dead is a big deal;
(2) think that just because they want to travel think they will do it safely;
(3) can’t grok that attitudes like (2) lead directly to (1);

To have time to improve its testing.

The only way to get through the pandemic is for people to show a smidge less self-interest and show that they can actually manage their behaviour and stop the virus. This has decidedly not been shown.

#83 Still employed in AB on 02.01.21 at 4:44 pm

Love these posts about the many businesses you’ve run. If you’re going to check out Reddit take a look at this post where someone paid 450K over asking and regrets it already. https://www.reddit.com/r/PersonalFinanceCanada/comments/l9unrb/how_i_paid_450k_over_asking_price_on_a_home_and/

#84 Keen Reader on 02.01.21 at 4:52 pm

#26 Sail Away: Sorry for your mates involved in this terrible accident. Sometimes radar altimeters read the top of trees, instead of the ground underneath, so the crew likely thought that the rappelling ropes were reaching the ground, from their instruments’ indications. NVG also messes up depth perception, had a few scares myself… Both factors probably explain why they weren’t punished severely. Enjoy your Kona stay; very nice place indeed and a great alternative under the travel ban to Mexico & Caribbeans!

#42 Ponzius Pilatus: The point is choosing the adventure, instead of taking the safe road. Not all military careers are alike, BTW…

#46 BillyBob: last time you doubted my being a pilot; not Phil… NVG and side-mounted guns/sensors on helos, new helo types, photo/safety chase on jets, worked with test teams from NRC Flt Research, TCCA, Bombardier, Airbus, Bell Helicopters. Worked as Trg Capt/TRI/TRE with airlines. Right time/place, more lucky than good!

#85 AMC Baby! on 02.01.21 at 4:53 pm

Ok oldies, AMC is going to the moooooooon!

#86 Billy Buoy on 02.01.21 at 4:56 pm

You mean you actually “worked” AND “produced” something?

How 1970’s.

54% of USA GDP is from the USA gov’t that does not produce a thing.

I wonder what is Canada’s GDP ratio now?

#87 Jeff in Vic on 02.01.21 at 4:57 pm

Love the post! Thanks for sharing your past! We had the exact same car… Brings back memories.
Also love the Nova Scotia side to you.
I am from Quebec, went to Acadia U., married a BC girl and we had our honeymoon at a family cottage in Green Bay, NS in the late 90’s! Nice to have a coast to coast perspective. Yes, I have had two dogs in my life with at least one more to love in the future when the time is right.

#88 Another Deckchair on 02.01.21 at 4:58 pm

@60 Old Ron

(discussion points below, not meant to be “angry” – I’m not Millennial Realist!)

Hold on a sec – when you graduated Uni, this boomer was only 13 years old. You owned a house before this boomer even tried real estate.

When I graduated, 13% mortgages were considered low, an economic recession was on, and by 26 there was no way I could have afforded the beaches. (had a relative renting there, so could dream)

The term “Boomer” catches people who are still not quite at retirement age, and I think I have more in common with GenX and Mills than the older boomers. I got into the ARPANET, Internet, and in making (via chips-n-wirewrapping) “personal computers”, could type, yada, yada, yada.

The Mills, Gen-X that I work (worked??) with were all doing about the same as I did at their age. Anyway, things are interesting, as always.

#89 Vstrom Rider on 02.01.21 at 5:02 pm

Zellers? Is that that new store that replaced Towers? I should go check them out one day.

#90 Interstellar Old Yeller on 02.01.21 at 5:02 pm

Cool story, Garth, thank you for sharing it. I remember when newspapers were a big deal. Crazy how things have changed.

