The K

RYAN   By Guest Blogger Ryan Lewenza
.

As Covid-19 hit taking the global economy down with it, economists were quick to define the ultimate recovery in the economy with a letter from the alphabet. The more optimistic bunch called for a V-shaped recovery, where the economy would quickly drop and then recover, looking like a V. The bears out there (and you know who you are!) were calling for the dreaded U-shaped recovery, where the recovery would be drawn out and depressed. However, neither of those scenarios played out and in fact, there’s a new letter that we can add to our vernacular – the K-shaped recovery.

A K-shaped recovery occurs when certain parts of the economy recover faster and more strongly than other parts. Basically, the recovery is uneven, with some (mainly white-collar jobs and professionals) experiencing minimal impact, while others (typically blue-collar workers and lower income earners) suffer disproportionately from the downturn. That’s exactly what we’ve seen over the last year with this terrible pandemic really weighing on certain areas like restaurants, travel and leisure and small businesses.

Below is a cool chart (is that an oxymoron?), which illustrates this concept. I plotted the total aggregate hours worked by all employees for two different groups – professionals and the information technology sector and the services sector including restaurants, leisure and entertainment. Note how the white-collar professions have seen minimal impact to their total hours worked, whereas the service-based areas like restaurants and entertainment have experienced massive drops in their total hours worked.

You don’t have to be a trained economist to deduce this. All you have to do is look around. When I walk down Toronto’s Queen Street I see it everywhere. With the Ontario government shutting down businesses again, who do you think feels it the most? While I sit in my comfortable office at home, small businesses ranging from my local drycleaner, to my local pub and our favourite restaurants, are enduring incredible economic pain and emotional stress right now and are feeling the brunt of this crappy pandemic.

What a K-Shaped Recovery Looks Like

Source: BLS, Turner Investments

Another way to illustrate this K-shaped recovery is by looking at employment rates across different income ranges. For example, those income earners in the lowest quartile (in the US is defined as those earning below US$27,000) have experienced the biggest drops in employment with this group seeing a drop of 19% in employment rates since the pandemic hit. In contrast, those higher income earners (defined as over US$60,000) have actually seen their employment rates rise by 0.2%, as of September.

Low Income Earners are Getting Hit the Most During this Downturn

Source: Opportunity Insights

So we know this is happening and why, but what is the solution to this?

In my opinion there are three critical things that need to happen to turn this around.

First, while I am a staunch fiscal hawk, I believe the government needs to pony up and continue to financially support the hard-hit service sector and small businesses. This includes the continuation of the rent and wage subsidy for businesses, providing loans to small businesses and targeted support to our bars, restaurants, travel and small businesses. Yes this is expensive and yes this will leave us with a lot of debt, but because the governments are making the decision to close businesses to slow the spread of the virus, then the governments need to pay up. As the economy begins to recover and we get control of this pandemic, then governments should create a plan to return to balanced budgets to help get control of the skyrocketing debt. I don’t have much confidence in this current Federal government and our new Finance Minister to do this sadly.

Second, we need the vaccine and we need it fast. While details of the vaccine rollout have been sketchy and unclear, it currently appears that we’ll receive 6 million doses from Pfizer and Moderna by March, which would vaccinate 3 million Canadians (requires two doses). First responders and seniors in long-term care facilities will receive priority, with a broader rollout of the vaccine by the second quarter. Come fall a good percentage of us should be vaccinated, and when this happens we’ll begin to return to normal by going out again to the bars, restaurants and movie theatres. Not sure about you, but I sure do miss hanging with my pals and having some pints, or having a nice diner with the Missus. So, I see these areas recovering strongly next year as the vaccine takes hold.

Lastly, it’s all about job growth and getting people back to work. The vaccine rollout will be critical to this.

During the downturn the Canadian economy lost 3 million jobs in March and April Since then we’ve added back 2.4 million jobs, or 80% of what was lost in the spring. We need to get back to the 19.2 million peak in Feb 2020, and I see that happening over the course of 2021. I’m expecting job growth to slow going forward, but the trend will be up and we should be back above that 19 million level over the next year. This is critical to addressing this K-shaped recovery.

Canadian Employment is Still Down 600k Jobs since Feb Peak

Source: Bloomberg, Turner Investments

Through what I see around me and my many conversations with our clients I know people are hurting from this historic pandemic. These are not just statistics, or some numbers on my spreadsheets. It’s real people with real lives. So we need continued government support, a successful vaccine rollout and job growth to get back to normal, which I believe is on the horizon and will unfold in 2021.

In my own little way I’m going to try to help the service sector and small businesses by purchasing all my holiday gifts for the family through local businesses around town. No Amazon purchases for me this holiday season! Let’s all try to support our hard-hit local businesses this holiday season, as they need us now more than ever.

Ryan Lewenza, CFA, CMT is a Partner and Portfolio Manager with Turner Investments, and a Senior Vice President, Private Client Group, of Raymond James Ltd.

 

113 comments ↓

#1 Prince Polo on 12.05.20 at 9:33 am

Hi Ryan – I could sense your frustration with our esteemed PM, on this week’s Turner Investments call. Maybe we’ll get somebody better in the future, but in the mean time, as you said, we have to continue to support our closed businesses.

The pill might be easier to swallow if, in some cases, CERB wasn’t greater than the salary that is being replaced! May the gov’t please start using some logic in helicoptering money? Thanks!

#2 C V on 12.05.20 at 9:36 am

Great post. I wonder if people are giving too much credence to this vaccine. I’m not a virologist but don’t these things mutate? People get the flu shot and get different strains of the flu. Will people with the vaccine getting coronavirus be our dramatic media headlines for 2021? I hope not, but nothing surprises anymore

#3 Trexx on 12.05.20 at 9:47 am

Good post.

Shop and buy local this Christmas.

Wear a mask in public, it’s the courteous and polite thing to do.
Shows you care just a little about your fellow Canadians.
More than the very slight discomfort and bother a mask causes in any case.

#4 GrumpyPanda on 12.05.20 at 9:56 am

Good article Ryan. Suggestion: The Green Iguana. Definitely not mass produced, neat perfume bottles, artsy stuff. Also La Bella Managua for the best Nicaraguan food in Toronto. Both near Bloor and Ossington. My favourite store and restaurant. An exciting pandemic day trip.

#5 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 9:57 am

Interesting employment stats.

I fear this current govt spending will ruin any chance Canada has for balancing a budget ( paying down the debt will be impossible) forever.

Trudeau’s Liberals have spent more money in the past year than all other Canadian govts in the past 150 years.

He has doubled our debt in one year…. and he’s not finished yet.

I foresee massive tax increases and user fees being the norm moving forward….
Crushing worker incentive to earn a bit more by working extra hours.
Or the govt will be forced to eliminate cash as the working population moves back into “cash jobs” to save a few hard earned dollars.

The sooner the Helicopter Cash “hero” is out of office ….the better.

#6 just a dude on 12.05.20 at 9:58 am

Ryan, always enjoy reading your thoughts and analyses. Thank you for this great post.

#7 Ordinary Blog Dog on 12.05.20 at 10:01 am

Well said. I do worry about debt management by the government, I do not have confidence they will handle in a shrewd and effective manner.

#8 Simpson Rainer on 12.05.20 at 10:04 am

Good post but I do take issue that a free market finance guy (you) throws out some “socialism” advice towards the end. I do hope that you permanently stop buying more stuff from Amazon and everywhere else while continuing to encourage others to do the same. I’m not suggesting that I am any better, I am reading this blog, but I call BS on this. Stick to making money.

“Corporate socialism for the 1%,
Darwinian capitalism for everyone else.”

#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:22 am

@#8 Mt Ranier
“stop buying more stuff from Amazon…”

++++

Amazon will eventually crush most “Bricks and Mortar” businesses…… Covid just accelerated the process.

When I can order something that is delivered ….to my doorstep……in 24 hours……
Why bother getting in a car, driving to a store, park in a busy (metered?) lot, go in to a store that may or may not have what I want, search for the product, deal with barely interested cashiers, buy the product ( or go to another store), go back to my car ( hopefully undented by other a-holes), drive home, unpack the item.
OR
Get it delivered to your door with a few clicks of a mouse from Amazon……

#10 GrumpyPanda on 12.05.20 at 10:27 am

Re: #8 Simpson Rainer. And here I thought Ryan was referencing the advantages of a localized multiplier effect not socialism. Also, since it is easy to drift off topic here please encourage any friends you have in Florida to kill green iguanas where they are an invasive species.

#11 Andy on 12.05.20 at 10:43 am

Ryan, the first chart is incoherent. The valuations on the two vertical axes should be the same or at least have details of their distinctions. Does not make sense right now…?

#12 Burning Flag on 12.05.20 at 11:02 am

DELETED

#13 Thomas on 12.05.20 at 11:17 am

You lost me at the first phrase:
‘ Covid-19 hit taking the global economy down with it,‘
It is not COVID-19, but politicians that hit the global economy by imposing lock downs. Your charts and employment numbers are only the result of government actions. I would have loved to have the opportunity to vote on those decisions, since I will be asked to pay for the results of that decision to lockdown.

#14 Andrewski on 12.05.20 at 11:33 am

Our family has continued to watch how & where we spend our money. 1 easy way we support our local small restaurant owners is to NEVER use a 3rd party delivery service, because they steal up to 30% of the restaurant’s bill, so we pick up. Many of these restaurants will show their appreciation to us for picking up by throwing in a small side dish.

