Enough already

She made $5,000 last year baking cakes in her home. Covid hit. The wedding biz plopped. She applied for CERB to supplement household income (hubby kept his job).

The cheques rolled in. After collecting $18,500 in dole a letter from the CRA arrived questioning her eligibility for assistance. Pay the money back, it said. By December 31.

Crisis. She’d spent the cash. Saved nothing. The night after the letter arrived she spent in tears. Then she went to the media, to make the government look spiteful and cruel.

Welcome to Canada, 2020. Four in ten families pay no net tax. The federal deficit is $383 billion. When the current government is done, the debt will have doubled. The bulk of what future generations will owe was the work of one man, and his son.

On Friday StatsCan had some shocking things to say.

Household net worth since the virus hit has increased a cumulative $600 billion. As mentioned here before, the saving rate exploded higher with the pandemic. CIBC says $170 billion in cash now sits in bank accounts, private and corporate. Real estate sales and prices have romped higher. In the GTA the average property was worth $910,290 in February, when life was normal. In November, after nine months of unemployment, lockdown, death and quarantine, that property was worth $955,615.

Per capita, household net worth is $320,441, much of it real estate, which is $12,000 more than a year earlier. Across Canada, housing jumped in value by $440 billion in a single year, and most of that was represented by new mortgage debt. Home loan rates plunged by half, down to the 1.5% range. That meant even more debt resulted in lower carrying costs, so the rate of debt to assets fell to a 15-year low.

Cheap rates and $250 billion in direct payments to individuals, plus $180 billion in mortgage and credit card payment deferrals – along with sharply reduced family costs as WFH wiped away commuting and child care charges – have been profound. The wealth gap has widened. Houses have become sharply less affordable. Low-wage people have seen their employment wiped away. Small businesses have been obliterated. Folks with assets – like real estate holdings or portfolios of financial assets – have benefited disproportionately. Stock markets are finishing the worst year in a century for global recession and a public health crisis at record levels.

What is 2020 laying the foundation for?

First, more gains. Vaccine optimism and cheap rates will probably deliver a record real estate run come March. Many buyers will swallow massive mortgages at rates which can only increase in the future. Condo bargains will fade as it becomes clear the boss wants people back at their desks.

Stock markets, commodity prices and related financial assets will feed off the economic growth that the vax brings. Global GDP will increase, central banks will continue their stimulus programs and corporate profits will restore. Some analysts talk openly about The Roaring Twenties.

But we also have troubles ahead.

Cheap rates can’t last forever. When growth brings the spectre of inflation bond investors will want a premium, and yields increase. Higher rates will be a shock when mortgages are renewed, and as Ottawa services over $1 trillion in accumulated debt. Decisions taken amid a crisis in 2020 may look sketchy in 2025. Regardless of the actions taken by central banks, the price of money will rise. And so will the cost of living. A lot. Just ponder what the carbon tax will bring.

Tax levels won’t hold, either. No country the size of Canada can so increase public spending, and debt, free of consequences. The future will certainly bring higher corporate levies, an increase in the capital gains rate, empty-house taxes, elevated property tax, an additional tax bracket, more user fees, reduced local services and an extra cost for every Amazon purchase you make or Netflix movie you watch,

Political stability? Fuggedaboutit. Odds are 2021 will bring a federal election in Canada and dog-knows-what in the USA. Will Canadians re-elect the Libs who have the worst fiscal record in history, just because they dole out more money? Will the seventy million Americans who Donald Trump tricked into thinking the Biden presidency is illegitimate create discord, gridlock or worse? In a world growing ever more tribalized, how do we deal with common challenges like global debt, wealth inequality, climate change and a slimy little pathogen? We barely survived 2020, after all.

Well, stay the course. Be balanced and diversified. Forget DoorDash, Airbnb, Bitcoin or Robinhood. Fill your tax shelter vehicles. Don’t be seduced into new dollops of debt. Suck up to your employer. Shun GICs. Of course, get vaccinated. And muse on how we ever got to a point where someone earning five grand a year receives $18,500 in cash and feels like a victim.

The future can’t come soon enough.

188 comments ↓

#1 Doug t on 12.13.20 at 1:39 pm

There will be a lot of people getting a lump of coal in their stocking this Christmas

#2 espressobob on 12.13.20 at 1:48 pm

When it comes to anything the government is offering, always read the small print carefully.

Saves a lot grief.

#3 Tarot Card on 12.13.20 at 1:49 pm

Good morning
Thank you for the blog Garth.
I actually wrote the lady in PEI and suggested her to amend her tax return. There are no rules about not claiming expenses. So I suggested she remove enough expenses to get her above the $5,000. If the government says these are the rules then don’t fight the rules, use them.
Good luck to her!
Your post is both worrisome and optimistic.
I feel the economy will have lots of bumps till the vaxx and agree as firms build up inventory and the hospitality industry gets going the economy should boom.
And I agree in five years from now we may be facing some major debt hurtles.
I am still extremely worried about world debt, and I know you do not like gold? Insurance?
Thanks for reading and does anyone have other suggestions for Christine? Hopefully my idea will spur other ideas and discussions, let’s help those who are unfairly squeezed.
Cheers have a great weekend!

#4 Ray Skunk on 12.13.20 at 1:51 pm

The worst part of all these CERB overpayments/ineligible payments? T2 will tell the CRA not to chase them down as not to jeopardize the vote the cash was intended to buy. Guaranteed.

Meanwhile the CRA will no doubt be all over me if I forget to declare a $12 dividend payment.

#5 Cheese on 12.13.20 at 1:55 pm

Despite being a minimum wager, was cleaning a covid ward for most of May at 4hr/d, surviving on >1k/month, now I gross 2k/mo at my full time hospital work. I only took CERB for one month. I never want to live off government largesse, i’d rather make my own way, but somehow I suspect the taxes in later years will punish us who continued working somehow.

#6 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.13.20 at 2:01 pm

“….earned $5000 in 2019 and received $18,500 in CERB….”

++++

Yep.
The Liberals got some real geniuses at the helm these days….

“I owe, I owe…Its off to CERB I go……”

#7 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 12.13.20 at 2:06 pm

Anything MONETARY that the government is associated with…..AVOID!!

#8 i.see.debt.people on 12.13.20 at 2:09 pm

NO SYMPATHY FOR HER.
She didn’t qualify for CERB like thousands of others who gamed the CERB program and system for “free” money.

#9 Vigi cacavid on 12.13.20 at 2:14 pm

Trump won by a landslide!!!

The rest is history!

#10 Leichendiener on 12.13.20 at 2:25 pm

Never be the first in line for the next best thing.

#11 C V on 12.13.20 at 2:28 pm

This man is on fire today ladies and gents

A weird year that will usher in a weird 5 years for sure

Garth what would have to happen for these rates to start ridiculously low for 5 more years

#12 C V on 12.13.20 at 2:28 pm

*Stay* ridiculously low…

#13 Andrewski on 12.13.20 at 2:29 pm

Hubby still working & cake lady spends all $18,500 that she got from CERB? & she made $5,000 previously, what an income bump. All CERB recipients knew it was a taxable benefit & she spent it all?!

#14 Dogman01 on 12.13.20 at 2:35 pm

War on savers and wage earners.

Inflation just getting started, real inflation has been completely under-reported.

Asset inflation so make sure you own – houses, equities, maybe gold.

This is the takedown of the lower middle class in Canada, the end of upward mobility for the masses. Starting with the young.
• Competing against more labour supply, via Globalization & Immigration
• Less global demand for “workers” – via Technology
• Wages up against Inflation

“The promise of upward mobility and everybody getting a fair shake has turned out to be a fog of anaesthetizing gas administered by the ruling elites of this supposedly classless society.” -Neil Macdonald,

A few, those in the top 5% of smarts and conscientiousness will be able to find a position serving the establishment, and that will be held out as an aspirational goal.

Our new society will look more like a Brazil, entrenched wealth, masses caught in decline, more demand for socialism, more crime , more dependence on government, learned helplessness, corporate cronyism.

This is what happens when citizens become consumers.

#15 Stone on 12.13.20 at 2:39 pm

And muse on how we ever got to a point where someone earning five grand a year receives $18,500 in cash and feels like a victim.

———

Yeah…I still don’t understand why the gouvernment didn’t just replace lost income dollar for dollar. Absolute nonsense.

You didn’t qualify. You got caught…just pay it back.

#16 Dr V on 12.13.20 at 2:40 pm

Garth – two clarifications

“CIBC says $170 billion in cash now sits in bank accounts, private and corporate.”

I think it was Bloomberg that had a good article on this. In fact, this is the excess cash over and above what is normally expected. The actual totals are considerably more.

“Per capita, household net worth is $320,441”

Per capita is per person which in many (most?) cases
does not constitute a “household”. I suspect the value is either an average or median for a “household” and not per capita.

(a) “Canadian households and businesses have accumulated a minimum of $170 billion in excess cash throughout COVID-19 and are currently sitting on the largest cash hoard in recorded history, according to CIBC.” – Financial Post (b) “On a per capita basis, household net worth reached a record $320,441 in the third quarter.” – Bloomberg. – Garth

#17 BC_Doc on 12.13.20 at 2:42 pm

My college student daughter was laid off in March from her minimum wage grocery deli job. She’d earned over the $5k (net) threshold so qualified for CERB. After banking $6k (gross), she was called back to work to make less by the business owners who were receiving a 75% subsidy for her wage. I was proud of her for going back— many of her coworkers didn’t. They stayed home collecting the $2k/month pogie.

Here in BC, Premier Horgan is getting ready to write cheques for my kids that they really don’t need. I’ve advised them to deposit them in their TFSAs. My wife and I don’t qualify due to income thresholds. We will of course be paying for all of this in increased taxes down the road, as will my kids.

#18 Stone on 12.13.20 at 2:43 pm

#13 Andrewski on 12.13.20 at 2:29 pm
Hubby still working & cake lady spends all $18,500 that she got from CERB? & she made $5,000 previously, what an income bump. All CERB recipients knew it was a taxable benefit & she spent it all?!

———

Vegas baby!

#19 Stan Brooks on 12.13.20 at 2:47 pm

Rich through debt. While producing nothing. With commodities in the sink. With people unemployed and no good jobs around.

The more you borrow/print, the more valuations increase and the richer you are.

That is fantastic discovery, we can patent it and sell it to the stupid poor Europeans and to the rest to the world.

It seems the booze is not enough today to get enlightened on this genius idea, so going to get some more.

#20 Flop... on 12.13.20 at 2:56 pm

#5 Cheese on 12.13.20 at 1:55 pm
Despite being a minimum wager, was cleaning a covid ward for most of May at 4hr/d, surviving on >1k/month, now I gross 2k/mo at my full time hospital work. I only took CERB for one month. I never want to live off government largesse, i’d rather make my own way, but somehow I suspect the taxes in later years will punish us who continued working somehow.

///////////////////

Hey Cheese, I’ve have seen you posting on here for a while, been meaning to ask you this question.

Although you do vital, necessary, work at the hospital, you don’t seem to necessarily get rewarded by a little bit extra pay for working in that environment.

Would you like to do something in construction and earn a little bit more money?

Some people don’t like the dust, but I think this year and next is a perfect time to give it a try as everyone is wearing masks anyway…

M46BC

#21 Stan Brooks on 12.13.20 at 2:57 pm

The good news is that rich people pay taxes.

So I would expect at some point it will start rising significantly.

Let’s borrow/print 10 more trillions in a few years, shell we?

That will increase the net worth/valuations by 30 trillions and taxes by 2 trillions yearly.

While the loonie straightens and we get 10 times richer than US and the Europeans. Those poor shmucks.

House in GTA for 5 millions, why not 10 and 20? The sky is the limit.

Then we will get so rich that a single family in GTA will be worth more that entire countries.

Think about it folks, a single brick in a moldy shack in GTA worth more than a luxury yacht or Mediterranean French villa.

That poor French villa guy, should have bought a shack in Scarborough.

Cheers and keep innovating, folks.

#22 Cheese on 12.13.20 at 3:03 pm

#20 Flop…

Oddly enough, I clean the construction site at the renovations in the hospital sub, sub-contract at 18/hr. I ensure nothing leaves the infection barriers, and maintain the negative pressure as we are in transplant areas.

Funny thing is, I wanted to be a doctor when I was in my twenties, I’m working in a hospital now, buts not in a position that I had hoped for.

Still, I save and invest every penny I can scrape together, at my age I am very far behind the average poster, that’s for sure.

#23 wkg on 12.13.20 at 3:05 pm

I have to admit that I am astounded by what passes for political leadership in this country. Never did I ever imagine that Bill Morneau would have been seen as the voice of restraint in this government, turns out he was.

And Jagmeet, god help us. 24 seats, and he is dictating policy.

This government reminds me of a scene in the Mad Max movie where Mel Gibson and one of his minions are on a train, heading full speed into a barracade ahead on the tracks. The guys asks Mel “whats the plan”. Mel replies “there’s no plan mate”.

#24 Outrage on 12.13.20 at 3:14 pm

Inflation on everything will be going up next year.I can see 5 year mortgages going under 1% for sure in the next two years just like Europe and Japan. I’m in Puerto Vallarta now soaking up the sun. My electricity for the month was 96 pesos or $6.52 cad . I laughed when the landlady told me. My grocery bill for the month is half and my alcohol is even more than half from Canada. Canadians should come down here so there cerb can go a lot farther.