#91 wallflower on 02.01.21 at 5:08 pm

#45 binky barnes on 02.01.21 at 2:18 pm
Life used to be a lot simpler back then. Nice story, Garth.
~~~~~~
No kidding!
Can’t even get a neighbourhood adolescent to babysit or shovel driveways today – and just forget about midnight capers where they would be asking triple minimum wage and someone might start a suit for cpp/ei premia

#92 Grommet on 02.01.21 at 5:09 pm

Yeah I was a newspaper carrier T Star late 70’s, I used to hate doing inserts. Today being a carrier means something completely different….

#93 Handsome Ned on 02.01.21 at 5:13 pm

Mr. Lahey {rip.} would have killed for that car.

#94 the Jaguar on 02.01.21 at 5:13 pm

@#65 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 3:55 pm
Amigo, I am not on any form of Social Media, but I was able to see a few snaps before Instagram booted me out. Very colonial and historic. Great photos.

#95 statsfreak on 02.01.21 at 5:14 pm

LOVE the story!
LOVE the car!
Do I detect the possibility of another book?
Keep the memories flowing, Garth!
(I am reliving my youth vicariously LOL)

#96 Old Ron Speaks to Mellenial Realist on 02.01.21 at 5:15 pm

Ok Realist. I read your post. I am (as my comment implies) of the opinion that the Boomers had a great life handed to them by thier parents (The Greatest Generation Ever)

I can’t imagine what it would be like to start from scratch today, but that notion gets me thinking. What would it be like ? I am in my 70s, bored, retired, morbidly obese, with high blood pressure, and basically waiting for the Grim Reaper to take me to an endless conversation with the “Smoking Man”.

What if I put say $2,000 Canadian in a bank account, and that is all I have to work with. That’s it, my total stash. Where could I be by December 31, 2021 ? The short answer is, I have no idea.

Thanks kid. You inspire me. I’ll get back to ya.

#97 Ustabe on 02.01.21 at 5:20 pm

#53 Canuck Entrepreneur on 02.01.21 at 2:42 pm

Great story, Garth!

Now we know how you made your millions. Like so many entrepreneurs, cashing out to the right buyer at the right time is a lottery ticket hard to resist.

“Now we know how you made your millions” Also powering through stuff, bureaucracy, banks, negativity…your next success is just beyond this current failure.

Garth had newspapers, I had laundromats and hole in the wall pizza joints. No real difference except I never was forced to live in the big city. You can’t put a dollar figure on that.

#98 jess on 02.01.21 at 5:22 pm

Region’s first inspection blitz finds nearly half of local businesses not COVID-compliant
The province says of the 119 businesses were inspected in Waterloo Region over the weekend, only 65 were found to be complying with all public health measures aimed at fighting the spread of COVID-19(kitchener news)

#99 T on 02.01.21 at 5:32 pm

Will you pray with me to that my wife would be kept safe, and our family and children would be kept in perfect peace while this continues to unfold. She’s an incredibly strong women who is full of faith, but she is still a young woman and mom who is traveling alone.
Our rights are slipping right before our eyes and our freedoms are being stripped. It’s time to wake up.

Fiction. – Garth

—————

Dramatic, yes, however this is happening and has been for over a year. Ask me how I know.

If you don’t believe, go have a look at the Radisson on Dixon by Pearson. 3 layers of security, negative pressure hallways, and isolation rooms with views of various restaurants and coffee shops – taunting visitors every minute for 14 days of quarantine. Visitors are not allowed to order food to their rooms, all (terrible) meals are provided as is the worst coffee imaginable. All security are ex-military and treat the facility like a prison, and the visitors much like inmates. If you are lucky you may be let out of your room for fresh air 20 min a day. People are smoking in their rooms as they aren’t allowed out, the smoke leaks into all the other rooms through the shared air.

It’s actually quite a terrible experience. Avoid it at all costs.

#100 Loonie Doctor on 02.01.21 at 5:39 pm

Well. That is an awesome story that illustrates exactly why our system needs to encourage people to take the risk to be an entrepreneurial badass. Creates jobs, wealth, and makes for great blog posts to inspire the next generation to do it too.
-LD

#101 Hamish42 on 02.01.21 at 5:41 pm

Just a thought on the COVID vac strategy- how the hell did Israel and the UK do so well? Maybe it is as simply as they took it seriously- and paid up front to buy vaccines, or in the case of the UK even built plants that make vaccines.
Canada on the other hand………

#102 sweetride on 02.01.21 at 5:44 pm

Sweet ride sir – love the ‘i’m gonna drive my couch’ feeling… A buddy of mine had a ’78 Lemans which we affectionately called ‘the grocery getter’. It was baby blue, 4 door and pretty beat up looking, but had a suped up 350 (4 bbl, lumpy cam, yada yada). Always fun to light it up and put many of the so called sports cars to shame…

#103 Mr Happy on 02.01.21 at 5:45 pm

#52 Mr Happy on 02.01.21 at 2:37 pm

Fiction. – Garth
==========================.

You sure?

https://www.bridgecitynews.ca/news/edmonton-woman-takes-wrong-covid-test-detained-for-two-nights-following-international-flight

Let’s here more than one side of this tale before getting our knickers in a knot. – Garth

#104 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 5:47 pm

#82 Faron on 02.01.21 at 4:39 pm

And Don Guillermo who will like to come back to Canada one day when Mexico becomes uncomfortable.

******************************************
Faron, are you managing this Covid world OK? Although I rarely agreed with you, I used to think you presented yourself quite well. Now your tone sounds desperate. You seem like a decent sort. I hope you get through it all OK.

#105 George S on 02.01.21 at 5:50 pm

A really nice trip back in time. Huge luxurious cars. Social media was the telephone and the bar. Life seemed simpler although it probably wasn’t. Probably why it seemed simpler is that things weren’t changing as fast as they have been in the last 30 years. If you set up a business or got a job it was reasonable to expect that technological change wouldn’t make your business or career choice redundant after only a few years. You could even make a career out of being a TV repair person.

I still get the newspaper delivered and read the entire thing except for most of the sports reports every morning. It kind of gives me a sense of what is happening in the world. I know that I can get all sorts of online newspapers and I do but somehow it is better to me to be able to read it from paper. I can imagine that in a few years it will not be possible to get a newspaper delivered to your door in the middle of the night but til then…

#106 Oleg on 02.01.21 at 5:52 pm

Great Post. Never had any money in my early 20s but loved every minute of it. Happy days. Now in my late thirties, I have money but scant happiness. Nice post.

#107 George S on 02.01.21 at 5:53 pm

Something that might be interesting is to do one of your survey posts about people’s real estate experiences. Year and price of first home purchase, interest rate at the time current value of house vs original purchase price, etc.

#108 Nothing Surprises on 02.01.21 at 5:55 pm

Enjoyed your story. Thanks for telling. It brought back memories.

My experience came about from a casual conversation in 1971 with a friend looking for a manufacturer of a specialized part for a new Canadian product line for an International manufacturer which he was the Plant Super.

The Corp. couldn’t find a manufacturer in Canada and the plant was going to relocate back to the States.

I was a 26 year old, Ryerson trained engineer, working for a company and not satisfied. Had a wife and two small sons, living in a company owned, falling down house, with $1500 saved toward the purchase of our own place.

I asked my friend if he would consider an offer from me to manufacture these units. He said he was so desperate to keep the plant open he would take any offer presented. I worked for a couple weeks looking at the unit, developed a plan of manufacture and put in the offer predicated on every time a load was delivered, payment was made for the units immediately.
I was given an initial years order at my price. I then told my wife I was taking the $1500 (yes, still together after 54 yrs.) scrounged up some bank financing- that was the toughest part in those days, and rented the back end of an empty factory; designed and built the initial manufacturing equipment and produced the units for the next eight years.
The first year were 7 days a week with many days 14+ hours. My wife and greatest believer in me, would bring Sunday dinner into the plant along with the boys. I would explain things to them.

After the second year I bought a 3/4 acre lot in a small hamlet and had a house built. Total cost $35,000. Been here 47 years.

Sold the company to our customer and went on to other start-ups and endeavours. We’re retired now with 5 grown grandkids, all successful. My wife and I talk and laugh about these times as being some of the best we had.

#109 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.01.21 at 5:56 pm

@#86 Billy B
“54% of USA GDP is from the USA gov’t that does not produce a thing.

I wonder what is Canada’s GDP ratio now?”

+++

If our massive public sector workers and our massive debt is factored in…..

Less than zero.

#110 jess on 02.01.21 at 6:01 pm

the good ole days ?
Stock promoters, secretly paid by major Wall Street firms, were exposed in the Senate Banking hearings of the early 1930s, following the 1929 crash.

===========================

FINRA has strict rules for licensed brokers regarding use of social media. For example, their rulebook states:

“Investors and financial services professionals alike are increasingly using social media for a variety of business purposes. Social Media may be a new medium, but FINRA’s rules on communicating with the public are still applicable. The rules protect investors from false, misleading claims, exaggerated statements, and material omissions…

“Firms and their registered representatives must retain records of communications related to their ‘business as such.’ The ‘business as such’ requirement is based on the content of the communication not the type of device or technology used to receive or send the communication. These records must be preserved for a period of not less than three years…

“Firms must have the ability to supervise the business-related content associated persons are communicating on these sites, including possible suitability determinations if recommendations are made. A registered principal must review prior to use any social media site that an associated person intends to use for business. The principal may only approve a social media site if the principal has determined the associated person can and will comply with applicable rules…”

https://brokercheck.finra.org/individual/summary/6054636

https://wallstreetonparade.com/2021/01/gamestop-promoter-keith-gill-was-no-amateur-trader-he-held-sophisticated-trading-licenses-and-worked-in-the-finance-industry/

#111 domi on 02.01.21 at 6:04 pm

I stuffed newspapers and collected empty Beer bottles at Port Credit marina as a kid. Not sure if parenting then was better than now or whatnot. Nowadays I am stuffing the kids RESP and paying for a skating, dance etc. Meanwhile my parents let me run around unsupervised all day and had to get a job at 12. Keep up the stories we need a break from the news.

P.S. I sold off all but 1 or the remaining gme shares I had. yes – I folded like wet toilet paper under the pressure of the ladder dump. No diamond hands just sweaty palms.

Still did fantastic, and collected some tendies. Guess I am lucky’ish I chose to participate last monday.

But I had a exit plan – so that puts me ahead of many. Also have all those “what if” scenarios to think about. Maybe premature, because if the mother-of-all short squeezes really happen(s) tomorrow I have one share left to cash in.

Otherwise my stop order is set for $180 and that experiment will end for me when its triggered.

Oh well back to stuffing the proceeds into an etf until I find another get rich scheme :)

#112 KLNR on 02.01.21 at 6:07 pm

@#96 Ustabe on 02.01.21 at 5:20 pm
#53 Canuck Entrepreneur on 02.01.21 at 2:42 pm

Great story, Garth!

Now we know how you made your millions. Like so many entrepreneurs, cashing out to the right buyer at the right time is a lottery ticket hard to resist.

“Now we know how you made your millions” Also powering through stuff, bureaucracy, banks, negativity…your next success is just beyond this current failure.

Garth had newspapers, I had laundromats and hole in the wall pizza joints. No real difference except I never was forced to live in the big city. You can’t put a dollar figure on that.

variety is the spice of life they say.
I started rural, then spent teenage years in the soulless burbs, then career in the big smoke. Now thoroughly enjoying wfh in the country. Only place i’d reco everyone to stay far far away from is the burbs.

#113 Mr Canada on 02.01.21 at 6:09 pm

My Dad had that exact Olds Brougham — I think it had a “455” 4 Barrel Engine….it could move !!!

#114 VladTor on 02.01.21 at 6:10 pm

Garth,

GameStop was first. Now silver!

https://www.reddit.com/r/wallstreetbets/comments/l68ill/the_biggest_short_squeeze_in_the_world_slv_silver/

https://halturnerradioshow.com/index.php/en/news-page/world/goldman-sachs-issues-rare-sunday-warning-markets-will-collapse-if-squeeze-continues-bankers-too

https://www.forexlive.com/news/!/retailer-of-physical-gold-silver-says-physical-silver-is-almost-all-gone-20210201

https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/reddit-day-traders-silver-next-short-squeeze-2021-1-1030017108

https://www.reddit.com/r/wallstreetbets/comments/l71rdv/silver_biggest_short_squeeze_in_the_world_slv_25/

What do you think?

#115 Long-Time Lurker on 02.01.21 at 6:13 pm

That’s a nicer car than Kojak’s, Garth! You the man!

http://imcdb.org/vehicle_541771-Buick-Century-1975.html

1975 Buick Century

1975 Buick Century in Kojak, TV Series, 1973-1978 IMDB Ep. 4.12
Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: US

#116 KLNR on 02.01.21 at 6:14 pm

@#80 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 4:35 pm
#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

————-

Bullshit. Self-defeating apologist attitude. What was done then can be done now, probably easier.

nope.
nobody will ever have it that easy again.

#117 Long-Time Lurker on 02.01.21 at 6:15 pm

Zoolander 3. Script update.

PM Zoolander: “Wait! Wait! I’m not from here! I’m a Canadian. Nice weather today, eh? Put another shrimp on the barbie for me, eh? See! See!”

Munchkin Politicians: “Get him!”

The Munchkin National Guard soldiers raise their cork-popping air guns at PM Zoolander.

PM Zoolander: “Please! Please don’t hurt me!” He drops down to his knees and begs in a manner that would make Socialist Sing smile.

Munchkin Politician: “Wait! He is a Canadian. He’s too polite to be an American. Let him go.”

The Munchkin Politician walks up to PM Zoolander and says:

Munckin Politician: “Go on your way, Canadian. This is Official Munchkin Business.”

PM Zoolander: “But how do I get back home to Canada?”

Munchkin Politician: “Follow the Huntsman’s Golden Bribe Road. It will take you to the Wizard of the U.S.S.A.” He points to a golden brick road behind him.

PM Zoolander walks up to the road and notices the bricks have writing on them. He stoops down and reads: “CCP,” and “Burisma.”

Before PM Zoolander can ponder their meaning, he hears the Munchkin Politicians cry out:

Munchkin Politicians: “Impeach her! Impeach her!”

PM Zoolander turns and sees the Munchkin Politicians crowded around the curled up stockings and decides to flee before their attention turns on him again. He slips away unseen and runs down the Golden Bribe Road.

#118 Danger Dan on 02.01.21 at 6:27 pm

Thanks for sharing the story, Garth.

I’ve seen a lot of businesses based on good ideas limp to an early grave because of bad execution.

On the other hand, bad ideas have grown into big businesses because of good execution.

Now that we’re in the “hustle” era, we should all be working on some sort of side-business.

Speaking of which, does anyone know if Smoking Man ever ended up publishing that book he was writing?

#119 Ed on 02.01.21 at 6:33 pm

Sail Away

At $600/day in quarantine it’s pretty easy to make a case for staying in Hawaii

I’ve been in Hawaii since Dec 2nd, not returning till early July as it will take my boat about 22 days to return.

I too wish I could stay here permanently…Canada making frivolous new rules at random.

At least Kenny today stated any Albertan required to quarantine due to Covid gets their hotel room paid by the Alberta government…up yours JT!

#120 Ustabe on 02.01.21 at 6:39 pm

Just got an interesting tid bit from my financial team.

Apparently there is noise around silver of late, in fact I recall a post on here a few back.

But my new ifo from a highly respected financial services firm is that Citadel is long silver.

Do not buy silver. Do buy silver. Choices.

#121 Freedom First on 02.01.21 at 6:40 pm

Congrats Garth, on a life well lived!

Ditto. May we have many more adventures!

Respectfully,

Freedom First

#122 Drinking on 02.01.21 at 6:43 pm

Great story! We had 65 Parisienne which never died until it died of old age. My baby was a 70 Chevelle, upped the horse power, gears, headers, 50’s on the back 60’s on the front and raced it on the weekends at Race City!

That Mill person needs a box of tissue’s delivered to him/her!

I still miss the TV guide/times! Use to love reading through it as a youngster.

#123 bobbyh on 02.01.21 at 6:47 pm

Sweet ride man! Back then we had to go all in, no side hussle or dabbling. We didn’t have marketing degrees and zero knowledge about how to make things operate. Trial by error.

#124 Jen on 02.01.21 at 6:47 pm

Love reading your musings and reflections.

Life’s a journey full of uncertainties but, somewhere along the way, you come out on the other side largely unscathed.

#125 Pete in Barrie on 02.01.21 at 6:48 pm

Your wrong, Garth. Your story does have a point. It reminds us of a time when media was trustworthy and nonpartisan. Oh yeah, and people needed literacy skills to consume it.
It was a nice story.

#126 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 6:51 pm

Neat story.

I think every small time made good success story goes something along those lines, and there are a million of them. I don’t have one but my dad does. Makes me a bit frustrated when I read comments here from people who think the government should make life worse for these employment generators. They have no idea the risks and struggles it takes to pull it off and how many end in failure.

Ballad of the 12 Year Old Immigrant

Not to make too long of a story of it, my dad started out working up north on the oil projects leaving my mom alone in a basement suite with 2 infants (me being one of them). Then he got a partner and they began general contracting. Eventually they had 12 lots in Hawkwood under contract and became home builders, and things looked bright. Then the Saudis pulled the plug on the oil market and the banks pulled all the financing. My dad lost everything but his tool van and his personal guarantee. Work was hard to find. We moved twice in one year, this time with 4 kids in tow. He got a new partner and started general contracting again, eventually moving into land development. That nearly ended in bankruptcy again but eventually they pulled through and through a tricky “option” deal went on to developed 500 lots. That money went into commercial real estate and so far he hasn’t looked back. Lots of jobs were created along the way for everyone from the guys paving the roads to the electricians wiring the houses. Along the way he and his partner built the Scout Hall, the Rotary Club campground, and an outdoor stage, all gratis but with donated materials and land so it wasn’t just him, business men and women from all over town were involved with large donations. More jobs for the drywallers and excavators, plus legacy infrastructure for the town. The Scout hall is so lousy with Beavers and Guides that my son’s Scout troop has to use a room rented in the basement of a church.

So given that my dad was an immigrant who arrived at 12 and couldn’t speak English but managed all this through god times and bad, you can kind of see why I get miffed at the comments section sometimes. Ya, he did spend some time cruising around in a class A motorhome, but he deserved it. He worked long, hard hours with his hands in the cold and the mud and took a lot of risks.

The Ballad of the Uninteresting Story

I wish my story were so interesting, but it isn’t. All I did was go to university, get me a P.Eng., and go to work for a struggling O&G company that was using stock options to attract talent because they didn’t have the money for high salaries. Then I got lucky. Of course O&G companies don’t hand out options like that anymore because it was never their plan that some arse was going to hold them to expiry because he didn’t want to pay more child support and thus net a 7 digit windfall. Plus, the joke was on me because I ended up paying way more child support than I would have if I had cashed them when they vested, which is what everyone else did. “You can’t eat options” my coworkers would say. So I guess I took some risk too.

The Moral of the Stories

Success is seldom accomplished without taking risks. Neither is failure. Unless, of course, you become a dentist. But whichever path you chose, it will be a lot of hard work and late nights.

#127 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 6:53 pm

#66 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 4:04 pm
Talking about innocence:
The End of the Innocence / Don Henley
— —-

A great tune, that never gets any airplay these days…

#128 Dogman01 on 02.01.21 at 6:55 pm

Great story: There are some games where you have to be “all in” to play.

Garth:
“I can write better than anyone who can write faster,” he said, “and I can write faster than anyone who can write better.”

The ex Military people know what it is like to be “all-in” and working with others whom are equally committed.

#129 conan on 02.01.21 at 6:57 pm

Did not take long before I realized this story needed music.

https://youtu.be/oDOH3ViMmCM

#130 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.01.21 at 7:05 pm

@#82 Faron
“The only way to get through the pandemic is for people to show a smidge less self-interest and show that they can actually manage their behaviour and stop the virus.”

++++
True enough.

But enough talking about me.

I guess Kim cried at the thought of her show “Keeping up with the Kardashians” being cancelled.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gv8-wvbXfqc

Life is so unfair.

#131 Dr V on 02.01.21 at 7:06 pm

78 S BBY – I got many compliments on my 80 Olds. It was a great transition from the early to mid 70s “boats”. Some described it as “timeless” with its appeal lasting for years.

I forget the chassis model, but it was shared with the Buick regal, Chev Monte Carlo and the Pontiac Grand Prix. But I think the cutlass was the most popular.

#132 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 7:09 pm

#41 under the radar on 02.01.21 at 2:01 pm

“I had a 75 Cutlass Supreme I bought in summer 1985 for $500.00. Got me through 3 years of law school in the frozen tundra at Osgoode. That car never failed me.”

Up until the early 70’s US auto manufacturers were the envy of the world, and based on the technology of the time built great cars. But something happened. I wouldn’t touch a GM product with a 10 foot pole now.

It used to be all a GM needed was regular maintenance and paint at the 10 year mark, as they were rust buckets. Now you can paint it all you want but everything else falls apart. I mean who came up with the idea of building radiators out of plastic?

#133 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 7:13 pm

My buddy just sent me a text reminding of my great silver capade. Through the 70’s I worked contract construction in Northern Alberta. Being a BC resident I wasn’t good working outside in the cold so I would quit projects in mid December, head back to BC for Xmas with parents and then off to Mexico for 3 months. My Mexico back then was Pie de la Cuesta, a small palapa style fishing village about 10 km north of Acapulco. This particular December 1979 the silver markets were on fire. I took all my extra money ($11,000) at the time and bought silver certificates. I then sat on the beach in Mexico over the winter and watched my 11K melt down to 2K. I laughed and said that if I’d have held those until today I would have been retired by now. Bottom line is it didn’t make a tiny bit of difference to how my life turned out. Might have even taught me some discipline going forward.

#134 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:14 pm

#103 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 5:47 pm

I was pretty hopeful as of Friday. My hope comes from the fact that places that have high vaccination rates are seeing great results. So, if Canada can manage to get its vaccination act together, there’s a chance this whole show ends before next winter. But then I did some reading on the current thinking and evidence about the new variants. The discouraging news is that they present a substantial risk to this timeline if we let up now.

Repatriation of citizens has been a large crack through which any number of viruses have slipped over the past decades not the least of times being March and April when people flew home during the initial outbreak. The new variants are no different. So, requiring extremely stringent measures be taken to ensure returning travellers are free of the variants is a reasonable choice. This should be accompanied by a huge campaign to sequence virus on test samples to characterize exactly what variant is where and when it circulates.

Having given up numerous trips this year out of a conscientious understanding that it is my duty as a citizen to do what little I can to stop the spread, it’s hell of annoying to read BillyBob whine about the restrictions and see folks tra-la-laing off to the tropics. This is act two thousand sevenhundred and ninetyfour in the tragedy of the COVID commons and I’m getting sick of it. It represents an extreme level of entitled obliviousness coming from a cohort who is the first to decry entitledness ’cause I pulled muh self up by muh boot straps n all. And that some of it comes from a fellow who schlurped federal grants while running a “recession proof” business makes it that much more disgusting.

So, the tone is severe annoyance compounded by the pile-ons that happen here when the kiddos don’t like what they read even if I’m toeing a line backed by science and expertise and overall good will. At least BillyBob makes me laugh by childishly implying that any kind of sexual nonconformity is a drawback or that having a child is somehow a crime against earth all while being a CO2 maximal glorified bus driver.

Finally, cut the crap Don. Either be sincere or don’t. Enjoy Mexico, sincerely.

#135 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 7:15 pm

“I then sat on the beach in Mexico over the winter and watched my 11K melt down to 2K”

I guess I was Faron’s stereotype back then!

#136 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 7:16 pm

#45 binky barnes on 02.01.21 at 2:18 pm
Life used to be a lot simpler back then. Nice story, Garth.

BB

—————————-

I am not sure that is true. Read “The Ballad of the 12 Year Old Immigrant” I posted above.

#137 protea on 02.01.21 at 7:16 pm

Garth very inspirational , some of these quips can be attributable to yourself, I love them.

“If you dont risk you don’t win”

“Life is about doing your best ”

“Control what you can and don’t sweat the rest”

#138 SniffingYogaFarts on 02.01.21 at 7:17 pm

Oh geez… I can never make it past three or four comments… Great story, great blog. Please don’t ever let the sewage section get you down.

#139 triplenet on 02.01.21 at 7:19 pm

So Garth…. one of the little minions in my office – my nephew – whom I’m paying to educate
– says this…..ya gotta laff-