#15 looking up on 12.05.20 at 11:41 am

#5 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 9:57

Interesting employment stats.

I fear this current govt spending will ruin any chance Canada has for balancing a budget ( paying down the debt will be impossible) forever.

Trudeau’s Liberals have spent more money in the past year than all other Canadian govts in the past 150 years.

He has doubled our debt in one year…. and he’s not finished yet.

I foresee massive tax increases and user fees being the norm moving forward….
Crushing worker incentive to earn a bit more by working extra hours.
Or the govt will be forced to eliminate cash as the working population moves back into “cash jobs” to save a few hard earned dollars.

The sooner the Helicopter Cash “hero” is out of office ….the better.

————

Not advocating for Trudeau but you’re not being realistic. The extreme spending over the last year was necessary to keep the economy afloat due to the Covid crisis. Virtually every nation on the planet did the same and now find themselves with historic debt.

Unfortunate but completely necessary.

I do totally agree with you though that Amazon will crush a lot of retail.

I went out the other day looking for a furnace filter. The stores I went to used to have it but didn’t for whatever reason. Went home logged in to Amazon and the next afternoon it was on my doorstep.

#16 Flop... on 12.05.20 at 11:45 am

Well the military has there plans for the vaccine roll-out, I’ll keep plugging away with my back-up plan of having it administered at your local Tim Hortons.

So convenient, it’s ridiculous!

All you have to do is order your normal beverage and say that you’ll have an extra shot to go with it.

There is talk of having to provide proof of vaccination to travel, go to sporting events, concerts and such, society’s possibly about to get bifurcated, not for the first time.

Just go to your local Timmies, for the people that are a little scared, just don’t get there at opening time, wait a few hours, until the opening drinks and extra shots have been consumed, if you know what I mean.

Wink, wink, nudge, nudge.

Just look for the posters that allows you you hopefully return to a somewhat normal life by having full access to everything.

Roll-up-the-sleeve-to-get-in…

M46BC

#17 the Jaguar on 12.05.20 at 11:53 am

The employment numbers are a little bit like the ‘canary in the mine’. One wonders what will unfold after the vax rolls out. This past year has been a time when many big corporations needed to show their compassion and understanding, but I am in no doubt that it also afforded them an opportunity to examine new ways of running their business in a more ‘lean environment’. An example might be those ancient warrior Banks. Been running on skeleton staff in their branches, realized their lifelong ambition of migrating customers to digital channels, and have successfully run their share prices back up to previously high levels before the Pandemic arrived. Even if you don’t like Banks, you have to admire their nimble craftiness.

They never sleep, you know. It’s way too much fun staying up all night planning how to capitalize on adversity. Bricks and mortar are bound to suffer in this scenario. Hey, Garth! Can you use another former Bank branch location?

#18 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 12.05.20 at 11:56 am

Do you think this Covid-19 virus will come back every year in the flu season just like the influenza that comes round every winter??? Will it mutate so that an ajusted vaccine will have to be administered every winter?

#19 Doug t on 12.05.20 at 11:57 am

Sadly most local shops have product made in ……drum roll….China, and I refuse to support the CCP

#20 Doug t on 12.05.20 at 12:00 pm

#9 fartz

Sad but so true – plus your likely to get a parking ticket in Victoria faster than you can say “ we don’t want you downtown shopping “

#21 AlbertaGuy (locked down) in AB on 12.05.20 at 12:17 pm

Ill try and channel the sm..

flwnza your recovd jbs big r fake .. kept alive on life support by machine /cxxb angone fr ever when vax trickling . greta jobs wont exist for 1oyr more..robots putting sun shingles and changing dead batries in carz..sheep pt to pastr

#22 Joseph R. on 12.05.20 at 12:33 pm

#13 Thomas on 12.05.20 at 11:17 am
You lost me at the first phrase:
‘ Covid-19 hit taking the global economy down with it,‘
It is not COVID-19, but politicians that hit the global economy by imposing lock downs. Your charts and employment numbers are only the result of government actions. I would have loved to have the opportunity to vote on those decisions, since I will be asked to pay for the results of that decision to lockdown.

—————————————————————

You live in a democracy. Nobody is preventing you from running for public office.

#23 Brian Ripley on 12.05.20 at 12:53 pm

My Calgary Housing chart (November data) is up:
http://www.chpc.biz/calgary-housing.html

Condo prices are trading like it’s March 2006 when the TSX Energy Index traded 4 times higher than now.

Fortunately Alberta average employment earnings are 8% above the national average and it shows up in the single family detached market that has remained aloft for the last 7 years despite the TSX Energy Index plunging by 72% in the last 6 years.

Here is a quote from a November 2020 Bloomberg report
https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2020-peak-oil-era-is-suddenly-upon-us/

“We’re not going back to the same economy,” U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell cautioned in mid-November. “We’re recovering, but to a different economy.”

That new economy means people will continue working more from home, traveling less, and staying in to binge on digital programming. About two thirds of Covid’s impact on oil demand will be from setbacks to the global economy, according to BP’s (British Petroleum) estimates, and one third will be from permanent changes in behavior.

“Permanent changes in behavior.”

#24 Tarot Card on 12.05.20 at 12:55 pm

Thanks for the blog Garth
And thanks for your post Ryan
I agree I am all for fiscal prudence and I also agree we now should take the opportunity and spend billions wisely. Research and development are the keys to future success. Imagine if we spent 100 billion on new innovations. Canada will Rock! Jobs jobs jobs sounds easy.

Look at the recent innovations, saline solutions in masks, in Calgary, small nuclear reactors, waste water tests for covid in Ottawa, engineer designs gel to heal tissues, Edmonton, Ontario pilot project to turn plastic into fuel, and the list goes on,
Call your MP and demand money be spent to help our innovators. And while your at it bring manufacturing home!

My take on wearing a mask
I am intelligent enough to know I may be asymptomatic it is obvious to me major infections in BC were caused by asymptomatic people. I cite the hockey players returning from Alberta, I cite one person going to a gym infection 40. And the list goes on. It could be 10 percent of you or 30 percent we still don’t know. So I wear a mask because I am smart enough to stop the spread.

I wear a mask not because I am afraid, far from the truth it is my civic duty to protect others.

I am not for government lock downs, but those minority people who fight the system and are arrogant will cause the lock downs in the end, so why not be patient and do your duty before we are forced. I am smart to volunteer now rather than be forced later.
Yes our civil liberties are taken away, but it’s temporary. Get over it.
Ask yourself why am I in the same boat but rowing the opposite way? Now give your head a shake. Maybe you should get out of the boat and let the majority continue fighting on.

As far as vaccines, I will get one.
When I went to Brazil last year, I was not allowed in the country unless I had a yellow fever shot, so my choice go to Brazil and get a shot or stay home. And it was awful.

Yes we are all tired but imagine four years of war and the sacrifices, I think you can do your part for as long as it takes don’t you? Try ration cards for sugar and gas imagine. You selfish people absolutely have no clue.

Why does the majority in the country always suffer at the hands of the few?

Today I will shop locally and proudly wear my mask.
Respectfully submitted.

#25 TurnerNation on 12.05.20 at 1:14 pm

Cites + taxes.

In this New System , rolled out globally in March, it is clear that no new money for infrastructure or fun is available. How can it be, transit is being cut all over.
No per “UN agenda” for ‘equality’ (aka we all go broke) the only new spending will be on the Poverty Industry.
Google that term. Hundreds of millions spent for a handful of people – who get very little while adminstrators and the friends of the Party get rich.
Exactly like this. Quote is lift from a blog comment elsewhere.
— Seeing as our global elites play the Long Game you think that all these empty hotel rooms in our city were planned? Or just happenstance.


“California is pouring magic money into buying hotels and motels to convert their tiny rooms into ‘homes’ for the ‘homeless’. Example: Sonoma County (adjacent west to Napa county where French Laundry is) has had ~3000 homeless for years despite an incredible 136 million budget in 2019 for their ‘care’ by ‘non profits’.

The latest 2020 plan is to spend 27 million on buying 3 downtown hotels, depriving those towns of income, jobs and visitor taxes to convert so that approximately 75 rooms are ready for ‘homeless’ out of the 3000. They will be ready in 3 years. All three hotels are owned by the same family.

This same pretend ‘care’ is being acted out in virtually every California county with over a half billion of money from nowhere being spent before EOY. Sonoma county is now raising their wine country tourism tax to help pay their share of this ‘care package’ which will frighten off even more tourists who are already horrified by the endless homeless encampments and associated human waste and needles.”

#26 Faron on 12.05.20 at 1:18 pm

In my own little way I’m going to try to help the service sector and small businesses by purchasing all my holiday gifts for the family through local businesses around town.

Gread post Ryan, and the bit above is spot on. In the before times my favourite way to xmas shop was to pick a medium sized town, park the car and spend the day walking from shop to shop. Lots of good holiday vibes.

Fun fact: Jeff bezos could now gift $100,000 to each Amazon employee and still have the wealth he enjoyed pre-pandemic.

#27 Dolce Vita on 12.05.20 at 1:21 pm

Ah, on the jobs Canada probably broke even in November.

Job gains come from StatCan “Statistically Massaged” Seasonally Adjusted numbers vs. the “Unadjusted” actual or raw data:

https://i.imgur.com/8pQormt.png

Unadjusted data: Canada lost jobs. Massaging, Canada gained jobs. Call it a wash?