#25 But Sophie on 12.13.20 at 3:19 pm

Get $24,000 and get away with it.

May be different class, Elite or Super Elite.

#26 Ryan M on 12.13.20 at 3:21 pm

As Garth has suggested in the past (unless I’m misremembering), it’s clear that 2021 will also see banks fold up a lot of their branches permanently – using Covid as an excuse. My local (green) branch recently put a tacky “5” on a piece of paper over what used to be an illuminated “Open 7 days a week.” Stickers on the sidewalk outside encourage people to bank online. Covid-related, sure, but it also looks like an off-ramp to me.

#27 Doug in London on 12.13.20 at 3:23 pm

It’s a given that taxes will go up if not next year then certainly in 2022. I have 2 stories to tell about seeing the future.

The first is, anyone remember 2006? In the early 2000s it seemed like every company was becoming an income trust for the tax benefits. I recall on or about Oct. 18 reading an article about it in The Globe and Mail. I figured it was inevitable the loophole would be closed, and guess what? That’s exactly what happened on Nov. 1 when Jim Flaherty put an end to it. A lot of people complained, but I thought didn’t anyone see it coming? That day I scooped up some REI.UN and CIBC Income Fund on sale.

That year or 2005 I showed up at the Timmins Sportsplex for the noon adult swim early in the year. I paid my $1.75, the admission for at least 3 years, and the girl at the desk said it’s $2.00 now. I said: I figured it would go up sooner or later so I’m not surprised. She said: You’re the first one to say that. I was surprised, didn’t anyone else see it coming or figure it’s inevitable?

Now back to the present and future, the announcement will be made taxes are going up and there will be a lot of complaining and I’ll say: what, you didn’t see it coming?

#28 Do we have all the facts on 12.13.20 at 3:25 pm

Where was the logic in setting the minimum income level at $5,000 in the prior year and then setting up CERB to transfer three or four times that amount as a grant in 2020.

Most individuals who declared income of only $5,000 in 2O19 were either working part time, were students, or were self employed and working for cash.

Side hustles are all the rage these days and good majority of all “gigs” continued to generate income through the Covid 19 crisis. Basing CERB on an honour system where any revenue received by a CERB recipient during the crisis was to be declared as income to the CRA was just a touch naive.

Has our government decided how to deal with loans provided to small businesses under CEBA or BCAP that fall into default through bankruptcy of voluntary closure. Will the business owners remain responsible for their debts or a portion of their grants if they cease to operate.

Lots of loose ends to investigate it seems.

#29 TG on 12.13.20 at 3:39 pm

Garth,

Thanks for speaking up on that article. I was very surprised how someone who netted less than $5k could collect $18k in benefits (incorrectly) and be defended by CBC…did they think they won the COVID lottery? There are many injustices of life to report on, I am surprised that our national govt news broadcaster picked this one.

#30 Linda on 12.13.20 at 3:40 pm

The lady in question claims she did research to ensure she qualified. Didn’t find/see the word ‘net’ when income earned was looked at. Thus feels victimized at being requested to pay back benefits that she actually didn’t qualify to receive.

As for the amount received, if CERB was an investment that would be one stellar ROI. Make $5K net, qualify for CERB & receive $18K+. That is what, better than 350% growth for income? What a deal. Except in the lady’s case, was too good to be true. Though I did read one MP making a case for restating the previous years income tax return so as to boost the net, which may in some cases permit one to keep the money. Don’t know if that would be allowed by the CRA now a letter has gone out, but presume there will be attempts to prove the CERB recipient did indeed qualify.

#31 Flop... on 12.13.20 at 3:41 pm

#22 Cheese on 12.13.20 at 3:03 pm
#20 Flop…

Oddly enough, I clean the construction site at the renovations in the hospital sub, sub-contract at 18/hr. I ensure nothing leaves the infection barriers, and maintain the negative pressure as we are in transplant areas.

Funny thing is, I wanted to be a doctor when I was in my twenties, I’m working in a hospital now, buts not in a position that I had hoped for.

Still, I save and invest every penny I can scrape together, at my age I am very far behind the average poster, that’s for sure.

/////////////////////

My Dad went the other way, upon leaving high school he got a job as a wood machinist.

One day in his early 20’s he went to work and chopped off 2 and a half of his fingers.

He went and got a job at our local hospital in Tasmania as an attendant.

I think you guys call the same job here an orderly, mainly ferrying around patients and helping lift them onto different structures when necessary.

He did that job until he retired…

M46BC

#32 JM on 12.13.20 at 3:46 pm

” And muse on how we ever got to a point where someone earning five grand a year receives $18,500 in cash and feels like a victim.”

Accountability is a lost art and victimhood is the new normal. My father, an immigrant, worked 6 days a week and on the 7th went to job sites. He carved a decent living and was grateful for everything Canada offered. He never took one cent from the government, never held out his hand for anything. My mom kicked ass and raised 6 kids who were taught the basics of right and wrong.

Canada and the world needs more people like them.

P.S.
I don’t blame her, it’s the soft conditioning by our leaders that have led us to conduct ourselves in this manner.

#33 Faron on 12.13.20 at 3:47 pm

#47 Uncle Charlie on 12.12.20 at 11:20 pm

#39 Dr V

Lol! Actually, I think someone has an argument going with Faron. That should bring up the totals by tomorrow morning.

I certainly am trying to start an argument with Nonplused. Dude keeps spouting baseless garbage that sounds high minded unless one knows better. I want him to own up to what he’s writing and show the cards he thinks he has. Unfortunately, his hand is pair of deuces at best. Can’t even spell his username correctly. He’s a total joke.

#34 Yukon Elvis on 12.13.20 at 4:03 pm

The bulk of what future generations will owe was the work of one man, and his son.
……………………………

That was painful to read. I wish I could unread it. Knock it off will ‘ya ! They are like a family of dictators in a third world country who rape the treasury then sail off into the sunset to live off their trust funds unaffected by what they have done. Sad part : we elected them. We are bozos.

#35 Grumpy Panda on 12.13.20 at 4:04 pm

Re #23, actually Trudeau’s CERB cash delivery reminded me more of the bond villain Max Zorin in A View To A Kill gunning down his workers for fun.

#36 Camille on 12.13.20 at 4:04 pm

Very good, sounds like a great analysis and advice to me.
A balanced and diversified portfolio is the only way to go.
Semantics no doubt but the “spectre” inflation says a lot, and again anyone can live without bitcoin, but you won’t get away from the world of crypto, digital currencies, and especially blockchain technology.

#37 Faron on 12.13.20 at 4:04 pm

To the point of Garth’s post today:

I have a friend who is soaking in the CERB/CRB/EI right now and it worries even my own hyper liberal sensibility. Economically, building that cash hoard isn’t good as fartz pointed out with his velocity of money post. I remain irrationally hopeful that when that gets spent and when we add it all up a few years from now when the tax bills start rolling in, Canada will be in a better economic position to weather the coming tax and interest rate storm than other countries.

Never in modern economics has a huge chunk of economic activity been forced to stop with the promise of a restart in a years time. Each country is running on its own economic models because the times are unprecedented. Canada is leaning far on the side of pumping money into the economy directly to those who will spend it now or eventually. This is far far from perfect, but I think it remains to be seen if the approach is building a stronger bridge to post COVID times or will have pushed us too far into public debt. I remain irrationally hopeful.

I think that our stronger restrictions on activity to stanch COVID demanded a larger gov’t response. I’ll concede at this point that it may have been too large. But I also think there are a lot more bumps to come and the question now is if we de-stimulate to force the savings rates down or negative at the potential costs of hitting those who haven’t been able to save. There will be slop either way.

#38 Russ on 12.13.20 at 4:09 pm

Shelley Merven on 12.13.20 at 12:13 am

Wow!! CRA really screws the pooch on payment pay backs…

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-cerb-benefits-payback-1.5838395

… The Trudeau government has deceived hundreds of thousands of people …

=========================================

It does seem like such a sad story but the Grinch comes by at Christmas Time each year.

The CRA just needs to get it’s work done. And all Canadians need to buck up now and pay their fair share.
Stop the whining and take out a HELOC to get it done. Rates are cheap enough.

And we can’t go back to WE Charity or corporations or Africa and other poor nations to recapture the largess Trudeau dished out in the Pandemic Euphoria, so CRA is stuck with sticking it to the average Canadian.

Move along, nothing to see here. Move along and wear the mask so we cannot see your shame.

Cheers, R

(relevant for the day)

#39 Faron on 12.13.20 at 4:21 pm

Sorry Garth, posted this in the wrong spot.

#77 Faron on 12.13.20 at 4:19 pm

#66 kc on 12.13.20 at 12:27 pm

…lick the petri dish at 20 CT or 40 CT? and at which result would you ask for a second test to know if you are sick or how sick you are?

Know what you talk about…

So, you are an expert in microbiology? Cool. I mean, you picked up that CT acronym right quick as soon as your social media feeds started pumping it at you. That’s rad. So you also know that a petri dish has nothing to do with COVID testing, right? Good, thought so. You probably have been running PCR machines since the ’80s anyhow…

Speaking of the ’80s. Rolled your car? Bummer. Makes me wonder what kind of innovative driving you were up to that got you rolling…

#40 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.13.20 at 4:22 pm

@#37 Faron
“it remains to be seen if the approach is building a stronger bridge to post COVID times or will have pushed us too far into public debt. I remain irrationally hopeful.”

++++

I agree.
I remain hopeful but I just dont see it.
As you have pointed out “unprecedented economic shut down + unprecedented govt spending = ?????

And with the current dilettantes in charge…… I cringe at what may be coming.
I saw a lady yesterday standing in the pouring rain with two kids about 9 and 10 outside Safeway in Burnaby with a cardboard sign that said, “No money, 5 kids, need food.”

I bought a loaf of bread, canned food, milk , etc, enough to fill one bag and gave it to one of the kids. ( i refuse to give money lest its a scam).

She didnt say a word and neither did I.

#41 Jimmy Zhao on 12.13.20 at 4:28 pm

I bet there were a lot of food servers who collected cash tips and didn’t report all of it on their tax returns. Yet they are they first ones in line to collect CERB benefits.

Advise me how these people love to collect all the ‘goodies’ that society offers yet don’t want to share in the burdens.

Billionaire Donald Trump bragged about paying no tax because he was ‘smart.’ What a role model for modern society. No wonder we are pooched. – Garth

#42 Useless on 12.13.20 at 4:35 pm

Lol. Garth thanks for everything you do buddy. Another beaut of a blog entry today.

#43 TurnerNation on 12.13.20 at 4:51 pm

I used the C word last post. Maybe that’s a blanket term. I’m not an economist or social scientist, trying to call this New System as I see it.
How about
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_statism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporatism#Fascist_corporatism

Dunno but this year they wasted no time in rolling out Corporate Board and hiring composition requirements.
We’re all equal…kinda.
Before heading to a job interview check that your CV is in hand; glance in the mirror and ensure all is ok; then check the mirror again – versus the new quotas.
You’ve come a long way, Baby?

…….

Pay attention to where our leaders fawn.
Cuba has two currencies. Reg + convertable. In parallel.
Bank of Canada was taking up its new e-currency. Could it be issued to pay for the UBI? Two currencies in tandem.

– Travel rights/gasoline cars. They won’t come and take your car only that insurance coverage and replacement parts cost will be made so expensive – via taxation.
Recall those old cars kept using scrounged parts in Cuba?
Yep that will be us.

Our elites play the long game. Did ya notice last year that Ontariowe killed the Electric car subsidies?
Why?
Good luck with affording a Tesla on your new Global Wage of $15 – at the Amazon distribution centre

By the way all those people fleeing to small towns, the local garages and Dealerships have not the authorization or expertise in repairing the electric cars.
But you are free to leave at any time right?
Trapped in our UN Smart Cities.
There’s no bus service; scant train and airline service. Few electric car chargers outside city limits.

The Long Game. Get to know this.

#44 zee on 12.13.20 at 4:54 pm

This lady did not even earn 5k, that was not her net income. Absurd how she never felt that there was some thing wrong each month when she collected the CERB. Her one month of CERB was more than what she earned in her business!

#45 yvr_lurker on 12.13.20 at 4:55 pm

although I usually like to give people the benefit of the doubt, this lady is clearly off her tree. Whether it be net or gross income, a paltry approximately 5K in earning for the previous year warrants her getting 18.5K from the Gov’t? It is incredulous to think that she feels herself wronged by the Gov’t. Did she expect that without Covid she would have turned her tart-selling business from home into a 20K per year business, and therefore the Gov’t should cover those “losses”. Nuts that she would feel that she has been wronged, and where did the $$ go? A new swimming pool or other home renovations etc… I am hoping that this woman is an outlier. How about though for balance focusing on a corporation that received lots of support that was not needed.

Nobody in my family collected a nickel of Gov’t support in the past 9 months, and my kid made his own job this summer tutoring and doing lawncare…. I am sure I will be hammered though with extra tax increases going forward…

#46 Classical Liberal Millennial on 12.13.20 at 4:56 pm

Don’t hate the player. Hate the game. If she made over $5,000 why is the CRA making her pay it back? Did she lie about it?

