Stress buster

More hunks of the 905 went into lockdown this week. Windsor, too. Plus Calgary, Edmonton, most of Quebec. Germany on Wednesday. LA a few days ago. Westjet and Air Canada have chopped flights. Commuter rail traffic in Toronto is down over 90%. No Christmas this year. “Blame me,” said Manitoba premier Brian Pallister in a gritty address. But it’s not him. It’s everywhere.

Did we think in March this would be here in December? Or the second wave would be deeper than the first? Three million people in the nation are still without work. Small business is on life support. I hear school grades are falling most everywhere. Online learning doesn’t work. Kids need kids.

Hope may be in the window. The first vaccine arrived yesterday. But it will be the summer, at best, before enough have been inoculated to bring change. Experts says we’ll still be masked a year from now.

So the pandemic is endless. It has brought not only heartbreak and loss to twelve thousand families in Canada, but isolation and stress to us all.  Do you feel it? A third of people now report enough extra tension to impact their daily lives. No wonder. Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it.

Masks are essential. But they remind us constantly of the state of emergency enveloping society, and render it impossible to see a smile, a cocked lip or those little wrinkles of welcome in a familiar face. The virus makes us fear everyone, everything. Physical distancing. People leaping off a sidewalk to avoid you. Signs saying don’t pet someone else’s dog or to sanitize your hands when entering any door. There’s panic hearing a random cough or sneeze. Temperature checks are forced on you. Capacity limits and plastic barriers everywhere. There’s no escape.

Experts say this triggers the body into a fear mode, as being in a constant state of danger. Over time – and it’s been months now – it can accelerate aging and the risk of diseases accompanying that process. Because there’s no normal anymore – no work for many, no certainty of school, seeing friends, travel, church, routine – we’re constantly a little disoriented. Just enough to impact confidence or trigger a sense of rejection. No sitting in Timmies with friends. No people-watching in the mall. No shared lunches at work. No praying, drinking, skating or playing together.

Not getting dressed for work is no longer a relief. It’s a trap. PJs, sweats and pants you wear for eight days because, well, why not… they become the clothing of an inmate. Cut off from society, we feel less professional, less engaged, even less judged. Online conferencing can’t show your shoes or share your fragrance. We’re less human without the nuances of our physical beings.

Now it’s December and it’s easy to regret this world. Empty downtown streets, closed stores, no clogged roads or busy subways and airports plus UPS/FedEx guys who ring the doorbell and run. And layer on this the personal setbacks we all face. An ill child. Getting old. A beloved animal companion who sickens and dies. No wonder we feel this way. Covid may not sicken many, but it has stricken us all.

What to do?

Stop being angry about it. Raging against masks or immunization, politicians who order lockdowns or shopkeepers imposing rules is pointless, fruitless and just isolates you further. This is not anybody’s fault – not the prime minister, not China or globalists. The virus is a virus. It has no politics, religion, agenda or purpose other than to spread and infect as widely as possible. Stop weaponizing it.

Look for some of the good coming out of the mess. It’s there if you’re an investor, for example. Financial markets have romped higher. Plus your house is probably worth a lot more as mortgage rates went down and property lust went up. It’s a big irony most people emerge from the pandemic better off, even as others suffer so much. It’s a good reason not only to be grateful, but to be charitable. If you help someone else you will feel so much better.

Think ahead. Pandemics are temporary. They always end. Modern pharma cut the development time for effective vaccines from ten years to nine months. That was a miracle. So is the new messenger technology, which could save many lives from many threats. Billions of people will be dosed in the next year. The pathogen will end up sulking in dark corners, gone from your life, defeated by science.

Finally, reflect on what we lost to Covid – what you miss. Shopping freely. Visiting family. Shaking hands. Riding the crowded streetcar. Going to a concert, a play, a club or a hockey game. Travelling for business or a vacay. Seeing faces. Going to work. Sending your child to school with no mask or anxiety. Restaurants without plexiglass walls. Making friends. Sharing your dog.

All that is coming. The patina of life. Hold on.

201 comments ↓

#1 Dave on 12.14.20 at 3:18 pm

By the time life is back to normal….end of 2021 real estate will have become so expensive that all middle class is poorer.

Housing costs have destroyed Canada….covid made it worse.

#2 WFH on 12.14.20 at 3:23 pm

Work from home?

No. More like back to normal.

#3 just a dude on 12.14.20 at 3:24 pm

Garth,

Excellent message of hope, perspective and gratitude. Very much needed during these dark times. Thank you, Sir.

#4 Ottawan on 12.14.20 at 3:28 pm

Last night I had this dream about you,
In this dream, I’m dancing right beside you,
And it looked like everyone was having fun,
The kind of feeling I’ve waited so long,

Digital Love, By Daft Punk

#5 Carla on 12.14.20 at 3:30 pm

Thank you for your message of hope and gratitude. Be well.

#6 "NUTS!" on 12.14.20 at 3:33 pm

A lovely perspective amidst radical viewpoints, thanks for providing some grounding in a sea of misinformation.

Be nice people,

#7 Flop... on 12.14.20 at 3:33 pm

Howmuch put their latest visualization up.

Probably a pretty good one right about now showing the amount in increase in total retail sales since the start of the century, and perhaps more importantly the dramatic increase in e-commerce.

E-commerce was less than 1% of the pie in the year 2000, after creeping up to 10.9% last year, they have it currently pegged at 14%, but could rise above 15% after the dust settles after the holiday period.

What?

And give up getting shouted at by someone telling you to stand on a dot, no way…

M46BC

“Visualizing Over 20 Years of Retail Sales and E-Commerce in the U.S. Retail Industry.

The coronavirus pandemic is once again causing new widespread business lockdowns. For lots of people, this means the only way to order Christmas gifts is through the Internet. However, the consumer shift to e-commerce instead of in-person shopping is a long-standing trend, as our most recent visualization makes clear.”

https://howmuch.net/articles/timeline-retail-sales-growth-US

#8 Love_The_Cottage on 12.14.20 at 3:35 pm

Shaking hands was always a germ sharing and disgusting practice. Let’s hope that doesn’t come back.

As the Georgia Satellites said – keep your hands to yourself.

#9 CjohnC on 12.14.20 at 3:38 pm

The patina of life….what a great, thought provoking choice of words

#10 mj on 12.14.20 at 3:40 pm

the government should either close everything down completely for 2 weeks, give everyone a warning to have enough food , medication and supplies for one month. Or keep everything open and know we will have consequences. Doing it like they are doing is not helping. With the borders closed, how are people still traveling in and out of Canada, I read that some snowbirds still plan on traveling to Florida.

#11 Lockdown Forever on 12.14.20 at 3:42 pm

Even with 100% Covid vaccination, we will experience lockdowns for a long time. This is based upon the use of the PCR test for case reporting. The present test is sensitive and does not allow for a range of viral load.
It will pickup dead nucleotides and amplify them to give a positive result but the individual does not have active Covid. Since we have lived with coronaviruses likely forever, there will always be a large number of cases reported. I’m with Bill Gates when he says we will not go back to normal until 2022 but for a different reason.
Adapt to the new normal until the test has a gradation index of viral load. I’ve adapted, don’t go anywhere and live in a mountain ski town where I can recreate everyday of the year and work online. I feel for those who have lost their livelihood.

#12 TRUMP IS OUR JESUS! on 12.14.20 at 3:45 pm

But yet, in spite of the destabilizing effects on mental health, the isolation and fear, the contributors to this comments section continue to be grounded, rational and polite at all times, with no one typing in while wearing only their underwear and no conspiracy theories at all.

Truly, we are a model of modern resilience and brilliance.

#13 Pandemic my derriere on 12.14.20 at 3:50 pm

We are now at the end of the first cycle of this propagandized false flag event called a ‘virus pandemic,’ which began with a telegraphed fake pandemic and then became a fake casedemic. We are now at the end of the testing casedemic period; the very apparent next stage will be a claimed more deadly pandemic than the last, and the fraud will continue until total control over people can be realized. This is actually not a complicated plot, but it does rely on a weak, ignorant, and beaten down populace that is more interested in their smart phones and social network status than in their own liberty. How could any intelligent society fall into the trap of becoming such a pathetic and self-absorbed herd? Only by the destruction of intellect could this have taken place.

And when it comes to destruction of intellect, you are an inspiration. – Garth

#14 Alex on 12.14.20 at 3:52 pm

I agree. Need to focus on the positive.

My wife and I gave more to charity than ever before. It felt good indeed.

#15 Stone on 12.14.20 at 3:53 pm

My observations pre-covid:

Most people staring listlessly at their phone, drool running down from their mouth.

My observations during covid:

Most people staring listlessly at their phone, drool running down from their mouth although now covered by a mask.

Plus ca change, plus ca demeure pareil.

#16 Another Deckchair on 12.14.20 at 3:57 pm

A bit of a rant here, but it is bugging me.

I’m reading (again, the cycle repeats every 5-10 years) about hydrogen as being the next “green” fuel for cars and planes and trains and trucks.

Know where over 95% of the hydrogen comes from? Burning (e.g.) natural gas in a reduction environment, and taking the excess hydrogen and bottling that up.

Natural Gas is correctly a gas taxed as a “Carbon”. Which means 95++ % of the hydrogen bottled up in North America is subject to “Carbon Taxes”.

Sure, you can extract pure hydrogen from water with electrolysis, but

a) it’s energy inefficient (which is why Nat Gas is used)

b) where do you get the electricity; (burning coal??)

c) what do you do with the remainder of the “junk” (impurities in H2O),

d) How do you ship it? Hydrogen has an energy density of close to nothing compared to Diesel (or kerosene, which is basically what planes use)

Maybe (anarchic thought here) we should individually reduce our energy footprint (whatever the source) usage rather than purchasing a Hydrogen powered SUV…

Thanks or the place to air my rant… Over and out. ;-)

#17 Oracle of Ottawa on 12.14.20 at 3:58 pm

Always good to hear a voice of reason when you think things are getting out of hand. Stay the course.

#18 RyYYZ on 12.14.20 at 3:59 pm

Well, that was depressing. I can always count on you to cheer me up, lol. If we’re still having to wear masks a year from now, meaning that not enough people have been vaccinated for herd immunity a full year after the first vaccine shipments, well, that’s pretty poor IMO. I mean, considering how important for the economy, people’s sanity, children’s educations (nearly 2 years is an eternity when you’re a child), etc it is to achieve this.

#19 IHCTD9 on 12.14.20 at 4:01 pm

“…and render it impossible to see a smile, a cocked lip or those little wrinkles of welcome in a familiar face”
___

This is the part I hate most. I usually joke around with random folks when the opportunity presents itself. Restaurants, gas stations, grocery stores, convenience stores – you name it. It’s tough to do this when everyone is masked up.

#20 Bespoke on 12.14.20 at 4:02 pm

Finally, reflect on what we lost to Covid – what you miss.

Shopping freely. Last time I checked, my internet was still working.
Visiting family. Overrated. Once every year or two is quite enough.
Shaking hands. Silly custom anyway, touching people’s hands. Good riddance
Riding the crowded streetcar. Can’t say I missed that… Ever.
Going to a concert, a play, a club or a hockey game. Been doing fine without hockey… Thanks for reminding me how little I missed it!
Travelling for business or a vacay. Did tons of travel just before first shutdown. Got seasons passes for skiing so can’t leave anyway!
Seeing faces. Huh? Oh, faces. Sorry, I thought you said faeces.
Going to work. Retired in 2017, Omers commuted value came with me.
Sending your child to school with no mask or anxiety. Forgot to have children. Can’t relate.
Restaurants without plexiglass walls. Wouldn’t mind keeping those up permanently! Seriously, if it keeps little Johnny at bay!
Making friends. Not all it’s cracked up to be. I had one once, didn’t really care for it. Always ends in disappointment.
Sharing your dog. I prefer to borrow other people’s dogs. All the fun, none of the work!

I guess we really aren’t all in this together!

#21 Leo Trollstoy on 12.14.20 at 4:02 pm

If lockdowns worked during the spring, why do we need them now? And if lockdowns didn’t work in the spring, why do we need them now?

Asking for a friend

#22 RyYYZ on 12.14.20 at 4:03 pm

Meant to add – I can stand the working from home. The office didn’t have that much attraction for me. Maybe if I was still at my old job with colleagues I had worked with for years, but the new one not so much.

But combined with the lack of normal activities (shopping, restaurants, bars, sports), yeah, I’m feeling it. I’m not sure I can handle another year of living like this.

#23 RBull on 12.14.20 at 4:03 pm

Wonderful message Mr. Turner. Many of do have a lot to be thankful for and could offer more help to those who haven’t been as fortunate.

#24 Retired in Kelowna on 12.14.20 at 4:07 pm

Great Column Garth. Thank you for the words of inspiration. I hope you and Dorothy are well.

#25 Jay on 12.14.20 at 4:09 pm

March \ April \ May seems like a breeze compared to the dictatorship every government is becoming now. Back then there was talk of cohort families, getting outside to socialize with neighbors at a distance to keep our sanity, talk about the need to balance mental health and preventing spread. Not Anymore.

Alberta just said no outside gatherings after talk all summer long of a balanced approach. The media and left wing harassment has forced this after months of demanding shut down for ratings (no hospitals are not overloaded and we have not asked for field hospitals, that is made up trash journalism).

I fear mental health will take a very serious turn for the worse when you cant even share a glass of wine 20 feet away on your driveway with a neighbor or see your family at all, even outside spaced out around a fire, especially over Christmas.