In the face of partial restrictions all over Canada for October, November…which numbers were the most likely? Massaging or actual, raw?

I will leave that up to your discerning selves.

And unfortunately, StatCan back to seasonal adjusting (like you know, they’ve have other global pandemic “seasons” of data to lean back on). We had a good run at raw, actual data for at least a quarter…something to be happy about.

For those so inclined, go here to StanCan…slice, dice, filter, add/remove then Apply to your heart’s content (as I do):

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/cv.action?pid=1410028701

————————–

A heck of a lot better than believing the 2 Bricks Short of a Full Load Cdn MSM that goes here and copy/pastes anything shiny:

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/201204/dq201204a-eng.htm?HPA=1

AND completely ignoring the “Employment growth continues to slow” section.

Oh well, hope springs eternal. People looking for some good news where this is none. All the power to the Optimists of the World…we need more of them.

I just not one of them when I put my Rational Thinking hat on.

#28 KNOW IT ALL on 12.05.20 at 1:24 pm

Your predictions are as good as the rest of them….

But that is a good idea “BUY LOCAL”.

#29 Ryan Lewenza on 12.05.20 at 1:25 pm

Simpson Rainer “Good post but I do take issue that a free market finance guy (you) throws out some “socialism” advice towards the end.”

When you say “socialism” are you referring to my point that our government should continue to support businesses through these different programs? This is Keynesian economics, which I’ve always believed in and supported. Basically, when the economy is in a recession governments should increase spending to help spur growth and create a sustaining recovery. The problem with this is that governments never follow through with the other half of Keynesian economics, which entails governments pulling back spending when the economy has recovered. They do the easy part of Keynesian economics and avoid the hard part. Last point is while I’m a ‘free markets guy’ there will always be the need for governments and regulations since if governments and individuals are left to their own devices with no oversight we’ll have corporations dumping highly toxic materials into our lakes and oceans, we’ll have no worker rights or protections, and individuals will just go around screwing everyone else over in the name of profits. A successful free market society needs regulations and guardrails to protect individuals and the overall system. – Ryan L

#30 Stone on 12.05.20 at 1:27 pm

#21 AlbertaGuy (locked down) in AB on 12.05.20 at 12:17 pm
Ill try and channel the sm..

flwnza your recovd jbs big r fake .. kept alive on life support by machine /cxxb angone fr ever when vax trickling . greta jobs wont exist for 1oyr more..robots putting sun shingles and changing dead batries in carz..sheep pt to pastr

———

Not bad. I had a good laugh. You forgot to slip forex in there somewhere and being abducted by aliens but I’ll still give you a B+.

#31 G on 12.05.20 at 1:29 pm

#1 Prince Polo, re: Maybe we’ll get somebody better.

Hopefully some more quality caring smart citizens like our host once did, will step up.

I’ve seen a couple do so over the years. But have noticed this always is the case.
My fingers are crossed more will step up going forward. But I’m not holding my breath.

Costs can be high on many levels to run for office. Big donors and lobbyist have the possibility to manipulate policy, hopefully this doesn’t happen but… And MSM seem to be/is controlled.
.
Of course electronic vote counting I see, IS, vulnerable to being manipulated fraudulently.

If you think electronic voting is protected and safe to do with the vote you haven’t open your eyes yet.

Why have these ‘tools’ been allowed to be deployed on the local level??? My toes are cross they don’t find their way into the federal election level.

Would be nice to see them locally go back to paper ballots counted by citizen hands at each pole location only!
These vote counting ‘tools’ should all be put into hydraulic crushers and “Terminated” today!

#32 Dolce Vita on 12.05.20 at 1:32 pm

Canadian military creates ‘Operation Vector’ to help with coronavirus vaccine rollout

https://globalnews.ca/news/7498914/coronavirus-vaccine-rollout-caf-operation-vector/

First, I have a lot of respect for the Cdn Military (part of the Allies that liberated WWII Italia and my Partisan parents and private industry worked with them on procurements…TOP NOTCH, TOP SHELF people…pity grotesquely underfunded).

So here is my take (blame #16 Flop… for getting me started – sorry Flop):

The Cdn. military is going to dry run vaccine distribution as follows:

1. Receive imaginary airport delivery of cryo or deep freeze stored vaccines from imaginary cryo equipped aircraft.
2. Imaginary transport #1 to imaginary distribution centres that do not exist.
3. Store said imaginary vaccines in imaginary cryo or deep freezers the former ordered but not yet received, (Deutschland a large source of them and they are in the EU and not Canada) – hopefully GE, Samsung and others can help out with the freezers (imaginary) – Yukon, NWT, Nunavut just keep the Moderna doses outside (top of Grouse Mountain for rain soaked YVR). SOL if Pfizer.
4. #3 qualifier: see #2 for location.
5. Take imaginary vaccines out of storage, thaw and begin imaginary injecting Lord only knows where…Walmart parking lots, Malls that no one is setting foot in, TIM HORTON’S where clever than most Flop will be, etc.
6. Imaginary get them to line up, 2 m apart, avec masks…imaginary do that to the elderly in LTC homes…oops forgot wheelchairs, make that 3 m apart or 6 m if you have to wheel in their beds.
7. Rinse Repeat.

You know what worries me here?

Is that if it does not go well, probably will not, our fine and GREAT people of the Military will get blamed along with Healthcare personnel, as if their plates are empty with work as of late.

Still, Canada has muddled it way thru so far in ONE PIECE and I give credit to the most educated people on Earth, Canadians, and not their Gov’s.

#33 Ryan Lewenza on 12.05.20 at 1:33 pm

Andy “Ryan, the first chart is incoherent. The valuations on the two vertical axes should be the same or at least have details of their distinctions. Does not make sense right now…?”

Focus more on the trend then the levels. It’s always hard to plot numerous series (more than 2) so I had to play around with which series went on which y-axis. By plotting it this way I was best able to illustrate the large declines in those service sectors relative to professionals and the info tech sector. Give the blogger a break sometimes! – Ryan L

#34 Ryan Lewenza on 12.05.20 at 1:36 pm

CHERRY BLOSSOM “Do you think this Covid-19 virus will come back every year in the flu season just like the influenza that comes round every winter??? Will it mutate so that an ajusted vaccine will have to be administered every winter?”

I sure hope not! I’m hoping it’s more like the SARS virus, which faded away than the influenza virus. – Ryan L

#35 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 1:37 pm

@#20 Doug t
” plus your likely to get a parking ticket in Victoria faster than you can say “ we don’t want you downtown shopping “”
++++

Hah!
The car nazi’s in Vancouver dont want you downtown….period…..unless of course you’re a non taxpaying homeless person with a tent in need of a safe injection site……

#36 Larry Laffer on 12.05.20 at 1:44 pm

Let’s all try to support our hard-hit local businesses this holiday season, as they need us now more than ever.

Amen to that.

#37 TurnerNation on 12.05.20 at 1:48 pm

#54 calgary rip off on 12.04.20 at 3:45 pm cool story and ideas but we no longer have any right to our own health. Only the government and Big Pharma ca ‘keep us safe’ and cure all. Now the State owns our bodies . The next time you attempt to buy commerce witness all the signs plastered everywhere to this effect. Comply.

…..

As this is a part-time health blog, some weekend reading of life in Occupied Kanada.
Looking back at Sept 11, the last global event before the GFC then today; the rules afterwards made no sense. Some call them Security Theatre. Onboard, Nail clippers not allowed; matches are allowed. In the end it was all about control and humiliation: line up. Wait your turn. Get interrogated and groped. Then, nude body scanners. Secret No-fly lists, no more rights.
It was for our Safety right?

Fast forward today and the subjegation and humiliation continues: long lines outside food stores in the cold in Soviet Kanada. No talking, 6 feet apart. For your health Comrade! Essentials only. Like children you are told “no touching” – just the food.

Today’s weekend story is this, found on another blog. My point from way back in March is that every system designed to protect us, has been turned against us. Yes I personally know people who cannot obtain the preventative health care they need.

*Not my story, it is from elsewhere. If all you can do is screech at people to cover their smiles then consider what might strike you, next – for our health!

…………
“My Covid Test Story”

“Anyway I got the ridiculous test done and began to drive home. I was nearly there when I got a call from my local Health Unit. The person on the phone could tell I was driving, and “ordered” me to go home immediately. They said that I need to quarantine myself for 14 days, no exceptions, I can’t go get tested and I can’t go out and buy provisions. I questioned their authority to essentially imprison me for two weeks, and they said because I was exposed to a “confirmed case,”

In addition to all this, it was explained to me that any negative test results I get are not relevant because the incubation period is up to 14 days. I will be “ordered” to be tested part way through my isolation, and then again at the end. If any of the tests come back positive, my isolation period restarts. If i refuse to get tested, I face a $5,000 fine and a court order to be forcibly tested.

