The toll

First to go, Bandit and I noticed on a morning walk a month ago, was a slow fashion store. (I had to ask Dorothy what the hell that meant. Now I know.) Then her fav bookstore went down. An art gallery up the street has disappeared. So have the horse-drawn carriages. On the weekend the main coffee hangout on the corner opposite my office posted big “CLOSING” signs (above). Everything half price. Fixtures for sale. Fail.

Such is the toll of the virus on a tourist-based economy. As Air Canada and Westjet go, so goes the economic fate of thousands of small businesses. Hotels. B&Bs. Restaurants. Tour operators. Here’s what the entrepreneurs running the local coffee shop had to say to the community:

CLOSING DOWN  The uncertainty associated with the impact of COVID-19, especially in relation to its effects of tourism along with the considerable expense load that we carry, has forced us to make this decision. We are so very grateful to the amazing staff both past and present who joined us in establishing our unique business style. We tried to create a type of oasis where our customers were surrounded with tasteful and cheerful merchandise while enjoying the atmosphere of an old fashioned cafe. We would sincerely like to thank all our many customers for their continued support, it has been extremely rewarding to receive so many genuine compliments, literally on a worldwide basis. Sad day.

Sad indeed. The pooch and I walk every morning into the aroma of their roasting coffee beans. No such pleasure soon. Plus an empty storefront. Another one.

So the latest economic stats are grim. The Canadian economy shrank close to 12% in April, on top of a 7% dive in March. May probably saw a small (3%) uptick, so it’s safe to say we have about 16% less GDP than we did back in the halcyon days of Feb. By comparison, during the darkest days of the Great Depression – 1931 and 1932 – the economy withered by 10% annually. And here we are with a 16% tanking in a hundred days. Gulp.

This is the worst. Ever. All 20 sectors of the economy took a drubbing. Accommodation and food was obliterated with a 42% collapse, after a 37% drop the month before. It just doesn’t get any suckier. Entertainment and sports, down 25%. Construction, 23%. But online shopping up 17%.

Now, look at this. It’s a snapshot of Covidian chaos as of Tuesday morning. Things seem under control in Canada but are suddenly raging south of the border. Given the integration of the two economies, Trump and the inability of Americans to corral this bug, it suggests recovery may take a lot longer than new all hoped.

Seeing red: the virus erupts in 29 US states

Meanwhile many people you know are direct victims of this economic contraction, as they carry fat debt. Even as the virus was ravaging jobs, mortgage debt grew substantially in May – a new record high. And why? Not because of a ton of real estate sales, but rather thanks to deferred mortgage payments, which added to the overall debt load. The better part of a million households are not making loan payments, and haven’t for several months now.

The result: $1.08 billion in new debt added every four weeks to the steaming pile of $1.68 trillion, since folks choose not to service mortgages worth $180 billion. Payments they cannot or will not make are simply thrown on the heap – money that’ll have to be paid in the future. Mortgage growth of over 8% (annualized) during May was the highest in a decade. What an awful validation of the financial illiteracy of a nation of debt-snorflers.

So if Trump blows the virus challenge, US GDP tanks and true recovery takes a few years, what to do?

Play defence.

This is exactly why this tedious blog has yammered for years about the logic of having a balanced, diversified and liquid portfolio. It’s designed to dampen volatility and, unlike most husbands, be predictable. When darkness descends and markets fall, it protects you. When times are good, it joins in. Just look at the experience thus far in 2020.

Beyond this, pull in your horns. No big purchases. No investment condo. No leverage. Do not let 2% mortgages seduce you. Don’t defer debt, but pay it down instead. Take advantage of a localized real estate surge, based on pent-up demand, to unload. These are the days to crave maximum liquidity – wealth in negotiable securities, not tied up in a property that could soon take ages to flog.

Oh, and go buy something from the dude on the corner. There, but for the grace of dog, go thee.

 

180 comments ↓

#1 Bartman on 06.30.20 at 3:33 pm

Can’t believe it

#2 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 3:37 pm

Balanced and diversified. Check.
No Debt. Check.
Loading up on cash. Check.
Plan for disaster and hope for fair weather.
Waiting to “vultch”…….. (sorry MF but some people’s misfortune is other people’s….fortune).

#3 Paterfamilias on 06.30.20 at 3:40 pm

So what is or was a ”slow fashion store” ? Thank you.

#4 Huge Talent on 06.30.20 at 3:41 pm

Silly Americans!

Seems like this is gonna last a long time. Can the world economy hold much longer? This is crazy.

#5 Nick on 06.30.20 at 3:42 pm

.
Lower Brainland BC update – Bidding wars have erupted as horny folks come out of quarantine and after watching House Hunters all that time.

You were wrong Siddall. Lower Brainlanders know better!!