Doc (that’s what they call me) – I went to the race track to bet on the horse race. The ticket wicket guy says- which horse do you think will win and what’s your bet?
He replies – I want to bet on the horse that I think will lose the race.
Apparently he was told to f-off!
No cheating on the track.
Now he’s on Robinhood..

#140 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 7:20 pm

#80 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 4:35 pm
#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

————-

Bullshit. Self-defeating apologist attitude. What was done then can be done now, probably easier.

———-

100%, not to mention my silent Gen/Boomer parents would tell a decidedly different story than Old Ron.

I’ve often though that if I were in my 20’s just starting out, things would be easier, and cheaper for me today than they were back in the 90’s. A simple plan involving a career that pays well, does not require a 6 figure education, or living in an urban environment would produce quicker, and more lucrative results than they did 25+ years ago. They evidence for this is all around me.

#141 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 7:20 pm

#62 cuke and tomato picker on 02.01.21 at 3:44 pm
Once again a great post. Enjoy the posts as while as the comments. Did you meet your wife at university?

No. In a rock band. Another story. – Garth

——————————-

Please tell…..

#142 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 7:21 pm

#118 Ed on 02.01.21 at 6:33 pm

I’ve been in Hawaii since Dec 2nd, not returning till early July as it will take my boat about 22 days to return.

———–

Very nice. Need a couple of experienced deckhands for the run back? For all I know, we might still be here then… and that would be just fine… as long as the poke doesn’t run out.

#143 VladTor on 02.01.21 at 7:25 pm

Garth! Your story open my eyes about you! Interesting! Having this car you didn’t have a any choice as to be politician in future.

https://www.curbsideclassic.com/blog/car-show-classic-1976-oldsmobile-cutlass-supreme-brougham-the-right-car-at-the-right-time/

Personally me, I like old cars. All of them has character. Now all cars looks like eggs in basket – just different colors…

Do you still have this car?

#144 STATISTICS CANADA - "PANDEMIC on 02.01.21 at 7:26 pm

DELETED

#145 Konijr on 02.01.21 at 7:33 pm

My first job was at Zellers, thank you for sharing that awesome story G.T!

#146 Ed on 02.01.21 at 7:34 pm

———–

Very nice. Need a couple of experienced deckhands for the run back? For all I know, we might still be here then… and that would be just fine… as long as the poke doesn’t run out.

Maybe…should perhaps connect to ensure neither of us are nefarious pirates etc.

#147 Drinking on 02.01.21 at 7:35 pm

#128 conan

Awesome, pure 70’s funk/soul music. Isaac and his band just had that coolness to him/them, brings back great memories.

#148 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 7:37 pm

#131 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 7:09 pm
#41 under the radar on 02.01.21 at 2:01 pm

“I had a 75 Cutlass Supreme I bought in summer 1985 for $500.00. Got me through 3 years of law school in the frozen tundra at Osgoode. That car never failed me.”

Up until the early 70’s US auto manufacturers were the envy of the world, and based on the technology of the time built great cars. But something happened. I wouldn’t touch a GM product with a 10 foot pole now.

It used to be all a GM needed was regular maintenance and paint at the 10 year mark, as they were rust buckets. Now you can paint it all you want but everything else falls apart. I mean who came up with the idea of building radiators out of plastic?
——

Gimme a break! Out here, early mid 2000’s GM trucks are everywhere! Many in great shape too. Look up what these things cost used, even 15 years old they command a premium over any other brand with a full size. Mine is turning 18 this year, zero rust (they dump salt on the roads here in Ontario) and just regular maintenance. I’d probably have no issues getting 12k for it even though it is 2WD and gas. My bro sold his ‘05 4×4 3500 8.1 litre gasser for 16,500.00 a couple years back with 250k on the clock.

The early Silverado/Sierra’s are likely the most popular used pickup truck of all time, and for good reason.

#149 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:41 pm

#134 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 7:15 pm

I guess I was Faron’s stereotype back then!

Based on your insta, 100% Still are. Buenas Noches.

#150 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:54 pm

Sorry for wasting your time with my rancor today Garth especially under your inspiring, relatable and hilarious story. But, I can’t resist countering this travelling COVIDIOT BS, even as I realize it’s not my hill to die on.

To the rest, have a good evening.

#151 Bruce MacLachlan on 02.01.21 at 7:54 pm

You know if all else fails, you could always write a weekly opinion piece. You’re good at this

#152 TurnerNation on 02.01.21 at 7:57 pm

Oldsmobile…the Old Man’s marque. Our forum host would have had more luck in a Pontiac or Chev 2-door if you know what I mean ;)

At least this weblog then was following that There’s No Replacement for Displacement.

In the Malaise Era of domestic cars. When small block V8s were smogged-down to produce maybe 130hp.
Before my time but:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaise_era
Malaise Era is a term describing U.S. market cars from roughly 1973 to 1983[2][3] during which they suffered from very poor performance.[4] The U.S. Federal Government was mandating technologies that increased fuel usage, while also mandating that fuel usage decrease

#153 Barb on 02.01.21 at 7:59 pm

What a marvelous look back to 44 years ago, Garth and Dorothy! The best thing about reminiscing, I’ve heard, is that we tend to forget all the little bad things that occur. And that’s good.

Foresight–and always a wee bit of luck–had you in the right place at the right time. Imagine someone wanting into the newspaper business today!

What a team you two are to this day!
The only downside being that the years fly by far too quickly.

#154 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 8:00 pm

#110 domi on 02.01.21 at 6:04 pm

…and collected empty Beer bottles at Port Credit marina as a kid.
——-

Heh, I did that too! The choice hunting grounds were the ditches along local country roads. I guess sucking back beers while taking a drive was popular back then. Hundreds and hundreds of bottles came out of those ditches at .10 each. Some still had horrid rotting swill in them, others became caskets for dead field mice. The “Brewers Retail” employees did not like it too much when they saw us coming with our garbage bags full of stinking shitty old bottles.

After that it was doing hay and straw, shovelling chicken shit out of barns, picking eggs, landscaping, and construction work. I had a pretty smelly youth.

#155 Upenuff on 02.01.21 at 8:07 pm

Loved the walk down memory lane Garth!

Had a 1968 Chrysler Newport 383 and around 1979 when gas was converting from gallons to
litres, I had to start charging my buddies a couple bucks each if they wanted to spend the night night cruising around the city….. gas started to cost more money and those big boats were a beast to fill!

Upenuff

#156 domi on 02.01.21 at 8:09 pm

Hey Garth, forgot to say this before.

Wanted to say thank you. I read allot of blogs and forums to try and stay informed. Am always looking for a good value play. My weakness. A bit of risk taker in me that I need to keep in check somewhat.

I always come back here.

You have been giving out good-grounded-safe and this is the biggie – “free advice” for years. Helps with the big picture. And for that I thank you.

Cheers.
Plus the dog pictures. eh.

#157 VicPaul on 02.01.21 at 8:10 pm

Sweet ride – best friend’s first car was an early 70’s Black Gran Prix with a 455 4brl – on Friday’s, we all gave Allan 10 bucks and we’d drive for an hour – til the gas almost ran out – man, to be 16 again for a week…

M57BC

#158 fishman on 02.01.21 at 8:11 pm

Confirmation from the Maestro. Youth & no sleep beats age & experience.

#159 Trudi Woods on 02.01.21 at 8:13 pm

Yep …time and again the message is always the same…its the ride… not the destination …which can go off the rails in a flash. .enjoy…that seems to be what you and your bride have done…

#160 Victoria News on 02.01.21 at 8:18 pm

Still get my daily newspaper delivered six days a week, and it comes with the full colour Sunday funnies. They started colouring the daily comic strip too which caused great outcry, but we got over it and adjusted our eyes. This paper has been in print since 1884 as the Victoria Times that merged with the Daily Colonist in 1980.

#161 TurnerNation on 02.01.21 at 8:25 pm

Back to the New System at hand, in year one of a 10-year rollout into 2030:.
Control over our Feeding, Breeding and Movement/Travel. We are to be controlled as animals.

– Food supply – the slow creep. It’s in the open now. Mainstream.

https://www.economist.com/the-world-ahead/2020/11/17/edible-insects-and-lab-grown-meat-are-on-the-menu
Edible insects and lab-grown meat are on the menu
Coming soon to a table near you

– yahoo news: The Trump administration used it to bail out farmers suffering from its trade wars. Now the Biden administration wants to deploy a $30 billion pot of money in the Agriculture Department to tackle climate change, support restaurants and kickstart other programs without waiting for Congress.

– Bill Gates is now the largest farmland owner in America …www.marketwatch.com › story › bill-gates-is-now-the-lar…
Jan 16, 2021 — The billionaire Microsoft co-founder has become the largest owner of farmland in the United States by quietly buying up massive plots across the …

—– Breeding: Pheromones are how people meet, connect, spark. Try that when your nose and mouth is covered. Yup they know what they are doing. Faceless and genderless army of worker bots

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_pheromone
“The many types of pheromones (i.e. alarm, aggregation, defense, sexual attraction) all have a common cause acting as chemical cues to trigger a response. However, sex pheromones are particularly associated with signaling mating behaviors or dominance. The odors released can be seen as a favorable trait selected by either the male or female leading to attraction and copulation”

————Travel, goes without saying. UBI time soon? By Q2 maybe.
Our global rules DO NOT want us getting sunshine at all. Ski hills are closed in Ontario. Still think this is for your health?

Globalnews.ca
Air Transat temporarily suspends operations, citing new COVID-19 travel restrictions
Air Transat announced Friday it is suspending its regular operations … The company said it has resulted in further layoffs of both flight crews …
2 days ago

#162 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 8:30 pm

#148 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:41 pm
#134 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 7:15 pm
I guess I was Faron’s stereotype back then!

Based on your insta, 100% Still are. Buenas Noches
**********************************
You must have been looking at .1028

#163 Yuus bin Haad on 02.01.21 at 8:31 pm

yes, I vote for more stories

#164 earthboundmisfit on 02.01.21 at 8:32 pm

Had it’s poor cousin, ’76 Impala Custom Landau, for a number of years. Bought it from an RCMP narc. Like driving in your living room.

#165 Elon Fanboy on 02.01.21 at 8:44 pm

Well Scotia iTrade cancelled my 4 digit limit sell orders on my little GME dabble.

What are they afraid of?

I guess a ‘free market’ is only for the parasite hedge funds when they are winning.

#166 Randy on 02.01.21 at 8:52 pm

How did you know that I just checked in here from r/wallstreetbets ?

#167 Dianne M Maley on 02.01.21 at 9:05 pm

Charming

#168 The West on 02.01.21 at 9:07 pm

I worked at a sod farm for one whole summer (it was grueling work, I was 15) to buy my grandfather’s 1989 Buick New Yorker for $450. It needed to be fixed every day and I spent a lot of quality time with my grandfather learning how to fix and maintain. It was a couch on wheels, it was a beautiful vehicle.

Honestly Garth, I envy the world you got to grow up in. Doubtless, it was not without its risk but it was a better time. Wages matched living expenses and families were together. There was pride. There was purpose…there was a sense of community.

It’s gone. In the wake of globalism there is no more middle class, there is no more “pull yourself up by the bootstraps” out there in the world. There is the very rich, the desperate poor and the inconsolably angry. The corruption is stifling.

I’d encourage you to head to r/wallstreetbets and read why they are angry and what happened to their parents in 2007/2008. Petulant? Maybe. Is the anger warranted? Absolutely.

I know you want to think differently but, the age of financial capitalism is unravelling. And its going to be ugly. The money changers have much to answer for. But of course, they keep the poor divided and in the dark. Eric Weinstein put it perfectly: “Wokestan vs MAGAstan”

This is the consequence; decades worth of privatizing the profits and socializing the losses. This is exactly how World War Two began forming in the 1930s. Those on the outside of deep, systemic corruption have had enough.

#169 Millennial Realist on 02.01.21 at 9:37 pm

#60 Old Ron

“No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.”

Thank you for your clearminded honesty, Ron.

We need lots more of that to understand the unjust, complicated mess that the younger generations are inheriting.

Boomers, be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

#170 Yukon Elvis on 02.01.21 at 9:38 pm

I miss the 20th century when my cup holder sat beside me and wore a mini skirt.

#171 Cici on 02.01.21 at 9:52 pm

Everything that #11 Jaguar said!

That’s an awesome story Garth, but you sure are lucky Dorothy has put up with you all these years…after all, mostly ladies will only tolerate a $1-million debt if their man has spent it on them, LOL!

#172 alexinvestor on 02.01.21 at 10:17 pm

Efficiency is the name of the game. Instead of a staff of forty back then, you can do almost the same job now with a staff of one. Guess where the extra money/effort/costs of the 39 people goes to now … houses !