I have no symptoms of any illness, I am perfectly healthy, and I am arbitrarily under strict quarantine

Full story is here: https://pastebin.com/cvqXT4NH

#38 Dolce Vita on 12.05.20 at 1:51 pm

Canadian Military Vaccine Logistics TIP…

and not so good news for those of you that think vaccination in Canada will go well OR in any other country for that matter. This today from @welt on Twitter, you know where they make the stuff and are currently transporting it as I type:

https://i.imgur.com/6GRtMQ2.png

[and they say Italians are the Nervous Nellies of Europe, no, that would be Deutschland]

So observe cryo transport outfit in above photo link. Thus, my TIP:

A lot of AB and BC snowmobilers as of late with time on their hands and with a fast ride. Good for Moderna logistics, maybe not Pfizer. Again, Yukon, NWT and Nunavut you are Moderna good to go (YVR add the top of Blackcomb to the list). Central and Eastern Canada, pray for your usual Moderna friendly cold outdoor storage and logistics Winter.

You know, Canadians aren’t stupid. In this poll yesterday, yanked from Twitter faster than you can blink, The Toronto Sun asked the question:

“Do you believe most Canadians will be vaccinated for COVID-19 by the end of 2021?”

No 72%
Yes 28%

Prescient and smart bunch Canadians, yes indeed…maybe not hopeful, rational yes. 50 responded until it got yanked that I know of, enough to be statistically significant (35 sample size minimum required for that).

-FWIW

#39 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 1:55 pm

@#15 looking up at the mountain of debt
“Virtually every nation on the planet did the same and now find themselves with historic debt.

Unfortunate but completely necessary.”

++++
au contraire mes amis

Canada blew the doors off all the other G7 economy’s for deficit spending in 2020 and we aint done yet.

I especially enjoy hear from friends and acquaintance’s about “money ” dumped into their bank accounts for “one time” aid….whether they needed it or wanted it.

One friend is a paraplegic, works full time, no Covid layoff, earns $90k per year and Boom! Got $600 bucks from the gub’mint.
His parents are in their 70’s , both have pensions and several million invested, no money issues…Boom! Got $400 each from the gub’mint.
Another friend with an open EI claim had it automatically switched over to the more generous CERB cash party….he called the EI office up asking why? “We’re doing it for everyone” was the answer.

The ease of access to “emergency” cash. The shotgun approach to cash being handed out, The lack of follow up…..
Hundreds of $ Millions? $ Billions?
Screams out for abuse of the system….

And we are ALL going to pay for it.

My suggestion to all the people who have received money they didn’t request or need……donate it to the Conservative election war chest.

#40 jess tree on 12.05.20 at 1:59 pm

permanent changes to whose behaviour ?
let us hope so….

How money is laundered through New York banks

By filing suspicious activity reports to regulators, big banks in the U.S. can collect transfer fees on suspicious transactions. Failure to file a SAR can expose banks to fines or penalties.

https://www.icij.org/investigations/fincen-files/

The probe was based in part on 2,100 top-secret suspicious activity reports, or SARs, obtained by BuzzFeed News and shared with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and its global media partners. The SARs are filed by global banks to the United States Treasury Department’s intelligence unit, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, known as FinCEN.

#41 gimme stuff on 12.05.20 at 2:07 pm

Maybe ask to get taxes on investments up.

#42 Barb on 12.05.20 at 2:27 pm

“…or having a nice diner with the Missus.”

————————————
Probably would like some place nicer than a diner.

#43 S.O on 12.05.20 at 2:29 pm

Our country is ran by financially illiterate people, with Freeland unable to explain how a bank operates. As for the vaccine, I’ll wait and see how effective it really is especially when its been rushed. Early in the testing process of the vaccine they had to stop the trials for a short time because it was causing neurological problems with some people, and now Phizer has come out and stated that eighty percent of people will feel adverse effects depending on the amount of dose. Not to mention proper vaccine development can take around 4 to 25 years. Im not an anti vaxxer I just think there are too many unknowns with these vaccines and I’m more than happy to pass my dose to a senior who needs it

Did you just state you are happy to let a senior take a medicine that you’re afraid of? Get off my blog. – Garth

#44 CJohnC on 12.05.20 at 2:31 pm

Good post Ryan and I agree with your sentiment: “First, while I am a staunch fiscal hawk, I believe the government needs to pony up and continue to financially support the hard-hit service sector and small businesses. This includes the continuation of the rent and wage subsidy for businesses, providing loans to small businesses and targeted support to our bars, restaurants, travel and small businesses. Yes this is expensive and yes this will leave us with a lot of debt, but because the governments are making the decision to close businesses to slow the spread of the virus, then the governments need to pay up.”

T2 and Freeland have to quit the indiscriminate vote buying and instead focus on business support.

Without small and large business there is no economy

#45 Dmitry on 12.05.20 at 3:04 pm

#13 Thomas

Exactly!

#46 Pete from St. Cesaire on 12.05.20 at 3:07 pm

#19 Doug t on 12.05.20 at 11:57 am
Sadly most local shops have product made in ……drum roll….China, and I refuse to support the CCP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
It’s not just the local shops whose merchandise comes from China. Virtually everything comes from China. So when someone says “I’m going to keep my money in Canada by buying in a local store instead of on-line” they’re really just paying a premium to the local retailer. It’s like giving the local guy a gift while the manufacturing remains overseas. It’s akin to buying stuff online and then going into the shop and throwing money on the counter and saying “here, take this, it would have been your mark-up”.

News flash for you: retailers do not manufacture product. By shopping locally you employ people who pay taxes, regardless of the origin of the merchandise. – Garth

#47 Dolce Vita on 12.05.20 at 3:19 pm

Still choked that the competent yet I think in the end, setup, Cdn Military tasked with vaccine distribution, management.

As I have said many times over:

History a good teacher, few pupils.

So let’s take a quick “jab” at memory lane.

Mar 4 I Tweeted from Italia to Gov Canada dignitaries about ventilator shortages in Europe, equipment, how bad it is, act like yesterday (Jan. China cases then 865, Italia 350 in Mar., clear exponential, writing on the wall to me) – dignitaries: Hajdu, Tam, Bains, HRH Trudeau, Freeland, etc.

Mar 5 Tweet from Gov Canada we are prepared. Mar 5 I Tweeted no you are not. They retweeted the same we are prepared Tweet.

https://i.imgur.com/2czbpgB.jpg

Not all asleep in Gov Canada (my suspicion Bains paid attention). Back Channel request via ex-Liberal Literati Perrin Beatty, Mar. 17, as in OMG we are NOT prepared:

https://i.imgur.com/KB3igks.png

So on that last famous Tweet, I fully expect in the next few days a Tweet Repeat (after DND dry run “The Emperor Has No Clothes” vaccine distribution Operation Vector some time in December?):

“Are you a manufacturer who can retool to manufacture critical cryogenic vaccine storage equipment, transport vehicles, distribution centres and…?

If your answer is “yes”, the Canadian Military wants to hear from you ASAP.

Bonus, we will give you a ride on our outdated CF 18 aircraft, though, you will have to pay your own way to Cold Lake and somewhere in Québec. Please contact [email protected]

Ya I know, > 120 character limit in Twitter. Just take a screenshot of the above and Tweet it as an inline image, so there.

Hopefully it all goes well. UK the Canary in the Coal Mine, pay attention to them DND.

And Gov Canada, go back to sleep in your unicorn, faerie dust and Leprechaun rainbow World – dream about the Great Reset.

#48 Niagara Region on 12.05.20 at 3:22 pm

Toronto is finally planning to tax vacant homes which will slow migration out of Toronto to cheaper parts of Ontario:

#49 Keen Reader on 12.05.20 at 3:22 pm

Good post, thanks. I used to be upset at all the helicopter money, until reflecting on what the K-recovery meant for investors with disposable income, like many of us here. Anyone still invested in the markets saw significant gains thru the pandemic. Even with partly going to cash (erroneously) as the DOW rebounded, I’m still way ahead overall YTD. So I have now made my peace with subsidizing those on the downward leg of the K. No doubt it could have been done better, thereby changing the focus of my displeasure.

I love proven vaccines that keep us safe and open up many of the world’s highly interesting spots. Is “a” COVID vaccine sorely needed? Of course. Will the current mRNA varieties subdue all expressions of the monster? Lots of “if’s” to swallow. We’ll only know in hindsight. Meanwhile, suppressing conflicting data and dissenting opinions is unhelpful. I cheer for early volunteers, for first-line responders, but I also listen to all arguments and am not convinced either way, even whether my getting jabbed will actually make a difference for the community. I may have little choice as a pilot ultimately, but let’s see the data!

#50 Dolce Vita on 12.05.20 at 3:44 pm

Last thing on vaccines.

I will take mine here in Italia GLADLY. Humanity needs herd immunity fast so we can all get back to generating wealth and going about our lives without FEAR of S. L. Pathogen. Smite the DAMN VIRUS as quickly as possible I say.

As gentle soul John (TNSTAAFL?) said the other day, take the jab and he is correct, SO correct.

The thing is the EU dragging its approval feet here, they meet late December, and Italia saying 3rd week of January vaccinations begin.

This is when you have to admire the UK. Yes, I call them the Canary in the Coal Mine but if anyone can pull it off with few Murphy hiccup events, its the Brits and all the best UK from me. And obviously they understand TIME IF OF ESSENCE unlike the EU (they approved it using a clause of national emergency in the EU accord, good on them I say, clever, even though technically they are still in the EU until the end of the year).

Question to the EU:

How many more will die or get sick while you drag your Imperious Vaccine Approval feet?

And EU, you do realize that the Pfizer, Moderna vaccines are being manufactured in Belgium, Deutschland and Switzerland as I type?

EU: shame (incl. Italia).

The vaccines are available, use them for the Love of God especially when they are in your backyard, ready and esp. when you don’t have to worry about cryo aircraft.