#47 Cliff on 12.13.20 at 4:58 pm

Or, another way of looking at it is that the government gave back a pile of cash that citizens had previously paid to them, reducing their net worth in the process. Citizens, now richer, can spend that money to strengthen their financial positions or boost the economy. The government on the other hand will have to budget their funds. They might have to pay their basics first – interest on debt, healthcare, maintenance etc. and give up on their stupid pet projects that remodel society in their particular desired image or abandoning industries such as oil and gas for lithium batteries. Might just be a good thing!

#48 TurnerNation on 12.13.20 at 4:59 pm

Comrades, remember that you are free to leave your UN Smart city at any time.
Newer cars are tracked via GPS and Wifi onboard too:

Does anyone wonder how fast this New System nightmare was rolled out? Was it planned or just happenstance globally.

Remember, always this is about control over our Breeding, Feeding and MOVEMENTS. As farm animals.

One major faith-based holiday must be cancelled. Why it already was x-ed out: XMAS. See how that work.
Crossed out. Wrong.

https://outline.com/B8WGPH

This past week, the province’s top public health official had bad news and a strong warning. COVID-19 cases are continuing to rise despite weeks of restrictions. To control the second wave, Ontarians must stop being so casual with social contacts — especially with December holidays upon us.

But cellphone mobility data suggests this message — one Ontario’s top officials and politicians have stuck to for months — is ignoring a critical driver of new infections.

#49 Watson on 12.13.20 at 5:00 pm

“ The future can’t come soon enough.”

The Future is Already Here.

#50 Ustabe on 12.13.20 at 5:00 pm

Once again someone has used the First/Second/Third World thing wrong.

First World refers to the Allies, Second World refers to the Axis powers and Third World refers to non-aligned nations during WWII.

While it is true that a great many nations in the Third World were impoverished sub Sahara nations, not all were. The US was a Third World country for a good long while as First World countries were over there fighting against fascists. Antifa if you would.

And, Canadians…and you too Garth…rather than blather on about some woman in PEI who arguably tried her best to comply and due to government ineptitude made an error we should perhaps be aware that Trump is being lobbied hard by certain sycophant Congressmen to abandon the Columbia River Treaty.

If that is allowed to happen we will have a lot more to concern ourselves with than some CERB over payments.

#51 Bob in Hamilton on 12.13.20 at 5:04 pm

“And muse on how we ever got to a point where someone earning five grand a year receives $18,500 in cash and feels like a victim.”

That statement in a nutshell explains completely the state of our society in Canada in 2020. It will not end well….

#52 Bob in Hamilton on 12.13.20 at 5:08 pm

#40 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.13.20 at 4:22 pm

“I bought a loaf of bread, canned food, milk , etc., enough to fill one bag and gave it to one of the kids. ( i refuse to give money lest its a scam).

She didn’t say a word and neither did I.”

You’re a good guy…..

#53 Bob in Hamilton on 12.13.20 at 5:10 pm

#45 yvr_lurker on 12.13.20 at 4:55 pm

“Nobody in my family collected a nickel of Gov’t support in the past 9 months, and my kid made his own job this summer tutoring and doing lawncare…. I am sure I will be hammered though with extra tax increases going forward…”

You know it….of course that is going to happen.

#54 db on 12.13.20 at 5:12 pm

Hello in the following paragraph from the post did you mean to write 600 billion rather than million? The former seems plausible, the latter sounds like a rounding error. Thx…..Household net worth since the virus hit has increased a cumulative $600 million. As mentioned here before, the saving rate exploded higher with the pandemic. CIBC says $170 billion in cash now sits in bank accounts, private and corporate. Real estate sales and prices have romped higher. In the GTA the average property was worth $910,290 in February, when life was normal. In November, after nine months of unemployment, lockdown, death and quarantine, that property was worth $955,615.

#55 X on 12.13.20 at 5:28 pm

Remarkably short sighted by the Federal Liberals to not have a clause with the CERB to have payments max out with your previous years income.

#56 Bill Hurley on 12.13.20 at 5:30 pm

She made $18,500 in CERB and plowed that into TESLA and Bitcoin?

#57 Drinking on 12.13.20 at 5:34 pm

I read the story this morning and just shook my head!

What bothers me the most that a news network subsidized by our tax dollars keep running these stories knowing full well that it was just selfishness on their parts, meaning all these stories that they are posting are people who just plainly took advantage of the situation.
Enough already, they knew what they were doing. Do not even get me started on the so called Libs; how disappointing….

By the way; good blog today Garth!

#58 meslippery on 12.13.20 at 5:34 pm

So if you have yet to file 2019 taxes tips are income.

#59 Godofwisdom on 12.13.20 at 5:39 pm

I feel zero compassion for that so-called businesswoman who has a huge sense of entitlement. Generally, how many people even declare income that can easily be ignored? You bet thousands, if not millions lost out on CERB because they’ve always cheated, but now regret not being “kinda” honest in at least one year, 2019, to qualify for advantage of free money.
Cheaters should hopefully have huge bank balances to tide them over in emergencies. Mais non, you have to either spend that cash asap, or hide it in a mattress, in case of audit!
Cannot have your cake and eat it. Sorry, cake lady. You’re lucky enough that you’re not even paying rent for your so-called business

#60 Yukon Elvis on 12.13.20 at 5:39 pm

#45 yvr_lurker on 12.13.20 at 4:55 pm

Nobody in my family collected a nickel of Gov’t support in the past 9 months, and my kid made his own job this summer tutoring and doing lawncare….
………………….

You do good work over there in yvr. Kudos to you and yours.

#61 Inequity on 12.13.20 at 5:42 pm

When you say yields increase, I take that to mean the price of bonds will go down. Or does that mean the distributions will go up, or some combination of the two?

#62 Timmy on 12.13.20 at 5:43 pm

It would be intersting to see what median net worth is without real estate, as it is so inflated that it skew everything

#63 TOM BLACK on 12.13.20 at 5:47 pm

Get vaccinated, laughing..

I bet you don’t you scoundrel…!

Keep an open mind on vaccination folks, this one in particular has been approved by no-one. Various polls show up to 60% of folk will sit on the bench.

I don’t blame them.. In due course something safe and properly approved will emerge. Until then if you’re vulnerable stay safe and mask up, wash hands and keep your distance.. fly nowhere.

TBlack

#64 Tea4Two on 12.13.20 at 5:49 pm

So they have failed to eliminate the common cold or flu over decades but somehow they magically have a vacinne for this covid plandemic? And why is a former software engineer running the show? Oh man, if people only knew how bad things are going to get.

#65 NSNG on 12.13.20 at 5:54 pm

Dogs trained to detect people infected with COVID-19 – by sniffing their armpits

https://www.studyfinds.org/dogs-detect-covid-by-sniffing-armpits/

This probably won’t be implemented in Canada because who could possibly make money from that?

I think we would also need to keep them away from CEF because that would probably constitute cruel and unusual punishment. The animal welfare people would have a bird.

So where are your covid sniffing cats, Felix?!!

#66 45north on 12.13.20 at 5:55 pm

Tax levels won’t hold, either. No country the size of Canada can so increase public spending, and debt, free of consequences. The future will certainly bring higher corporate levies, an increase in the capital gains rate, empty-house taxes, elevated property tax, an additional tax bracket, more user fees, reduced local services and an extra cost for every Amazon purchase you make or Netflix movie you watch.

coming from a former minister of revenue, that’s pretty scary. Right now companies are leaving California for Texas because of government. Even though it’s the same country. How is Canada going to compete? Oh yeah, clean energy. Like solar power. You gotta be kidding. We’re competing with Texas.

Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance resigned, what two months ago. Paul Rochon, Deputy Minister resigned two weeks ago. Maybe they were thinking “No country the size of Canada can so increase public spending, and debt, free of consequences.” But maybe Trudeau thinks consequences for the country are not consequences for him.

#67 Tron Light on 12.13.20 at 5:57 pm

Most people, especially politicians, can’t see beyond their noses.

#68 Midnights on 12.13.20 at 6:02 pm

Let’s talk Trudeau selling out the country, shall we?

#69 Long-Time Lurker on 12.13.20 at 6:06 pm

Zoolander 3. Script update.

Location: The office of Hemlock Roans, detective.

Mr. Wilson walks hurriedly into the office of Hemlock Roans and speaks to him.

Mr. Wilson: “Prime Minister Zoolander’s done it! He’s progressively increasing the carbon tax to 2031 in order to eliminate fossil fuels! Just like Karl Swab’s Global Economic Committee and the Combined Nations promoted! Build Back Better! The Great Reset! Agenda 2031!”

Helmock Roans, detective: “The cost of everything is going to go up. Fossil fuels power our civilization. The current alternatives are undeveloped; and, excluding nuclear, even if they were developed rapidly they are insufficient to fuel our current energy usage. People are going to experience high levels of austerity in the near future.”

Wilson: “Except for the elites like Zoolander who can afford the higher carbon taxes.”

Roans: “Yes. Austerity for us but luxury for them. It’s very much like George Orwell’s 1984 with an extended time-frame.”

Wilson: “What do we do Roans?”

Roans: “The majority of people are either mollified by the Wuhan Coronavirus or stupified by Zoolander’s legalized cannabis to do much of anything until the austerity hurts them.”

Wilson: “For the non-brainwashed minority then?”

Roans: “An imprisoning force is met with a freeing counter-force. An energy revolution is in order if people can start it.”

Wilson: “How so, Roans?”

Roans: “Back in the early 1990’s I read Jeanne Manning’s The Coming Energy Revolution. It goes far beyond solar and wind technologies. I’ll say more on it later and something more. Right now, I have business to attend to….”

#70 Long-Time Lurker on 12.13.20 at 6:07 pm

CBC Radio – How to Run Cars on Water
3,496 views
•Jul 21, 2008

BatteryReviver
CBC Radio – How to Run Cars on Water

A Vancouver Gadgeteer on radio interview on Water-Hybrid (run a car partially on water)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqJBgVTQ458

#71 Bigtuna on 12.13.20 at 6:09 pm

And she probably bragged to her friends all year long on how she was making easy money … now its payback time!

#72 Damifino on 12.13.20 at 6:11 pm

#46 Classical Liberal Millennial

Don’t hate the player. Hate the game.
————————–

The game is simply this: Everything in Canadian tax law is open to interpretation… by the CRA, not by you.

#73 Midnights on 12.13.20 at 6:15 pm

Let’s talk C. Freeland, needing help from the General Public. On how to get the rich to spend their money, lmbo.
Yeah, she’s qualified, NOT!
https://youtu.be/BHp4gN7IQ8U

#74 Dolce Vita on 12.13.20 at 6:21 pm

Morally bankrupt cake lady.

Pay the money back.

Redemption.

———————

They should have accountability in voting.

Those that voted Trudeau in should have to pay for his +$300B in largesse (Toronto and Montréal). Same goes for the King Singh voters.

Leave the other 1/2 of the country out of it.

#75 dgb on 12.13.20 at 6:22 pm

#46….???…she made 5000 for the year !!she said that was her gross before her expense deductions…this was not a job but rather a hobby!!! …why should we tax payers supply her with 18000+ that we will be taxed greater to pay down the huge deficit??? can’t you see there is something terribly wrong with this system…and WE have to pay it with higher taxes ….she did not NEED that income or she would have had a REAL job…this cerb was meant to help those whose real job was lost due to shutdowns, jobs that people depended on …not these clowns and their hobbies!!! due some critical thinking about the right and wrong of the cerb….it was never meant to be free money to all who claimed it….but our government made a piss poor job of managing it…all who received it and placed it in investments or sqandered it, should definitely have to pay it back…just another mess from this t2 regime…please someone with a financial head please run for PM in the next election!!!! please please please!!!

#76 COW on 12.13.20 at 6:23 pm

Sir Garth: Our adult son has both intellectual and physical disabilities. He was employed in the agricultural sector during COVID period from March through October. He was paid $15 an hour for 975 hours before his employment ended. If he had been on CERB he would have grossed more than he did working. Now unemployed this is where it gets interesting. His EI pays less than if he were on CRB. As well he works on call to plow snow on parking lots. 50 cents from every dollar earned is deducted from EI payments. If he had been on CERB he would now be on CRB and money earned through snow plowing would not be deducted from the CRB payments until your income exceeds $38,000. This was verified by Service Canada as being correct.

#77 Damifino on 12.13.20 at 6:24 pm

#23 wkg on 12.13.20

And Jagmeet, god help us. 24 seats, and he is dictating policy.
—————————

No, he’s not. For now, he follows the PM’s marching orders. After the next election when he has only 10 seats, he’ll become fully irrelevant.

#78 Dr.Tom on 12.13.20 at 6:25 pm

Does anyone else wonder if what we’re really witnessing here is a war against capitalism ?

#79 Moses71 on 12.13.20 at 6:25 pm

In her crocodile tear note did she also include how maybe she was laughing in the kitchen with her husband how smart she was when she was squandering the money? Pft Even a thief will offer to give it back to avoid retribution .
Thieves and liars, usually no difference.
No sympathy from over here

#80 the Jaguar on 12.13.20 at 6:31 pm

“Household net worth since the virus hit has increased a cumulative $600 billion.”

Indeed, but primarily because real estate values got a NASA-like lift off, not because of newly developed financial smarts or savings habits. If you don’t know what people do when the value of their home goes up I’ll tell you. They increase their mortgages to borrow on the increased equity available. They pay off all their copious unsecured credit card debt, ( the mean old Banks thank you profusely for securitizing their debt, by the way ,) or they borrow to do what? That’s right. To buy more real estate. They look down the railway track of house porn and see only sunshine and unicorns. Not the runaway train headed in their direction.