#173 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 10:25 pm

#126 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 6:53 pm
#66 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 4:04 pm
Talking about innocence:
The End of the Innocence / Don Henley
— —-

A great tune, that never gets any airplay these days…
————-
I know, a fricking classic.
But all we get now is hip hop, where every song has the same beat.
And no piano.

#174 Rain on 02.01.21 at 10:35 pm

Hi Garth.

You are the best. I enjoyed this post the most in the last 10 years of reading your blog. Keep them coming!

~Raincoast

#175 Silent the people on 02.01.21 at 10:36 pm

What’s the point of the story, there isn’t one!
At a time like COVID-19 it is refreshing! Thank you….

#176 The first Joel on 02.01.21 at 10:37 pm

Thank you for your candid, likely frightening at the time description of your start. It is definitely inspiring to the ones of us that pay attention yet seldom post.
I’m saddened that so many missed the message you portrayed so early on. “We badly miscalculated on the first issue, and it took all night to get it out. This sacrifice helped forge a bond between us that has never been broken.” You essentially are saying (even to the irritating ones posting here not paying attention) the importance of finding someone (a partner) you can count on despite all the chatter life can bring. I am lucky enough to have found one too and am very grateful, way more important than simply having money because money cannot love you back.
PS I had a 1974 Malibu with swivel bucket seats( last year of point ignition) if anyone is Paying attention.

#177 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 10:46 pm

#149 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:54 pm

Sorry for wasting your time with my rancor today Garth especially under your inspiring, relatable and hilarious story. But, I can’t resist countering this travelling COVIDIOT BS, even as I realize it’s not my hill to die on.

————

Exactly. If you keep stressing about things you can’t change, you’ll give yourself the vapours. Not to mention you’re almost certainly wrong. If you do end up having kids, you’ll either learn to chill waaaay out or explode.

#178 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 11:13 pm

#118 Ed on 02.01.21 at 6:33 pm
Sail Away

At $600/day in quarantine it’s pretty easy to make a case for staying in Hawaii

I’ve been in Hawaii since Dec 2nd, not returning till early July as it will take my boat about 22 days to return.

I too wish I could stay here permanently…Canada making frivolous new rules at random.

At least Kenny today stated any Albertan required to quarantine due to Covid gets their hotel room paid by the Alberta government…up yours JT!
————-
Why would the Alberta Guberment pay for rich people circumventing the rules.
Pretty stupid, if you ask me.
NO wonder you are deep in Corona Shit.
Don’t forget the Prime Minister has a budget to balance.

#179 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 11:30 pm

#132 Don Guillermo on 02.01.21 at 7:13 pm
My buddy just sent me a text reminding of my great silver capade. Through the 70’s I worked contract construction in Northern Alberta. Being a BC resident I wasn’t good working outside in the cold so I would quit projects in mid December, head back to BC for Xmas with parents and then off to Mexico for 3 months. My Mexico back then was Pie de la Cuesta, a small palapa style fishing village about 10 km north of Acapulco. This particular December 1979 the silver markets were on fire. I took all my extra money ($11,000) at the time and bought silver certificates. I then sat on the beach in Mexico over the winter and watched my 11K melt down to 2K. I laughed and said that if I’d have held those until today I would have been retired by now. Bottom line is it didn’t make a tiny bit of difference to how my life turned out. Might have even taught me some discipline going forward.
————–
Remember the times.
The Texan Oil Barons, the Hunt Brothers, tried to corner the silver market.
History recalls that did not turn out too well.
Many novice investors got burned.
But they did not learn.
BreX was lurking in the shadows.

#180 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 11:35 pm

#166 Elon Fanboy on 02.01.21 at 8:44 pm
Well Scotia iTrade cancelled my 4 digit limit sell orders on my little GME dabble.

What are they afraid of?

I guess a ‘free market’ is only for the parasite hedge funds when they are winning.
————
I guess they are just politely telling you to bugger off.

#181 waltersafety on 02.01.21 at 11:39 pm

I have a feeling you also had an Impala SS in the 1990’s and took it to the drag strip once.

#182 Robert Ash on 02.01.21 at 11:45 pm

Hey # 33 Ottawan…. I was a 10 year old Citizen Delivery kid also… 102 dailies, up to 125 -150 for Saturday… and did will have to stuff those Saturday Editions… I know this will sound corny, but I started my business training as a Paper Boy… Had to do my weekly reconciliation, with my Older Brother… then on the Bike to Nepean, to the Neighborhood Paper Depot… stand in line, and square up with all your rolled coin… use to carry all the Coin in a Nice Blue Crown Royal 26er Bag with the Draw string… started in small business at 23… I think there aren’t enough jobs, for young Canadians, today, and it is a problem… a big problem.
Thanks for the Blog, today, I motored in a 78 Grand Marquis, as my first Company car… cruised, like a dream…

#183 mj on 02.02.21 at 12:23 am

I’ve been reading your blog for many years every day. I have so much respect for you. To share your knowledge with so many people and ask for nothing in return is just incredible. I’m going to throw this out there. If Dorothy is willing to write something for one day, I would love to hear one of her stories with you.

#184 Where's My Money Going Greedeau? on 02.02.21 at 12:34 am

Off topic but I know now why investors/people don’t trust Wall Street-ppl in charge; if they can corrupt their game of baseball then their whole system is done.
I just heard about this today after watching comedian Artie Lange’s podcast Halfway House-Episode #2 from 2019 with Len Dykstra (National Baseball League pro from the mid 80’s to mid 90’s).
We all know about the scandal in 1929 with the Black Sox throwing games and the modern day steroid scandal (Balco-owner Victor Conte Jr was the bass player in band Tower Of Power). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Major_League_Baseball_players_named_in_the_Mitchell_Report
Starting at about the 18 minute mark, Dykstra said when he was playing, he hired private investigators to follow umpires to get the dirt on them. Then when he went up to bat, would bring up these indiscretions to get favorable calls. He said there was only about 3 umpires that were on the up and up, so he couldn’t get dirt on them.
For the 2 years following this, Dykstra led the league in most plate appearances and most walks, also batting over .300.
No wonder I no longer watch baseball. I follow sports and this should have been plastered all over MSM. It’s not even in his wikipedia info.

Let’s face it, the US is a pit digging itself deeper every day.
I’ve also been watching football and the start of the new hockey season and I cannot believe the obvious slanted calls by the refs that completely change the games, and the rules that prohibit camera use.
I’m so sick of it.
I used to bet on NHL/NFL/NBL, but after the disastrous 2019 NFL season, I couldn’t handicap anymore because of the, imo, rigging of the games through the referees, so haven’t given another penny to any of the gov’t bookies.
So you see kids 15-25, get a little token of play money from the gov’t, figuring it’s all rigged and voila, you get #wallstreetbets. Silver, to the moon!!!

Hey anyone want to bet that Tom Brady and the Tampa Bay Bucs win the Super Bowl?
The US needs a hero now and the writing’s on the wall.
Anyone want to bet how many bad calls there will be that will completely change the game?
The Bucs shouldn’t even be in it.
And don’t get me started on the NHL.
Fooled ya, I’m not betting a penny on this or any sports ‘game’.

#185 Nonplused on 02.02.21 at 12:45 am

#147 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 7:37 pm

I will give you the GM trucks. It seems the big three can still make trucks.

#186 calgaryPhantom on 02.02.21 at 1:48 am

It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey.

#187 willworkforpickles on 02.02.21 at 3:08 am

There are fools and then there are greater fools.
Have a look at just about any heavily shorted stock out there now.
Look at their recent share price spikes and subsequent immediate large drop-offs.
Fools rush in.
All of those recent sp spikes were/are from speculative buying.
speculative retail buys (gambles) fueled by high hopes of those stocks becoming the next big social media driven short squeeze.
Every one of those stock speculators are currently bleeding red…every one…hoping…waiting.
The rules of the game supportive of the shorts could change on a dime and the crazies (FOMO spec buyers) just wind-up losing their a$$e$.
They will protect short sellers with new regs if need be. The intrinsic value to short selling is long established for it to go down in flames and out in a blaze of glory via a rising trend..
Now maybe one or two of those 50 to a 100 or more spec buys will develop to a big short squeeze.
Luck of the draw…some may win many will lose … the average joe will sing the blues again.
It’s a fools game and there are many.

#188 willworkforpickles on 02.02.21 at 3:26 am

What’s really bad about all this current (WSB) speculative buying is how it will turn many a newcomer would be market investor off over the mindless losses now before they ever have a chance to learn the ins and outs of trading. Many are going to get their a$$e$ kicked before they ever learn a thing.
The market needed an influx of newbie investors, but not to be wasted like this.

#189 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 3:57 am

#46 BillyBob: last time you doubted my being a pilot; not Phil… NVG and side-mounted guns/sensors on helos, new helo types, photo/safety chase on jets, worked with test teams from NRC Flt Research, TCCA, Bombardier, Airbus, Bell Helicopters. Worked as Trg Capt/TRI/TRE with airlines. Right time/place, more lucky than good!

===========================

Actually I doubt it even more now. Earlier you humble-lamented “Likely making half what my airlines counterparts get”, but now you apparently were a “training captain, Type Rating Instructor, and Type Rating Examiner at airlines”.

Sorry man. Doesn’t pass the smell test. You throw out NRC and Transport Canada as previous gigs, but use EASA licensing terms?

Of course you may hold multiple licenses, I do myself. But one can’t obtain a TRI/TRE rating without actively flying for the sector requirements, which means you had to be employed by an airline for a significant amount of time. Especially as you state “airlines”. Was this before or after or between the military and test pilot careers?

Any Call of Duty player knows what NVG is.

If you’re going to post bona fides it’s best to at least make them credible.

#190 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 4:21 am

#133 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:14 pm

Having given up numerous trips this year out of a conscientious understanding that it is my duty as a citizen to do what little I can to stop the spread, it’s hell of annoying to read BillyBob whine about the restrictions and see folks tra-la-laing off to the tropics. This is act two thousand sevenhundred and ninetyfour in the tragedy of the COVID commons and I’m getting sick of it. It represents an extreme level of entitled obliviousness coming from a cohort who is the first to decry entitledness ’cause I pulled muh self up by muh boot straps n all. And that some of it comes from a fellow who schlurped federal grants while running a “recession proof” business makes it that much more disgusting.

So, the tone is severe annoyance compounded by the pile-ons that happen here when the kiddos don’t like what they read even if I’m toeing a line backed by science and expertise and overall good will. At least BillyBob makes me laugh by childishly implying that any kind of sexual nonconformity is a drawback or that having a child is somehow a crime against earth all while being a CO2 maximal glorified bus driver.

==============================

Yes, Faron. Your goodwill is freely displayed and never-ending.

Again with the straw man attacks. I have never defended “unnecessary” travel – not even as the lack of it threatens my previous livelihood! But if you could try and step out of your simplistic worldview you might realize not everyone is travelling to an all-inclusive. For someone who never wastes a chance to associate yourself with science, you’re pretty quick to claim anecdotes as data.

There is more personal investment in issues beyond Covid and “what Faron and BB want”. Real example: family of four working overseas with a mother/grandma in Canada terminally ill. They’d like to see her before she dies. Completely willing to comply with whatever measure will “conscientiously do their part” etc to prevent the spread of Covid. But crushed now by the apparent $8,000 increase in the cost to see a loved one for the last time. I don’t know, perhaps there is some group/compassionate rate? Yes, yes I know too bad so sad, you make the choice to live somewhere else it’s your problem. To which I say, eff you.

If you see my offer of help with your stated goal of reproduction as judgement, I’m afraid that’s more on you than me. I really do know some highly suitable baby mommas in Victoria. It seems I touched a nerve, apologies. The world could use nothing more than another sanctimonious know-it-all, go for it! *thumbs-up emoji here*

Had to chuckle at the “glorified bus driver”, never heard that before. Is it ok if I use it?

Are you also opposed to those same “drivers” currently using “science and expertise” a great deal more practically than you ever will, landing massive cargo planes every day bringing PPE and vaccines and fresh food to you? I’m just curious as to how far your hypocrisy and logical disconnect extends.