A common sense assessment of risk would help us get through this, stop demanding pointless rules (WTF Manitoba). If 2 families have each been isolating in their houses for weeks, the virus just doesn’t spawn from thin air when they see each other outside. People picking up a toy bought at Costco next to the toilet paper and corned beef is not going to affect virus transmission at all.

Alas though, any ask for some sort of reasonable rules that focus on actually making a difference on the spread of the virus and your labelled an “anti masker” and dismissed, could this covid stuff become more of a cult?

#26 wallflower on 12.14.20 at 4:11 pm

I told mom in early March, gonna be two years of this. Gonna be bad. I wanted her to start mentally preparing for little to no social contact for two years. It helps when you can start thinking about it…versus whammo, here it is. Told her the Florida run in November would not be happening… told her the future planned cruise would be not happening. She didn’t quite get it but she now gets it.
I found it interesting that the least compliant group with the changes (in my experience) was the post 70 crowd. And that is the group requiring most protection!
Putting the two year frame on this makes it easier to deal with. Putting the four week frame on it … lurchingly painful.

#27 Irrefutable Evidence on 12.14.20 at 4:12 pm

DELETED

#28 Dolce Vita on 12.14.20 at 4:13 pm

You described LTC facility life for the elderly where truth be told, it’s where they go to die.

All that you say has been denied to us during this pandemic is denied to them because of being infirm. Average time they live in an LTC I was told by where my Mother was is 3 years, well at best.

She lasted 5 years needing 24/7 care. Went there 1 time per week at least. Cheered her up. Brought her home cooked Italian. Bought her clothes so she could look good, and so forth. Extended her life I think with some quality…well that’s what the LTC people told me.

A person needs to learn to do that not only for others but for themselves.

Turn in on yourself, be honest with yourself and love yourself for all that you are [good and bad] and then the rest is easy…even during a pandemic.

Inner peace goes a long way people. It will see you thru all manners of adversity. Best of all, it is not fear based, the opposite.

So, have a care…with yourself.

Pandemics come and go. This one will too. Use it to advantage.

——————-

-Good you shared how you feel Garth.

Truth will always set you free.

#29 Terry Cloth on 12.14.20 at 4:19 pm

#11 TRUMP IS OUR JESUS! on 12.14.20 at 3:45 pm

But yet, in spite of the destabilizing effects on mental health, the isolation and fear, the contributors to this comments section continue to be grounded, rational and polite at all times, with no one typing in while wearing only their underwear and no conspiracy theories at all.

Truly, we are a model of modern resilience and brilliance
_________________________________

Couldn’t agree with you more… And yesterday’s blog was a superlative example of that….. where commenters heaped praise on that horrid PEI woman for following all the government rules when applying for CERB. How dare she?

Doesn’t she know she can’t bake her cakes.. And eat them too!
She just has to STEAL them… as so many compassionate commenters pointed out!

#30 Tron Light on 12.14.20 at 4:22 pm

It’s not the silly little virus that decided to lock everyone in their homes, it was the politicians who decided how to respond to the silly little virus.

Can you say “cure worse than the disease” boys and girls?

#31 tbone on 12.14.20 at 4:25 pm

Is there a pandemic, well we forgot to tell all the people in cars on the 401 and across eglington in the west end. After 3 pm it looks like pre pandemic traffic to me .

#32 Camille on 12.14.20 at 4:26 pm

Excellent message, could have been written for Christmas day. Hope to see our lives wrestled away from government control (I’m sure the authorities are exhausted too) as appropriate with the vaccine rollout.

#33 Faron on 12.14.20 at 4:30 pm

#19 IHCTD9 on 12.14.20 at 4:01 pm

“…and render it impossible to see a smile, a cocked lip or those little wrinkles of welcome in a familiar face”
___

This is the part I hate most. I usually joke around with random folks when the opportunity presents itself. Restaurants, gas stations, grocery stores, convenience stores – you name it. It’s tough to do this when everyone is masked up.

Yeah, me too. The eyes can only say so much. Maybe I’ll learn to wiggle my ears…

A very tough time to be deaf who rely most heavily on reading facial expression especially lips when ASL isn’t “spoken”.

Thanks for the post today Garth.

#34 Dolce Vita on 12.14.20 at 4:32 pm

#13 Pandemic my derriere*

“And when it comes to destruction of intellect, you are an inspiration.” – Garth

Second that admonition.

—————————–

*And in the visceral, less than kind reply department:

gown up, wade into a COVID ward, take your mask off, breathe in and let us know how you make out.

Proof in the pudding when you eat it, not how you talk it.

#35 Friendly Giant on 12.14.20 at 4:33 pm

#21 Leo Trollstoy on 12.14.20 at 4:02 pm

If lockdowns worked during the spring, why do we need them now? And if lockdowns didn’t work in the spring, why do we need them now?

Asking for a friend
______________________________

Please advise your friend that questioning the narrative will not be tolerated.
And you are endangering yourself by associating with people like this!
I suggest you choose your friends more wisely!

#36 binky barnes on 12.14.20 at 4:37 pm

Nice words today, Garth. And much needed–I will try and heed your advice.

BB

#37 S.Bby on 12.14.20 at 4:37 pm

I knew this winter would be bad for Covid; no one had to be a rocket scientist to figure that out. I am also very skeptical of these vaccines.

#38 Tron Light on 12.14.20 at 4:40 pm

To follow up my last post about the cure being worse than the disease, Just Facts just published this in-depth picture of “misinformation” on the pandemic. Really well worth the read if anyone is interested:

https://www.justfacts.com/news_covid-19_essential_facts

I know some of you will say “but Covid…” and it will be hard to wrap your minds around.

“The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” – Marcus Aurelius

US Covid-related deaths in the last nine months today passed 300,000. That’s ten thousand more than the number of Americans killed in WW2. Do you have a spiffy that-wasn’t-so-bad document on the Second World War? – Garth

#39 S.Bby on 12.14.20 at 4:40 pm

Royal LePage forecasting 5% sfh price increases in YVR
for 2021.

#40 Dwilly on 12.14.20 at 4:43 pm

This is a better post. I agree with a large swath of this post, especially the part about staying positive, looking for upside and silver linings (in whatever form they may take). This is a great outlook we should all strive towards. Other points of agreement:
– the pandemic is no one’s “fault”, certainly not some dude from Manitoba!
– masks are unfortunate, but a sensible precaution. They may help or they may not, but they are a largely zero-downside intervention (unlike many others)
– etc

Where you have missed again: the virus is nobody’s fault and not in politicians’ control, but our response sure as hell is. As you stated yourself, our response to this (which is VERY much open to debate) has led to much other suffering, stress, anxiety, and I think we should have a reasonable discussion about how necessary or effective some of it has been. On a blog basically entirely devoted questioning politicians, I don’t see why we’d say “just suck this up and do as they say”. Especially for such severe interventions. If we can question money and finance, surely we can also question forced closure of someone’s business, while another gets to remain open?

#41 Doug t on 12.14.20 at 4:43 pm

I’ve been lake fishing more than ever – 3 to 4 times a week – eagles flying above – working out at home for last 30 years (never cared for gyms) – reading more – walking way more – pubs still open – to be honest it hasn’t been that horrible – it’s the families with young kids that I feel for

#42 yvr_lurker on 12.14.20 at 4:55 pm

In my comments in March, I was fully predicting a harsh second wave and that we were in this for the long haul. When I was in my 20’s my grandfather used to describe the 1918 pandemic for him and his family, and the resurgence of the virus in the fall of 1918 that killed his father after his mother died in the first wave. Why would it be any different now 102 years later. What I did not anticipate is that due to some brilliant scientific advances they have vaccine candidates so fast, that will provide some degree of protection (which will only be more understood as time goes on).

Everyone is different, but our little family has been just fine. Kid is doing really well in school, we help out as needed, and he has taken up skiing this fall with his buddies. Dog is good therapy through long hikes, and we have greatly expanded the cooking repetoire and saving $$$. Wife and I both enjoy the WFH. Only thing that we miss is the idea of hopping on a plane with backpacks going somewhere a bit challenging. Never did much if any of the crowded bars, trendoid restaurants, hockey games, cruises, sports events etc…

#43 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 4:57 pm

There might be coming to protect people a bit more until the vaccine can be fully distributed.
A drug that has been around awhile. Check out what this smart medical man has to say. Quite interesting….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgOAaLmoa68

#44 FriedEggs on 12.14.20 at 4:58 pm

I have severe allergies.

So do 2.6 Millions Canadians and 50 Million Americans.

#45 Garth - are you gettin paid to spread govt agit prop on 12.14.20 at 4:59 pm

DELETED

#46 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 5:01 pm

oh crap. That was the wrong link.
here is the correct one. About Ivermectin.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tq8SXOBy-4w

#47 TurnerNation on 12.14.20 at 5:05 pm

It’s not a new world order it’s…waiting till the Bankers drop their next hit on us

A year ago if you had told someone we’d require electronic tracking bracelets in order congregate. Where, North Korea? Prison trial?
You see it all makes sense when you realize that to our nasty global elites WE Are the parasite to be controlled.

No this is the never ending electronic lockdown planned for us. From today’s news feed.

Divided we stand. The A.I. will be controlling our every step. It’s here. For your health Comrade!

“Draganfly’s Vital Intelligence technology utilizes regular cameras to read vital signs such as Heart Rate, Respiratory Rate, and Sp02. The technology can help screen for infectious conditions, including COVID-19. The technology has been deployed on Drones and in Kiosks, along with an initial mobile API that has been implemented with several pilot customers.”

“To promote the safety of all participants and the community at large, every tournament member will be required to self-isolate upon arrival in their individual hotel room and will be supplied with a TraceSafe wristband that will enable event organizers to ensure that they self-isolate for the required time.

Additionally, throughout the event, all teams and tournament staff will have TraceSafe’s contact tracing beacon embedded in their event credentials. TraceSafe’s low powered BLE technology will prompt physical distancing reminders and provide real-time contact tracing for all participants. TraceSafe wearable safety tech will be complemented by regular COVID-19 testing throughout the event.

#48 Jake on 12.14.20 at 5:08 pm

Optimism is half the cure, we all need to think positive to get through this. Made it to Munich’s Oktoberfest in Sept. 2019, a personal bucket list. Can’t wait for the day to hoist a cold pint again with friends and family shoulder to shoulder.

https://www.muenchen.de/media/wiesn/2017/exithamster/exithamster/zelte-hp.jpg

#49 Dwight on 12.14.20 at 5:15 pm

Sorry to break up your party.

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-55308211

#50 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm

Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:

HIV – eating bushmeat in Africa
COVID-19 – wet market in China
Spanish Flu – Ducks in Europe to some, a chicken farm in the US to other experts
SARS – Horseshoe bats
Ebola – Bats
Swine Flu – Pig farm
The list goes on and on.

When Europeans came to North America, disease ravaged the indigenous peoples here because they had no immunity to the various diseases picked up from domesticated animals and livestock. The indigenous people did not infect the Europeans because they did not domesticate animals. Horses arrived later in North America.

We know who to blame. It’s anyone who supports animal agriculture. Because this will happen again and again, as it always has.

All so that people can enjoy a heart-attack inducing steak.

Wow, what a great trade.

#51 From a British blog on 12.14.20 at 5:24 pm

repeat my claim – shot down rather rudely the other day by John P – that the government response to Covid is proceeding on the basis of surveillance, phone activity and mobility. The objective is not zero-Covid but ultra compliance. My belief is that non-compliance is being measured by intelligence and the ‘infection’ numbers cooked up to justify whatever measures are desired to undermine. discredit or crush dissent. That’s why it’s all “young people’s fault” or “rule breakers’ fault”.

Why are there twenty or so behavioural scientists attached to Sage? Why does it need a Behavioural Insights team to ‘sell’ government policy? Why the sudden swerves and changes? They are calculated to secure obedience to mere authority – so that the public comply however unsupported by reason, consistency or legality the authority is.

Why? Because the plan is to make us accept the unacceptable: centralised management of our lives, truncated democracy, an inversion of the citizen’s relationship with the state. Who wants this? Let’s just say some global corporations are bigger than some national economies. They’re tired of having their plans disrupted by democracy. Brexit and Trump must never happen again, but also we must not be free people with our naive and inconvenient views.

Inevitably, from experience on other sites, when you say anything like this, the trolls (government sponsored and freelance) are all over you like a rash, which indicates to me that you are over the target. Otherwise, why do they care so much? If the public generally knew what is being done to them, they would resist.

I must admit it never occurred to me in writing this blog post that it would bring the conspiracy theory whackadoodles scuttling out from the underbrush. The Covid-is-a-plot belief constitutes a form of mental illness. Get help. And go away. – Garth

#52 SeeB on 12.14.20 at 5:25 pm

#95 Drinking on 12.13.20 at 7:38 pm
#84 SeeB

Ok, I see and understand what you are saying, your view, respected!

My question is: What would you do different to correct situations like this??? Do not hold back; we are, well many, are very interested, no judgment, just say it like it is. I am very interested, the more people say/comment is more real/actual democracy!! Sorry Garth, you are good enough to allow this!

—————————————————————–

Well, I can’t say for certain what the absolute correct way to move forward is, and many people will have different ideas about what’s better, but there are already some examples of where to start.