They don’t grasp numbers. Numbers like actually owing a million dollars when their salaries have barely changed in five or ten years, or how they will manage payments if one of them becomes ill or loses their job. And especially how quickly interest rates can take off and bury them when an economic cycle changes.

The Land Owner Transparency Registry came into affect in British Columbia on Nov.30th, and with the Speculation and Vacancy Tax, possible changes to the capital gains exemption for primary residence, etc., it sure seems like the sleeping giant of taxation has woken up. If revenues to pay for infrastructure and upkeep of our cities, highways and way of life are falling short because everyone wants to stay home in their pyjamas and charge their electric cars and order in from Skip the Dishes & Amazon, then housing starts to look like the big fat pig in the room that needs to be roasted on a spit. And for every decent Canadian who didn’t and would never take money through programs like CERB unless in dire need and with qualification , we all know someone who did exactly that.
And people are seething about it. If our Prime Minister hasn’t figured that out and its impact on the next election he is even dumber than I thought.

#81 Dolce Vita on 12.13.20 at 6:39 pm

#46 Classical Liberal Millennial

“Don’t hate the player. Hate the game.”

For the Love of God, it’s not hockey or billiards we are talking about here. That woman has no moral compass, plain and simple she is a THIEF.

Your “slogan” is reductio ad absurdum.

She took money not rightfully hers, knew what she was doing and now cries like a baby because she got caught red handed. Somehow, we the people she stole from, are supposed to feel sorry for her.

Ah, no can do. You’re a THIEF lady. Be grateful Gov Canada is asking for restitution and not jail time.

Good on the CRA. I hope they catch every last one like her, ALL of them.

DESPICABLE.

#82 Balmuto on 12.13.20 at 6:48 pm

Net worth numbers are hard to evaluate if you don’t know what’s included and whether or not/how it’s tax adjusted.

$1 in principal residence $1 in investment property $1 in TSFA $1 in taxable investment account $1 in RRSP, on an after-tax basis.

And do you include DCP/commuted value of DB pensions?

I wish there were some standards around this, as the numbers could differ wildly depending on the methodology one uses.

#83 Drinking on 12.13.20 at 6:50 pm

#72 COW

Just once, JUST ONCE, I wish CBC would cover stories like your son and others that have posted today! Very admirable, you should be very proud, actually you are what your son has accomplished but like many of us very disappointed in the leadership of this country; kudos to your family and others!

Stay safe everyone!!!

#84 SeeB on 12.13.20 at 6:52 pm

Well, we’ve cheated the working class out of fair wages for 40 years, so there is that too. Not to say this lady was a worker or anything, but maybe her business would do better if working people had money to spend, or maybe not and someone more enterprising would benefit.

The CRA is going to hold it against her, so justice served, right? Why do we care if she complains or not?

I can’t blame her for trying to get free money only to cry endlessly when she had to give it back. It’s worked for the wealthy and corporations for decades, so…

But overall, I love the finger wagging at people who didn’t even make it to the poverty line. Aren’t we great people :)

#85 Canuck on 12.13.20 at 6:57 pm

Billionaire Donald Trump bragged about paying no tax because he was ‘smart.’ What a role model for modern society. No wonder we are pooched. – Garth
_______________________________________________

Interesting… You have said on here and in your books I believe, that tax evasion is wrong but tax avoidance is fine and legal. Now that Trump brags about taking advantage of tax law, he’s morally bankrupt? Please… I’m willing to bet most billionaires pay little to no tax

He’s the president. There is no excuse for paying nothing and certainly not for bragging about it. Stop trying to defend the indefensible. – Garth

#86 joblo on 12.13.20 at 7:05 pm

DELETED

#87 Harry Hector Badgering on 12.13.20 at 7:16 pm

DELETED

#88 Proud CERBian on 12.13.20 at 7:16 pm

My people have earned their money and deserve to keep it.

Canada is OUR country too.

#89 Apocalypse2020 on 12.13.20 at 7:19 pm

Civil war erupting in the US

https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/12/us/stop-the-steal-protest-washington-dc-trnd/index.html

PREPARE

#90 CJohnC on 12.13.20 at 7:21 pm

For what it is worth, this is T2’s plan…..It’s called “Going Direct.” That’s the financial bailout plan designed and authored by former central bankers now on the payroll at BlackRock, an investment manager of $7 trillion in stock and bond funds. The plan was rolled out in August 2019 at the G7 summit of central bankers in Jackson Hole, Wyoming – months before the public was aware of any financial crisis.
The BlackRock plan calls for blurring the lines between government fiscal policy and central bank monetary policy – exactly what the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve are doing today in the United States. BlackRock has now been hired by the Federal Reserve, the Bank of Canada, and Sweden’s central bank, Riksbank, to implement key features of the plan. Three of the authors of the BlackRock plan previously worked as central bankers in the U.S., Canada and Switzerland, respectively.

https://wallstreetonparade.com/2020/06/blackrock-authored-the-bailout-plan-before-there-was-a-crisis-now-its-been-hired-by-three-central-banks-to-implement-the-plan/

The Plan: https://www.blackrock.com/corporate/literature/whitepaper/bii-macro-perspectives-august-2019.pdf

Both longish but interesting reads

#91 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:22 pm

“Will the seventy million Americans who Donald Trump tricked into thinking the Biden presidency is illegitimate create discord, gridlock or worse?”

Probably not. ANTIFA and BLM caused most of the destruction we’ve seen, not the Proud Boys. Sure, they have their protests and rallies, the one Trump recently overflew was YUGE!, but people on the right tend to list “property rights” pretty high on their list of sacred things. They don’t mind fighting though so there could be violence if ANTIFA tries to crash the party.

Anyway it looks like it is all but finalized at this point. Four more years of Obama ahead!

—————————————

“And muse on how we ever got to a point where someone earning five grand a year receives $18,500 in cash and feels like a victim.”

Ya, it is an interesting question as to how the CERB was ever more than a person earned in the previous year. Mrs. Cookies wouldn’t been in that bad of shape if the CRA only sent her $5,000. And she seemed to be living on that before. It should have been “the lesser of $2,000/month or 1/12 of your 2019 earnings per month”.

Me thinks it was a social experiment as much as anything. There was no reason during lockdown to pay people more than they were making before lockdown. And the CRA had the numbers.

And I never got any CERB even though covid eliminated my ability to earn money through my usual means. Another reason not to use dividends I guess. Had I known, I would have paid myself $5,000 in salary last year instead of the minimum $1,200. They get you one way or another. I hate it when the rules keep changing. And I think they set that arbitrary rule very much intentionally to make sure people with corporations were not eligible.

And it is the cumulation of one bad government policy after another! The reason so many “professionals” use corporations is because companies insist so they can avoid government laws that may consider them “employees”. It was a bunch of unnecessary red tape in the first place! Sort of like how California is trying to turn all the Uber drivers into “employees”. It was bad enough to be a part of the “gig economy” before but at least there were some “gigs”. Now there will be none.

———————————–

“Tax levels won’t hold, either. No country the size of Canada can so increase public spending, and debt, free of consequences. The future will certainly bring higher corporate levies, an increase in the capital gains rate, empty-house taxes, elevated property tax, an additional tax bracket, more user fees, reduced local services and an extra cost for every Amazon purchase you make or Netflix movie you watch,”

I don’t doubt your premise but where exactly does the government and their economystics think the money is going to come from? Every dollar they attempt to hoover up in this fashion means one less Slurpee for a kid after a soccer game (assuming anyone can still afford to put their kids in soccer) and that means less tax via the HST and the various taxes on the owner of the 7-11. It is just nutty to think taxes can be raised. We are at peak tax. The plan is to drive down consumption, not only of Slurpee’s but of every other product or service that makes it worthwhile to get out of bed in the morning. Well, the net result will be that nobody gets out of bed in the morning. Why would you?

———————————–

“Just ponder what the carbon tax will bring.”

It would have been simpler and just as effective to double the HST.

Some of the folks in this comments section think that maybe carbon taxes will influence change of behavior, and they will, people will be buying less stuff because they don’t have the money. But the only way to lower the demand for carbon based fuels in the economy is to reduce economic activity.

And that is probably the plan.

#92 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:34 pm

#85 Canuck on 12.13.20 at 6:57 pm
Billionaire Donald Trump bragged about paying no tax because he was ‘smart.’ What a role model for modern society. No wonder we are pooched. – Garth
_______________________________________________

Interesting… You have said on here and in your books I believe, that tax evasion is wrong but tax avoidance is fine and legal. Now that Trump brags about taking advantage of tax law, he’s morally bankrupt? Please… I’m willing to bet most billionaires pay little to no tax

He’s the president. There is no excuse for paying nothing and certainly not for bragging about it. Stop trying to defend the indefensible. – Garth

————————————-

Both of you settle down. The dog (the IRS) did not bark. All of Trump’s tax returns are always under audit for 7 years back.

And don’t forget he’s been giving his whole presidential salary to charity since he was elected and can’t collect a salary from other sources while president. Ya, that adds up to a pretty low personal tax rate. His companies are still paying whatever cooperate and property taxes are applicable as negotiated with the IRS but it is not currently under his supervision.

#93 the jaguar on 12.13.20 at 7:34 pm

@ #74 Dolce VITA
Thank you for expressing it so well!
Exactly how I see it. Throw in Maritimes too!

#94 rowdie on 12.13.20 at 7:34 pm

People who cheat the system should pay, and go to jail! There are innocent people out there some where. The government is become a free for all, and now time to pay up kiddoes!

#95 Drinking on 12.13.20 at 7:38 pm

#84 SeeB

Ok, I see and understand what you are saying, your view, respected!

My question is: What would you do different to correct situations like this??? Do not hold back; we are, well many, are very interested, no judgment, just say it like it is. I am very interested, the more people say/comment is more real/actual democracy!! Sorry Garth, you are good enough to allow this!

#96 Catalyst on 12.13.20 at 7:41 pm

The CERB was a mess from day one and everyone knew it. They should have done like the US and not cheap out and just give everyone equally the same amount, just a pulse to qualify. Instead we got this system where we will *wink* come after fraudsters and most just took it to expecting a forgiveness (which I think is still the likely outcome).

As a taxpayer however, the biggest waste was the CEWS. It saved little jobs, gave millions to many businesses that didn’t need it. CBC did an article and identified one example (TFI trucking) as having received over $60 million in CEWS and paid out nearly the same in dividends so lets be real, this was an equity holder bailout as decisions like cutting the divies to weather storm didn’t need to be made. The true victims (small biz and airlines) got little.

#97 Doug t on 12.13.20 at 7:44 pm

#76 cow

I had to read your comment 3 times – I commend your son BIG time – you must be very proud of him – this country could use more like him – sadly our government doesn’t seem to want people that actually try hard – best regards to your son

#98 Linda on 12.13.20 at 7:51 pm

#55 ‘X’ – exactly! Consider that EI payments are tailored based on previous income. Just because one pays into EI doesn’t mean one receives ‘the maximum’ should one become unemployed. Now, never even looked at the website to apply for CERB as it was immediately obvious I wouldn’t qualify, but wonder exactly how the question regarding income was structured. Was it just ‘did you earn over $5K’? or did it ask applicants to state their 2019 income with $5K being the minimum to apply? If door #2, how is it that EI can be tailored but CERB wasn’t? Seems like a bit of coding would have prevented a lot of grief. Also still can’t imagine why income tax wasn’t deducted at source, just like it is with EI.

As for spending ‘all the money’ & not setting anything aside to pay income tax owing, I’d imagine that in the excitement of receiving most didn’t bother to read past how to qualify. I expect much crying when the tax bill is presented.

#99 sue on 12.13.20 at 7:52 pm

I’m sorry, but from my research, Trump actually paid millions in taxes as per NYT article.
https://pjmedia.com/vodkapundit/2020/09/28/nyt-bombshell-trump-paid-millions-in-taxes-owes-no-debt-to-russia-wait-what-n974892

#100 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:54 pm

#33 Faron on 12.13.20 at 3:47 pm
#47 Uncle Charlie on 12.12.20 at 11:20 pm

#39 Dr V

Lol! Actually, I think someone has an argument going with Faron. That should bring up the totals by tomorrow morning.

I certainly am trying to start an argument with Nonplused. Dude keeps spouting baseless garbage that sounds high minded unless one knows better. I want him to own up to what he’s writing and show the cards he thinks he has. Unfortunately, his hand is pair of deuces at best. Can’t even spell his username correctly. He’s a total joke.

———————————

Who are you to tell me how I should spell my handle?

Anyway it is a legitimate spelling:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/nonplused

I chose to drop an “s” years and years ago because the regular spelling was already in use on many sites.

“Faron” it turns out is a name:

https://nameberry.com/babyname/Faron

#101 BC Renovator on 12.13.20 at 7:57 pm

DELETED

#102 kc on 12.13.20 at 7:57 pm

#39 Faron on 12.13.20 at 4:21 pm

So, you are an expert in microbiology? Cool. I mean, you picked up that CT acronym right quick as soon as your social media feeds started pumping it at you. That’s rad.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Actually NO. I have been reading journals and papers about what it is all about and how they test and what a test actually is.