#191 Wrk.dover on 02.02.21 at 7:39 am

#131 Nonplused on 02.01.21 at 7:09 pm.

I mean who came up with the idea of building radiators out of plastic?

———————————————

Formerly soldered copper, now aluminum tubes with crimped on plastic tanks, entire assembly relatively weightless.

So the O-ring may fail after over a decade, then you purchase a brand new rad aftermarket for under $200cdn (if GM , much more for other makes) instead of the previous generation copper/brass version for many hundreds of dollars and more. The heavy copper ones could be fixed up in a shop, but they were still compromised by the build up of crap in them and the corrosion of the fins.

Light weight is the goal for acceleration and efficiency, plus the aluminum transfers the heat better.

Which is why an upgrade to an antique behemoth is an aluminum/plastic tanked rad.

I will add right now before you counter, when I explain things you never seem to ‘get it’. But I volunteered.

The short answer would have been ‘an engineer like Sailed Away’.

#192 Howard on 02.02.21 at 7:50 am

#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm
A trip down memory lane Garth. We were a blessed generation. A 4 year degree @ U of T for $2,000 total in tuition. Class of 74. Then renting a beach house in Spain for $56 Canadian a month. Staying their till the money ran out a few years later, return to the family Real Estate Biz. A quick haircutt and a walk down the Danforth to get out-fitted by Saul @ Korry’s (May he rest in peace) Owning a prime detached house in the Beach by age 26.
No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

————————————-

You’re not going to be very popular in this steerage section with such inconvenient truths, Ron.

In fairness, you didn’t mention that mortgage rates were 20% for a few weeks in 1981. Your generation has been talking about that non-stop for 40 years, it’s almost disorienting to read a Boomer tale without it being mentioned.

#193 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 7:52 am

BillyBob, what is the beady eyed, climate change, ginger arse goin’ on about now? I’m trying to enjoy my Cuba Libre here on Varadero beach while reading Andy Ngo’s new book. Sigh.

#194 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 7:58 am

Oh, here is a link to an article that plugs Andy’s book, case you are interested.

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/2021/02/01/andy_ngo_unmasks_antifa_534868.html

Selling out on Amazon, apparently.

#195 NoName on 02.02.21 at 8:10 am

@working forever…

…plus the aluminum transfers the heat better.

Are you sure about that, and on a side note mas production of copper radiator for cars stopped way back in 70s…

Sand side note of side note, i had two indentical dell computers, one was always noisier and gues what quieter one had copper heatsink on a cpu, heat transfer 2x better…

#196 Bezengy on 02.02.21 at 8:17 am

Great story of success, and that Olds with a rocket engine sure was a beauty. It seems to me everyone would love to “hit one out of the park” but that just isn’t possible. Personally, I gave up on that idea a long time ago. I’m not sure what happened throughout the last few decades, but I’ve got a hunch it has something to do with this fixation on winning. You’re either a winner, or a loser. When I was a kid we had track and field day, you picked three events to participate in, and gave it your best shot. Everyone had to participate, period, and shower afterwards together too. I remember the phys ed coach yelling “I don’t care if it’s this small, get in the shower”, as he used his fingers to measure off an inch. We all played the game so to speak. Nowadays, most kids get to choose whether or not to play, with most sitting on the sidelines as spectators. Too bad, for the one thing I’ve learned in my life is that winning really doesn’t matter, it’s just great to be in the game.

#197 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 8:20 am

@#174 Piano Plunker
“But all we get now is hip hop, where every song has the same beat.
And no piano.”

++++

Alas my Austrian Amigo.
Mozart’s musical magic is behind you.
Time to get with the times.

#198 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 8:26 am

From today’s issue of the National Post:
“Canadians may need to brace themselves for higher borrowing costs earlier than expected.

That’s the message from economists at some of Canada’s largest banks after a report Friday showed gross domestic product grew more quickly than anticipated at the end of 2020, even amid a new wave of lockdowns. The numbers are calling into question whether a first-quarter contraction will materialize after all, and leading analysts to suggest growth in 2021 could be stronger than earlier believed.

They also threaten to put pressure on the Bank of Canada to reconsider how quickly it expects to withdraw stimulus.

The central bank has pledged to keep interest rates near zero until slack is fully absorbed, something it doesn’t see happening until 2023. But stronger growth could lead to an economy running at full capacity earlier than the two-year timeline, which may prompt policy-makers to bring rate hike expectations forward.

The data carry “potentially strong policy implications for the bank of Canada that is increasingly looking as if it over-committed itself to keeping rates on hold until 2023,” derek Holt, an economist at bank of Nova Scotia, said in a report to investors. “The prudent thing to advise heavily indebted Canadians is to plan their finances around rate hikes commencing considerably sooner.”

Now where have you read that before? – Garth

#199 Build the barricades on 02.02.21 at 8:31 am

DELETED

#200 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 8:33 am

@#187 calgaryPhantom
“It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey.”

++++

Shhhhh, we’re not supposed to be traveling…..until the last airline is bankrupt…… then we’ll be allowed to travel.

Perhaps China might be a good post apocalypse destination.
I hear they’re virus free.

Speaking of apocalypse…..has anyone heard from “poxy” in a few days?
I’m getting worried, the bunker may have collapsed.

#201 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 8:44 am

@#193 Howard
“In fairness, you didn’t mention that mortgage rates were 20% for a few weeks in 1981”

+++
Try again jealous Howie.
Most people get loans and mortgages over several years.

The high interest rates in the 80’s crushed the housing sales and prices for almost a decade.
A friend had a new truck he was paying 23.75% interest for 4 years…. typical for that decade.
Boomers were ubermen compared to the whining “good job” , equality empowerment milksops of today.
You’re so much happier now that you’re all equal.

Feb 1st and the bank line ups were huge at 2pm…..so I guess the multibillion dollar govt CERB handouts haven’t run their course yet.

And the rich get richer.
Life is unfair.
Get over it.

#202 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

#80 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 4:35 pm
#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

No wonder the kids hate the Boomers. We had it handed to us on a plate.

————-

Bullshit. Self-defeating apologist attitude. What was done then can be done now, probably easier.

———-

Oh yeah? You mean people today can get things easier such as:
Defined benefit pension
Reasonably priced home
Decent union job just out of high school
Decent job just out of University
Set up a local newspaper (as Garth did)
Gasoline without paying a carbon tax

Two generations ago, one parent worked.
One generation ago, both worked.
In this generation, you need two really good incomes to afford the standard of living they had one generation ago. With academic inflation, a university degree means less and less to employers.

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

#203 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 8:51 am

Hey Dolce,

Don’t agree with the EU jumping the queue ahead of the UK when the latter got their act together to build manufacturing capacity in their own country and develop and approve a vaccine faster.

But I’d say your pessimism regarding Canada getting them soon is well-placed.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/john-ivison-ominous-rumblings-about-eu-vaccine-export-ban-could-prove-bad-for-canadians-and-trudeau-government

My favourite comment:

“However, as the opposition peppered her with questions, it became apparent that the verbal assurances the minister has received aren’t worth the paper they’re not written on.”

Perfectly captures the essence of the current federal government. They’re really, really good at…talking.

#204 Phylis on 02.02.21 at 8:59 am

#196 NoName on 02.02.21 at 8:10 am
@working forever…

…plus the aluminum transfers the heat better.

Are you sure about that, and on a side note mas production of copper radiator for cars stopped way back in 70s…

Xx-xx
The trick to a well designed radiator is in the centers. The geometry of the centers has numerous parameters to control. At least that’s what Lisa told me. Fun times back then.

#205 Dharma Bum on 02.02.21 at 9:04 am

You know you’re a geezer when you read that others are asking what Zellers is!

Great nostalgia. It’s corny but I have fond memories of those days.

I had a 1969 Cutlass Supreme (it was my mom’s car – I got it in ’76 when she graduated to a Volvo). I hung mini skates from the mirror, and had racing stripes painted on the hood and trunk. It had a “fastback”. It could burn rubber like nobody’s business. Peeling out was cool. Doing donuts and squealing fishtails was my specialty.

Driving around hammered was not a criminal offence.
You could get a ticket though.

Back then, I used to watch Garth on TV.

Some things don’t change.

#206 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 9:24 am

hi Jag, thanks for the book recommendation, I checked it out and will give it a read! Ngo may be no angel, but anyone who calls out Antifa is to be commended. They’re scarier than the far right, as at least one can see Nazis for what they are – unlike Antifa, they’re not usually screaming “No hate, no fear” while they beat a journalist near to death. To paraphrase Lewis, “…those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.”

————————————–

@Ponzi,

I was so touched by your concern about the Covid situation in Czech Republic yesterday, that I wanted to reassure you that we do have some hope on the horizon. I know how you worry all the time, poor thing!

Plan is currently to start churning out another candidate, Novavax, by April.

https://www.praguemorning.cz/czech-vaccine/

Big plant only 40km outside of Prague. 89.3% efficacy according to the Phase 3 trials, which were done in the UK while the more virulent variant was present.

Fingers crossed, there will be some left over to send to Canada to help out with the shortages. On those carbon-burning cargo planes flown by bus drivers using science and expertise.

Your prayers are being answered!

#207 Keen Reader on 02.02.21 at 9:41 am

#190 BillyBob – Easy-peasy: new plane type, so only TP/EIS pilots can be TRI/TRE (under validation), until company TRIs log enough time/sectors. By law, EPNER grads can fly any DGAC-cert aircraft. Most CAAs treat tier-1 TPS grads (USNTPS for me) similarly. Next, “working with” meant flight-testing with/on behalf of these orgs, not “hired”.

In my current org, EIS are fun assignments, paying me to fly for months from places I planned to visit in retirement. So I work “at” multiple airlines, but not “for” them. And yes, many trainees make twice my salary, after conversion to CAD. Still wouldn’t trade spots. BTW, I flew my first-ever airline sector directly as PIC, with the company CP as my SIC, before moving onto other trainees. Lots of mistakes and grey hair over the years, but learned a ton from the best of your community and thoroughly enjoyed my time “at” each airline.
BTW2 – smell-test issues should be COVID-checked! Cheers!

#208 IHCTD9 on 02.02.21 at 9:44 am

#174 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 10:25 pm
#126 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 6:53 pm
#66 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 4:04 pm
Talking about innocence:
The End of the Innocence / Don Henley
— —-

A great tune, that never gets any airplay these days…
————-
I know, a fricking classic.
But all we get now is hip hop, where every song has the same beat.
And no piano.
___

We might be saved by Gen Z. My 18 y/o is right into Metallica, AC/DC, and Classical stuff like Holst and Rossini, while my 16 y/o likes to play “boogie woogie” on the piano, loves Little Richard, and watches stuff like the Simpsons, The Office, Star Trek TNG – all 80’s – 90’s stuff. I once saw him really laughing at his iPad, so I walked over to see what he was watching. It was Abbott and Costello’s “who’s on first?” routine :).

I think the all encompassing, nearly free availability of all music and entertainment to Gen Z’ers is really going to shape them differently than all generations before them. Both of my kids have just as much (if not more) decades old stuff in their entertainment preferences as contemporary.

#209 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 9:45 am

@#204 BillyBob
“Perfectly captures the essence of the current federal government. They’re really, really good at…talking.”

+++

It’s not just the Feds.
All levels of govt. excel at the “non answer bs.”
I particularly love the fed/prov/muni bureaucrats that fall back on ” We can’t discuss this due to privacy conflicts” when some family member is standing in front of the cameras demanding answers on how some govt agency screw up caused the death of a loved one.
If that was the private sector causing a death the govt would be all over it like ugly on ape.

Most corporations large enough to have an H.R. Dept. seemed to have “drank the kool-aid” and followed their govt brothers in “doublespeak”.

#210 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 9:59 am

@#207 Shawn
“…… a white 1982 Cutlass Supreme. It was a total cloud rider….”
+++++

I owned a 1977 Ford Ridieu 500 for about a year.