Makes my blood boil, sorry for that people.

#51 Diamond Dog on 12.05.20 at 4:03 pm

Letters smetters, lets talk groovy signs! Almost outdated V’s and stuffy too true K’s and such, it’s my own sometimes unvarnished opinion that the Scorpio sign best describes it!

https://pixfeeds.com/images/astrology/scorpio/1280-604378252-gold-sign-of-zodiac-scorpio.jpg

Oh, I could be the gnarly perma bear and use Virgo (that’s thee uh, um, 20 year long term chart line with another bottom or two to throw in there somewhere), but I’m somewhat flippant and optimistic today (with index’s til’ Christmas, that’s the top):

https://pixfeeds.com/images/4/253721/1200-594914842-virgo-sign.jpg

#52 Stan Brooks on 12.05.20 at 4:09 pm

I sure hope not! I’m hoping it’s more like the SARS virus, which faded away than the influenza virus. – Ryan L

You should know better that hope alone is not a good strategy. I was hoping for a vaccine for stupidity and financial illiteracy for years… to no avail.

Cheers,

#53 Stan Brooks on 12.05.20 at 4:45 pm

This is from 1989…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUUdQfnshJ4

https://www.nomorelyrics.net/chris_rea-lyrics/284751-road_to_hell-lyrics.html

And common sense is ringing out the bell
This ain’t no technological breakdown
Oh no, this is the road to hell

And all the roads jam up with credit
And there’s nothing you can do
It’s all just bits of paper flying away from you
Oh look out world, take a good look
What comes down here
You must learn this lesson fast and learn it well
This ain’t no upwardly mobile freeway
Oh no, this is the road
Said this is the road
This is the road to hell

#54 Linda on 12.05.20 at 4:58 pm

I agree that the service industry has taken it on the chin & that the government did & does have a responsibility to mitigate the loss of income that resulted when ordering businesses to close. I accept that the need to provide aid quickly meant that some amount of funds would be dispersed to those that normally would not qualify to receive them. What concerns me is that the government apparently isn’t doing much to refine the distribution process. This despite the knowledge that yes, there have been payments made that the government will now be trying to recover from those who should not have received them in the first place. Throw in the income tax nightmare – & seriously, why wasn’t that collected up front? So now those who may have blown the lot will be either on the hook for taxes owing or there will be a call for ‘debt forgiveness’ of same.

#55 Flop... on 12.05.20 at 5:12 pm

Seeing the occasional green shoot of normalcy.

Tuned into watch my beloved Manchester United this morning and was surprised to see a smattering of fans in the stands at West Hams home ground in London for the first time in 270 days.

2000 souls were allowed in, pales into the background compared to the 52,000 that recently attended a rugby game in Queensland, Australia.

Australian Football is hoping to have full stadiums at some stage next year.

Melbourne Cricket Ground has a capacity of 100,000.

Melbourne, Victoria is place to watch for me.

If you polled the people of Melbourne a few months ago about who was ready for a vaccine, the number would have likely been over 75%.

They went from a hard lockdown to being COVID free, not a single case, in over a month.

If you asked the same question now, do you want to rake a vaccine, I wouldn’t be surprised if the number hadn’t slipped below 50%

It seems you either do the hard lockdown, and then get on with life until the next blip, with more positive news coming out daily, or just limp along putting all the eggs in the vaccine basket.

I said on this blog, maybe in March, you’ll know this government is serious about eradication of the virus here when everyone is ordered to stay home for a while and groceries were delivered to everyone’s front door every second day for a month or so.

How much would that have cost?

Flop Enterprises would have put in a tender for slightly less than 381.6 billion, let’s put it that way.

Lockdowns or vaccination?

Both?

The hard lockdowns have undoubtedly been harsh, but either way it appears everyone has to take some form of tough medicine…

M46BC

#56 Jake on 12.05.20 at 5:22 pm

Doing my share by supporting my local restaurants with take-out/pick up/delivery where offered. That means No McD’s, Wendy’s or Tim’s here. They are reaping rewards already from this pandemic with their drive-through models. If anyone has a favourite dining establishment, do your part and order from them regularly to help them make it through to April.

#57 Flop... on 12.05.20 at 5:23 pm

The local Tim Hortons in my neighbourhood is probably 15 blocks from my house.

Dunno, how long it’s been there, 5-6 years, if I was to hazard a guess.

I’ve never been in there, going to get my COVID vaccine in there could be my first visit.

If I walk in and Bon Jovi’s , Bad Medicine, is blaring in the background, I will probably take the cue and skip the vaccine for that day and just poison my body with one of their double-doubles instead…

M46BC

#58 Yukon Elvis on 12.05.20 at 5:44 pm

#43 S.O on 12.05.20 at 2:29 pm
Our country is ran by financially illiterate people, with Freeland unable to explain how a bank operates. As for the vaccine, I’ll wait and see how effective it really is especially when its been rushed. Early in the testing process of the vaccine they had to stop the trials for a short time because it was causing neurological problems with some people, and now Phizer has come out and stated that eighty percent of people will feel adverse effects depending on the amount of dose. Not to mention proper vaccine development can take around 4 to 25 years. Im not an anti vaxxer I just think there are too many unknowns with these vaccines and I’m more than happy to pass my dose to a senior who needs it.
………………………………

I am a senior. I have had two heart attacks, have four stents in my heart, and i have copd as well. I take daily meds to keep me upright. Even minor adverse effects from the vaccine could be fatal for me so I am probably gonna wait a bit and see how the vaccine affects people, then talk it over with the quacks and go from there. In the meantime I mask up, distance, and sanitize.

#59 John in Mtl on 12.05.20 at 6:09 pm

Mr Ryan, I tip my hat off tou you for your gesture on supporting local businesses and shunning huge ones like Amazon and other giants! I hope most of the blog dogs and their friends/family adopt a similar mindset; at least this holiday.

#60 Penny Henny on 12.05.20 at 6:13 pm

#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:22 am
@#8 Mt Ranier
“stop buying more stuff from Amazon…”

++++

Amazon will eventually crush most “Bricks and Mortar” businesses…… Covid just accelerated the process.

When I can order something that is delivered ….to my doorstep……in 24 hours……
Why bother getting in a car, driving to a store, park in a busy (metered?) lot, go in to a store that may or may not have what I want, search for the product, deal with barely interested cashiers, buy the product ( or go to another store), go back to my car ( hopefully undented by other a-holes), drive home, unpack the item.
OR
Get it delivered to your door with a few clicks of a mouse from Amazon……
/////////////

Also on the plus side is no one has to look at your ugly puss. ;)

#61 Penny Henny on 12.05.20 at 6:25 pm

#21 AlbertaGuy (locked down) in AB on 12.05.20 at 12:17 pm
Ill try and channel the sm..

flwnza your recovd jbs big r fake .. kept alive on life support by machine /cxxb angone fr ever when vax trickling . greta jobs wont exist for 1oyr more..robots putting sun shingles and changing dead batries in carz..sheep pt to pastr
///////////////

golf clap for trying but it appears too busy to be SM

#62 Diamond Dog on 12.05.20 at 6:30 pm

First, while I am a staunch fiscal hawk, I believe the government needs to pony up and continue to financially support the hard-hit service sector and small businesses. – Ryan

I think there was a great deal of hard and soft pressure on our Feds to borrow money from the U.S. and spend it during their election year. That hard pressure has turned to soft pressure, but its still there.

Why would the U.S. pressure or influence Canada to borrow more money from U.S. treasuries? It gets Canada unintentionally too indebted over time, making Canada vulnerable to a currency crisis that if not properly handled, even properly handled could lead to the sell off of Canadian assets.

In other words, its good for U.S. economic expansion (at our expense) and if our indebtedness isn’t handled well from here, our very sovereignty is at stake in the form of death by a thousand cuts and selloffs (like cuts to social spending and greater foreign ownership of Canadian banks, or public and private land). Canadians simply cannot ignore the obvious threat high public debt levels create here.

This leaves us in a pickle. Trudeau’s overspending is a major blunder. The problem is, is O’ Toole ready to lead? I don’t think so. Is the Con party ready? Doubtful. Are they running the right candidates? Probably not. Would they have done things differently? Difficult to say, but one can hope so. I think we need a change of government, but have reservations as to what that would lead to and look like. The expression “it can always be worse” comes to mind, but the govy taking on 20% fed debt to GDP this year was bad. Ok, ugly.

Either way, not much we can do about it unless we want to run for office if we think we can do better or cast our vote. On that note, its easier to talk about letters :D Like the letter W, two V’s stuck together like 2020 and 2021, second verse same as the first. Eh, eh? I could live with that. (Scorpio sign, 3 bottoms over 3 Ides of March or so, could live with that too)

https://assets.rbl.ms/11540398/980x.jpg

#63 SOMETHINGS UP!! on 12.05.20 at 6:33 pm

“Forecasts may tell you a great deal about the forecaster; they tell you nothing about the future.”

Warren Buffett

CHRYSTIA Agrees

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/pandemic-forecasts-have-been-consistently-wrong-freeland-1.1532013

#64 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 6:37 pm

On the other hand we could look at the collapse as a test run for what happens if Trudeau attempts rapid decarbonization of the economy. In this case the reduction in energy consumption was driven by collapsing demand, but it can also work the other way around with collapsing energy production reducing demand. Energy consumption and economic activity are very highly correlated and there are good physical reasons for that.