CT = Cycle Threshold … it is the magnification of the sample they take out of your body and examine it in a PCR test. the cycles are what is magnified. a test ran at 40 cycles produces the majority of the “False Positives, that are called a case” Basically they run the test at a HIGH number to speed up the search, however this number is misleading because it is VOODOO science. as A high testing number finds Asymptomatic positives. Meaning a person is NO THREAT to the general population, however they must go through the 14 day BS. what doctors need to do is retest after a test over 30 CT and rest at 20 CT to see what the LIVE infection numbers are at.

how is that for an answer?

https://medical.mit.edu/covid-19-updates/2020/11/pcr-test-result

#103 LP on 12.13.20 at 7:58 pm

I have no sympathy either for that woman and her plight, largely brought on by her own greed. But I am intrigued that no one else tonight has raised the case of a frequent poster here who brags often about how he and his brother enjoy receiving apparent buckets of cash, money they neither need nor “deserve”. I don’t now recall if he applies for such largess or if it just turns up in his bank account. The problem of paying out funds to people who don’t need it has existed for a long time. And full disclosure, I am a senior who received $300 this year under one of the
those programs.

#104 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 8:08 pm

#70 Long-Time Lurker on 12.13.20 at 6:07 pm
CBC Radio – How to Run Cars on Water
3,496 views
•Jul 21, 2008

BatteryReviver
CBC Radio – How to Run Cars on Water

A Vancouver Gadgeteer on radio interview on Water-Hybrid (run a car partially on water)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqJBgVTQ458

————————————

Don’t buy that kind of stuff. It certainly does work but it takes a lot of energy to separate the H from the 2O in the H2O. Certainly more than you get back out when you recombine them in an internal combustion engine.

“There is no such thing as a free lunch” applies in thermodynamics more so than anywhere. By the way where did TINSTAAFL go? One of our better commenters and the only commenter to get a guest blog.

#105 Barb on 12.13.20 at 8:08 pm

#3 Tarot Card on 12.13.20 at 1:49 pm

“I actually wrote the lady in PEI and suggested her to amend her tax return. There are no rules about not claiming expenses. So I suggested she remove enough expenses to get her above the $5,000. If the government says these are the rules then don’t fight the rules, use them.”
——————————–
Thoughtful of you to contact her with your suggestion.
Just a Q: Being self-employed, could she simply issue herself a T-4 for a larger amount than she actually earned. As an amendment to her tax return? Seems easier. Or would it not alleviate the issues?

#106 Bill on 12.13.20 at 8:16 pm

Ill qualify that politely…. big US companies well known ones have ways to reduce their taxes big time.

I should have said also T2 indiscriminately sprayed money at everyone to garner votes.

#107 WIN not Lose on 12.13.20 at 8:20 pm

PS don’t revise 2019 tax form after you get your CRA letter. Clearly an attempt to game the system.
That’s waving the flag like Hunter.

#108 belly rubs on 12.13.20 at 8:20 pm

“Decisions taken amid a crisis in 2020 may look sketchy…”

Hindsight, ha. Happy I always saw gov as an annoyance and not a parent. Still the adult in my little world. Doesn’t the term “sketchy” come from police sketch?

#109 Drill Baby Drill on 12.13.20 at 8:24 pm

This PEI woman receiving $18K for only $5K work in 2019 is very typical of most Canadians when it comes to finances. “Hey it’s free money from the government”. Trudeau is betting on this monetary ignorance for the next election. I truly feel sorry for many households in the maritime provinces but really enough is enough.

#110 kc on 12.13.20 at 8:27 pm

102 kc on 12.13.20 at 7:57 pm

#39 Faron on 12.13.20 at 4:21 pm

XXXX

i meant to say, I been reading about this stuff for months now. It is not some BS I just pulled out of thin air.

cheers

#111 Looking up on 12.13.20 at 8:28 pm

#89 Apocalypse2020 on 12.13.20 at 7:19 pm
Civil war erupting in the US

https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/12/us/stop-the-steal-protest-washington-dc-trnd/index.html

PREPARE

—————

Remember the deal. If the world is still intact on Jan 1 you are NOT allowed to change your handle to Apocalypse2021.

#112 Nicole on 12.13.20 at 8:37 pm

My thoughts exactly. Make $5,000 and then expect to be paid $18,500. Come on cbc really?

#113 Steve on 12.13.20 at 8:44 pm

What is really missing in Canada is social responsibility. The government is the people. People who scam the government, are really cheating theirs neighbours, family and friends. I have no problem helping people who need help, I don’t want people starving or homeless. However, I truly believe that household that make over 120k/year, don’t need an extra 600 from the government. As per this carbon tax, I expect to see a loss of manufacturing jobs to places with no carbon taxes. I guess we all can go on CERB. The real question is how damage has been done, and can we recover?

#114 Dr V on 12.13.20 at 8:50 pm

91 Nonplused – you have to get proper advice on those corps. Remember that you will pay the same amount of total tax on divvies as on a wage of the equivalent amount. Upside is you can level the taxes if your corps income varies and avoid large CPP contributions as we are double whammied like self-employed.

My acct always has me pays myself the minimum required for max CPP. That may just leave enough room to max an RRSP and bring you down to a lower tax bracket. If you haven’t used up your 6 lowest years of CPP you can then switch to the divvies.

#115 Rakiki on 12.13.20 at 8:54 pm

This is the $5000 cake-baker anecdote I was ranting about like a crazed maniac to my wife yesterday morning! Thank you for shining the light on this. Where has all the money gone during the year? Zero, zero, zero sympathy. We will pay for this madness for a long time. CERB should have been capped at whatever the taxpayer’s net income was for the previous year. And what about giving $300 to all seniors regardless of income level? How hard would it have been to set an income cut-off? Let’s hope the taps get turned off at some point.

#116 Faron on 12.13.20 at 9:06 pm

Garth:

…so will the cost of living. A lot. Just ponder what the carbon tax will bring.

Respectfully, the carbon tax is revenue neutral, so should balance at the household level and not effect cost of living. Of course, it will impact the O+G industry by reducing demand for their product and ultimately their profitability. Any government instituting a carbon tax needs to be certain that they are supporting industries that those workers can rotate into. I don’t support job losses in the name of rotating into a greener economy. I don’t think anyone does with any seriousness.

38 cents a litre for gas, eventually, will be the cost. Plus significantly higher heating and power costs. Families will feel this, even as governments dole money back in periodic payments. It may be the ethically correct thing to do, but never assume it will not hurt. – Garth

#117 Winterpeg on 12.13.20 at 9:10 pm

#73 Midnights
I read your link to Freeland being interviewed by Rosie Barton. OMG Chrystie Freeland is ANNOYing!
The look of Rosie’s face as she is interviewing Freeland says it all!

Some great posts tonight re: the CERB lady’s woes compared to some hardworking people who should have collected.

I hope that one omission by the government of the word “net” income on the front page of the CERB application doesn’t turn into the allowing of people who wrongly applied to be pardoned in some way.

#118 Gravy Train on 12.13.20 at 9:10 pm

#91 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:22 pm
“It would have been simpler and just as effective to double the HST.” No, taxing ‘bads’ (such as carbon emissions) and subsidizing ‘goods’ (such as solar panels) can nudge people into doing the right things. For further explanation, read up on externalities and Pigovian taxes.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externality
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigovian_tax

“Some of the folks in this comments section think that […] carbon taxes will […] change […] behavior, and they will; people will be buying less stuff because they don’t have the money.” Wrong again! People are provided with incentives (subsidies) to use nonpolluting energy sources at much lower cost.

“But the only way to lower the demand for carbon-based fuels in the economy is to reduce economic activity.” No, there are numerous ways to reduce the demand for carbon-based fuels without reducing economic activity. Read up on externalities, and maybe crack open an introductory textbook on economics. :P

“And that is probably the plan.” Wrong again! The plan is to reduce carbon emissions without reducing economic activity. :P

#119 the Jaguar on 12.13.20 at 9:18 pm

I am obviously ‘fit to be tied’ tonight with a second longer post, but this business of freeloading is one that begs the sound of the crack of the riding crop. I’ve dragged this gem out before, but it is worth repeating. In fact we might all benefit from repeating it to ourselves as we look in the mirror each day. Margaret Thatcher:

“”I think we’ve been through a period where too many people have been given to understand that if they have a problem, it’s the government’s job to cope with it. ‘I have a problem, I’ll get a grant.’ ‘I’m homeless, the government must house me.’ They’re casting their problem on society. And, you know, there is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first. It’s our duty to look after ourselves and then, also to look after our neighbour. People have got the entitlements too much in mind, without the obligations. There’s no such thing as entitlement, unless someone has first met an obligation.””

Full disclosure. I am currently reading Jack London’s ‘The People of the Abyss”, written about the underclass in the city of London based on his experiences there in 1902. When you read about the lives of the poor and destitute during that period and relate it to the many advantages all of us are afforded each day in the Western World today it really is hard to forgive those who take advantage when monies could be directed to those most in need.

#120 WIN not lose on 12.13.20 at 9:18 pm

DELETED

#121 fishman on 12.13.20 at 9:19 pm

The two wokesters swallowed the Kool Aid. CBC aired their bleatings. Trying to inject the PC poisons of “relative morality” & “victim status” into the CRA. Internal purges starting up in the RCMP. Using the first two poisons & adding a third, “multiculturalism”. The Armed Services aren’t far behind. The PC ruling political elite are going to find their endeavours fruitful & “wake” up to a PC Canada. The last poison, “tyranny of secular humanism” will reign supreme. Yes Martha, there is no God. Now is the time to be neither a believer or a dissenter. Now is the time to prepare to be a plunderer.

#122 45north on 12.13.20 at 9:42 pm

Dolce Vita

Those who voted Trudeau in, should have to pay for his $300 billion in largesse (Toronto and Montréal). Same goes for the King Singh voters.

and boy would they be pissed!

#123 the jaguar on 12.13.20 at 9:45 pm

I love Fishman. He is a true visionary.

#124 Bill on 12.13.20 at 9:47 pm

38 cents a litre for gas, eventually, will be the cost. Plus significantly higher heating and power costs. Families will feel this, even as governments dole money back in periodic payments. It may be the ethically correct thing to do, but never assume it will not hurt. – Garth

When fuel goes up so does everything else.
They quote 2% inflation I don’t think so. Groceries are way up…so I’m told as I don’t shop..Building materials up 7 to 20% this year.

Here read this from the US.
A lot of people are going to be way up $hit creek to say the least.
How A Soaring National Debt Can Reduce Retirement Standard Of Living By 77%
http://danielamerman.com/va/Conflict.html

#125 tyberius on 12.13.20 at 9:49 pm

DELETED

#126 Classical Liberal Millennial on 12.13.20 at 9:51 pm

Dolce in regards to your response, I agree if she was untruthful then she deserves to be caught. But did she make the required $5,000 or not? If she did, then they can’t demand that she repay.

#127 Doug t on 12.13.20 at 9:52 pm

#121 fishman

Yup that’s about it – yup

#128 Bobby S on 12.13.20 at 10:00 pm

Climate what? Garth, don’t ya know they’ve relabelled it? Apparently it’s a climate “crisis” now…

#129 Garth's Son Drake on 12.13.20 at 10:21 pm

This is wrong by the Feds.

This money needs to be reviewed like the EI setup where you have to get approved BEFORE receiving any money.

You can’t dole it out then turn around and take it back if people like this are literally surviving off of it and pretty much made the requirements. If the Gov does not want someone who made 5k collecting almost 20k, then change the requirement. I am hearing way too many of these stories at present. Throw money into a tornado and then go track it down. Great job fed.

This is a huge mistake by the government and nobody knows how many of these cases there are. These people are going to be financially crippled. If it is already spent there is no way they will have the ability to pay it back. Then what? Belt tightening like never before.

And given the above I am betting on a not so robust Spring. Look at the employment numbers. Gov handouts are ending. You would have to be seriously naive to not think some serious belt tightening is coming. Call it the hangover. Just a matter of learning how wide spread this problem is. Watch what happens after March, 2021.

#130 Morrey on 12.13.20 at 11:14 pm

Who is being referred to here? PET?

The bulk of what future generations will owe was the work of one man, and his son

#131 Maskless on 12.13.20 at 11:20 pm

71 million Americans rejected your idea of “conservatism” Mr. Turner, and the Obama/Clinton way of monetizing political office.

#132 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 11:30 pm

#118 Gravy Train on 12.13.20 at 9:10 pm
#91 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:22 pm
“It would have been simpler and just as effective to double the HST.” No, taxing ‘bads’ (such as carbon emissions) and subsidizing ‘goods’ (such as solar panels) can nudge people into doing the right things. For further explanation, read up on externalities and Pigovian taxes.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externality
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigovian_tax

“Some of the folks in this comments section think that […] carbon taxes will […] change […] behavior, and they will; people will be buying less stuff because they don’t have the money.” Wrong again! People are provided with incentives (subsidies) to use nonpolluting energy sources at much lower cost.

“But the only way to lower the demand for carbon-based fuels in the economy is to reduce economic activity.” No, there are numerous ways to reduce the demand for carbon-based fuels without reducing economic activity. Read up on externalities, and maybe crack open an introductory textbook on economics. :P

—————

hmm you distorted my text considerably. Editing is not allowed. But to reiterate my point there is no way renewables are going to support our current level of economic activity. If we are going to give up on carbon based fuels we are going back to the stone age, with approximately the same population and lifestyle. Unless GenIV nuclear works out. Or maybe fission. But trying to replace 350 million years of accumulated sunlight with solar panels isn’t going to work.