It was a 21 ft long land yacht….canary yellow with a lime green vinyl roof….hideous color scheme…..floated down the highway sucking gas like a tank .
No one challenged the Battle Star Galactica in heavy traffic…..

It was a two door that you NEVER parked uphill or the door was a 5ft long beast to push open.

#211 Practice Pork on 02.02.21 at 10:00 am

No one will touch the “ Trudeau-vax built in haste by an untested company with zero history of vaccine production in Montreal. This is just another Trudeau bungled attempt to get out from under his own blundering incompetance. Reading the fine print it says the experimental vax won’t be ready “ until the scheduled inoculation in September. Just more bullshit from the Trudeau goons.

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/federal-government-signs-deal-to-make-novavax-covid-vaccine-at-montreal-facility-still-being-built

I know you don’t want to let it through Garth but you must be a little constipated knowing that by supporting Trudeau you’re conspiring to kill children. Good end to your career buddy.

#212 Diamond Dog on 02.02.21 at 10:00 am

Enjoyed your post Garth, got something out of it, thanks for that. Sounds like you’ve lived a few lifetimes in one and have been blessed along the way, good for you.

What a world is right. Speaking of which, we’ve got a March correction coming up beginning from this Month’s peak on and it ends with approved stimulus. The market rebounds into summer or fall and likely crashes. Not sure if you caught Jeremy Grantham’s latest take, he explains it better than I can and so he should! Jeremy is damn near old as dirt and his take on market history reflects it. The interview is quite good:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYfmRTyl56w&t=242s

#213 Don Guillermo on 02.02.21 at 10:07 am

#180 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.01.21 at 11:30 pm
Might have even taught me some discipline going forward.
————–
Remember the times.
The Texan Oil Barons, the Hunt Brothers, tried to corner the silver market.
*************************************
History recalls that did not turn out too well.
Many novice investors got burned.
But they did not learn.
BreX was lurking in the shadows
**************************************
Exactly, years later I passed by the little BreX office with big gold letters daily on my way to work. I didn’t jump in but many younger folks around me did.

#214 IHCTD9 on 02.02.21 at 10:07 am

#205 Phylis on 02.02.21 at 8:59 am
#196 NoName on 02.02.21 at 8:10 am
@working forever…

…plus the aluminum transfers the heat better.

Are you sure about that, and on a side note mas production of copper radiator for cars stopped way back in 70s…

Xx-xx
The trick to a well designed radiator is in the centers. The geometry of the centers has numerous parameters to control. At least that’s what Lisa told me. Fun times back then.
_____

I think copper is #1 for heat transfer – but it weighs a ton, and these days it costs a mint. I froze an engine with a copper rad once, but drove it anyway. I got no heat inside the car at all, but the temp gauge became pegged. I ended up blowing a 10″ rip between the end tank and core at the factory seam. It was an easy fix. A new rad today would have been junk – but they are cheap to replace.

A well built copper/brass rad can last damn near forever though. The rad in my small dozer is 70 years old, and is still in perfect working order – It cools a 140 ci engine, and weighs about 40 lbs.

#215 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 10:22 am

#203 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

Oh yeah? You mean people today can get things easier such as:
Defined benefit pension
Reasonably priced home
Decent union job just out of high school
Decent job just out of University
Set up a local newspaper (as Garth did)
Gasoline without paying a carbon tax

Two generations ago, one parent worked.
One generation ago, both worked.
In this generation, you need two really good incomes to afford the standard of living they had one generation ago. With academic inflation, a university degree means less and less to employers.

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

————–

Let’s just say that the stagecoach guild did not do well after the car appeared. And when’s the last time you used a manual typewriter? Also, it’s good for every adult to work.

Times change. People adapt. Or they choose to mythicize the past. Always the same.

Ends meet, you say? In Pakistan it can be a bucket of grain a week and tin-roofed shack. Every westerner llives the life of royalty in comparison.

#216 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 10:28 am

#209 Keen Reader on 02.02.21 at 9:41 am
#190 BillyBob – Easy-peasy: new plane type, so only TP/EIS pilots can be TRI/TRE (under validation), until company TRIs log enough time/sectors. By law, EPNER grads can fly any DGAC-cert aircraft. Most CAAs treat tier-1 TPS grads (USNTPS for me) similarly. Next, “working with” meant flight-testing with/on behalf of these orgs, not “hired”.

In my current org, EIS are fun assignments, paying me to fly for months from places I planned to visit in retirement. So I work “at” multiple airlines, but not “for” them. And yes, many trainees make twice my salary, after conversion to CAD. Still wouldn’t trade spots. BTW, I flew my first-ever airline sector directly as PIC, with the company CP as my SIC, before moving onto other trainees. Lots of mistakes and grey hair over the years, but learned a ton from the best of your community and thoroughly enjoyed my time “at” each airline.
BTW2 – smell-test issues should be COVID-checked! Cheers!

================================

Aha! Yeah, the EIS stuff is pretty esoteric, I enjoyed doing delivery flights to Dubai, more free logoed crap that I can give away. But that was plenty close enough to “new” as I ever wanted, give me a machine with the bugs worked out, please. Was there from Day 1 when they introduced the A380 and what…an…absolute…nightmare. Good riddance.

The gent I referred to earlier graduated National I think it’s called? TP school but not military if I recall. I’m far too stupid and lazy, didn’t have the grades or drive to delve into the theory enough, and love money too much for that to have ever been my path. I went into aviation to avoid offices and classrooms, not live in them. My last couple gigs were DEC and yeah, I think many people would be surprised to know that the first time most pilots fly an actual airliner is with paying passengers.

On the other hand you could have Googled everything you wrote, so…viva la Internet, where one can be anything they want hahah!

Appropos of nothing, wowsa:

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-55900622

Hopefully we’ll join Hungary and buy this one too!

#217 IHCTD9 on 02.02.21 at 10:42 am

#186 Nonplused on 02.02.21 at 12:45 am
#147 IHCTD9 on 02.01.21 at 7:37 pm

I will give you the GM trucks. It seems the big three can still make trucks.
___

I’ll agree with that one, Ford/GM/RAM own the full size truck market. The Tundra is the only thing that looks like competition for the big three, but they are not stepping up near enough.

Look at RAM – Chrysler has stepped up huge. I’ve never been a Dodge/RAM fan, but that new interior in the Limited /Long Horn and all the other stuff they’ve packed in there is finally starting to make me think twice. It’s such a damn nice vehicle, even before you count in the utility offered by a 4×4 truck.

It’s an S class sedan that can tow, haul, never gets stuck, and gives up nothing when it comes to luxury and features. Eventually, the RAM will be made with aluminum too like the GM/Ford trucks are, so you can add “will never rust” to the list as well. Finally, option the 3.0 ecodeisel and the near 3 ton beast will get 30 mpg highway on top of it all.

I could be happy with any of the domestic offerings for a full size truck these days. All of them are sweet!

#218 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 10:49 am

Last comment but please Garth, post something on GME tomorrow, it’s cratering as I type lol…down 65% so far and falling.

“HOLD FAST DIAMOND HANDS TO THE MOON!!”

Um. no.

#219 Howard on 02.02.21 at 11:06 am

#216 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 10:22 am
#203 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

Oh yeah? You mean people today can get things easier such as:
Defined benefit pension
Reasonably priced home
Decent union job just out of high school
Decent job just out of University
Set up a local newspaper (as Garth did)
Gasoline without paying a carbon tax

Two generations ago, one parent worked.
One generation ago, both worked.
In this generation, you need two really good incomes to afford the standard of living they had one generation ago. With academic inflation, a university degree means less and less to employers.

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

————–

Let’s just say that the stagecoach guild did not do well after the car appeared. And when’s the last time you used a manual typewriter? Also, it’s good for every adult to work.

Times change. People adapt. Or they choose to mythicize the past. Always the same.

Ends meet, you say? In Pakistan it can be a bucket of grain a week and tin-roofed shack. Every westerner llives the life of royalty in comparison.

—————————

That’s a nice list of non sequiturs. Pakistan? Really?

He was responding specifically to your claim that things are EASIER today, for young Canadians, than for the Boomers in previous decades.

#220 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 11:19 am

#216 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 10:22 am
#203 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

Oh yeah? You mean people today can get things easier such as:
Defined benefit pension
Reasonably priced home
Decent union job just out of high school
Decent job just out of University
Set up a local newspaper (as Garth did)
Gasoline without paying a carbon tax

Two generations ago, one parent worked.
One generation ago, both worked.
In this generation, you need two really good incomes to afford the standard of living they had one generation ago. With academic inflation, a university degree means less and less to employers.

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

————–

Let’s just say that the stagecoach guild did not do well after the car appeared. And when’s the last time you used a manual typewriter? Also, it’s good for every adult to work.

Times change. People adapt. Or they choose to mythicize the past. Always the same.

Ends meet, you say? In Pakistan it can be a bucket of grain a week and tin-roofed shack. Every westerner llives the life of royalty in comparison.

———

What does your response have to do with comparing the plight of baby boomers to Millennials? I thought you were arguing Millennials had it just as easy if not easier than Boomers. Not that Millennials have it easier than people in a 3rd world country. Don’t change the subject.

#221 IHCTD9 on 02.02.21 at 11:57 am

#203 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?
____

YOLO on GME?

Seriously though, I am surrounded by Mils who are doing great. These are generally married, 2 income and all are not living in a big urban center, most have kids.

1. A welder/fitter married to a health care worker, 120K/year, 650.00 mortgage payment for a small house just down the road.

2. Two married high school teachers, 160K income, 2500.00 mortgage one town over.

3. Construction business owner and retail worker, 135K income, paid for house they built themselves – down the road the other way, high school education, and they started out very young.

4. Summer Campground operator/maintainer, part time and odd job doers, 40K income, zero mortgage, beautiful timber framed cottagey home he built for peanuts over a 6 year period overlooking a small lake north of 7. Super low cost of living (my Sis and BIL).

They all earn enough where they live to prosper. Incomes vary, methods vary, skills vary, locations vary – results? They’re the same.

It should be clear by now that loading up on school debt and then working in places like YVR/YYZ is a bad plan for probably 90+%. These jobs just don’t pay enough anymore – outside a shrinking handful.

The next generation will make ends meet by doing some variation of what the local to me Mils are doing. That pretty much amounts to stacking life’s deck in their favour from the outset, instead of shooting themselves in the foot, just as the race begins.

#222 Alberta Ed on 02.02.21 at 12:11 pm

We ink-stained wretches share a lot of memories. I still can still hear the Linotypes clattering and the printing press thundering away… 50 years ago.

#223 DON on 02.02.21 at 12:11 pm

#199 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 8:26 am
From today’s issue of the National Post:
“Canadians may need to brace themselves for higher borrowing costs earlier than expected.

That’s the message from economists at some of Canada’s largest banks after a report Friday showed gross domestic product grew more quickly than anticipated at the end of 2020, even amid a new wave of lockdowns. The numbers are calling into question whether a first-quarter contraction will materialize after all, and leading analysts to suggest growth in 2021 could be stronger than earlier believed.

They also threaten to put pressure on the Bank of Canada to reconsider how quickly it expects to withdraw stimulus.

The central bank has pledged to keep interest rates near zero until slack is fully absorbed, something it doesn’t see happening until 2023. But stronger growth could lead to an economy running at full capacity earlier than the two-year timeline, which may prompt policy-makers to bring rate hike expectations forward.

The data carry “potentially strong policy implications for the bank of Canada that is increasingly looking as if it over-committed itself to keeping rates on hold until 2023,” derek Holt, an economist at bank of Nova Scotia, said in a report to investors. “The prudent thing to advise heavily indebted Canadians is to plan their finances around rate hikes commencing considerably sooner.”

Now where have you read that before? – Garth