The first major feasible long-term goal could be a transition to something similar to the current modern Nordic or German models and go from there. Still not “perfect”, but what is? Any systems that recognize the right of companies and unions to exist, and attempts to find consensus, rather than competing endlessly for advantages over the other would be measurably better. Any systems where workers are given a significant ownership stake at the companies they work for, and allows them to immediately recognize the fruits of their labour would be nice, rather than just hope for pitiful profit sharing and incremental wage increases that depend on the largess of a board stacked strictly with owners only interested in the current stock price and future returns. Maybe require dividends on all stocks to discourage heavy speculation, or force owners and board members to have skin in the game by shouldering a real burden if their own decisions result in poor performance. “Hmm, that was a poor investment” is too far removed from “How am I going to feed my family?”

No small task given how ingrained the North American myths of rugged individualism and meritocracy are. Not to say individual achievement shouldn’t be respected, revered, and elevated, but those rewards should probably go to the people doing the work, like the actual researchers rather than CEOs and Billionaire owners, and even then, that reward shouldn’t be “most of the money”.

As for the short-term, continuing to advocate for progressive policies that ACTUALLY help poor working people as a whole will help move progress forward. Identify political leaders that will forward this agenda, and speak against candidates that just want to limp through the next 50 years using the same economic systems and ideologies created for the 17th century.

#53 Tron Light on 12.14.20 at 5:27 pm

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#54 You know val on 12.14.20 at 5:33 pm

Great! All we have to worry about after this is over (?) Is Mr. Socks (Mr. We) Great Reset. The Vaccine is approved for emergency use, does anyone know what that means? For sure no liability to Mr. Bug Pharma.

#55 Doug in London on 12.14.20 at 5:34 pm

Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it.
————————————————————–
Loneliness? That’s debatable. Here’s a clip from an article in The Globe and Mail in 2017: Loneliness is failed solitude. Solitude is a state of productive and contented time alone, whereas loneliness is an anxious emotion that derives from the suspicion that you’re supposed to be somewhere else or in the company of others.
We often encounter loneliness first, as an instinctual reaction, and if we move through loneliness, we arrive at solitude on the other side.
My thoughts exactly. I’ve worked from home and loved it. Earlier this year I met a guy at a cottage near Gravenhurst, had been there since March, who would normally work out of a Toronto office. He said he loved it, enjoyed the quiet of Muskoka, with the use of Zoom meetings to conduct business. Life is what you make it.

#56 George on 12.14.20 at 5:35 pm

Experts says we’ll still be masked a year from now.

………

lol, which experts Garth? those that said let’s lockdown initially , and we should be good to go? those that said initially we dont need masks?

its pretty clear public health is kinda in the dark. The little bug is spreading, that’s what little bugs do. Thank our lucky stars this little bug’s mortality rate is crazy low, or else we’d have a REAL big problem on our hands

#57 MF on 12.14.20 at 5:36 pm

“ No wonder. Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it”

-Not one person I know who is working from home feels even a hint of that…8 or 9 months later.

MF

#58 Brian Ripley on 12.14.20 at 5:38 pm

“The patina of life” Garth

Lovely phrase, thank you.

And here is the Wabi Sabi of Canadian Household Debt, GDP, Foreign Direct Investment and Balance of Trade

http://www.chpc.biz/household-debt.html

For anyone keeping track, in the last 10 years:

Household Mortgage Debt is UP 66%
Total Household Debt is UP 56%
GDP is UP 13%
Negative Net Trade is UP 549%
Negative Foreign Direct Investment is UP 633%

The widening spread between total household debt and household mortgages means we are borrowing even more to maintain lifestyle.

Foreign Direct Investment OUT higher than IN over the last 20 years means Canadian companies are investing outside of Canada to get a better return on Capital and Labour. For every $1 of investment coming in to Canada, $1.43 leaves (full year 2019 data).​

The chronic negative Canadian Balance of Trade means that OUR debt obligations continue to provide more stimulus to offshore than onshore producers.​

“Characteristics of wabi-sabi aesthetics and principles include asymmetry, roughness, simplicity, economy, austerity, modesty, intimacy, and the appreciation of both natural objects and the forces of nature.” Wikipedia

#59 SeeB on 12.14.20 at 5:47 pm

#48 TurnerNation on 12.14.20 at 5:05 pm

It’s not a new world order it’s…waiting till the Bankers drop their next hit on us

A year ago if you had told someone we’d require electronic tracking bracelets in order congregate. Where, North Korea? Prison trial?
You see it all makes sense when you realize that to our nasty global elites WE Are the parasite to be controlled.

No this is the never ending electronic lockdown planned for us. From today’s news feed.

Divided we stand. The A.I. will be controlling our every step. It’s here. For your health Comrade!

———————————————————-

All of this has already happened. Smart phones, Apple watches, web browsers, social media algorithms, to name a few, already do what you describe and more, SECRETLY and without your direct knowledge and permission.

Yet, you’re afraid of some stupid quarantine tracker?

Your news feed is full of imbeciles.

The NWO you fear so much is already here. It’s actually made up of petty little tyrants fighting each other for what little scraps of attention you have left. The MSM has always been in on it, and your “news feed” is likewise full of grifters capitalizing on your disgust with the status quo, selling you stranger and more bizarre stories to feed your imagination, all to get you to crave whatever product or ideology they were paid to shill.

It’s a decidedly banal and boring dystopia.

#60 Trevor on 12.14.20 at 5:51 pm

A virus is a virus, yes. But every government in the country should be defeated humiliatingly for how they’ve dealt with this. This could’ve been dealt with reasonably quickly if they took it seriously firstly in February, and then again over the summer. Instead, the constant reaction has screwed generations over with the debt level now on the books. It’s criminal how inept and spineless governments are.

#61 Fyodor on 12.14.20 at 5:53 pm

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#62 Vstrom Rider on 12.14.20 at 5:53 pm

Working from home has been the best time of my life since I was a teenager. No stressful commute, save on gas, save on wear on my car, no having to buy expensive clothes for the office, can wake up at 8:45, can cook my own lunch each day and eat healthier, can wear sweat pants all day. It’s been great! I get that not everyone likes it for various reasons, but those people need to stop ragging on those of us who do. If working from home doesn’t work well for you for whatever reason, that’s your problem, not mine. For me it works great and I hope this continues for as long as possible.

#63 Don't Believe The Hype on 12.14.20 at 5:54 pm

Garth: today’s dispatch is probably one of the best you’ve ever written. Captures what most everyone is essentially feeling right now.
Indeed: we gotta hold on just a little bit more.

#64 Drinking on 12.14.20 at 5:54 pm

#53 SeeB

Great response and interesting ideas! As you mentioned no system is perfect. I have been to Germany a few times and have always been impressed by how much pride they have keeping the country clean, I know it sounds silly, but the towns and cities I visited looked like picture postcards. People were always friendly, I am only saying what I observed as a tourist not a habitant. One could clearly see the wealth in that country!

Whether the North American style is better or worse is debatable but what I cannot stand about the current system is where a new CEO takes over a company, lays off thousands of staff that made the company what it is, then collects a huge million/s dollar bonus for the fact that he/she propped up share values on the backs of all the people terminated, that is just wrong!

#65 MicroGX on 12.14.20 at 5:59 pm

+gratitude+ Thanks for the reminder.

#66 Long-Time Lurker on 12.14.20 at 6:00 pm

>Follow the Zoolander.

Aug 15, 2020
Why California’s Climate Policies Are Causing Electricity Blackouts
Michael Shellenberger

…California saw its electricity prices rise six times more than the rest of the United States from 2011 to 2019, due to its huge expansion of renewables. Republicans in the U.S. Congress point to that massive increase to challenge justifications by Democrats to spend $2 trillion on renewables in the name of climate change.

Even though the cost of solar panels declined dramatically between 2011 and 2019, their unreliable and weather-dependent nature meant that they imposed large new costs in the form of storage and transmission to keep electricity as reliable. California’s solar panels and farms were all turning off as the blackouts began, with no help available from the states to the East already in nightfall.

Electricity from solar goes away at the very moment when the demand for electricity rises. “The peak demand was steady in late hours,” said the spokesperson for CAISO, which is controlled by Gov. Gavin Newsom, “and we had thousands of megawatts of solar reducing their output as the sunset.”

The two blackouts in less than a year are strong evidence that the tens of billions that Californians have spent on renewables come with high human, economic, and environmental costs.

Last December, a report by done for PG&E concluded that the utility’s customers could see blackouts double over the next 15 years and quadruple over the next 30….

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2020/08/15/why-californias-climate-policies-are-causing-electricity-black-outs/

#67 Long-Time Lurker on 12.14.20 at 6:02 pm

>Follow the Zoolander.

Sep 5, 2019
Renewables Threaten German Economy & Energy Supply, McKinsey Warns In New Report

Michael Shellenberger

A new report by consulting giant McKinsey finds that Germany’s Energiewende, or energy transition to renewables, poses a significant threat to the nation’s economy and energy supply.

One of Germany’s largest newspapers, Die Welt, summarized the findings of the McKinsey report in a single word: “disastrous.”

“Problems are manifesting in all three dimensions of the energy industry triangle: climate protection, the security of supply and economic efficiency,” writes McKinsey…

…But McKinsey issues its strongest warning when it comes to Germany’s increasingly insecure energy supply due to its heavy reliance on intermittent solar and wind. For three days in June 2019, the electricity grid came close to black-outs.

“Only short-term imports from neighboring countries were able to stabilize the grid,” the consultancy notes.

As a result of Germany’s energy supply shortage, the highest observed cost of short-term “balancing energy” skyrocketed from €64 in 2017 to €37,856 in 2019.

“It can be assumed that security of supply will continue to worsen in the future,” says McKinsey.

Renewables are causing similarly high price shocks in other parts of the world including Texas, Australia, and California.

And Britain and Australia have faced similar energy supply problems in recent years as they have attempted to transition to intermittent renewables…

…German consumers have paid dearly for the energy transition. German electricity prices are 45% above the European average, McKinsey reports. Green taxes account for 54% of household electricity prices.

Electricity prices will continue to rise through 2030, McKinsey predicts, despite promises in recent years by renewable energy advocates and German politicians that they would go down….

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2019/09/05/renewables-threaten-german-economy-energy-supply-mckinsey-warns-in-new-report/

#68 vancover help on 12.14.20 at 6:10 pm

If your google Canada debt it is $2434 billion, now of course they will try to say its less due to loans and other factors that will get paid back.

Since when do you get to count income you don’t have as a positive, well when your the government you lie, lie again and if that don’t work give away money.

seems to work.

#69 nan on 12.14.20 at 6:12 pm

DELETED

#70 KLNR on 12.14.20 at 6:19 pm

@#36 Captain Uppa on 12.14.20 at 4:34 pm
I was blessed enough to have my family remain healthy and spend way more time with my two young kids than I ever would have if the pandemic didn’t hit. A silver lining for my family, anyways. My heart goes out to those who have loved ones go sick or pass.

same for me and my family.

Maybe i’m in the minority but I still love working from home.

#71 zoey on 12.14.20 at 6:24 pm

Agree except for the streetcar part …I’m never going back , not because of covid but because its a horrible service.

#72 KLNR on 12.14.20 at 6:25 pm

@#42 Doug t on 12.14.20 at 4:43 pm
I’ve been lake fishing more than ever – 3 to 4 times a week – eagles flying above – working out at home for last 30 years (never cared for gyms) – reading more – walking way more – pubs still open – to be honest it hasn’t been that horrible – it’s the families with young kids that I feel for

saw a bald eagle for the first time about a month ago.
In south western Ontario of all places.
What an amazingly huge creature.

#73 Cult schmult on 12.14.20 at 6:25 pm

#25 Jay on 12.14.20 at 4:09 pm

Alas though, any ask for some sort of reasonable rules that focus on actually making a difference on the spread of the virus and your labelled an “anti masker” and dismissed, could this covid stuff become more of a cult?
_________________________

Cult? What cult?
Now off with his head… But make sure his mask stays on!

#74 Howard on 12.14.20 at 6:26 pm

Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it.

————————–

Nope. Still love it.

I go into the office once a week for a little variety. Almost nobody is there though. In my open space area where there were previously 30 people, now only 4 or 5 are there on any one day. This is the future. A mix of at home an in office, but increasingly at home.

The needy extroverts who require a constant audience will have to adapt.

#75 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 6:29 pm

“I hear school grades are falling most everywhere. Online learning doesn’t work. Kids need kids.”

Anecdotally I can add that online learning was rough for my son at first. He just wasn’t getting anything done. So he dropped from 93% in math last year to failing in the first 6 weeks of online. He’s doing better now that we’ve moved him out of his room and set firm work times but he started out in a pretty big hole.

My daughter is doing her practicum and she reports that the students she works with were all struggling too, even in class. The masks, social distancing, hand sanitizer, one way hallways, etc. are having their affects there too.

Overall I am not too impressed with the online teachers. The curriculum is good and they did a good job setting that all up in a short time, but there is less follow up than in class, the kids are on their own.

But regardless, we’ve decided to continue online for semester 2 because we can’t see how it can go from “Christmas is cancelled” to “the schools are open” by Feb. 1st. Now that he is getting the hang of the Moodle model he doesn’t want to switch to Zoom. It was decided under much uncertainty because his preference would be to return to class.

Last year he won the “band award” and was sent to something called the “honor band” and I bought him a $1200 “trigger trombone”. This year no band. Last year he played most of the school sports, this year none. Scouts is a Zoom thing now. We did our shift selling Christmas trees but many of the other parents chickened out. Scouts popcorn is also cancelled.