#133 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 11:31 pm

*Fusion

#134 Sheesh on 12.13.20 at 11:45 pm

#102 kc on 12.13.20 at 7:57 pm
CT = Cycle Threshold … it is the magnification of the sample they take out of your body and examine it in a PCR test. the cycles are what is magnified. a test ran at 40 cycles produces the majority of the “False Positives, that are called a case”
…..
So, I read the link you posted, and my question is – did you?

Cases detected at 40 ct aren’t false positives. True, their viral load is lower than a case detected at 20 ct meaning they may be less likely to spread it, but at this point we don’t know that for certain.

It’s not voodoo science. They don’t have all the answers, so they err on the side of safety. That’s how science works.

#135 Hilroy on 12.14.20 at 12:12 am

No link to story , based on your info;
Her business probably won’t be up again until late 2021 – so there’s $10,000 she’s out. Also , we don’t know if she was expecting the business to grow each year, if she has loans ( ie. inventory/baking equipment/delivery vehicle) to worry about. It must be a stressful time for business owners with so much uncertainty.

#136 CERBians on 12.14.20 at 12:16 am

#117 Winterpeg on 12.13.20 at 9:10 pm
#73 Midnights

I hope that one omission by the government of the word “net” income on the front page of the CERB application doesn’t turn into the allowing of people who wrongly applied to be pardoned in some way.

—————–
Well, that pretty well sums up the difference between you and I.

I would hope that it does in fact turn into the government allowing these CERB claims. Why should she have to pay it back? She did nothing wrong. She was hesitant to even put the claim in.

Take it up with the government you voted for if you don’t like it! They are the ones that forked up. They won’t have a chance if this ever goes to court… If in fact it was not expressly stated in the initial claim requirements.

#137 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 12:42 am

@#73 Midnights

Wow!
Even the CBC interviewer was getting annoyed at Freeland dancing around every question she was asked…..

https://youtu.be/BHp4gN7IQ8U

But its good to know the multi billion dollar National Daycare program is a feminist agenda.

I guess the multi billion dollar National Pharma Care program is a drug dealers agenda.

Freeland was asked repeatedly, “How the National daycare program was going to be funded?” …..smile, laugh, and babble…..quite an evasive technique when one doesnt really have the answers…..

#138 Fr0stty on 12.14.20 at 12:46 am

Took my cerb and invested with the green bank… TFSA fat! And if cra comes looking I’ll make a deal like everyone should … etfs and personal stocks picks are All up dividends alone should cover whatever I took in a year or 2 :)

#139 NSNG on 12.14.20 at 12:46 am

So I think CRA has finally proven that you actually can’t have your cake and eat it too.

When so many Canadians have acted like this, I think I can understand why Trudeau acts as if he has contempt for the average Canadian. Maybe this whole scheme was his passive-aggressive attempt to justify his contempt.

Thirdly, if they think they can scrape back all those tax dollars with a carbon tax, they are probably overestimating the benefits. We’ve had this scenario before where the government has applied a gas tax in the name of fighting pollution. People adjust and the ‘projected’ revenue dries up. Suddenly they come out claiming they need tolls or higher licensing fees (which is where we are now) because the gas tax is not adequate.

Hmmm. I thought it was all about fighting pollution?

The same will be with the new carbon tax. People will migrate away from high carbon expenses and the government will realize this latest tax grab did not produce as much as the experts projected.

#119 the Jaguar on 12.13.20 at 9:18 pm

Full disclosure. I am currently reading Jack London’s ‘The People of the Abyss”, written about the underclass in the city of London based on his experiences there in 1902. When you read about the lives of the poor and destitute during that period and relate it to the many advantages all of us are afforded each day in the Western World today it really is hard to forgive those who take advantage when monies could be directed to those most in need.

That is definitely recommended reading but people need to be prepared for what is in there. It is incredibly heartbreaking. I think that needs to be in the school curriculum. It sure would give the iPhone generation some perspective. It is hard to believe that the ‘developed’ world was like that only 120 years ago.

We have much to be thankful for.

#140 crossbordershopper on 12.14.20 at 12:52 am

with dollar at close to 80 cents, i dont know why prices havent drifted lower.
including real estate materials. forget about wood prices thats like 5% of the house cost, you can import direct from china at good prices. go get a can and go shopping as soon as this virus lets down.
so i can start building some houses, builders and developers are making out like criminals.
i hope things work out for everyone after this mess, and i am up like 200% on my porfolio.
doing covered calls on slv, working out well, covered calls on brk.b, and pltr for my flyer.
good luck

#141 Nonplused on 12.14.20 at 2:04 am

#114 Dr V on 12.13.20 at 8:50 pm
91 Nonplused – you have to get proper advice on those corps. Remember that you will pay the same amount of total tax on divvies as on a wage of the equivalent amount. Upside is you can level the taxes if your corps income varies and avoid large CPP contributions as we are double whammied like self-employed.

My acct always has me pays myself the minimum required for max CPP. That may just leave enough room to max an RRSP and bring you down to a lower tax bracket. If you haven’t used up your 6 lowest years of CPP you can then switch to the divvies.

—————————-

Ya but back then retained earnings were a good way to smooth out income. If you made $200,000 one year and zero the next you could use retained earnings to pay out $100,000 (minus 15% TAX) a year over 2 years. The new rules want to assess current year earnings only, no smoothing allowed. In effect they are trying to raise the taxes on the “gig” economy. They don’t like it.

On the other hand big corporations get to keep paying the same and smoothing the taxes. But little operators better not try that.

#142 Faron on 12.14.20 at 2:34 am

#116 Faron on 12.13.20 at 9:06 pm

38 cents a litre for gas, eventually, will be the cost. Plus significantly higher heating and power costs. Families will feel this, even as governments dole money back in periodic payments. It may be the ethically correct thing to do, but never assume it will not hurt. – Garth

Yeah, I agree that asking for payment up front (at the pump, on heating bills, rolled into grocery costs etc.) will have immediate impact and will be damaging to some in the interim between the spend and whatever easing of the tax burden occurs. It’s also far from ideal that those who will change their behavior due to increased fuel costs will be those who are already living marginally and are more or less forced to make hard choices. Those who can afford it probably wont alter their usage much (although everyone likes to save a buck…). In that way it’s a regressive tax at the personal/household level.

Ultimately, the economic pressure of the tax will motivate the more rapid development and deployment of low carbon tech that will mitigate the tax. But, like all economic transitions, there are many (mostly little guys) who will get squished/feel much pain, so the policy has to be carefully thought out.

#143 Huh on 12.14.20 at 3:49 am

Soooo lets go after people like this woman and not worry one bit about monster Wall Street corporations like Amazon, Wal-Mart and Apple that have snorfled and added collective trillions from taxpayers and consumers while millions have been thrown out of work and watched their businesses crushed by hypocrisy.

How about we hand the bill to good old Jeff Bezos? I’m sure he and his fellow corporate pals with their bs stock valuations can easily afford it.

#144 Shelley Maven on 12.14.20 at 3:50 am

I think Cake Lady feels like she’s been duped, not that she’s a victim. Read the contract she signed. It’s obvious, at least to a semi- literate like myself, that the CERB application contract is/was a political document…that took the form of a contract.

You don’t have to be a lawyer to design a contract. If this one was dreamed up by a civil servant who didn’t know what they were doing….it would be the first time a massive screw up was brought back from the dead by a zombie civil service worker.

It reads ( in a nutshell) click twice and receive the funds no questions asked or further responsibility. A contract is an agreement between two parties to perform certain agreed to tasks. Cake Lady applied, was approved, and Federal consideration sealed the deal.

Many may scoff at the simplicity, but they have never studied contract law. This baffling CRA action, rather a knee jerk reaction to save Trudeau from another black slash across his record, ( likely a political mask) is going to be challenged at court and be struck down. That you can take to the bank. Cake Lady might want to wait before she sends in a payment.

Internationally the Trudeau story is much more exposed than in Canada. Justin has once again been the ever manipulating meddler. He’s pissed off India again and they’ve take to ripping his sheets off and exposing his latest scandals.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/106538826522115/permalink/1017250335450955/

Justin is killing off farmers in Canada without mercy. His carbon taxes are already crushing them. The newest tax increase is a death knell. Yet Trudeau steps out and backs a radical Punjabi faction. Is it because Trudeau has to pander to Sikh loyalists who control his minority position by bloc voting thier influence in Brampton and Vancouver? This doesn’t play well in India.

Imagine if Quebec seperatist had never stopped murdering diplomats or blowing up grocery stores or civilian airlines. Would Trudeau be as benevolent if a group of terrorists was active in border province of Canada when the solutions offered by the terrorist org with connections to nuclear and very belligerent Pakistan, is more murder without surrender?

Trudeau should focus on the Two Micheals release instead of supporting hate in India if he wants a foreign policy platform. Trudeau might think he needs Sikh votes, but at what cost to Canada on the world stage. On this file in particular his mind and handlers are off the reservation.

#145 kc on 12.14.20 at 8:01 am

#134 Sheesh on 12.13.20 at 11:45 pm

So, I read the link you posted, and my question is – did you?

Cases detected at 40 ct aren’t false positives. True, their viral load is lower than a case detected at 20 ct meaning they may be less likely to spread it, but at this point we don’t know that for certain.

It’s not voodoo science. They don’t have all the answers, so they err on the side of safety. That’s how science works.

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Yes I have read many things from Dr.s and lab techs and scientists. The problem is that those who speak out against the grain of the “official” story get silenced. Minute particles of any strain will not replicate and become a full blown case of higher “viral load” (remember this term, as I am sure you will be hearing it more now) as the particles found at a CT of 40 are mainly dead cells. Many doctors have tried to voice out that if you get tested and are positive @ a greater CT you need to get retested at a lower count to see where you stand. But this is not happening as these doctors don’t get the chance to speak.

A case is a case is the mantra that is/has become the “dogma” now.

People don’t question what is on the news any more. they couldn’t be bothered to make out what is noise and what might be facts, as they don’t have the time or actually don’t care enough to think for themselves. Easier to “label” someone a conspiracy person when sometimes a person might know what he or she is talking about. (attack the person and not the topic)

If you question the establishment, maybe you can become more educated in a certain topic and see both sides of the story.

Example…. Many people still do not know 3 towers fell on 2001-09-11, cheers

#146 Captain Uppa on 12.14.20 at 8:29 am

People I know are mocking me for strongly considering a 10 year fixed at around 2.5%, but I can’t help but think that is once in a lifetime jackpot.

Back me up, Garth.

You discuss mortgage terms with your friends, who then feel free to mock you? Your problems far exceed real estate financing. – Garth

#147 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 8:30 am

@#134 Morrey
“Who is being referred to here? PET?”

+++++

Not much gets past you….

#148 Phylis on 12.14.20 at 8:35 am

#122 45north on 12.13.20 at 9:42 pm
Dolce Vita

Those who voted Trudeau in, should have to pay for his $300 billion in largesse (Toronto and Montréal). Same goes for the King Singh voters.

and boy would they be pissed!

Nice to hear the concept is gaining traction.
Fiscal policy, proportionally backed by your vote. Now there is a use for blockchain. Secure public ledger, kept forever. Vote wisely.

#149 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 8:35 am

” She made $5,000 last year baking cakes in her home. ”

++++

Perhaps the CRA sat up and took notice because she made 5 grand selling wedding CAKES in the province of PEI..?!?!?
With a population smaller than the city of Burnaby……..?

#150 millmech on 12.14.20 at 8:41 am

The carbon tax will be 38 cents a liter on fuel which will flow through to the consumer at the till, the companies will just pass it on. We import most of our food, that which we do grow throughout the non tradition growing seasons is done in heated by fossil fuel greenhouses so expect that to be more expensive also. There will be no tax breaks or revenue neutral aspects to this as our govt is broke, those who believe that this will cause great innovation better get use to a larger portion of the family budget being dedicated to food .
The WFH who may have to now commute longer to work will certainly enjoy the 50% hike on fuel for the commute, it will now cost just as much to drive in for two days as it was for five days. Do not forget the new tolls, road pricing and levies everyone is bringing in to fund the climate action plans that just go into general revenue.
This will all be payed with after tax dollars so it is a tax on a tax on a tax.
A real enlightening process is to save your monthly bills and add up all the taxes that you pay on your purchases, add in your municipal taxes, provincial and federal taxes and see how much you really pay.

#151 Squire on 12.14.20 at 8:50 am

#68 Midnights on 12.13.20 at 6:02 pm
Let’s talk Trudeau selling out the country, shall we?

————————————————————-
I think that’s a strong possibility and the first buyer waiting in line is the CCP. Don’t believe it ? Just don’t be surprised if you wake up one day and find out how much of Canada is CCP owned.

#152 Do we have all the facts on 12.14.20 at 9:04 am

Deciding to lockdown major portions of the Canadian economy without any idea of the immediate impact on Canadian citizens resulted in programs designed to cover as many potential victims as possible.

Rather than asking citizens to define the impact of Covid 19 on their net income each month our government decided that a transfer of $2,000 per month should satisfy everyone that might be affected by the lockdown.