Either way it’ll be the ones at the bottom of the economic ladder that will get hit the hardest. Always is.

#65 calgary rip off on 12.05.20 at 6:39 pm

Bars, restaurants and theaters are overrated. Thats all boring. I go out the same as before the pandemic. I dont have the patience. Simple everyday tasks are constantly mistaken. And im going to spend my free time on this? Daily i cannot believe the mistakes i see daily made by doctors i work with. How did they become doctors? By not making mistakes when gatekeepers were watching? The only thing maybe i would be willing to do is be at a weightlifting gym, not crossfit but a gym.

The vaccines likely will help. Better than having irreversible damage from covid

#66 Paul on 12.05.20 at 6:45 pm

#43 S.O on 12.05.20 at 2:29 pm
Our country is ran by financially illiterate people, with Freeland unable to explain how a bank operates. As for the vaccine, I’ll wait and see how effective it really is especially when its been rushed. Early in the testing process of the vaccine they had to stop the trials for a short time because it was causing neurological problems with some people, and now Phizer has come out and stated that eighty percent of people will feel adverse effects depending on the amount of dose. Not to mention proper vaccine development can take around 4 to 25 years. Im not an anti vaxxer I just think there are too many unknowns with these vaccines and I’m more than happy to pass my dose to a senior who needs it

Did you just state you are happy to let a senior take a medicine that you’re afraid of? Get off my blog. – Garth
————————————————————————————————
Garth,you need to put a little more umph in it when you are kicking someone off you blog!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7UVOay0GQw

#67 Argentina's Approach to Paying for COVID Measures on 12.05.20 at 6:45 pm

The Argentine government has voted to impose a wealth tax on the 12,000 people whose net worth is over 2.5 million USD. They constitute about 0.8 percent of the taxpayers. One has to wonder if this tax is going to be a temporary measure or if it will be permanent.

#68 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 6:48 pm

#11 Andy on 12.05.20 at 10:43 am
Ryan, the first chart is incoherent. The valuations on the two vertical axes should be the same or at least have details of their distinctions. Does not make sense right now…?

———————–

The key to understand graph number 1 is to understand that the two series with (RHS) are plotted against the right hand axis while the others are plotted against the left as per normal. This is a common trick when plotting series that have different units but here Ryan has used it to fit series that have different magnitudes into a smaller plot.

#69 Ustabe on 12.05.20 at 7:13 pm

I’ve mentioned it before and now will again:

When you purchase a gift certificate from your local eatery, bakery, florist, whatever; you place needed cash directly into their hands with no immediate need to use it to replace product.

Sure, the place might fail taking your money with it but…

Story time: There was a joint back in the day that did a real media push around Christmas to get folks to buy gift certs for their restaurant. Shortly into the new year they closed, slipped away. Much furor in the paper and on radio. (No social media in those days.)

So I sent out a press release and offered to go onto the various radio morning call in shows and offered to honour these gift certificates dollar on the dollar in my restaurant at the time.

Well, I got two big stories in the paper and was on the radio multiple times. Had the best January ever and when things slowed up a bit in February I pushed a follow up story out and got a bit more paper and radio traction that resulted in the best February we ever had as well.

So…buy gift certificates and figure out the rest later, it probably will be of benefit to you in some manner.

#70 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 7:16 pm

#26 Faron on 12.05.20 at 1:18 pm

“Fun fact: Jeff bezos could now gift $100,000 to each Amazon employee and still have the wealth he enjoyed pre-pandemic.”

———————————

Where would he get the money to do that? Amazon shares are not money and all the Robinhood traders will scatter like cockroaches in the light if he tries to sell that sort of quantity of shares. I suppose he could try and give each employee $100,000 worth of shares but that would also be a taxable event so he still has to come up with billions in cash to pay the government, as they do not take shares in kind.

Bernie and AOC do not actually understand what wealth is when they call to “tax the rich”. Bezos “net worth” is calculated by taking the number of shares he has and multiplying it by the last price an Amazon share traded for on Robinhood. It is not money. His shares in theory generate dividends and I am sure he pays himself well, but he’s already taxed on that. And when he does sell or kicks the bucket he or his estate will be taxed.

“Tax the rich” is catchy but it makes about as much sense as “defund the police”. These folks are messing with things that they just haven’t thought through.

#71 History Repeats on 12.05.20 at 7:19 pm

After the 1981 crash entry level 1100 sq ft townhomes with 3 brs and 1 1/2 baths and single carports were the best choice for builders not wanting to get stuck with condos dropping in price

#72 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 7:30 pm

#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:22 am
@#8 Mt Ranier
“stop buying more stuff from Amazon…”

++++

Amazon will eventually crush most “Bricks and Mortar” businesses…… Covid just accelerated the process.

When I can order something that is delivered ….to my doorstep……in 24 hours……
Why bother getting in a car, driving to a store, park in a busy (metered?) lot, go in to a store that may or may not have what I want, search for the product, deal with barely interested cashiers, buy the product ( or go to another store), go back to my car ( hopefully undented by other a-holes), drive home, unpack the item.
OR
Get it delivered to your door with a few clicks of a mouse from Amazon……
————-
What are you gonna do with all that free time?

#73 Sara on 12.05.20 at 7:36 pm

#232 Penny Henny on 12.05.20 at 9:37 am
@#211 Sara
“Smokers, drug addicts and alcoholics have a mental health issue which is not a matter of choice, whereas refusing a vaccine is a choice.”
///////////////

What about fat people? You know, the obese?
Should they be denied health care because they made a choice to have that second bag of chips every night and become chubba?
======================

Absolutely not. Nor do I think that vaccine refusal should be used as reason to deny treatment for COVID.
However to suggest that the choice to refuse a vaccine is somehow comparable to addiction (whether that be to food, alcohol or other drugs) is invalid since addiction is not a choice.

#74 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 7:42 pm

As the economy begins to recover and we get control of this pandemic, then governments should create a plan to return to balanced budgets to help get control of the skyrocketing debt. I don’t have much confidence in this current Federal government and our new Finance Minister to do this sadly.
—————–
This echoes the opinion of most of the blog dogs.
Let’s now assume that the majority is always right, who would be the knight in shining armor who’s gonna save us from financial armageddon?
O’Toole?

#75 Sara on 12.05.20 at 7:47 pm

#238 Frank Blood on 12.05.20 at 12:48 pm
Re: Sara
?? You are kidding right.. that first cigarette, that first snort of coke, that first drink is not a choice? The information on the perils of all are freely available and taught. They are all choices
========================
Frank, addiction is primarily a mental health problem, not a choice. People who abuse alcohol and drugs do so to mask emotional pain. It is a poor coping method obviously which cannot be resolved by simply choosing not to use, but rather by dealing with the underlying mental health issues that cause people to seek pain relief in the first place.

#76 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 7:52 pm

@#72 Ponzie Plots
“What are you gonna do with all that free time?”
+++

I was thinking of visiting your condo and redecorating the elevator…………?

#77 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 7:55 pm

@#60 Penny for your thoughts .

” on the plus side is no one has to look at your ugly puss. ;)”

+++++

Its a DOG Blog….only Felix is allowed to toss out cat insults….. :0

#78 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 7:56 pm

#35 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 1:37 pm
@#20 Doug t
” plus your likely to get a parking ticket in Victoria faster than you can say “ we don’t want you downtown shopping “”
++++

Hah!
The car nazi’s in Vancouver dont want you downtown….period…..unless of course you’re a non taxpaying homeless person with a tent in need of a safe injection site……
————–
The centre of Vienna, Austria is a huge pedestrian zone only.
All the brand name stores are there. You can walk 1 hour and only see delivery vehicles.
And everybody is happy.

#79 Faron on 12.05.20 at 8:01 pm

#70 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 7:16 pm

Not only are you wrong, you are insufferable. And why do trot out your half formed theories in defense of the uber rich? There is “truthiness” to your ideas, but closer examination reveals flaws that reveal your armchair quarterbackness and/or a throw your hands up reluctance to any kind of change because you know better. And verbose to boot. What a waste of ASCII.

#80 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 8:09 pm

#55 Flop
Saw the Aussies frolicking on the beaches.
No masks anymore.
I’m no BeachBoy, but that made me envious.
Anyome against strategic lockdowns should take note.
Short term pain for long term gain.

#81 Ustabe on 12.05.20 at 8:36 pm

“Tax the rich” is catchy but it makes about as much sense as “defund the police”. These folks are messing with things that they just haven’t thought through.

1984 we defunded the RCMP some and formed CSIS. Because the RCMP weren’t doing a good job.

1998 we defunded the Red Cross and formed Canadian Blood Services. Because the Red Cross wasn’t doing a good job.

Maybe in 2021 we really do need to defund some of the orgs, individuals and institutions that also are no longer doing a good job.

Last RCMP wellness check I read about they shot the guy dead within 71 seconds.

6 months later the ranking officer on that job was promoted.

Just maybe some defunding while actual funding of social workers might ameliorate that kind of thing?

The “rich” in this current time, in Canada, are taxed well below historical rates. They no longer carry the same burden and the human cost of that trickles down, about the only time trickle down works.

#82 JM on 12.05.20 at 9:11 pm

“This is Keynesian economics, which I’ve always believed in and supported”

There is the problem. If no one is allowed to fail, then no one will be accountable. If the average Joe sees big financial companies being backstopped for bad decisions, why shouldn’t the average Joe expect the same.