Pandemics suck.

#76 Howie Mandel on 12.14.20 at 6:36 pm

#8 Love_The_Cottage on 12.14.20 at 3:35 pm

“Shaking hands was always a germ sharing and disgusting practice. Let’s hope that doesn’t come back.

As the Georgia Satellites said – keep your hands to yourself.”

I couldn’t agree more!

#77 Howard on 12.14.20 at 6:37 pm

#67 Long-Time Lurker on 12.14.20 at 6:02 pm

Along those lines, investors should take a long hard look at uranium stocks.

#78 henry on 12.14.20 at 6:41 pm

lies = fear , anger

truth = love , joy , peace

#79 Grateful Boomer on 12.14.20 at 6:41 pm

Yup. Keep holding on. Onward

#80 kc on 12.14.20 at 6:42 pm

#181 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 2:19 pm

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/no-covid-19-casedemic/

XXXXXXXXXXXXX

I link to MIT health and you link me to a website that wants donations and people selling books… sure a small bit of useful information after you wade over the bits that makes me question the whole web site.

I think we agree to disagree and I will continue to believe in my thinking that it is a whole ton of hog wash…..

When wifes dad died in June we were in and out of hospital since January… the ER section of a major hospital was EMPTY during the first wave. and even the nurses were bored on the floors as they shut down surgeries etc.

Can’t convince me that a bug that attacks the majority of older people warrants the draconian system we are seeing playing out today.

Welcome to the greater depression 2.0

cheers

#81 Hingadin on 12.14.20 at 6:44 pm

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm

Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them

All so that people can enjoy a heart-attack inducing steak.

Wow, what a great trade.

—————-

Just picked up a giant holiday tenderloin at Costco. Biggest tenderloin I’ve ever seen! $260 and worth every penny.

Mmmmmmm… Xmas Eve filet mignon, New Year’s eve beef wellington… the sheer gustatory delight might trigger a heart attack.

But, sorry… you were saying?

#82 JRinVic on 12.14.20 at 6:47 pm

Well Garth I can agree with the whole be positive mantra for life regardless of the pandemic or what is going on today. For every negative there is an opportunity hiding.

However, the whole just give up and follow the rules is just not the right attitude. If all the people in the 60/70’s gave up that easy and just followed the rules, regardless of how nonsensical they were, I doubt we’d have many of the rights we have today and enjoy so much if it wasn’t for protest.

Pretty sure in one of your posts recently you mentioned how our leaders and experts are just people too and trying to make the right decision. Well, the thing people forget is these leaders are very average at best, and after having been in rooms with them during my years of service in the gov I can say they wouldn’t know the right decision if it hit them in the face. Everyone knows in government the smart people are the ones doing the work. The ones at the top have rarely a clue and are too scared to make a gutsy decision based on actual science for fear of appearing wrong to the masses.

In my opinion the biggest issue we face now is the weaponizing of opposing views. There is no room for debate any more in society if it doesn’t follow the mainstream narrative. We’re so quick to label and punish others who question anything that is going on today, like the decisions made are the correct ones. Oh you have a question about the vaccine? Anti Vax! Take issue with masks? Anti Mask! You’re a republican? You must be a Trumper!!
And on and on and on. We’ve lost our way and cannot reason anymore.

The media exists only to make money. They need eyeballs, clicks and attention and the only way to get that is from sensationalizing every topic and make it polarizing or political. The truth is actually quite boring and sits somewhere in the middle.

As for this pandemic… Our leaders have had it wrong from the beginning yet they continue to double down on their decisions in the face of actual science and don’t want to listen to anything that might oppose what they’re doing. In BC here, restriction after restriction continues to be commanded down from above to no avail. They make no difference and aren’t helping. Not that things are unmanageable but all they’re doing is making things worse for everyone and every business except for the mega corps. I can’t watch my son play soccer from 20 yards away but outdoor fitness is ok or shopping with 300 strangers in Costco is fine? It’s bizarre and it just feels like they’re throwing darts at a board hoping the vaccine comes soon so they can retreat and disappear back to their cubby holes where no one knew they existed.
Hence why people are angry and asking questions as they should and this should not be dismissed as anti anything!

Throwing money at a virus is not the solution. We now have a 400 billion dollar, and climbing, hole in our books and nothing to show for it. If governments did their job they would have taken all the magically found money and invested it in healthcare and other areas to help support the treatment of covid and other public health issues instead of locking people down, which does nothing, and cause such widespread misery and destruction. We’d at least have better services to show for all this spent money.
It is very clear that the repercussions and fallout from these decisions are way worse than the virus itself yet they keep doubling down on them. It’s insanity.

The latest data out of the Ministry of Health in BC is that COVID has had no impact on death rates in care homes this year. Meaning, even though 80% of deaths from covid have come in care homes, there has been no rise in the death rate (13.78%), in line with previous years, which tells you people are dying despite covid. Now that doesnt mean we shouldn’t do anything but it tells you its not as alarming as it is being made out to be. Coincidentally, 2017 was a worse year (14.2%) and that year the flu vaccine was ineffective.

As for vaccines, people fail to realize that the biggest consumer of time in vaccine development is not the testing to make sure it’s safe, its the waiting game. Waiting for grant approval, have the pharma companies set up a trial, finding trial volunteers, etc. In this case we had unlimited amount of money and resources thrown at this vaccine coupled with a new technique to produce many viable candidates. If we did this for every one, the time to market would also be shorter but it doesn’t work that way. Sure people can be skeptical but I’m sure the data that will come out will be in line with previous vaccines for side effects etc. I also think Covid is going to just be an endemic with a yearly shot, if requested, like the flu and on we go.

Oh and here’s an actual randomized controlled trial on face masks, not the observational nonsense floating around..
https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

As well a metric ton of studies related to covid:
https://swprs.org/facts-about-covid-19/

#83 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 6:48 pm

“And when it comes to destruction of intellect, you are an inspiration. – Garth” on #13 Pandemic my derriere

Garth, I am surprised you don’t just DELETED the “pandemic hoax” comments like you do the “anti-vax” comments. I mean it is one thing to question the efficacy of non-medical masks but to call the whole thing a hoax? Pretty near the whole medical profession across the world would have to be in on it.

#84 belly rubs on 12.14.20 at 6:52 pm

I have been doing a lot of yard work, hands in dirt, muck in face, which I believe maintains some level of cootie immunity. The critters/deer/ducks are now quite accustomed to my daily presence. I talk to them, and recently they’ve begun talking back. Beats talking to my invisible friend, who, oddly, has returned from my childhood.

#85 Upenuff on 12.14.20 at 6:53 pm

#20 Bespoke on 12.14.20 at 4:02 pm
Finally, reflect on what we lost to Covid – what you miss.

Shopping freely. Last time I checked, my internet was still working.
Visiting family. Overrated. Once every year or two is quite enough.
___________________________________________

Entered a mall in Burnaby for a Dr’s appointment this afternoon, Christmas shopping mayhem, but with masks on, but no distancing…. Sad…

Until the sheeple start seeing hearing true cases about young, normal, healthy people getting whacked with this virus, we may be seeing individuals drop in the streets before we truly have lock down and get a grip on this virus.

#86 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 6:55 pm

#16 Another Deckchair on 12.14.20 at 3:57 pm

Ah, thermodynamics. Like gravity, you cannot avoid it.

Policy discussions around energy would be a lot more productive if they involved people from the engineering or physics departments.

There is no such thing as a free lunch.

#87 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 7:03 pm

NonPlused greatest quality is his open honesty. He never tries to posture or brag but just gives us the reality of parenting in a difficult time. Thank you NP.

#88 CL on 12.14.20 at 7:04 pm

WFH doesn’t seem to work well for the majority from what I see. Having kids screaming in the background or not returning calls in a timely fashion just doesn’t work. This has been an ongoing theme since March.

Also hear from friends in management positions that they get video calls from employees on a daily basis saying they are sick and can’t work.

Have to agree with Garth on this one.

#89 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:08 pm

@#51 Piano Man 88
“We know who to blame. It’s anyone who supports animal agriculture. Because this will happen again and again, as it always has.

All so that people can enjoy a heart-attack inducing steak.”

++++

I haven’t had a good steak in a while…..thanks for the suggestion.
When you play piano at my funeral, make sure the keys are pure ivory……

#90 Linda on 12.14.20 at 7:10 pm

Agree silver linings abound. Lots of neighbors got to know one another better, masks & social distancing notwithstanding. Our entire neighborhood spruced up, with lots of gardens during the warmer weather months to admire plus home improvement projects galore. Now in the holiday season I swear the outdoor displays are far more extensive & colorful than in previous years. We are fortunate to live across from a public green space with amenities such as a ball diamond/soccer field, skateboard park, tennis & pickle ball courts & right now an outdoor rink. The nearby bicycle/pedestrian trails are being cleared of snow & are heavily used. We see dozens of pedestrians & dog walkers every day, entire families going out together to get some fresh air despite the cold weather.

Traffic is lighter, fuel is cheaper (for now) & for sure shopping is far more efficient, since no one wants to linger! Less traffic also means less pollution.

Will we still be wearing masks a year from now? Maybe. Some may choose to just keep wearing them during cold/flu season in future years. Plus a lot more people are washing their hands. That can’t help but have a positive influence on public health overall.

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:11 pm

@#58 MF
“-Not one person I know who is working from home feels even a hint of that…8 or 9 months later.”

++++
Do you guys have “Zoom” PJ parties during work day?…..Or is that for later?

#92 Theyoungone on 12.14.20 at 7:14 pm

I could do this for 5 more years standing on my head.

Like I said before hand, raise interest back to 2-3% and stop rewarding stupidity and I will get vaxed. youth must stand together or face slavery till death to eat and keep dry.

The body must relax at 55 , it can’t do what it does at 30.

#93 DON on 12.14.20 at 7:15 pm

Like YVR lurker my family is taking advantage of the down time. Helping the kids out with homework every night…what else should I be doing? I made the choice to have kids and homework is part of the deal not going out and playing with my friends.

Besides going out to events…shoping…restaurants etc. stretched some folks thin trying to keep up with the Jones. The I need it now culture put a lot of folks in debt.

It really depends on individual circumstances. I have a couple of friends who WFH and live alone. They crave the friendships but not the toxicity of the workplace.

If I were younger and single…well I might share the mindset of the 20/30 year olds.

People looking for jobs or changes unfortunately have to wait a bit longer and those without, in need or in harm’s way should be are only priority for giving out free money. Perhaps we should have housed the homeless and those with mental health issues rather than giving money to folks that didn’t need it. How about putting resources in place to protect those that are most vulnerable.

WFH was making in roads prior to the virus. Why continue to build roadways and transportation inly to become congested? Why have people use fuel to drive to work and increase pollution? Technology enables us to change our ways. Not all jobs can WFH or are suited to work from home. All I can tell you is how much I appreciated the reduced time it took me to get to the office these past months due to the uncongested roads.

#94 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.14.20 at 7:15 pm

#8 Love_The_Cottage on 12.14.20 at 3:35 pm
Shaking hands was always a germ sharing and disgusting practice. Let’s hope that doesn’t come back.

As the Georgia Satellites said – keep your hands to yourself.
————
We’re becoming more and more Asian.
Which I think is a good thing.

#95 Abc123 on 12.14.20 at 7:17 pm

DELETED

#96 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:18 pm

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm
“Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:”

Well, that isn’t going to go away. If we get rid of all the cows the fields they live on will be useless and the deer will take over.

There is a lot of ranch land out there that simply isn’t good for anything else but raising cattle. Or sheep maybe.

Any part of Alberta that is suitable naturally or through irrigation to support potatoes, canola, corn, wheat, what have you, already does. We put the cows on the grasslands. Or occasionally in the forests. It’s actually a pretty good way of controlling forest and grass fires because the cows eat up the grasses that act like kerosene in getting the fires spreading.

And then we have our pets, dogs, cats, hedgehogs, horses, etc. Should we try and live without all of them too?

Some things don’t actually have a better solution.

#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:20 pm

@#70 KLNR
“saw a bald eagle for the first time about a month ago.
In south western Ontario of all places.
What an amazingly huge creature.”
+++++

You should come out west when the Covid shutdowns are over and go to Squamish for the annual Eagle Count….

http://www.brackendaleartgallery.com/EagleCount.html

Its quite something. I see them over my shop in Burnaby almost daily.
I have a bird seed feeder that I put out in the winter and two year ago in the winter….I had a bald eagle slam into a group of sparrows on the ground not 5 feet from my office window.
The fricken thing sat there eating a sparrow.
It was about 3.5 feet high and bulky.
Looked like a dog.
Impressive.

#98 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.14.20 at 7:23 pm

#19 IHCTD9 on 12.14.20 at 4:01 pm
“…and render it impossible to see a smile, a cocked lip or those little wrinkles of welcome in a familiar face”
___

This is the part I hate most. I usually joke around with random folks when the opportunity presents itself. Restaurants, gas stations, grocery stores, convenience stores – you name it. It’s tough to do this when everyone is masked up.
———–
It’s the eyes my friend.
The gateway to the soul.
I’m hard of hearing, and I hate it when people wear sunglasses.

#99 Outrage on 12.14.20 at 7:24 pm

Do you trust our government. Many pay over half their wages in taxes. We have lost our liberty and freedom over the years. Our government politicians lie and cheat to benefit themselves .Crime pays in Canada, we all know that do the crime do a little time.
Yes take the vaccine ,the government knows best.