Any responsible government would have structured the initial $2,000 payments as a loan until actual need was verified based on net income in 2019 and potential income that was lost in 2020 due to the Covid 19 lockdown. If someone earning $5,000 or $10,000 in 2019 was affected the level of assistance received would be prorated based on the net impact on their income over the lockdown period.

Rushing to send anyone who applied for CERB a grant of $2,000 per month without examining the actual need of each applicant showed a complete lack of respect for the citizens and businesses who must retire the cost of this largesse in future years.

I will not forget this when the next election arrives!!

#153 Oakville Rocks! on 12.14.20 at 9:22 am

@ #104 Nonplused

Anyone who writes this…
“Don’t buy that kind of stuff. It certainly does work but it takes a lot of energy to separate the H from the 2O in the H2O. Certainly more than you get back out when you recombine them in an internal combustion engine.”

… should not be writing about Fission or Fusion or anything else involving atoms, or perhaps science.

Exactly what kind of engineer are you? Not chemical I am guessing but the molecular makeup of water is Grade 11 chemistry anyway.

To be fair, you post a lot so you are bound to write a lot of nonsense – just thinking about your Trump won the election posts. Easy to see how you could be taken in.

#154 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.14.20 at 9:30 am

Gee, I wonder when Trudeau’s PC nazi’s create a law to arrest people who critisize thegovt.

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/venezuela-politics-hatelaw/

Perhaps they should send a task force to Venezuela to be trained…. or better yet, have the Venezuelan army come up and train our forces here in “hate speech” at CFB Petawawa……what the hell.
If its ok for communist chinese troops it must be ok……..

#155 vic Hood on 12.14.20 at 9:33 am

Real Estate is not worth more, it just costs more.

#156 Gravy Train on 12.14.20 at 9:44 am

#132 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 11:30 pm
“hmm you distorted my text considerably. Editing is not allowed.” I didn’t distort your writing in the slightest, but merely cut down on your verbosity. :P

“But to reiterate my point there is no way renewables are going to support our current level of economic activity.” “In 2018, Canada produced 647.7 terawatt hours (TW.h) of electricity. More than half of the electricity in Canada (61%) is generated from hydro sources. The remainder is produced from a variety of sources, including natural gas (9%), nuclear (15%), wind (5%), coal (8%), biomass (1%), solar (<1%) and petroleum (<1%).”
https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/en/data-analysis/energy-markets/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles-canada.html

“If we are going to give up on carbon-based fuels we are going back to the [Stone Age], with approximately the same population and lifestyle.” We can gradually wean ourselves off carbon-based fuels while providing incentives (subsidies) to use renewables. You suffer from all-or-nothing thinking, a type of cognitive distortion. Read up on it! :P
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_distortion

“Unless GenIV nuclear works out. Or maybe fission.” Yes, if it works out, nuclear waste will remain radioactive for just centuries instead of millennia. :P
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_IV_reactor

“But trying to replace 350 million years of accumulated sunlight with solar panels isn’t going to work.” Again, you need to work on your all-or-nothing thinking. Here’s an article to help you crush it! :P
https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/friendship-20/201812/8-ways-catch-all-or-nothing-thinking

#157 Garth - u get the vaccine first on 12.14.20 at 10:12 am

DELETED

#158 Jesse on 12.14.20 at 10:12 am

In the middle of a pandemic and world wide crisis Trudeau wants to jack up our carbon taxes, and keep jacking them up until 2030… until the nation is completely bankrupt.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/net-zero-carbon-climate-trudeau-1.5838736

#159 David Hawke on 12.14.20 at 10:17 am

#43 TurnerNation on 12.13.20 at 4:51 pm

Some interesting facts raised, Canuckistan has NO had nation-wide bus service since Greyhound stopped servicing the west or a year ago leaving the common man with no means of affordable travel.

Wonder if the the new currency will also be like Cubas where the CUC or tourist Peso = 24CUP peoples Peso which further keeps the peons from travel, interesting, EH!

#160 jess on 12.14.20 at 11:02 am

eliminate the common cold or flu ?

“The main challenge with rhinovirus is the number of circulating strains,”types of virus and they mutate rapidly. Therefore, in the time it takes to develop a vaccine, it is no longer useful.
“It’s incredibly difficult to create a vaccine or drug that will target all of those 160 [strains],”to discover some part of the viral structure that’s shared between all 160 serotypes. If they can successfully target an immune response against that common structure, then they could design a single vaccine that would offer protection against every strain of rhinovirus.

The polio vaccine consisted of all three of polio’s viral serotypes, and the vaccine created against pneumonia has components from 23 different bacterial strains.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-havent-we-cured-the-common-cold-yet/

A new variant of coronavirus may be behind a faster spread of the virus in the south-east of England, Matt Hancock has revealed.Speaking in the Commons, the health secretary said the government had notified the World Health Organisation about the variant.He said: “Over the last few days, thanks to our world class genomic capability in the UK, we have identified a new variant of coronavirus, which may be associated with the faster spread in the south-east of England.

“Initial analysis suggests this variant is growing faster than the existing variants. We’ve currently identified over 1,000 cases with this variant, predominately in the south of England.

“Numbers are increasing rapidly,” he added. “We’ve notified the World Health Organisation about this new variant and PHE is working hard to continue its analysis at Porton Down.”

He also stressed there is nothing to suggest the variant is likely to cause more serious disease, with the latest advice being “highly unlikely” it would fail to respond to a vaccine.

Fauci:..” highlighted an important gap in treatment options for newly infected people: more antiviral interventions are still needed for early cases of the disease—and, if successful, they could perhaps address future outbreaks that might be triggered by other emerging coronaviruses.
Remember, this is the third pandemic coronavirus we’ve dealt with in 18 years, starting with the SARS outbreak in 2002, then the MERS [Middle East respiratory syndrome] outbreak in 2012 and now COVID-19.My overwhelming preference is for direct-acting antiviral agents that can be administered orally. We could give these drugs—likely in combination—for maybe five to six days or a week at most to completely suppress the virus. That, to me, is the highest priority.
We felt we were prepared for a pandemic before this one, and obviously, there has been a lot more suffering, infection and death than we might have anticipated. So we need to do better. We need global interconnectivity, a global health security agenda, and adequate resources and science. A part of the pandemic preparedness that was very successful—and I think we should recognize that—was the investment put into the technologies now available in the field of vaccinology that allowed us to go from identifying a brand-new virus [around early] January to having a vaccine that’s ready to administer to people in less than one year. That is a pace of scientific advance that would have been unimaginable 10 years ago. The implementation of some public health measures has obviously not been as successful.

Any Delay in Ending COVID Could Spur a Different Pandemic

Coronavirus infections can lead to bacterial infections—and bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to treatment with antibiotics

#161 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 11:06 am

#145 kc on 12.14.20 at 8:01 am
Yes I have read many things from Dr.s and lab techs and scientists. The problem is that those who speak out against the grain of the “official” story get silenced.
…………
That’s one narrative, yes. You also have to question those that make the dissenting claims. What is their field of expertise, for example. Often when you dig even further, you’ll find that the doctors or scientists being ‘silenced’ are not experts on the field in question. But they are quick to say that paid shills for Big Whatever are hiding the evidence.

Scientific consensus changes with mounting evidence and replicated study results, not with the findings of one study, or opinion.

First and foremost, you need to have a solid understanding of the scientific process to be able to judge if what you’re reading is credible. Science Based Medicine is a good site to read, if you’re interested in questioning the questioners that is.

Ps. The third tower conspiracy has been debunked.

#162 Damifino on 12.14.20 at 11:09 am

#156 Gravy Train

I find it quite amusing you sent Nonplused a link to a puffy Psychology Today article on ‘all-or-nothing’ thinking since that mindset falls squarely in the domain of modern climate alarmists.

We’re not having a small but manageable impact on the environment while enjoying the enormous net benefit hydrocarbon fuels brought to humanity.

No… We’re a mere dozen years away from a complete societal meltdown in a hellhole planet caused by the inherent, insatiable greed of the human race.

The point Nonplused makes is valid. We will not find the level of required industrial heat in solar, wind, biomass etc. to feed the machinery now supporting our world.

Certainly, we can get a small amount of energy from those sources provided the necessary subsidies are maintained. We could also meet some of our transportation requirements by canoe. We could meet some our agricultural needs with teams of Oxen. It’s certainly possible and it’s been done before.

But why?

Today, solar and wind energy systems are largely a form of penance foisted upon the hydrocarbon industry, supposedly for making our planet ‘dirty’.

Our planet is and always was dirty. It took huge quantities of dense energy to make it more habitable and to protect us, it’s weak, fragile denizens from its worst side effects. We’re going to need a lot more such energy going forward.

Nuclear is the only realistic option in the distant future. BTW, don’t worry too much about nuclear waste. It takes up vastly less space and is much easier to deal with than endless acres of dead solar panels and decommissioned windmills.

#163 Job#1 on 12.14.20 at 11:12 am

#156 Gravy Train

Your own figures above demonstrate the paltry contribution of renewables to power generation. And those figures are just for electricity. No mention of transportation, heating of homes, commercial and industrial buildings, industrial processes requiring high temperatures, as well as increased grid loads for charging EVs, should they attain popularity, as so many wish.
You cannot heat a home relying on wind and solar. I challenge you to present an energy budget to run a home without fossil fuels as the dominant contributor. In my experience, only a geothermal heating/cooling system could reduce reliance on carbon fuels to any significant degree.
Also, we are fortunate in Canada to have an abundance of falling water to generate electricity. Most regions of our world are not so lucky. The claim that renewables can meet our energy requirements is delusional. The numbers are easily calculable and speak for themselves. This has nothing to do with your hopium and “all or nothing” criticism.

#164 Guelph Guru on 12.14.20 at 11:27 am

No one is talking Real Estate valuations, so let me bring it up.
So far the best investment has been SFH in Canada(Last 10+ years). Has faired great through the entire business cycle of the stock market. Even the pandemic and recession saw new highs.
Low int rates have caused the Bull run. Will it change when rates start rising? Or will the salaries rise everywhere in Canada making the price reasonable? Is it different this time?

#165 Km on 12.14.20 at 11:33 am

I made just over $5000 last year with my business start up. I did not take CERB as my husband worked to the whole time and we had money saved. Everyone was baffled as it is considered free money and take what you can get even if you have a loaded bank accounts etc. Meanwhile we do not understand taking money that can go to people who need it more. This from my husband who is a millennial and myself somewhat older GEN X. We haven’t been able to get someone to manage our money but we do have some put away and compared to most of our friends are well off which is sad as it is well under $100 k saved. Meanwhile they all make more than us but live off C.C. and consider it okay to do so. Welcome to Canada where being piced in debt is the new normal and us who try to live in our means are considered strange.

#166 Railrich on 12.14.20 at 11:42 am

One thing I never understood is why isn’t there a split between Bank of Canada interest rates between business and residential sectors? Seems a lot of the problems spoken of here could be alleviated by being able to goose residential rates while stimulating business development.

#167 JB on 12.14.20 at 11:43 am

#92 Nonplused on 12.13.20 at 7:34 pm

#85 Canuck on 12.13.20 at 6:57 pm
Billionaire Donald Trump bragged about paying no tax because he was ‘smart.’ What a role model for modern society. No wonder we are pooched. – Garth
_______________________________________________

Interesting… You have said on here and in your books I believe, that tax evasion is wrong but tax avoidance is fine and legal. Now that Trump brags about taking advantage of tax law, he’s morally bankrupt? Please… I’m willing to bet most billionaires pay little to no tax

He’s the president. There is no excuse for paying nothing and certainly not for bragging about it. Stop trying to defend the indefensible. – Garth

————————————-

Both of you settle down. The dog (the IRS) did not bark. All of Trump’s tax returns are always under audit for 7 years back.

And don’t forget he’s been giving his whole presidential salary to charity since he was elected and can’t collect a salary from other sources while president. Ya, that adds up to a pretty low personal tax rate. His companies are still paying whatever cooperate and property taxes are applicable as negotiated with the IRS but it is not currently under his supervision.
……………………………………………………………………
Sure, arms length right?
Just like the AG office and all other offices.
The guy is dirty and his whole family is as well. Tax evasion runs rampant in the Trump family. He just has never been charged yet!

#168 NoName on 12.14.20 at 11:44 am

@farts

for when you are low on sugar.

Nestlé has launched an elaborate new line of KitKats in Japan, using chocolate aged for six months in whisky barrels in Scotland.

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/kitkat-scotch-whisky-japan-scli-intl-gbr/index.html

#169 Linda on 12.14.20 at 12:02 pm

#149 ‘Crowded’ – weddings are expensive. The average cost for a cake to serve approximately 100 people is $600. That is for a basic, nothing too fancy cake! IF you want a fancy cake the cost can easily be $1,000 or more. At those prices it wouldn’t take long to rack up $5K, even in a province with a small population. Now add in the fact that PEI could well be a favored ‘destination’ for out of province weddings. Not difficult to imagine that someone who is spending big bucks to host family/friends at a destination wedding will be budgeting big bucks for a fancy, over the top wedding cake.