*************
I think i saw a putty cat…i did i did see a putty cat.

Thanks JAG sending article to little sis…who lives below her means and resists the FOMO on everything.

@ Garth

Inspiring story Garth.

#224 Keen Reader on 02.02.21 at 12:13 pm

#217 BillyBob – Yep, NTPS in Mojave – easy Google find! Indeed, I’m hiding in my mom’s basement, using the same handle and evolving storyline for over 20 years on Garth’s different blogs… Work email clears this easily, if you open your kimono first ;o)

Sputnik-V has a bit more traditional approach than mRNA crops of vaccines, and potentially offers longer protection. Sounds appealing, but I saw no data on immunity, compared to low 30’s for mRNA. Time will tell for each. Can’t wait for this whole thing to fade, so people stop fighting each other over masks, vax and travel. Keeps TurnerNation very busy, though! Cheers

#225 IHCTD9 on 02.02.21 at 12:25 pm

#221 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 10:49 am
Last comment but please Garth, post something on GME tomorrow, it’s cratering as I type lol…down 65% so far and falling.

“HOLD FAST DIAMOND HANDS TO THE MOON!!”

Um. no.
_______

They’re all crazy over there – but the humor is top notch. All these little “voice over” vids they’re posting are hilarious! The gorilla one is great :)

#226 KLNR on 02.02.21 at 12:29 pm

@#223 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 11:19 am
#216 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 10:22 am
#203 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am

Oh yeah? You mean people today can get things easier such as:
Defined benefit pension
Reasonably priced home
Decent union job just out of high school
Decent job just out of University
Set up a local newspaper (as Garth did)
Gasoline without paying a carbon tax

Two generations ago, one parent worked.
One generation ago, both worked.
In this generation, you need two really good incomes to afford the standard of living they had one generation ago. With academic inflation, a university degree means less and less to employers.

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

————–

Let’s just say that the stagecoach guild did not do well after the car appeared. And when’s the last time you used a manual typewriter? Also, it’s good for every adult to work.

Times change. People adapt. Or they choose to mythicize the past. Always the same.

Ends meet, you say? In Pakistan it can be a bucket of grain a week and tin-roofed shack. Every westerner llives the life of royalty in comparison.

———

What does your response have to do with comparing the plight of baby boomers to Millennials? I thought you were arguing Millennials had it just as easy if not easier than Boomers. Not that Millennials have it easier than people in a 3rd world country. Don’t change the subject.

he’s trolling you.
that’s his game on here.

#227 Penny Henny on 02.02.21 at 12:35 pm

#119 Ed on 02.01.21 at 6:33 pm
Sail Away

At $600/day in quarantine it’s pretty easy to make a case for staying in Hawaii

I’ve been in Hawaii since Dec 2nd, not returning till early July as it will take my boat about 22 days to return.
//////////////

In that situation you can make a case that you already quarantined for more than the required 14 days.

#228 Penny Henny on 02.02.21 at 12:45 pm

#134 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:14 pm

I was pretty hopeful as of Friday. My hope comes from the fact that places that have high vaccination rates are seeing great results. So, if Canada can manage to get its vaccination act together, there’s a chance this whole show ends before next winter. But then I did some reading on the current thinking and evidence about the new variants. The discouraging news is that they present a substantial risk to this timeline if we let up now.

/////////////

Don’t worry Faron, only 28 more days.
And mandatory border quarantines are here to stay.
Travel is now only for the well off.

#229 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 12:47 pm

#222 Howard on 02.02.21 at 11:06 am
#216 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 10:22 am

Ends meet, you say? In Pakistan it can be a bucket of grain a week and tin-roofed shack. Every westerner llives the life of royalty in comparison.

————

That’s a nice list of non sequiturs. Pakistan? Really?

He was responding specifically to your claim that things are EASIER today, for young Canadians, than for the Boomers in previous decades.

————

Correct, Pakistan. Animals, including human animals, need very little to subsist.

A dog is perfectly happy in either a tent in the woods or an opulent house. Take a lesson from the dog.

If you want more, then go and get more. Geez. Everybody wakes up stupid some days. The beauty is that there’s no need to stay that way. Don’t fight to get in the turd sandwich restaurant (props to Soggy).

#230 Howard on 02.02.21 at 1:00 pm

#232 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 12:47 pm

Thanks for the lesson in minimalism. But what does that have to do with your assertion that things are easier for young Canadians today than was the case for young Canadians in the 70s and 80s? By what metrics are you basing that?

#231 Gravy Train on 02.02.21 at 1:01 pm

#196 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 7:58 am
“Oh, here is a link to an article that plugs Andy’s book, case you are interested.”

#209 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 9:24 am
“hi Jag, thanks for the book recommendation, I checked it out and will give it a read!”

I can recommend—and I think you’ll both like—these two books:
The Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith, and
• A Theory of Justice by John Rawls.

#232 Penny Henny on 02.02.21 at 1:12 pm

#213 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.02.21 at 9:59 am

I owned a 1977 Ford Ridieu 500 for about a year.

??

like this a one?

http://smog-era.com/meteor-1973-to-1983/meteor-rideau-500-of-the-smog-era/

#233 Penny Henny on 02.02.21 at 1:14 pm

#170 The West on 02.01.21 at 9:07 pm
I worked at a sod farm for one whole summer (it was grueling work, I was 15) to buy my grandfather’s 1989 Buick New Yorker for $450.

////////////

Did you mean Chrysler New Yorker?
or maybe Buick Park Avenue?

#234 Faron on 02.02.21 at 1:22 pm

#179 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 10:46 pm

#149 Faron on 02.01.21 at 7:54 pm

almost certainly wrong

About what exactly? And my demeanor here has little to do with my in-person demeanor as I hope is that case for you lest your friends and family suffer a raging egomaniac with a predilection for “genius” strong men.

#192 BillyBob on 02.02.21 at 4:21 am

Again with the straw man attacks. I have never defended “unnecessary” travel

You termed the PM “punch face” after an announcement accompanied by shut-downs of sun-travel that made the aim of the proclamation clear. As always on the internet, we are talking past each other. Regardless, the numerous examples of sun travellers just on this comments section kind of makes it clear why this order is being put in place.

As for your friend’s tragic yet common situation. Yes, that sucks. I’ve been there. There are currently compassionate travel exceptions in place. They could also jump a plane now if it’s really that important to them, but maybe they need to schedule the death into their lives. Understandable.

Maybe instead of armchair QBing and going straight to “punch face” you could assume that your gov’t actually does think about these things or at the very least will respond to them by modifying the policy. And if they don’t modify policy there is recourse citizens can take. You clearly have zero clue how policy is put in place. If you think the PM just walks down the steps and wings it, you’ve been watching Trump too long. You simply fit the announcement to your “punch face” narrative and are running with it. Hard.

Regardless, think back to the last time Canadians lost tens of thousands in a global event. Yeah, WWII. I don’t have the facts in front of me, but I reckon if you wanted to bibbity boop across the ocean to see grandma take her last breaths it would have been hard to get a visa.

I really do know some highly suitable baby mommas in Victoria.

Juuuust keep shoving that foot deeper in your mouth bud. Who knew pilots are so flexible!?

It’s hilarious watching you call Keen Reader a fraud. That’s making you look like a real stud.

I take back my glorified school bus driver comment. I regret that. But, I’ll only do so in exchange for not schooling you on how little you know about science, applied science and the relevance of scientific research on many things including everything you do in on or around aircraft starting with Bernoulli. Pointing out how reliant your career is on science while calling my and other scientists work irrelevant and/or esoteric is, just, wow.

#195 the Jaguar on 02.02.21 at 7:52 am

BillyBob, what is the beady eyed, climate change, ginger arse goin’ on about now? I’m trying to enjoy my Cuba Libre here on Varadero beach while reading Andy Ngo’s new book. Sigh.

Yeah, stay out of it Jaguar. Keep up or stay immaterial. Stand up for female intellect or cower behind BillyBob’s Epaulettes. Doesn’t matter to me.

#235 Real Men Drive Kias and Wear Man Buns, They Don't Ride Harleys on 02.02.21 at 1:24 pm

And we wouldn’t be caught dead driving a Cutlass.

Or anything maroon.

#236 Faron on 02.02.21 at 1:37 pm

#233 Howard on 02.02.21 at 1:00 pm

#232 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 12:47 pm

Thanks for the lesson in minimalism. But what does that have to do with your assertion that things are easier for young Canadians today than was the case for young Canadians in the 70s and 80s? By what metrics are you basing that?

SA’s using the ol’ “if you can afford a smartphone” trope. Yes, humans can live, laugh, love in dirt-floor huts under repressive regimes with scarce food for days or weeks and water filled with bacteria. They can also have life expectancies 80% of ours, die without teeth, education, and maybe without food. But I guess that’s all equivalent because they live, laugh, loved?

The equivalent within western society is, I dunno, iphone, cheetos, and TV? There’s a vast class of americans and Canadians for whom achieving your (SA) level of wealth is almost as faint a hope as the pakistani person living in the dirt floored hut. And the life expectancy to match. But I guess that’s okay because they have iphones, cheetos and TV?

#237 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 1:47 pm

#233 Howard on 02.02.21 at 1:00 pm
#232 Sail Away on 02.02.21 at 12:47 pm

Thanks for the lesson in minimalism. But what does that have to do with your assertion that things are easier for young Canadians today than was the case for young Canadians in the 70s and 80s? By what metrics are you basing that?

———–

Well, I’ve only been here for 15 years, so don’t know about the 70s and 80s. I’ve found it fairly easy to succeed between 2006 and now, but granted, it wasn’t completely handed on a silver platter.

I guess if everybody in Canada was given all their heart desired in the 70s and 80s, including wads of cash, houses and vehicles, then maybe it was easier then.

#238 Faron on 02.02.21 at 1:52 pm

For those enjoying the GME debacle. Google “bag holder quotes”. There’s also RampCapital who is downright funny in a finance nerd lite kinda way:

SA, don’t take this personally.

Ramp Capital @RampCapitalLLC

I’m just glad what is currently happening in $GME could never happen to $TSLA

#239 SoggyShorts on 02.02.21 at 2:38 pm

#204 Piano_Man87 on 02.02.21 at 8:45 am
#80 Sail Away on 02.01.21 at 4:35 pm
#60 Old Ron on 02.01.21 at 3:36 pm

What do you think the next generation is going to have to do to make ends meet?

***********************
Work a trade.
By the time a Zoomer graduates university another zoomer with 4 years experience is making 60K+ with zero debt.
If you can’t “make ends meet” with that you’re doing something very wrong.

From there the potential to make more is readily available:
♦Become a master of your craft-making 80K+
♦Take on some risk and become a sub-contractor to make 80-110K
♦Take on more risk and start your own trade company to make even more (or fail)

Supply and demand work for labor too. If university grads are a dime a dozen and “forced to serve coffee while construction crews are scrambling to find good help, why fight it?

#240 Barb on 02.02.21 at 3:21 pm

Before we bought the 2015 Tacoma (which I love!!!!), I had a 1979 Olds Cutlass Supreme. Beautiful and fabulous car except the rotors were always “going”. Sold it with only 106K on it.

Even had to sleep in it one night when I chaperoned a bunch of Jobie’s girls at “nite trek” at Mabel Lake, Lumby. I was not going to sleep in their makeshift tent/tarp strung between poplar saplings…in the rain.

Turns out the DeMolay boys were camped a mile away down the lake. It wasn’t called Nite TREK because they were going to stay there. But that’s another story.

#241 westcdn on 02.03.21 at 2:26 am

I wrote a while back that I baked bread and muffins in her honor. She did succeed in teaching me how to make bread. I just refused to let her know plus I did not like kneading. I sensed a future problem if I let on. It is still a life skill although the right amount of yeast remains an issue and one I can solve.

A magnificent women who would eat dirt for me. She gave me lots of room to roam and was my number 1 fan. I remember her getting angry when the neighbor tried to demonize me saying my ears were large – actually true.

I did things for her she did not know such going out of my way to killing mice and snakes which scared her. I did not take joy in it but she was more important to me than them.

#242 Cutlass for Life on 02.03.21 at 3:21 am

Long time lurker but a sucker for car stories.

I bought a brand new 76 Cutlass S when I was 18, and drove it daily for 10 years before I bought another car so I could preserve it. I still have it today. Did pretty much what Garth preaches and retired at 54 in 2012. I kept my auto costs low by buying new, paying cash and then driving them at 10 to 15 years. Similarily, traded up in houses only 3 times, when markets were slow and cheaper – some luck there.