#100 kc on 12.14.20 at 7:29 pm

#82 JRinVic on 12.14.20 at 6:47 pm

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Well said, and I am in BC also. I couldn’t have said it better.

cheers

#101 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:30 pm

@#63 No Hype
“Indeed: we gotta hold on just a little bit more.”

++++

I was driving to work this am and was listening to the radio.
The DJ’s were babbling on about ” I cant wait til 2020 is over!”
I hear people say, “I cant wit til this year ends.”

My concern is, Jan 1st 2021 as the death rate INCREASES because it’s FLU SEASON……a ton of people are gonna lose their shit…

As Chauncy Gardiner and Chrystia Freeland say, ” In the spring we’ll have growth, then things will gain strength and grow more in the summer”

I guess they dont want to talk about “the dead of winter…..”

#102 Drinking on 12.14.20 at 7:31 pm

#82 JRinVic

We live in neighboring Provinces, the differences (ideology) are what they are.

Stay safe, wear a mask when in public, wash those hands but for Gods sake (my view) do not “Stop”, living life! Enjoy your time with your kids and spouse, I really have enjoyed all the posts above stating that they are doing more outdoor activities, fishing, hiking , reading, etc., learning new recipes, skills, enjoying the latest meteor shower, Jupiter and Saturn aligning, watching the Northern lights, stop reading/watching the news daily most of it is complete nonsense!

We will all get through this; stay safe everyone!!!

#103 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:32 pm

#87 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 7:03 pm

“NonPlused greatest quality is his open honesty. He never tries to posture or brag but just gives us the reality of parenting in a difficult time. Thank you NP.”

Well, thanks. I thought at first it was too whiney but then I thought maybe someone will like to know they aren’t the only ones whose kids are suffering. The school boards haven’t been real forthcoming about what they are seeing, even though I am sure they have all the data they need. If I can see my kid’s grades online, they can see everyone’s grades online.

And anyway what would be the point of lying on an anonymous comment section? I do that in front of girls I am trying to impress. Especially in the days when I had a corporate card. Ahh, I’ll never forget 2006. Those were the days when you couldn’t actually make it all the way through Stampede without a break.

Ok, that was kind of like bragging.

#104 Paul on 12.14.20 at 7:33 pm

I have relatives in Australia, sent me this about their vaccine?

https://nationalpost.com/news/world/australia-abandons-covid-19-vaccine-after-phase-1-trials-return-false-positives-for-hiv

#105 Todd on 12.14.20 at 7:40 pm

There is a large swath of the population that should really reacquaint themselves with Occam’s Razor.

The conspiracy theory crap is getting out of hand.

#106 Thomas on 12.14.20 at 7:41 pm

Every action will bring a reaction!

Noone knows what will be the reaction to the risky experiment of emprisoning people in their own houses.

#107 Drill Baby Drill on 12.14.20 at 7:42 pm

I will bet my complete portfolio that the multi national pharmas are pushing aside far cheaper and more plentiful and easier treatments in order to pile on to the Vaccine money maker.

#108 S.Bby on 12.14.20 at 7:44 pm

I really astounds me the windbags that post in these comments. If I have to press page down 3 or 4 times to scroll past a comment it’s tldr and I don’t care what your personal view is on whatever thought was running through your brain at the time.

Keep it to a sentence or two…

#109 Phylis on 12.14.20 at 7:44 pm

#66 Long-Time Lurker on 12.14.20 at 6:00 pm And they shut the power off if it gets too windy.

#110 Russ on 12.14.20 at 7:45 pm

crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:08 pm
@#51 Piano Man 88
“We know who to blame. It’s anyone who supports animal agriculture. Because this will happen again and again, as it always has.

All so that people can enjoy a heart-attack inducing steak.”

++++

I haven’t had a good steak in a while…..thanks for the suggestion.
When you play piano at my funeral, make sure the keys are pure ivory……

——————————————————–

If COVID takes me out I want all my pallbearers to be politicians.

So they can let me down, one last time.

#111 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 7:52 pm

#80 kc on 12.14.20 at 6:42 pm
I link to MIT health and you link me to a website that wants donations and people selling books… sure a small bit of useful information after you wade over the bits that makes me question the whole web site.
…….
Lol, I had to go to the website and look for all the shilling you saw. One small button to become a patron and a link for an e book. Whoa, totally discredited. I give you a link full of verifiable facts and you come back with that and some anecdotal evidence.
So, is there any amount of evidence that would challenge your belief?

Xxxxxx

#61 Trevor on 12.14.20 at 5:51 pm
A virus is a virus, yes. But every government in the country should be defeated humiliatingly for how they’ve dealt with this. This could’ve been dealt with reasonably quickly if they took it seriously firstly in February, and then again over the summer. Instead, the constant reaction has screwed generations over with the debt level now on the books. It’s criminal how inept and spineless governments are.
….
I absolutely agree. Australia and New Zealand took pretty serious measures, and have it under control. Life is normal there. I guess it helps that they are islands and don’t have an irresponsible next door neighbour. We allowed the genie out of the bottle and we will be paying for a long time.

#112 Vivian on 12.14.20 at 7:53 pm

Thank you, Garth. :)

#113 TurnerNation on 12.14.20 at 7:55 pm

It’s been said that the world was conquered using only these two words: Mandatory. Asymptomatic.

We are but 9 months in. A dark winter and more bankers hijinx and control in 2021. Would you expect anything less atthis point? Say how are those R0 numbers looking lads? That goalpost. Gaol Pillories .
Many people are lapping up these New System rules.

#114 Justin S on 12.14.20 at 7:55 pm

Great post – thanks Garth.

Can not wait for things to get back to normal.

#115 Steve French on 12.14.20 at 8:02 pm

I used to like listening to the Howe Street .com podcast “This Week in Money”.

It’s a bit off the wall, but i especially liked that 70 year old California property analyst guy that speaks like a surfer dude.

But jeez louise that Jim Goddard guy sees to get some new guests.

This past Saturday featured Gerard Celeste — literally foaming at the month, ranting and screaming into the microphone about how wearing Covid face masks was one step away from the gas chambers.

The second part of the show featured a guest that expounded on how solar and cosmic cycles affects the stock market.

WTF? What the heck are they smoking over in Vancouver?

Sorry Jim Goddard– your podcast is a complete joke! I’d be embarrassed to present that crap.

#116 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 8:14 pm

@#110 Russ
“If COVID takes me out I want all my pallbearers to be politicians.

So they can let me down, one last time.”

********
HAHAHAHAHAHA

You, my son, win “Comment of the Day” award.

#117 Piet on 12.14.20 at 8:15 pm

#56 Doug in London
“Solitude is a state of productive and contented time alone…”

The past ten months of mainly solitude have been productive for me. It helps to be retired. I’m learning how to play the piano by working through the sequence of books my children studied a few decades ago. Becoming more serious about daily meditation. Studying advaita vedanta. Listening to Swami Sarvapriyananda podcasts while walking in the forest. Reading more. Doing lots of resistance training and yoga. Apart from quick trips for groceries once every two weeks or so the only contact with others is short conversations with neighbours now and then while out for a walk or bike ride. Solitude is quite agreeable.

#118 Conspiracy Theory on 12.14.20 at 8:17 pm

I was reading the other day that Facebook can tell whether you are about to hook up with someone by the number of times you comment on their posts and they comment on yours. So they start showing wedding or vacation adds. They can also tell whether you are going to break up with someone if the comments decline, so they start showing adds for dating sites and lawyers.

I thought this must be bunk, but then I noticed that the amount of dating adds I got on YouTube directly correlated to the number of clips I watched from “Two and a Half Men”.

And they don’t care if you don’t use your real name. They construct the profile anyway and know much about you just based on who your “Facebook Friends” are, what you click, what you post, and even where you hover your mouse.

George Orwell didn’t see this coming.

#119 DON on 12.14.20 at 8:19 pm

The Cake Maker dilemma is troubling to me. Not sure why I am sitting on the fence not but knowing all the details is definitely part of the problem. Was she in the midst of growing her business, did she buy equipment, or report income to aid her defense? The CRA’s primary objective is not to help you out, best to have your proof together and story straight as it is always recorded…thanks to the Customer ‘Relationship’ Management system.

Now, if there are enough folks in the same boat pleading the same thought as she is…could be a political spear for the Conservatives if Trudeau goes into a Spring election. Watch the additional 100 Billion in spending for election timing. People are loosing patience, his window may be closing or if the virus goes for another wave he could hold fro another year before more taxes come down the pipe. If I were him, I would go in the Spring and fill the platform with 100 Billion recovery spending for jobs and businesses, voila…slim majority…but still a majority.

People don’t seemed to be afraid of all that debt floating around out there. Debt seems to be comfortable at the moment as ALL the monthly payments are manageable to a certain degree. Consequences after 15 years of easy cheap money. The malls are seemingly packed in BC. Looked way busier than last year.

Great time of the year to be a criminal…mandatory masks and people flush with cash.

#120 Drinking on 12.14.20 at 8:22 pm

One last post for those of you interested in ice fishing.

Greg Oven lives in Southern B.C., completely genuine, tells it like it is. Loves the outdoors, drywaller by trade hoping to make a career change in his stage in life with Youtube videos. I very much enjoy his videos. Anyways here is one where he catches trout’s with a mousetrap, I am going to try it out this weekend; watch his videos they are great!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFam4l_ynxM

#121 Justin S on 12.14.20 at 8:25 pm

#58 MF on 12.14.20 at 5:36 pm
“ No wonder. Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it”

-Not one person I know who is working from home feels even a hint of that…8 or 9 months later.

MF

My wife and I both felt that way actually. Thankfully, I’m back in the office (as long as daycares remain open). My wife can’t wait to get back. Being isolated at home without any actual face-to-face human interaction sucks. Period. We’ll see how people feel in March, after 12 months of it, and a long 4 month winter.

#122 Reality is stark on 12.14.20 at 8:26 pm

When you hit the ice the world’s rules go to hell. When the 6’3” 225 lb. goon says he is going to chop your head off and means it (Marty McSorley comes to mind) that is when life gets real. When they keep punching even when you’ve been knocked out cold they mean business.
That folks is real life.
Covid is nothing.
Get tough and fight back.
Wear a mask.
You chose to get on the ice. Get some licks in on the way down.
If he doesn’t kill you you can always blindside him on the next shift and bust his collarbone. That usually stops them from chirping for a little while.

#123 KLNR on 12.14.20 at 8:32 pm

@#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:20 pm
@#70 KLNR
“saw a bald eagle for the first time about a month ago.
In south western Ontario of all places.
What an amazingly huge creature.”
+++++

You should come out west when the Covid shutdowns are over and go to Squamish for the annual Eagle Count….

http://www.brackendaleartgallery.com/EagleCount.html

Its quite something. I see them over my shop in Burnaby almost daily.
I have a bird seed feeder that I put out in the winter and two year ago in the winter….I had a bald eagle slam into a group of sparrows on the ground not 5 feet from my office window.
The fricken thing sat there eating a sparrow.
It was about 3.5 feet high and bulky.
Looked like a dog.
Impressive.

always figured I’d have to hit the west coast to see one.
was a total shock when I saw it – had to pull over.
and ya, totally looked like a big dog.

#124 Shelley Maven on 12.14.20 at 8:39 pm

Optimism is appreciated at this blessed time of year. It doesn’t help to be stressed, for sure. The best revenge is always, living well, so, start a new business or something positive. Make lemonade.

However, it hasn’t helped that Christmas hate groups have been allowed to proliferate or that our PM ( bless his shrunken little heart) contributed to the spread of the virus early on with his feckless policies of no airport checks, no masking and following China’s lies.

Anyone thinking the virus is an opportunity to slap horrid policies like the Great Reset on a devastated population will be remembered alongside history’s most infamous ghouls. OK, let’s not rehash that, it’s too painful. BTW, the number of dead is over 13000 not 12000. A thousand people should’ve not be glossed over. Let’s forgive Trudeau for putting Canada at the back of the line after screwing up any hope of getting vaccine in a timely manner instead of relying on the notoriously selfish Chinese Communist Party. Let’s give thanks instead to the Walloon people in Belgium who gave us a small part of their own vaccine. They also let Trudeau off the hook when he tried to bend the Cheese Rule, so thanks Belgium for your small favor when our own PM can’t get it together.

Can I get a Christmas apology on the Vancouver Real Estate file? We were punting up statistics and anecdotal information for several years only to have Eastern pundits shoot us down. Now it’s proven that foreign money was in fact the root of all evil and government agents weren’t including those certain facts, for whatever reason of their own. Now it seems the worm has turned and it’s obvious Vancouvers west side is nuclear, near vacant, nothing but a safe deposit box for foreign money.

Maybe if the reporting hadn’t been based on the politically correct we might have saved entire neighborhoods from being hollowed out? Think of that ?

#125 DON on 12.14.20 at 8:41 pm

@ the Jaguar

Is your line of work debt counseling, accounting?

#126 Stealth on 12.14.20 at 8:45 pm

Well, it is pretty clear that everything repeats in cycles throughout human history whichever iteration cycle you believe it to be. Everything except human psyche.

There are untold thousands or even millions of people in Canada and all over the world working extremely hard to keep pandemic under control especially front line health care workers.