Brett in Calgary said it best.

“Humans are exquisitely attuned to incentives. Incentivize the wrong thing and you reap what you sow.”

#83 Gary C on 12.05.20 at 9:18 pm

Ryan great post about supporting small business. Sure Amazon is easier to place orders with, but how much do they have invested in the local community.
In my town of Camrose Alberta pop 17000 all gift buying will be local, the stores are being boarded up, yet Walmart, Staples, are allowed to sell non food merchandise.
The loss of tax revenue for the county will result in much higher taxes for its citizens next year, think about that the next time you order from Amazon.

#84 Dr V on 12.05.20 at 9:18 pm

Seeing as Nonplused explained it all AGAIN to Faron at comment 70 (thx NP) I’ll discuss my on-line shopping
habits with Mr Fartz and anyone else who cares.

When I think of my larger-ticket items (vehicles, bikes,
electronics) I shop local. I dont even leave town. I have a presence in the local business community so I feel I should be supporting it as long as they provide advice or expertise so I can make an informed purchase. Some excellent experiences. If I feel a product is overpriced, I simply try to wait for a lower price. I don’t grind, I just say no thanks. I don’t want people coming back at me grinding my price.

However, once I have product knowledge, I tend to make online purchases for smaller repetitive purchases. Bike tires for example. Half store retail.
Now having customs issues with those as they no longer use Canada post.

#85 joblo on 12.05.20 at 9:47 pm

I have new found mad respect for Justin Trudeau, Freeland and the Lieberal party.

It is extremely difficult to be this bad at anything.

#86 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 9:48 pm

“Tax the rich” is catchy but it makes about as much sense as “defund the police”. These folks are messing with things that they just haven’t thought through.
————-
“Tax the Rich, Feed the Poor
Woodstock
Ten Years After.
They thought all through.

#87 BC Renovator on 12.05.20 at 9:52 pm

#84 Dr V on 12.05.20 at 9:18 pm
Seeing as Nonplused explained it all AGAIN to Faron at comment 70 (thx NP) I’ll discuss my on-line shopping
habits with Mr Fartz and anyone else who cares.
___________________________

As someone who has followed this Blog for years And reads the comments- Faron is Def the biggest Comment Troll to date. And never with anything Positive to contribute. Faron should go back to Trolling FB and arguing with the Simpletons

#88 Dr V on 12.05.20 at 10:11 pm

79 Faron – please explain where Mr BeZos gets $100B to gift 1M employees 100k each. And where the remaining $100B is and how he netted $100B income since prepandemic.

This is what you claimed as fact. Please present your logic and show your calculation. Thank you.

#89 John in Mtl on 12.05.20 at 10:15 pm

Wow… not saying they’ll grab the cash but then again, with the current government, you never know! I don’t like the allusions made in this article. At all!

“Ottawa eyes ‘pre-loaded stimulus’ in Canadians’ savings accounts”

“As Canadians look to Ottawa to repair an economy ravaged by COVID-19, there’s a growing focus on our savings accounts as a source of potent fiscal stimulus just waiting to be “unleashed.” ”

“If it turns out that as things re-open and consumers are still reluctant, then it may make sense for policy to shift.”

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/ottawa-eyes-pre-loaded-stimulus-in-canadians-savings-accounts-1.1531766

#90 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:18 pm

@#78 Political Ponzie
“The centre of Vienna, Austria is a huge pedestrian zone only.
All the brand name stores are there. You can walk 1 hour and only see delivery vehicles.
And everybody is happy”

++++++
Do they have the same fentynal deaths?
Homeless? Parks/Campgrounds?
Perhaps we should replace our social workers/politicians with Vienna’s politicos?

#91 MF on 12.05.20 at 11:04 pm

#79 Faron on 12.05.20 at 8:01 pm
#70 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 7:16

-Two of our best, most insightful posters -with polar opposite world views- going at it will always be intense.

I think the truth on this topic is somewhere in between.

From what I have read, the world of billionaires is stratified. At that level, where the entire group is already super wealthy, the upper eschelon is separated from the others by how much influence they have. That usually means political influence (think of billionaire monarchs who run whole countries as heads of state, or anyone else who is on a first name basis with the presidents/prime ministers of their own or other countries). This type of influence usually takes a long time to build and is often, but not always, old money individuals or families.

The forbes type rankings use the technique Nonplused was talking about (stock price x total shares owned). It’s easy to compute but may not be accurate since many billionaires/billionaire families are heavily diversified, making it hard to compute their total net worth. Usually, the longer someone has been a billionaire, the more diversified they are.

So, could Jeff Bezos (newer billionaire, not diversified, less influence) sell some stocks and gift his employees 100k each? Yes..but it would be a big story move and would involve taxes and the price of the stock would fluctuate like Nonplused said. Not easy.

What about Bill Gates? A more established, more seasoned, more diversified billionaire? Yes..he could do something like that much easier than Bezos. And he does. Bill Gates donates to charity like crazy as he should (Faron’s point).

How to “tax the rich” is a question whose answer varies depending on who is answering it. Right leaning individuals will argue the rich already pay the most tax (true, according to our tax brackets), and that taxing them more might force them to just go somewhere else (only somewhat true). Taxes are given way more influence in a society than they deserve. Some of the greatest societies on earth are high tax jurisdictions. The opposite is true too. Low tax jurisdictions are often horrible places.

That being said, left leaning individuals are correct in arguing that the mega wealthy often pay less tax than they “legally should” through offshore havens or loopholes. These are also a problem.

In conclusion, both Faron and Nonplused are right..and wrong. This one’s a tie.

MF

#92 SoggyShorts on 12.05.20 at 11:25 pm

#26 Faron on 12.05.20 at 1:18 pm

Fun fact: Jeff bezos could now gift $100,000 to each Amazon employee and still have the wealth he enjoyed pre-pandemic.

************************
I do wonder though… how many would show up for work on Monday?

It is funny when you think about Bezos: He has the money and access to our wishlist. He even has drones– that means he is making the conscious choice to not be Santa.

The same choice he’s been making with regards to not being Batman. Basically, Jeff is making bad choices as far as 6-year-old me is concerned.

#93 SoggyShorts on 12.05.20 at 11:28 pm

#18 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 12.05.20 at 11:56 am
Do you think this Covid-19 virus will come back every year in the flu season just like the influenza that comes round every winter??? Will it mutate so that an ajusted vaccine will have to be administered every winter

******************
Possibly, and perhaps with a mutation that no vaccine we make will work on.

That’s a big worry but the “Vaccine-hesitant” who want to “wait and see” certainly seem willing to roll the dice for all of us on that.

#94 SoggyShorts on 12.05.20 at 11:40 pm

#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:22 am
@#8 Mt Ranier
“stop buying more stuff from Amazon…”
————————–
For me the delivery is fantastic, I’ve ordered things just after midnight and got them in the morning.
BUT the return policies/customer service are what have me hooked.
I bought 2 matching air pillows for the wife and I but one pump nozzle was a little crooked.
Not a huge deal since we have the other pump, but I figured I’d contact the seller.
Sure enough, he doesn’t want it shipped back or anything, he just told me to order another one and gave me a 100% off coupon code.

On another order, they delivered to the wrong address. I contacted them and they gave me a full refund, no problem, and told me that if I find it I should keep it. As luck would have it my neighbor found it on his stoop and delivered it to me.

#95 PetertheSeparatistfromCalgary on 12.06.20 at 12:00 am

Letting these local businesses fail is not a good plan. If these businesses fail the jobs they create will take a very long time to come back. That will in turn make it difficult for governments to get spending down as they will be supporting a lot of unemployed people. What a mess!

#96 Tom from Mississauga on 12.06.20 at 12:18 am

Pfizer was going to have 2B vaccine in 2021 now 3 weeks later just 1B. Hopefully they aren’t having problems securing the compounds, containers, manufacturing facilities, warehousing and shipping needed, while closely guarding information to keep those compounds secret, imagine what the prices would go to. Hopefully we don’t get into the same export bans we had with PPE.

#97 Nonplused on 12.06.20 at 12:33 am

#84 Dr V on 12.05.20 at 9:18 pm
Seeing as Nonplused explained it all AGAIN to Faron at comment 70 (thx NP) I’ll discuss my on-line shopping
habits with Mr Fartz and anyone else who cares.

—————————-

Not sure you are chastising me for being repetitive or actually meant “(thx NP)”. But anyway I agree with your online shopping habits, sometimes if you need a small thing it isn’t worth driving all over town to find it. But it is nice to see say a washing machine in person or a car or even a TV before you buy, and I am not the sort to go order it online after the nice salesman spends an hour or more helping me decide.

I recently had a plumbing problem and couldn’t figure out where the leak was, it was behind a wall. After much in the way of failure to identify the leak I found an endoscope on Amazon for $30 delivered the next day. Problem identified. Try and do that at Home Depot. Although that is where I got the parts to solve the problem.

And I am sorry I am so repetitive about certain issues but this comment section seems to confirm that some of these points bear repeating. If we go down the road of taxing the rich (which we do already) we have to be careful we understand what the nature of their assets are. If we “defund the police” we have to wonder what it will be like to live in a world where there are still bad guys but if something happens nobody is coming to help. There are other issues as well but I want to stay away from a DELETED.