#170 Doug in London on 12.14.20 at 12:12 pm

@Jesse, post #158:
So why jack up carbon taxes? Simple, because that’s where the money is. I look around me and I see cars are getting bigger, and trucks and SUVs are more popular than ever. This time last year, my parents had a 2012 Honda Civic, until someone else hit it and it was a write off. So they went looking at new Honda Civics, and didn’t like them, figured they are too big. Remember eons ago when a Honda Civic was a tiny car like an Austin Mini? They managed to get a Honda Fit, just in time because they’re being discontinued. Do you ever wonder why Ford has been getting out of the car business and into trucks? Despite higher fuel consumption, they are so popular now. That tells me fuel cost isn’t a factor in decision to buy a truck. Everywhere I go I see one person car trips, and most people go way over the 100 Km per hour limit on the 401. If fuel was expensive, everyone would buy a small econo car, do more car pooling, and rarely travel more than 80 Km per hour on highways. A carbon tax is by far the best and fairest way to cut emissions and raise tax revenue. Bring it on!

#171 RyYYZ on 12.14.20 at 12:14 pm

#166 Km on 12.14.20 at 11:33 am
I made just over $5000 last year with my business start up. I did not take CERB as my husband worked to the whole time and we had money saved. Everyone was baffled as it is considered free money and take what you can get even if you have a loaded bank accounts etc.
===================================
When the government’s handing out free money, if you qualify, take it. Such opportunities don’t come along often. My issue is with the government giving it to people who don’t need it, but that’s the fault of the government’s hastily conceived plan (and their complete lack of fiscal responsibility). Your sacrifice will not be rewarded or recognized, sorry to say.

#172 kc on 12.14.20 at 12:15 pm

162 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 11:06 am

Ps. The third tower conspiracy has been debunked.

XXXX

You mean it didn’t fall down?

#173 the Jaguar on 12.14.20 at 12:24 pm

#163 Damifino on 12.14.20 at 11:09 am
#156 Gravy Train &

#164 Job#1 on 12.14.20 at 11:12 am
#156 Gravy Train

Hitting ’em out of the park today! Grand Slam Home Runs!
Mercy!

#174 Stoph on 12.14.20 at 12:26 pm

What doesn’t make sense is that someone who made $5000/year actually qualifies for $18k in CERB. This is a clear failing of the government who set up the program. Furthermore the government was focused on getting out money as quick as possible, processing claims even for cases where flags were present that the claimant didn’t qualify, and as far as I know didn’t inform claimants of their possible ineligibility. Seems negligent to me.

According to the CBC article, the word ‘net’ wasn’t added to the application website until April 21, after the PEI woman had applied and had started to receive benefits. The government should have clarified this requirement with those already receiving benefits.

This however doesn’t excuse ineligible claimants who claimed CERB. In cases where people where people were doubtful of their eligibility, they should have called to confirm their eligibility and not spent the money until confirmation.

#175 Faron on 12.14.20 at 12:34 pm

#167 Railrich on 12.14.20 at 11:42 am

One thing I never understood is why isn’t there a split between Bank of Canada interest rates between business and residential sectors?

Because, to a certain extent, lending rates are set on the open market. No one entity has a dial to control interest rates directly, it can only be done my putting pressure on the market. However, the BoC has been buying mortgage backed securities to keep the mortgage market stable and, thus, rates down. And in this go around, the US fed has purchased both MBS and corporate bonds of all grades. So, in a way, they do exert power over rates separately.

I think a better way to pressure the markets is through tax and central banks have no say in taxation. But, with tax, the forcing is much more targeted.

#176 Sonny on 12.14.20 at 12:43 pm

CRA are just like the RCMP…..they go hard after the lowest hanging fruit.

#177 The West on 12.14.20 at 1:24 pm

“The future cannot come soon enough.”

It does look good from the top down, the ruling establishments can unfurl their banner now.

“Mission Accomplished”

#178 WTF on 12.14.20 at 1:32 pm

#117 The Peg “The look of Rosie’s face as she is interviewing Freeland says it all!”

Ha Ha guess you didnt see Chrystia’s Pollyanna act on Bill Mahar. Cringeworthy eyerolling lectures. Google it if you dare.
—————————————————————–
Way bigger systemic problems in PEI than the cake lady.

Been going on for years, EG: Local Fish Plant has to recruit Temp Foreign workers (from China) as the locals apparently make more not working.

And yes I blame the politicians not the recipients. 50 Years of Government intervention ( ACOA/EI/XFER Payments, Higher percentage of Government Employment….ect)

Vote buying experiment worked so well in the east they’re going national !

With Alberta Oil Revenues in the tank where will the transfer $ come from to prop up other parts of the country. Taxes?

The Government that now has 0 Financial acumen at the highest level has some magic to perform

#179 Steven Rowlandson on 12.14.20 at 2:09 pm

Thanks to the politicians and their disease hypothesis’s and resultant lock downs.
My annual income from work will be slightly better than $3,000.00. I didn’t do welfare or CERB this year.

#180 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 2:19 pm

#173 kc on 12.14.20 at 12:15 pm
162 Sheesh on 12.14.20 at 11:06 am

Ps. The third tower conspiracy has been debunked.

XXXX

You mean it didn’t fall down?
……
Don’t be disingenuous. You know what I mean.
Also, read this and get back to me:

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/no-covid-19-casedemic/

#181 Cici on 12.14.20 at 6:32 pm

#3 Tarot Card

I hope she takes your advice and gets slammed for tax fraud.

You do realize that if she follows your (very bad) advice she’d be committing a tax felony? She’s already filed her 2019 return and profited from the expenses she claimed. Don’t think she can turn the taxation system upside down for her own benefit, especially not with her piddly and pathetic contribution to the country’s economy.

This is all her own doing and not the fault of the CRA.

#182 Gravy Train on 12.14.20 at 8:38 pm

#163 Damifino on 12.14.20 at 11:09 am
“[…] We’re not having a small but manageable impact on the environment while enjoying the enormous net benefit hydrocarbon fuels brought to humanity.” I presume this is sarcasm, but it’s also begging the question, an informal fallacy.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question

“No… We’re a mere dozen years away from a complete societal meltdown in a hellhole planet caused by the inherent, insatiable greed of the human race.” This so-called refutation to my arguments bears no relation to anything I wrote; hence, it’s a straw man argument, another informal fallacy.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_man

“The point Nonplused makes is valid. We will not find the level of required industrial heat in solar, wind, biomass etc. to feed the machinery now supporting our world.” Nowhere did I write that there should be an abrupt cessation of fossil fuel usage. This is more straw man. You and Nonplused also seem to imply that there is no room whatsoever for renewables as an energy source, which is all-or-nothing thinking.

“Certainly, we can get a small amount of energy from those sources provided the necessary subsidies are maintained.” I purchased from my power company just 52% of my energy consumption (with the remaining 48% coming from my solar panels). Explain to me how that’s ‘a small amount of energy.’

“We could also meet some of our transportation requirements by canoe. We could meet some our agricultural needs with teams of oxen. It’s certainly possible and it’s been done before.” This is an appeal to ridicule, another informal fallacy.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeal_to_ridicule

“Today, solar and wind energy systems are largely a form of penance foisted upon the hydrocarbon industry, supposedly for making our planet ‘dirty’.” This is more straw man.

“Our planet is and always was dirty. It took huge quantities of dense energy to make it more habitable and to protect us, it’s weak, fragile denizens from its worst side effects. We’re going to need a lot more such energy going forward.” Assumes facts not in evidence, and is irrelevant to my arguments.

“Nuclear [energy] is the only realistic option in the distant future.” Uranium is non-renewable, whereas the sun is by definition a public good and is literally ‘a free lunch.’ Who says there’s no such thing?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_good_(economics)

All told, your reasoning is fallacious and specious.

#183 Gravy Train on 12.14.20 at 9:24 pm

#164 Job#1 on 12.14.20 at 11:12 am
“Your own figures above demonstrate the paltry contribution of renewables to power generation. And those figures are just for electricity.[…]” Are you saying hydro power is not renewable?

“[…] You cannot heat a home relying on wind and solar. I challenge you to present an energy budget to run a home without fossil fuels as the dominant contributor. In my experience, only a geothermal heating/cooling system could reduce reliance on carbon fuels to any significant degree.” From Jun. 20, 2019 to Jun. 18, 2020, I bought 15,211 kWh, sold 4,926 kWh for net purchases of 10,285 kWh, produced 9,428 kWh, and consumed 19,713 kWh—using twenty 400W solar panels. Thus I purchased from my power company just 52% of my energy needs (with 48% coming from the sun through the photoelectric effect).

“Also, we are fortunate in Canada to have an abundance of falling water to generate electricity. Most regions of our world are not so lucky. The claim that renewables can meet our energy requirements is delusional.” I never said all our energy needs could be met with renewables. You are engaged in all-or-nothing thinking.

“The numbers are easily calculable and speak for themselves.” You didn’t provide us with the figures. When can we expect them?

“This has nothing to do with your hopium and ‘all or nothing’ criticism.” Appeal to ridicule, an informal fallacy.

#184 Valley of Kings and Slaves on 12.14.20 at 9:58 pm

As a former soldier I am fairly annoyed at this

after SARS — millions of dollars and thousands of hours were spent on this…

https://open.alberta.ca/dataset/c89245b6-a7fc-4c24-be87-c2686341ffb5/resource/a652811e-42f2-4c0d-90af-54e0e759e05e/download/2014-Albertas-Pandemic-Influenza-Plan-APIP-March-2014.pdf

And yet once again — those “in charge” think they are above it all… and need to recreate responses “on the fly”… cause they know better…

Mike Tyson once said — “everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face”

In the military we said ” no plan survives “CONTACT” “.

Thankyou for your insight Garth -All the best blog dogs…

Im going to walk “she who rules the world”… and enjoy the stars…

#185 morrey on 12.15.20 at 12:02 am

#147

so what does PET have to do with our present debt?
educate us. 1984 was his lats year as PM.

#186 Diamond Dog on 12.15.20 at 7:44 am

I must admit it never occurred to me in writing this blog post that it would bring the conspiracy theory whackadoodles scuttling out from the underbrush. – Garth

Yeah! I mean, your post was an excellent summation of the ebb and flow of this world. Your writing skills shined only to be followed with “pandemic is fake” speak comments? It’s not just grossly misinformed feedback, its myopic (obvious connection there) and woefully astigmatic. By New Years day, 350,000 people will have died. So what if most of them are old, it’s hospitalized 5x that or more, there’s more than 100k in U.S. hospitals as we speak with fresh faces ready to replace them every week.

This isn’t a benign flu here as fatalities suggest, people hospitalized with this have come down with some degree of pneumonia which, anyone will tell you it gets easier to catch down the road. It’s hard on the lungs and heart. Scarred organs is not something we knowingly sign up for and to pretend it doesn’t exist because a political cult decided it was in “their best interest” to do so… it shouldn’t give a suckered follower a lame excuse to follow suit no matter what they hear or read but I guess there are victims there too, voluntary or otherwise. For some I guess, propaganda for whatever reason is all they know.

38 cents a litre for gas, eventually, will be the cost. Plus significantly higher heating and power costs. Families will feel this, even as governments dole money back in periodic payments. It may be the ethically correct thing to do, but never assume it will not hurt. – Garth

The more I think on it, we need a carbon tax not that I’m trying to reinvent the wheel here but we need it whether we want to recognize it or not. A week ago I might have grumbled not so much with new and higher taxes, its just where that revenue is going. This is a more immediate problem than most recognize and some revenue needs to go to R & D. Currently, it isn’t and the provinces like Alberta seem more concerned with making diesel out of bitumen than they are with climate change.

A carbon tax will definitely change behavior, of this I have no doubt and some of the revenue can be spun back to the people, I can see the merits in that more now, but some revenue should go directly to tech research at the refinery level and other places too. Zero emissions at the refinery level and at big power gen doesn’t come without resources and incentive. We are incentivizing the consumer and pricing future green tech as more affordable to help with the transition to green energy, but we need to incentivize the hydrocarbon producer to clean up it’s act as well.

It’s not like the world is going to stop burning hydrocarbons tomorrow or need them for plastics and composites as we burn less and less hydrocarbons (hopefully) in the future. Refineries are still the largest emitters on the production side and something has to be done if the planet ever decides to take a wholehearted run at climate change and clock is ticking. This, plus overpopulation and over consumption, poorly priced pollution, they are systematic and the solutions aren’t incentivized, the problems never end.

#187 David Greene on 12.15.20 at 10:46 am

Yeah. That’s the thing. Some of us do the the right things because it’s right to do them, and/or because it contributes in general to society. Not because we’ll get recognized or rewarded for it.

#172 RyYYZ on 12.14.20 at 12:14 pm

#166 Km on 12.14.20 at 11:33 am
I made just over $5000 last year with my business start up. I did not take CERB as my husband worked to the whole time and we had money saved. Everyone was baffled as it is considered free money and take what you can get even if you have a loaded bank accounts etc.
===================================
When the government’s handing out free money, if you qualify, take it. Such opportunities don’t come along often. My issue is with the government giving it to people who don’t need it, but that’s the fault of the government’s hastily conceived plan (and their complete lack of fiscal responsibility). Your sacrifice will not be rewarded or recognized, sorry to say.

#188 HermPine on 12.16.20 at 10:55 am

Thats hilarious. $170 B in private and corporate bank accounts is a bit like saying Charlie Huddy & Wayne Gretzky combined for 96 goals for the ’81 Oilers….a lot more to be detailed in that $170 B. Corporate greed that it is!!