So thanks to all of them we will once again defeat this pandemic like we did many times before in human history while all these brave keyboard cowboys constantly complain, retort and theorize. There is no free lunch and this pandemic will be defeated on the backs of these unsung heroes.

Thank you front line workers. God bless.

#127 Keen Reader on 12.14.20 at 8:46 pm

Nice positive post, thanks. I totally miss a heart-felt handshake or squeeze from my good friends. Wearing a mask is a minor annoyance, and undoubtedly helps one another. I wish the same could be said for the recent crop of vaccines – data only support reduced symptoms at this point, nothing about immunity. However, lots of studies showing the near 100% efficacy of well-known repurposed drugs, from countries that just cannot afford the wait for the latest, greatest and priciest… all duly ignored by the MSM, too busy repeating and enforcing the official dogma!

Blame – the jury is still very much out on the virus’ origins:
https://www.newsweek.com/dr-fauci-backed-controversial-wuhan-lab-millions-us-dollars-risky-coronavirus-research-1500741
Add to this the flip-flopping by the WHO and our “leaders”, plus a good measure of CYA, economy be damned. It all definitely made things worse, and simply didn’t have to be this way. Deep breath, it will take some time yet, but hopefully headed in the right direction from this point.

#128 DON on 12.14.20 at 8:51 pm

#98 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.14.20 at 7:23 pm

#19 IHCTD9 on 12.14.20 at 4:01 pm
“…and render it impossible to see a smile, a cocked lip or those little wrinkles of welcome in a familiar face”
___

This is the part I hate most. I usually joke around with random folks when the opportunity presents itself. Restaurants, gas stations, grocery stores, convenience stores – you name it. It’s tough to do this when everyone is masked up.
———–
It’s the eyes my friend.
The gateway to the soul.
I’m hard of hearing, and I hate it when people wear sunglasses.
************

YUP all about the eyes. Now we are forced to look eye to eye. Interesting. But I do miss the small chat IH is referring to especially in a comical situation.

#129 Chris F on 12.14.20 at 8:55 pm

Thanks Garth.
Needed that…

#130 Flop... on 12.14.20 at 9:06 pm

#103 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:32 pm
#87 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 7:03 pm

“NonPlused greatest quality is his open honesty.”

Here I was, thinking it was his ability to annoy the piss out of Faron…

M46BC

#131 Mondo on 12.14.20 at 9:11 pm

Great message tonight Garth!
Keep on keepin on.

#132 Doug t on 12.14.20 at 9:11 pm

Sadly I am starting to believe our friend TurnerNation more and more- it’s getting hard to believe that we will ever go back to “normal” – civilizations never go “back” – what’s in store for us all is yet to be seen – adapt, comply, fall in line OR don’t and live your life the way you want to live your life

#133 SOS on 12.14.20 at 9:22 pm

#52 British blog is referring to the basic psychology being exploited to control the narrative. This has been obvious from the beginning or very early on, and it’s condescending. The fundamental need to belong and cognitive dissonance come to mind. Unfortunately I think our leaders themselves are at the whim of psychological forces beyond their awareness or control.

#134 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.14.20 at 9:23 pm

#100 kc on 12.14.20 at 7:29 pm
#82 JRinVic on 12.14.20 at 6:47 pm

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Well said, and I am in BC also. I couldn’t have said it better.

cheers
———-
Time to move to Alberta, guys.
Good riddance.

#135 MF on 12.14.20 at 9:24 pm

91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:11

Pfft. No. That was in March.

We do virtual pillow fights now instead!

MF

#136 Garth's Son Drake on 12.14.20 at 9:24 pm

‘New variant’ of coronavirus identified in England, as reported by BBC and everyone else today, which is right on cue with what Li-Meng Yan was predicting months back. So too has Jeff Gundlach more recently.

If there is a new variant that bucks the vax we are going to be in huge trouble for 2021 – it will make 2020 look like dream.

Next, starting to see signs the bottom might be in on the Urban Condo market.

The Downtown Vancouver condo market has taken a sharp U-turn this month. Listings that were getting zero calls are suddenly selling, sometimes in multiple offers.

Finally, Jim Goddard had Gerald Celente back on Howe Street? Just watched it. Dope. Not saying I agree with all of it, but very good points. Dude calls it like it is.

#137 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 9:28 pm

@#179 Linda
“#149 ‘Crowded’ – weddings are expensive. The average cost for a cake to serve approximately 100 people is $600.”

++++++

O….M….G…… I’ve been asskicked……by a wedding planner………..

Apocalypse2020 was right.

P.S.
Huge landslide in BC today. Bute Inlet.
Prepare!

#138 Faron on 12.14.20 at 9:29 pm

#96 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:18 pm

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm
“Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:”

Well, that isn’t going to go away. If we get rid of all the cows the fields they live on will be useless and the deer will take over.


Some things don’t actually have a better solution.

Wait, you are saying that we need to keep cattle around so we can keep the land that the cattle use for grazing in grazing shape? That is circular thinking my friend and makes zero sense. Could we use that land in other ways? Is not using land and letting it return to a semblance of naturalness a detriment to society? Quite the opposite. And without the trophic hole that eating meat puts us in, we wouldn’t need as much cropland further opening up more natural space. Overall, our landscape impact would drop or be used for more productive means — like windfarms and solar panels PV.

There’s also plenty of evidence that the introduction of non-native grasses has lead to the increased likelihood of wildfire.

https://www.pnas.org/content/116/47/23594

And that’s just N. America. Let us not even begin to address what Brazilian beef farming has done to the Amazon Basin.

I eat meat. It’s one of my many ethical quagmires and something I let myself glaze over because I don’t want to think about it, or I just want something tasty. But it’s far from necessary to us or to the earth’s wellbeing. Anyhow, a new years resolution for me perhaps.

#139 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.14.20 at 9:36 pm

#123 KLNR on 12.14.20 at 8:32 pm
@#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 7:20 pm
@#70 KLNR
“saw a bald eagle for the first time about a month ago.
In south western Ontario of all places.
What an amazingly huge creature.”
+++++

You should come out west when the Covid shutdowns are over and go to Squamish for the annual Eagle Count….

http://www.brackendaleartgallery.com/EagleCount.html

Its quite something. I see them over my shop in Burnaby almost daily.
I have a bird seed feeder that I put out in the winter and two year ago in the winter….I had a bald eagle slam into a group of sparrows on the ground not 5 feet from my office window.
The fricken thing sat there eating a sparrow.
It was about 3.5 feet high and bulky.
Looked like a dog.
Impressive.

always figured I’d have to hit the west coast to see one.
was a total shock when I saw it – had to pull over.
and ya, totally looked like a big dog.
———–
CEF
The other day, you had a humming bird in your feeder.
Now it’s an eagle that looks like a dog.
You probably found a new species.
Should call it eagle fartzentis.
As for eagle sightings, in summer just drive on 99 through Delta where the garbage dump mountain is.
There are more bald eagles than seagulls.

#140 Ordinary Blog Dog on 12.14.20 at 9:37 pm

Yep, the ‘conspiracy theory whackadoos’ are aplenty. I heard one person attribute it to a lack of critical thinking over the last few decades, one of the better explanations to me. I know a lady that believes the vaccine has a micro-chip in it and represents the ‘mark of the beast’ mentioned in the bible. I let her go, too much to unpack there. Asked her where Elvis was hiding out – and why they would mimic a moon landing. She didn’t get my sarcasm. I said inquiring minds want to know … and to stop spreading this hogwash, people will know she is a wacko and start avoiding her. The ones who don’t avoid her will be wacko’s themselves.

#141 Pete from St. Cesaire on 12.14.20 at 9:44 pm

DELETED

#142 Toasted on 12.14.20 at 9:46 pm

#18 not enough people have been vaccinated for herd immunity

Case in point we are done. The vacinne is not intended to make you immune, only to lessen your symptoms when you get it. They are literally saying that. So yeah, go ahead and line up for the shot. Might be so awesome it is even DNA altering amazing! Good luck, until they physically force it on me, I’m out

#143 Rahul on 12.14.20 at 9:51 pm

Thank you for this message of hope and comfort. This too shall pass. And maybe from it we will all have learned to value and appreciate those things in life that truly matter. Perhaps some years from now we can look back and say that a virus taught us all that we are not really different from one another… in our hopes and our fears.

#144 baloney Sandwitch on 12.14.20 at 10:07 pm

Inspired post, Sir Garth.
“Hope” is the thing with feathers https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/42889/hope-is-the-thing-with-feathers-314

#145 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 10:12 pm

@#125 DON on 12.14.20 at 8:41 pm

No. I’m retired but it’s a bit of a M. Corleone thing in a “Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!” kind of thing. Time on my hands right now due to Pandemic. Workin’ a “gig”. I’m a student of human behaviour with some insights gained from everyday observations of “close up data”.

I should probably keep my mouth shut more on this blog, lol. I have good friends on Van Isle, Don. If I should find myself headed that way I’ll curl up with you in a booth and tell you some stuff that will really scare the bejesus out of you…. Maybe Fishman will take me over on his boat from VanTown. Maybe BillyBob will be visiting his family. What a blast that would be….
We could send Garth a group Selfie…

#146 blintor on 12.14.20 at 10:33 pm

#115 Steve French
“I used to like listening to the Howe Street .com podcast “This Week in Money”.

The second part of the show featured a guest that expounded on how solar and cosmic cycles affects the stock market.
…”

There are some weird correlations that seem to make no sense. Check out this bleak story by Robert A. Heinlein (who, btw, came up with “TANSTAAFL”)

http://www.weylmann.com/The_Year_of_the_Jackpot.pdf

#147 Psydney on 12.14.20 at 10:51 pm

Thanks Garth, what a great post. Hang in there.

#148 Steven Nicolle on 12.14.20 at 11:29 pm

Good post. What I thought back in March is true. People are showing their worst side. The Saskatchewan premier was saying that the medical officer for that province who is Indian was on the receiving end of racial slurs over the weekend. People are selfish and petty for the most part. The winners are the people who care deeply and have some empathy for others. Usually these people are the ones who give more than what they receive. You know we can criticize things that were done and said during the pandemic but was there anyone available who was around in 1917 to warn us? This vaccination under a year rates with the moon landing. Incredible scientific achievement. People will slam it though because they seek failure in life. It justifies their failures. That’s the problem. Happiness makes them unhappy. So they have to voice their unsubstantiated opinion just to puff out their chest. Put something or someone down to make them feel better. Okay I am just rambling now. Everyone stay safe.

#149 Ben Dover on 12.14.20 at 11:29 pm

#137 Faron on 12.14.20 at 9:29 pm
#96 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:18 pm

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm
“Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:”

I eat meat. It’s one of my many ethical quagmires and something I let myself glaze over because I don’t want to think about it, or I just want something tasty. But it’s far from necessary to us or to the earth’s wellbeing. Anyhow, a new years resolution for me perhaps.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

In English, we have a word for you. It’s called hypocrite. You know, the type that love to portray themselves as beyond reproach and virtuous to the extreme. I think I met your wife Karen when we were picking up steaks, at Costco, no less.

Now show us your true colors and tell us … who will be visiting you for XMas this year. Daughter from university, son from a different province…don’t be shy. You’ve already told us about your meat hypocrisy. BTW, have you considered a career in politics?

BTW

#150 Ustabe on 12.14.20 at 11:42 pm

When did this place turn into a popularity contest?

#151 Robert Ash on 12.14.20 at 11:46 pm

Thanks and well said, Garth. I sure appreciate a good laugh now more than ever, so tell that old favorite, if you can ……Cheers, and top of the season to all!

#152 Indigirl on 12.15.20 at 12:03 am

Brilliant post today with a message we all need to hear. Thank you.

#153 Nonplused on 12.15.20 at 12:37 am

#137 Faron on 12.14.20 at 9:29 pm
#96 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:18 pm

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm
“Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:”

Well, that isn’t going to go away. If we get rid of all the cows the fields they live on will be useless and the deer will take over.


Some things don’t actually have a better solution.

Wait, you are saying that we need to keep cattle around so we can keep the land that the cattle use for grazing in grazing shape? That is circular thinking my friend and makes zero sense.

——————————-

My dear Faron, you need to stop using aspersions to describe other people and their thought processes.

Before there were cattle there were bison. As far as the eye could see. Nature grazed the land herself, and the noble natives lived off the bison (or buffalo if you prefer). Yes, we did replace the buffalo with cows, and not all of the reasons for that were in any way fair to the natives, but it is not like there wasn’t anything grazing the land or anybody eating the meat before.

#154 Nonplused on 12.15.20 at 12:39 am

#130 Flop… on 12.14.20 at 9:06 pm
#103 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:32 pm
#87 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 7:03 pm

“NonPlused greatest quality is his open honesty.”

Here I was, thinking it was his ability to annoy the piss out of Faron…

M46BC

—————–

Good with the bad I suppose.

#155 biochemist on 12.15.20 at 1:15 am

Lockdown Forever on 12.14.20 at 3:42 pm

Even with 100% Covid vaccination, we will experience lockdowns for a long time. This is based upon the use of the PCR test for case reporting. The present test is sensitive and does not allow for a range of viral load.
It will pickup dead nucleotides and amplify them to give a positive result but the individual does not have active Covid. Since we have lived with coronaviruses likely forever, there will always be a large number of cases reported. I’m with Bill Gates when he says we will not go back to normal until 2022 but for a different reason.
Adapt to the new normal until the test has a gradation index of viral load. I’ve adapted, don’t go anywhere and live in a mountain ski town where I can recreate everyday of the year and work online. I feel for those who have lost their livelihood.