————————-

#86 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 9:48 pm

Again, not sure whether that was supportive or critical. It is true that the boomers became a lot more practical as they aged. They traded their tie-dyes and love-ins in for pinstripes and SUV’s.

——————————–

#81 Ustabe on 12.05.20 at 8:36 pm

I didn’t really want to get into it because people will argue with every opinion I have about it, but to sum it up I believe the problem with police brutality is not enough funding as opposed to too much. A lot of these officers are riding around in cruisers by them self. We give them a car and a gun and then send them out into dangerous situations without ready backup. Of course someone is going to get shot.

If your proposal is to add additional mental health resources I would say “sounds reasonable”. But you still need the officers with the gun incase the mental health worker becomes threatened. So it still adds up to more funding. Ideally, funding to the point that nobody thinks shooting at an officer or running away has a chance of succeeding.

——————————–

#79 Faron on 12.05.20 at 8:01 pm
#70 Nonplused on 12.05.20 at 7:16 pm

“Not only are you wrong, you are insufferable. And why do trot out your half formed theories in defense of the uber rich? There is “truthiness” to your ideas, but closer examination reveals flaws that reveal your armchair quarterbackness and/or a throw your hands up reluctance to any kind of change because you know better. And verbose to boot. What a waste of ASCII.”

One of the better burns I have received in a while but if you’d like to inform me of how I was wrong with your “closer examination” I would be most enlightened. And I am sorry your reading speed is so slow. They used to offer courses to help. Maybe they still do.

#98 NSNG on 12.06.20 at 12:56 am

Anti-vaxxers rejoice!

We have Justin Trudeau and the Liberal government securing our vaccine supply.

We may never have to submit.

Worst case scenario is it will be run through millions of people before Canadian resisters need to do battle.

#99 Under the radar on 12.06.20 at 6:16 am

Shop local – of course. Went online for a gransfor bruk axe. Pick up Nov 30 , store calls a couple days later , we don’t have it. “But you took my money.” Sorry. Call our head office they have 2 in stock. “Yes sir we have that . ” next day , sorry online inventory system is not so good we don’t have it” ” Can you find me one I ask? ” Our Niagara Falls store shows stock I can have them ship it to you directly’ that would be great. “No problem we will send you a tracking number . No tracking number sent ,I call ” any news on my axe” Yes sir it shows it was delivered ” Who signed for it I ask ? ” Looks like the fed ex driver signed . Well I never received it . “Oh we will have someone call you on Monday ……. Trying to do my part and shop local ” .

#100 Not! on 12.06.20 at 6:59 am

Ryan said: “while others (typically blue-collar workers and lower income earners) suffer disproportionately from the downturn.”

Surely you jest Ryan, most of those people have been sitting at home on CERB making more for a couple than when they were working. The rest of us who have been prudent all our lives will have the honor of paying for that.

#101 Wrk.dover on 12.06.20 at 8:14 am

#21 AlbertaGuy (locked down) in AB on 12.05.20 at 12:17 pm
Ill try and channel the sm..

flwnza your recovd jbs big r fake .. kept alive on life support by machine /cxxb angone fr ever when vax trickling . greta jobs wont exist for 1oyr more..robots putting sun shingles and changing dead batries in carz..sheep pt to pastr

———————————–

Nailed it! BRAVO!

#102 Stone on 12.06.20 at 8:23 am

#95 PetertheSeparatistfromCalgary on 12.06.20 at 12:00 am
Letting these local businesses fail is not a good plan. If these businesses fail the jobs they create will take a very long time to come back. That will in turn make it difficult for governments to get spending down as they will be supporting a lot of unemployed people. What a mess!

———

I thought starting a business is to solve a problem/fill a need that hasn’t been addressed. Creating jobs is a secondary effect of that.

I see lots of problems/needs to be filled right now. That means many opportunities to create businesses to address them and employing people to get that done.

I’m not interested in supporting businesses that are not solving a problem/filling a need and/or can’t adapt to change. Since when should businesses be supported by welfare?

#103 KLNR on 12.06.20 at 9:02 am

72 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.05.20 at 7:30 pm
#9 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.05.20 at 10:22 am
@#8 Mt Ranier
“stop buying more stuff from Amazon…”

++++

Amazon will eventually crush most “Bricks and Mortar” businesses…… Covid just accelerated the process.

When I can order something that is delivered ….to my doorstep……in 24 hours……
Why bother getting in a car, driving to a store, park in a busy (metered?) lot, go in to a store that may or may not have what I want, search for the product, deal with barely interested cashiers, buy the product ( or go to another store), go back to my car ( hopefully undented by other a-holes), drive home, unpack the item.
OR
Get it delivered to your door with a few clicks of a mouse from Amazon……
————-
What are you gonna do with all that free time?

Triple his Inane posting on here most likely.

#104 JM on 12.06.20 at 9:15 am

It’s rather simplistic to say “buy local”. I work in sales at a manufacturing facility that sells instore product to retailers…big and small.

They all shop around for the best price and routinely will have me compete against overseas suppliers. It’s impossible for me to win but I’m lucky enough that we sell a lot JIT product that can’t be turned around overseas…especially now. I’m okay with that…it’s the rules that are established that we need to abide by.

If I had it my way, I’d love to see people actually buy product that was made locally but that’s a pipe dream…and so is the survival of many companies.

#105 Ryan Lewenza on 12.06.20 at 10:03 am

Stone “I thought starting a business is to solve a problem/fill a need that hasn’t been addressed. Creating jobs is a secondary effect of that.

I see lots of problems/needs to be filled right now. That means many opportunities to create businesses to address them and employing people to get that done.

I’m not interested in supporting businesses that are not solving a problem/filling a need and/or can’t adapt to change. Since when should businesses be supported by welfare?”

Since the governments decided to shut down businesses to help combat a global pandemic. I’m never for corporate handouts but this is different. The governments are telling businesses they can’t sell their goods or provide a service so in this instance, I believe the governments need to provide some temporary assistance. If they don’t just imagine how bad economically it will get. I’m not talking a bad a recession, I’m talking a 1930s depression. Drastic times call for drastic measures. – Ryan L

#106 Ryan Lewenza on 12.06.20 at 10:11 am

Not! “Ryan said: “while others (typically blue-collar workers and lower income earners) suffer disproportionately from the downturn.”

Surely you jest Ryan, most of those people have been sitting at home on CERB making more for a couple than when they were working. The rest of us who have been prudent all our lives will have the honor of paying for that.”

What line of work are you in? I think it’s easy for people to share this view (I’m working and doing my part so why should I pay for this) when they are largely unaffected by this pandemic. But that’s the point. Some people are losing their businesses, their livelihood, their life savings and their dignity because governments are closing everything down to save lives. We can debate whether these are the correct policies/actions but there’s no debate that many, many people are on the brink of losing it all, and it’s no fault of their own. – Ryan L

#107 Ryan Lewenza on 12.06.20 at 10:18 am

JM “There is the problem. If no one is allowed to fail, then no one will be accountable. If the average Joe sees big financial companies being backstopped for bad decisions, why shouldn’t the average Joe expect the same.”

Increased government spending through things like infrastructure spending, which creates jobs and spurs growth is different than bailouts. I agree the government should not be bailing out corporations like banks during the financial crisis. But as I already commented, this is different since the governments are forcing businesses to close down and prohibiting them from selling their goods or providing a service. – Ryan L

#108 NSNG on 12.06.20 at 10:18 am

So was this really all about getting the riffraff off the roads and planes?

Rich People & Journalists Made Exempt From Having To Enter COVID Quarantine In UK

https://www.zerohedge.com/political/rich-people-journalists-made-exempt-having-enter-covid-quarantine-uk

#109 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.20 at 10:23 am

@#103 KLNR
“Triple his Inane posting on here most likely.”

+++

Why stop at 3?
Quintuple?

#110 baloney Sandwitch on 12.06.20 at 10:35 am

I guess many of the free market types are advocating that the government should not have closed down the small businesses in the first place and if they did they should not be supported. I am not sure how we do the cost/benefit calculations? What is the cost / per year of a life? We spent $350 billion on this pandemic? Assuming we saved 12000 lives. Assuming each of these lives had 10 years to live. Basically the government is saying that each life is worth $28 million or $2.8 million per year. How many people earn $28 million is lifetime? Here are the calculations https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1YAuoNg7z-tCdTKbCuRF533vQx5ZVR4Y7KVzNLxvVRtg/edit#gid=0

#111 joblo on 12.06.20 at 10:52 am

just keeps gettin better

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-so-the-prime-ministers-office-can-predict-future-conversations-just-imagine

#112 looking up on 12.06.20 at 11:16 am

#101 Wrk.dover on 12.06.20 at 8:14 am
#21 AlbertaGuy (locked down) in AB on 12.05.20 at 12:17 pm
Ill try and channel the sm..

flwnza your recovd jbs big r fake .. kept alive on life support by machine /cxxb angone fr ever when vax trickling . greta jobs wont exist for 1oyr more..robots putting sun shingles and changing dead batries in carz..sheep pt to pastr

———————————–

Nailed it! BRAVO!

———-

Wrk Dover,

Kudos to you for deciphering AlbertaGuy’s post that was obviously written in some bizzare secret code. I still have no idea what he’s trying to say.

Perhaps alcohol was involved?

#113 Phylis on 12.06.20 at 12:53 pm

#112 looking up on 12.06.20 at 11:16 am It was a memorial posting. Go back a few years and you will find the posts of SM.