There are a LOT of misconceptions about the PCR test.

1) There is no such thing as “dead nucleotides”. Whether viruses are even alive is a matter of philosophy (generally, on their own, no). PCR detects relatively intact genomes. If it’s broken down, it’s dead, but it won’t be detected. If it’s intact, it is likely replicating, and you are thus actively infected. You may bave *very little* virus in you, but … low level right now doesn’t mean you haven’t had or will have higher levels. It’s all important to follow, especially for the sake of tracing outbreaks (yes, your case may be trivial to you, but the epidemiologists want to know!)

2) They use quantitative PCR. This is, by definition, quantitative. That Ct (threshold cycle) often used as a reason to doubt it? It actually tells you exactly how much there is. The more you have, the sooner (fewer cycles) the signal crosses the threshold. One copy amplifies about 28. Its’ there or it isn’t. This is why past 30 or so is discarded, as it isn’t, can’t be, real. But what if your Ct is earlier? It doubles per cycle, so Ct of 27 is two viruses in your original sample, 26 is four… etch. A scan of the literature suggests that you start being infectious at about 25, and severe cases are well into the teens.

A lot of the criticisms of PCR were worked out when these qPCR based diagnostic strategies were developed 15 or so years ago. Its’ a very powerful technique, so powerful that it’ basically the standard diagnostic now.

Long story short, it *is* quantative, and even one intact virus is clinically significant.

If anything, not sensitive enough. It’s directed, you need to know what you’re looking for. Look for cheap third generation sequencing to supersede it in the next ten years… it is even more sensitive, tell you everything that’s living on you in one quick swab.

#156 windjammer on 12.15.20 at 1:37 am

Well I have been meditating hard on how population growth needs to stop if we care to have any biodiversity left in Canada and the world. We need to not travel so much and not consume and use up so much energy if we have any hope of thwarting global warming. The water out here on the west coast is becoming void of salmon and other varieties of fish not to mention the Orca’s are in trouble. There is nothing left in the sea for anything bigger to eat. So this covid thing is accomplishing what I have been wishing for in many respects. Not the best way to do it for sure. I thought we would lean on each other more when we eventually got here. Anyway I fervently believe that less economic activity is what we need. But we need to put structure in place to eliminate suffering for all. Live larger with less. Peace and compassion.

#157 SoggyShorts on 12.15.20 at 2:44 am

#74 Howard on 12.14.20 at 6:26 pm
The needy extroverts who require a constant audience will have to adapt.
************
Can’t say I’m envious since the pandemic will pass before I get too bored, but it’s nice that there is something positive for you about being socially inept.

#158 Coastal gal on 12.15.20 at 2:46 am

Your best column ever. You totally defined how I was feeling today. You captured my emotions, frustration, loneliness and just wanting things to be normal again.
I wonder when we can see people smile again and get rid of masks. When we can have friends over for dinner or drinks.
My biggest fear is it will not be over… and we will forget what it was like to be human.

#159 Shelley Mavin on 12.15.20 at 4:21 am

DELETED

#160 BillyBob on 12.15.20 at 5:09 am

#58 MF on 12.14.20 at 5:36 pm
“ No wonder. Working from home may have seemed cool, affordable and flexible for a few months. But it also brings gnawing loneliness. Zoom doesn’t cut it”

-Not one person I know who is working from home feels even a hint of that…8 or 9 months later.

MF

================================

Anecdotal.

Worthless, remember?

#161 Diamond Dog on 12.15.20 at 6:55 am

#28 Dolce Vita on 12.14.20 at 4:13 pm

Appreciated reading your comment this morning, DV. A nice, human side to it, refreshing.

#162 Merci Garth on 12.15.20 at 7:02 am

.

#163 Grant on 12.15.20 at 7:17 am

#154 biochemist on 12.15.20 at 1:15 am

Explains why the are cycling 30-40 times to get the numbers they need for now. It also gives them leverage to play

How they could fake the success of the vaccine
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia3/ciencia_coronavirus238.htm

Make your own analysis. Good luck to all.

#164 Howard on 12.15.20 at 7:24 am

#156 SoggyShorts on 12.15.20 at 2:44 am
#74 Howard on 12.14.20 at 6:26 pm
The needy extroverts who require a constant audience will have to adapt.
************
Can’t say I’m envious since the pandemic will pass before I get too bored, but it’s nice that there is something positive for you about being socially inept.

———————————–

You mistake introversion for social ineptness. There are many socially awkward extroverts; actually for them it’s even more embarrassing, since they basically turn into clowns and don’t realize it.

If your attention span allows for it, I recommend Susan Cain’s book “Quiet” which does a good job of explaining the above.

#165 Do we have all the facts on 12.15.20 at 7:24 am

Immunologists have been studying relationship between chronic stress and the efficiency of the human immune system for years. It would appear that the production of chemicals that trigger responses in our immune systems are affected by chronic stress. The exact impact of this relationship on the human immune system remains to be
discovered.

Immunologists have also been studying the relationship between micronutrient deficiencies and the human immune system. I know from observing the eating behaviours of residents in long term care facilities that
the intake of zinc, selenium, copper, iron, folic acid, vitamins A, B6, C, D and E will probably decline with a loss of appetite.

Given the trillions of dollars of impact caused by the Covid 19 virus around the world I find it curious that the media, most governments, and most health agencies have become dedicated to the creation of chronic stress within the population by focussing on rising infection rates and deaths attributed to Covid 19.

I also find it curious that the media and government officials have almost ignored the importance of improving the nutritional needs of elderly citizens who are most vulnerable to all viral and bacterial infections.

In Ontario the construction of new long term care facilities where residents are accommodated four to a room was made illegal in 1998. For solely economic reasons the replacement or renovation of facilities constructed before 1998 has not been a priority of government. Given the extremely high percentage of deaths attributed to Covid 19 that occurred in long term care facilities one might assume that a reduction in density and an improvement in dietary supplements provided to all residents of long term care facilities might have become a government priority.

Placing all of our hopes on a vaccine for the Covid 19 virus does not address the underlying issue of how to protect our most vulnerable citizens in the future. This has been my concern from day one. We must look at the actual data being compiled and focus on measures that might protect our most vulnerable citizens from all viral and bacterial infections in the future.

#166 mike from corbeil on 12.15.20 at 7:25 am

#82 jrinvan
best post I have read in a long long time. thanks

#167 maxx on 12.15.20 at 7:32 am

@ #6

“Be nice people,”,

Don’t know where you’ve been hanging out, but the great majority of people I encounter on a daily basis are overwhelmingly polite and considerate, going out of their way to accommodate one another.

I find that this mess has brought out more good in people than bad. It’s the tiniest minority of jerks who spoil it for others. They believe:

– they suffer more than anyone else;
– everyone else is infected;
– their time is somehow more precious;
– they just deserve more……

You can spot these losers a mile away. Avoid like the plague.

And you don’t need to be nice to them.

#168 David Hawke on 12.15.20 at 7:46 am

DELETED

Never link that site here again. – Garth

#169 Gravy Train on 12.15.20 at 7:56 am

#86 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 6:55 pm
“Policy discussions around energy would be a lot more productive if they involved people from the engineering or physics departments.” Do you deny the photoelectric effect in solar panels is a phenomenon of condensed matter physics?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoelectric_effect

“There is no such thing as a free lunch.” Uranium is non-renewable, but the sun is by definition a public good and is literally ‘a free lunch’. Who says there’s no such thing?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_good_(economics)

#170 Apocalypse2020 on 12.15.20 at 8:13 am

The Russians have just hacked everything of critical security importance in the USA, esp the DHS.

https://globalnews.ca/news/7521377/us-homeland-security-businesses-russia-hackers/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlVGnu7i0tY

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/13/us/politics/russian-hackers-us-government-treasury-commerce.html

The scope of this is stunning. The vulnerability of the US right now is epic.

Most don’t have a clue how critical this will be in the weeks ahead.

The clock is ticking.

PREPARE

#171 Guelph Guru on 12.15.20 at 8:53 am

The pandemic has given us the break to pause and think.
There is more good in the world than bad. Needless to say we also have to learn from this, as a lot of flawed leadership has been unearthed.
Thanks Garth for steering the heard towards the positive.
Live long and prosper :)

#172 millmech on 12.15.20 at 8:58 am

#51&#137
https://www.amazon.ca/Guns-Germs-Steel-Jared-Diamond/dp/0393317552,
I found it to be an incredible book to read, if they have not burned all the copies highly recommend it!

#173 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.15.20 at 9:15 am

@#138 Potentates Piles
“As for eagle sightings, in summer just drive on 99 through Delta where the garbage dump mountain is.”

+++++

Spending quality time at the old Land Fill again are we P?

#174 Another Deckchair on 12.15.20 at 9:45 am

@168 Gravy Train

You’ve got to dig a little deeper. I’m not disagreeing with you, but just doing some back-of-the-envelope calcs. (check them, maybe I made a mistake here – its 5 minutes of digging:)

Solar returns something like 150 watts/(metre*metre) near the equator.

1gigajoule = 277,777.78 watts

From https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2510006001
average household yearly use is:
year 2015, 92.5 gigajoules.

So, that’s 92.5 x 277,777.78 = 25,694,444.65 watts/household for a year.

Solar returns something like 150 watts/m2

Figure (using cosine) that at best I’d get something like 150×0.7 = 105.

Now, the sun does not shine full brightness 24/7, so (fudge factor here) lets say I get full power 1/5 of the time.

105 watts/m2 / 5 = approx 21 watts/m2 per (24 hour) day.

* 365 days/year; 7,665 watts/m2

Now, my property here in the city is 50′ x 100′, roughly 500m2.

500 x 7665 = 3,832,500 Watts.

That’s about 14% of the energy required, assuming my property is 100% covered by solar panels. And, not taking into account inefficiencies of energy storage, nor the energy needed to construct.

I actually like using the backyard, and having sun shine in the windows.

As I said in the comment Nonplussed referred to “we need to use less energy” period.

#175 Dharma Bum on 12.15.20 at 9:51 am

#117 Piet

Solitude is quite agreeable.
——————————————————————–

Silence too.

“An artist respects the silence that serves as the foundation of creativity.” – an NYU Graduate…suckah!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E62iA6KCIQ

I just woke up. What’d I miss?

#176 James Locke on 12.15.20 at 10:02 am

DELETED

#177 Do we have all the facts on 12.15.20 at 10:13 am

One interesting fact is that a majority of experts familiar with PCR testing have confirmed is that tests that exceed 30 cycles will generate many false positives. A false positive means that presence of the Covid 19 virus cannot be confirmed and in most instances cannot be cultured.

The standard being used by health authorities in Canada is 35 to 40 cycles and in some jurisdictions 45 cycles. It is reasonable to ask why Health Canada is suggesting a minimum of 35 cycles when there is clear evidence from well qualified professionals that PCR tests performed at more than 30 cycles could result in thousands of false positives.

Our mainstream media has been almost silent on this issue in spite of dozens of articles in respected medical journals confirming the generation of false positives from PCR tests performed at 30 cycles or more.

Contrary to our governments opinion we can handle the truth!!

maximum of

#178 George S on 12.15.20 at 10:21 am

It seems to me that a big source of problems in the world is from the people accepting both sides of an argument as having equal validity when one side of the argument is a valid scientific argument with loads of verifiable evidence and the other is the personal opinion of a person with no scientific education and no supporting evidence whatsoever.

Covid is a perfect example. There is plenty of evidence that is verifiable that there is currently a global C19 pandemic with verifiable numbers of excess deaths (in countries that keep track of such things) due to something that can only be attributed to C19. But yet there are people that claim that it is a hoax, that it is no problem, and is only a ploy to inject 5G tracking units along with the vaccine.
It is not a valid side to any debate yet some people accept it as a valid side.

A saying from Mark Twain:
“Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.”

That is what is happening all around the world.

#179 Steerage science on 12.15.20 at 10:33 am

162 Grant on 12.15.20 at 7:17 am
#154 biochemist on 12.15.20 at 1:15 am

Explains why the are cycling 30-40 times to get the numbers they need for now. It also gives them leverage to play

How they could fake the success of the vaccine
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia3/ciencia_coronavirus238.htm

Make your own analysis. Good luck to all.
……

Anti-vaxxer conspiracy drivel……

#180 Steerage science on 12.15.20 at 10:45 am

A stunning scientific achievement…amaxing stuff.

https://twitter.com/EricTopol/status/1338854694337187844?s=19

#181 RyYYZ on 12.15.20 at 10:52 am

#173 Another Deckchair on 12.15.20 at 9:45 am
@168 Gravy Train

You’ve got to dig a little deeper. I’m not disagreeing with you, but just doing some back-of-the-envelope calcs. (check them, maybe I made a mistake here – its 5 minutes of digging:)

Solar returns something like 150 watts/(metre*metre) near the equator.

1gigajoule = 277,777.78 watts
===================================

No number of Joules equals any number of Watts. A Joule is a unit of energy, a Watt is a unit of power. A Joule/second is a Watt. A Watt-second is a Joule.

Slightly confusingly, we measure total energy consumed not in some multiple of Joules, but instead kWh = 1000 W * 1hr*(3600 s/hr) =3600000 J (or 3.6 MJ).

#182 Doug in London on 12.15.20 at 11:02 am

@George S, post #177:
You’re quite right. Personally I don’t get it with this rejection of good science in favour of rubbish. I’m healthy, never had polio, smallpox or other diseases that in the bad old days killed many people and left many others with permanent disabilities, all because of good science. On the subject of Mark Twain he also had good advice for anyone who believes and spreads this rubbish pseudo science. He said: You’re best to keep quiet and have everyone think you’re an idiot than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

#183 Jesse on 12.15.20 at 11:15 am

#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm
Most pandemics are caused by humans living in close proximity to animals, and eating them:

HIV – eating bushmeat in Africa
COVID-19 – wet market in China
Spanish Flu – Ducks in Europe to some, a chicken farm in the US to other experts
SARS – Horseshoe bats
Ebola – Bats
Swine Flu – Pig farm
The list goes on and on.

When Europeans came to North America, disease ravaged the indigenous peoples here because they had no immunity to the various diseases picked up from domesticated animals and livestock. The indigenous people did not infect the Europeans because they did not domesticate animals. Horses arrived later in North America.

We know who to blame. It’s anyone who supports animal agriculture. Because this will happen again and again, as it always has.

All so that people can enjoy a heart-attack inducing steak.

Wow, what a great trade.

************************

I didn’t know people eat pangolin and/or bat steak.

#184 LP on 12.15.20 at 11:19 am

#144 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 10:12 pm

Better include Flop in the invite..you know, for keepin’ it real.

F73ON

#185 Faron on 12.15.20 at 11:27 am

#173 Another Deckchair on 12.15.20 at 9:45 am
@168 Gravy Train

You confused Watts for Watt * hours, but otherwise checks out (I think) but the available energy calc is crude.

Here’s a handy map for integrated power rates including clouds/day/night/latitude/etc:

https://www.nrel.gov/gis/assets/images/nsrdb-v3-ghi-2018-01.jpg

Or to get numbers:

https://maps.nrel.gov/nsrdb-viewer

If you live S of 60, just click on your locale. This takes into account all factors.

Missed point is: how much energy are you generating on your roof(s) now? Most of us that’s zero.

My calcs:

3.6 kWh/sq m/day is available to me according to the above. I use about 12000 kWh annually, so 33 kWh/day. Lets call it 40kWh for safety factor. Efficiency of a panel is 15% at worst (22% at best).

I need 40 kWh dy ^-1/3.6 kWh m^-2 dy^-2/0.15 = 75 m^2.

would roughly need 75 sq meters to meet my electrical needs (50 sq m with efficient panels). I heat with electricity and gas, so this would be the low end. I live in a warm climate. Of course, there’s seasonal variability, but like most of us, the house is attached to a grid so can flow energy in and out as needed.

Coming at it the other way

93Gj = 93000000000j/yr/(3600s/hr*24hr/day*365.25day/yr)

~3000Watts as your burn rate (a watt is a joule per second) or

3000*24hr/dy = 72kWhr dy^-1 or, roughly double my amount above. 150sq m of panels needed which is about 1/4 of my property or my house plus my garage roof area. And projected area with latitude tilt makes the panel footprint smaller.

This number will be much much larger for a large house in Manitoba. But, a lot of Canadians live in small apartments that are really energy efficient. A simple way to think of that is #people divided by the surface area of the building. Single family detached sucks for energy efficiency. Regardless, the grid can distribute the power as needed.

#186 GARTH TURNER - STAY HUMAN on 12.15.20 at 11:45 am

DELETED

#187 Sara on 12.15.20 at 11:55 am

#177 George S on 12.15.20 at 10:21 am
“It seems to me that a big source of problems in the world is from the people accepting both sides of an argument as having equal validity when one side of the argument is a valid scientific argument with loads of verifiable evidence and the other is the personal opinion of a person with no scientific education and no supporting evidence whatsoever.”
==================================

Indeed. And then they get angry, claiming their right to freedom of expression when their “side” is moderated or flagged as being in opposition to facts and data (for example in twitter: “this claim about election fraud is disputed”).

So tired of dumb people who are clueless as to how dumb they are. See: “Dunning-Kruger effect” for one explanation as to why people think COVID is a “plandemic” or that Trump actually won the election.

#188 The West on 12.15.20 at 12:43 pm

#184 Sara on 12.15.20 at 11:55 am

#177 George S on 12.15.20 at 10:21 am
“It seems to me that a big source of problems in the world is from the people accepting both sides of an argument as having equal validity when one side of the argument is a valid scientific argument with loads of verifiable evidence and the other is the personal opinion of a person with no scientific education and no supporting evidence whatsoever.”
==================================

Indeed. And then they get angry, claiming their right to freedom of expression when their “side” is moderated or flagged as being in opposition to facts and data (for example in twitter: “this claim about election fraud is disputed”).

So tired of dumb people who are clueless as to how dumb they are. See: “Dunning-Kruger effect” for one explanation as to why people think COVID is a “plandemic” or that Trump actually won the election.

==================================

The Dunning – Kruger effect has been successfully refuted as a “pinnacle argument theory” wherein disagreement of opinion can be dismissed because “the individual does not agree and therefore holds itself superior to counter argument”.

Financial Capitalism has been a disaster that is winding down its inevitable conclusion. Maybe you’re one of the lucky ones – maybe not.

But watch the projection out there. There is a lot of human suffering going on and whether, or not, your CNN narrative is superior to QAnon’s narrative (or any other two juxtaposed arguments) you cannot dismiss the fact that culturally and socially North America has run its course under the current circumstances.

Continue the hard line division by using confrontational words to dismiss and insult those you don’t agree with and you are a part of the problem.

Forget post-modern theory, the human condition is already well understood. Look to recorded history (all of it, not just the bits pieces that serve your bias) and you will gain a clearer understanding of the world around you.

Compassion, empathy and human connection have been removed from our existence (and long before the lockdowns) – the age of HyperNormalisation and Atomic human societies.

Well worth the watch:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yS_c2qqA-6Y

#189 Faron on 12.15.20 at 12:48 pm

#186 Sara on 12.15.20 at 11:55 am

#177 George S on 12.15.20 at 10:21 am

I hypothesize that this is part of a larger phenomenon owing to the erosion of professionalism people’s view of it and deliberate methods of eroding fact with disinformation. It’s true that snake-oilers and conspiracy minded people have been around as long as humanity, but my belief is that the erosion of fact really took off when the tobacco companies put together a play book to defend their product against the objective truth that cigarettes cause cancer. Additionally, at around that same time a backlash against technology and science grew within the counter culture movement of the ’60s and onward. The counter culture movement was accompanied by hedonism and selfishness that leads one to think themselves as the ultimate authority. Ultimately these led to the erosion of professionalism and respect for true professionals unless it was inconvenient (like Dr.s working on your personal malady or engineers building you a freeway or a lawyer defending you in divorce court).

These two “movements”, one directly attacking scientific knowledge with misinformation and the other attacking the technocracy that had grown in the post war boom and aimed to erode the standing of professionals have only grown since mid-century. The tobacco playbook has been used numerous times to protect business interests from growing regulation of their harmful effects (environmental degradation, C02 release, even the science around fat vs sugar). In many cases, the same people from one push jumped to the next once a battle was won or lost in the previous arena.

And now we have the internet where everyone is an expert and the rapidity of communication acts as an accelerant. Professionalism has been tossed aside and there is much less ability for those who truly understand problems to guide the public thinking about issues. Add to this occasional lapses of professionalism by professionals and the potency of politics and you have a morass that escalates and I don’t think we know how to deescalate this one given all of the new dynamics here.

#190 Faron on 12.15.20 at 12:57 pm

#148 Ben Dover on 12.14.20 at 11:29 pm
#137 Faron on 12.14.20 at 9:29 pm
#96 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 7:18 pm
#51 Piano_Man87 on 12.14.20 at 5:22 pm

Damn, I guess I should have chosen your level of ignorance and the associated license to do however I please.

#191 So Garth - u admit it.. on 12.15.20 at 1:05 pm

U sir are not human…so what are u then, a reptilian…

#192 espressobob on 12.15.20 at 1:35 pm

We’re creatures of habit. Change can be tough for some.

Why not consider activities thought about or considered pre covid.

Whether it’s working out, reading more (something I could never get enough of!) or going for a walk, whatever…

Nothing worthwhile comes easy.

#193 George S on 12.15.20 at 2:25 pm

To all of you speculating about how you are going to use your 150 Watts per square meter of solar power:

It is not that simple. Solar power is intermittent. You need some way of storing it for when the sun isn’t shining if you are not connected to an electrical grid. If you are attached to an electrical grid, the grid needs to have an instant switching source of an identical amount of electricity in case a cloud comes by or it gets dark. Any amount of unbuffered intermittent power (aka solar and wind power without storage) greater than 20% on grid results in instability and increased likelihood of brown and black-outs.

Batteries used as storage add a lot of cost and trouble to your electricity as well as making it much less efficient in terms of electricity per tonne of GHG emissions. There are a lot of embodied GHG emissions in batteries and other energy storage systems which can make them very inefficient ways of reducing net GHG emissions.

In addition, if you are attached to an electrical grid, any increased load on the grid (say you plugged in your nice new electric car to charge the batteries) is met by fossil fuel fired power plants. All of the renewable and low GHG emissions power sources are being used at their full capacity right now and until we start firing up a bunch of nuclear reactors any increased demand is simply going to be met by coal or natural gas.

#194 biochemist on 12.15.20 at 2:40 pm

“2 Grant on 12.15.20 at 7:17 am

#154 biochemist on 12.15.20 at 1:15 am

Explains why the are cycling 30-40 times to get the numbers they need for now. It also gives them leverage to play

How they could fake the success of the vaccine
https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia3/ciencia_coronavirus238.htm

Make your own analysis. Good luck to all.

—–

“One interesting fact is that a majority of experts familiar with PCR testing have confirmed is that tests that exceed 30 cycles will generate many false positives. A false positive means that presence of the Covid 19 virus cannot be confirmed and in most instances cannot be cultured.”

—-

They run the machines that long, but it doesnt matter. They check every cycle. Once it passes the threshold you can let it run as long as you want – it already has its result recorded. This is the big misconception. Your Ct is not the same thing as how long the machine runs!

IT is true that anything past 30 is a false positive, but…. the people running the machine know that (note that your average layperson is not smarter than your average scientist on this front. We are aware of the limitations of a technique). It’s actually advantageous to catch these, because your samples SHOULD be clearly positive (<30) or clearly negative (nothing). If you get "false positives" it indicates something is going wrong, and it's time to fix it if you can (sometimes, it's literally as simple as equipment needing a good cleaning). They are not reported as cases.

Viruses, in general, can't be cultured directly, this is something intended for bacteria (and even then, a lot of clinically relevant bacteria, can't be. The bacteria that causes TB takes a month to grow!). nCoV2, like other viruses, can be "cultured" in cell lines, but this takes too long to be diagnostically useful – again circa weeks to months – and is mostly done in a research setting.

#195 Faron on 12.15.20 at 2:43 pm

#192 George S on 12.15.20 at 2:25 pm

Whew, I’m glad you pointed that out! Sounds like license to not even try. Not trying has got us humans so far from cave dwelling knuckle dragging. Seems to work for most species really.

#196 PinO on 12.15.20 at 2:49 pm

If this doesn’t sound like the cure is worst than the disease. I must have misunderstood today’s blog.

#197 Gravy Train on 12.15.20 at 2:58 pm

#173 Another Deckchair on 12.15.20 at 9:45 am
“You’ve got to dig a little deeper. I’m not disagreeing with you, but just doing some back-of-the-envelope calcs. (check them, maybe I made a mistake here – its 5 minutes of digging:)” Nice to see you crunching the numbers. Sorry for not getting back to you right away, as I could’ve saved you a lot of time and effort.

I have a year’s worth of actual data (from Jun. 20, 2019 to Jun. 18, 2020) that I’m happy to share with you. Bought: 15,211 kWh. Sold: 4,926 kWh. Net purchases: 10,285 kWh. Produced: 9,428 kWh—using twenty 400-watt solar panels. Consumed: 19,713 kWh. Thus, 52% of my energy consumption was bought from my power company (with 48% coming from the solar panels).

More info: My 8-kilowatt solar system cost $14,925 after netting a dollar-per-watt rebate of $8,000. My annual cost savings this year are $1,447. My annual nominal after-tax rate of return is 9.6%, and my payback is 10.3 years. Hope this helps, and best wishes.

Full disclosure: I don’t sell or install solar panels.

#198 Mike on 12.15.20 at 9:22 pm

Great blog post. Made me cry

#199 Sham Solara on 12.15.20 at 11:05 pm

#198 gravy. You’re kidding right? The hype is interfering with your intellect. Your solar panels have ten year shelf life? Not even close. Landfills are filling up quickly with solar garbage. Like battery life in EVs , the replacement cost of failing ‘technology” makes it hyper- expensive long term. Maybe this is where the Green Carpetbaggers get their expansion numbers from… replacing your system every five years or less.

#200 Gravy Train on 12.16.20 at 7:57 am

#200 Sham Solara on 12.15.20 at 11:05 pm
“You’re kidding, right? The hype is interfering with your intellect. Your solar panels have ten year shelf life?” My solar panels are guaranteed for 25 years, have a degradation rate of 0.5% per year, and should continue operating at about 88% of their original capacity at the end of the guaranteed period. I’ll leave the math calculations for you as an exercise.

#201 Steven Rowlandson on 12.16.20 at 9:49 am

Garth is Cantada starting to feel like a prison?