My neighbor just took some HELOC money and bought a new BMW. The millionaire family is on CERB. Just another day in Lower Brainland.

#6 Ejy on 06.30.20 at 3:49 pm

Same on Vancouver Island, which is hugely tourism (Intl) based economy; shops closing & businesses struggling, except realtors, home-builders etc., but that may take a while to trickle through (winter 2020 or spring 2021).

#7 Brian Ripley on 06.30.20 at 3:50 pm

My new post this week: Deflation Probability

http://www.chpc.biz/history-readings/deflation-probability

Bank of Canada Governor, Tiff Macklem said on June 22nd, “Our main concern is to avoid a persistent drop in inflation by helping Canadians get back to work.”

Apparently “deflation” is a scary noun.

#8 Risky business on 06.30.20 at 3:53 pm

Walking the hood in Yvr this morning I noticed two Retail shops vacated that have been in biz at least 18+ years. A few new retail ventures never had the chance to open after making huge investments prior to the shutdown. I hope employees and patrons will remember these times in the future when small business owners are back to making a few bucks. It’s normally a challenge to make Money in Canada with high taxation and now with virus induced market contraction it’s almost impossible for the time being

#9 House Lust on 06.30.20 at 3:59 pm

Was on the fence about leveraging myself to the neck and purchasing a house that I really liked.

After reading today’s blog, going to hold off on the purchase.

#10 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 06.30.20 at 4:01 pm

In the 1840’s the price of whale oil was the equivalent today of $57 USD per GALLON. Hence, whales were hunted to the ends of the earth to fill the demand.

In 1853, a Canadian Geologist, Abraham Gesner, figured out how to distill kerosene from petroleum. The effect of his invention drove the price of whale oil down and collapsed the whaling industry.

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the whales from extinction. The Canadian oil patch did.

You’re welcome.

#11 Dolce Vita on 06.30.20 at 4:02 pm

“It just doesn’t get any suckier.”

…no truer words.

————————

April 2020 GDP, in $ terms, got rolled back to what it was in August 2020.

A 10 year roll back of the economy. TEN YEARS.

Then there were 27.6 million aged 15 or over eligible to work. Today, 31.1 million.

The paycheque just got smaller, the family got bigger, something has to give (and the head of the family keeps on spending like nothing’s happened).

————————

Old adage used to be that when the U.S. sneezes, Canada catches a cold.

Not any more from Garth’s map (medically).

#12 binky barnes on 06.30.20 at 4:03 pm

All things being relatively equal, Garth, would you stuff the TFSA or take advantage of spousal RRSP?

BB

Do you love her? – Garth

#13 Sean on 06.30.20 at 4:07 pm

Somehow real estate in Toronto keeps chugging along. Tons of listing showed up under 800 but all of them sell well over 900-1M. The market is pretty much at highs or higher than before covid. Nothing makes sense anymore.

#14 Madcat on 06.30.20 at 4:09 pm

Went to the mall for the first time post virus…. I actually had to go there to have my phone repaired… While I was there I decided to do a little shopping.

When I entered the stores I wanted to shop in I almost got the feeling I was doing something wrong… ‘Trespassing’ LOL! Most stores requested you apply hand sanitizer (as is becoming the norm)… At one of the clothing stores I was told that in order to prevent lots of customers from ‘touching’ the clothes I should request items that I desired to see, which would then be selected by staff and given to me for try on etc (I assume this was mostly to stop pesky customers from messing up the nicely folded piles). At Sephora I was informed there would be no trying on the makeup or testing on the arm (understandably, but sooo lame…).

All in all… Not a good experience… I won’t be eager to go shopping again unless I absolutely have to…

A complete economic disaster…

#15 Arctic Gringo: Qalunaaq on 06.30.20 at 4:10 pm

Use of blood-red on a map = Fear.

I prefer the more calming blue colour palette here: https://covid19.who.int/

An assessment of colour chose for covid mapping here: https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/mapping-covid-19-how-maps-make-us-feel

Makes me feel better already.

#16 Retro Marxist on 06.30.20 at 4:10 pm

Make your bed and lie on it Max Bernier. Hating foreigners and non-whites would lead to more declines in tourists and demand for hotels and touristy businesses. COVID-19 was a Max Bernier’s dream come true!

#17 Squire on 06.30.20 at 4:12 pm

#7 Brian Ripley on 06.30.20 at 3:50 pm
My new post this week: Deflation Probability

http://www.chpc.biz/history-readings/deflation-probability

Bank of Canada Governor, Tiff Macklem said on June 22nd, “Our main concern is to avoid a persistent drop in inflation by helping Canadians get back to work.”

Apparently “deflation” is a scary noun.
———————————————-
“persistent drop in inflation” sounds like deflation may stick around for some time. Things shut down quite fast but I believe it will take a long time to start many businesses back up. In the meantime, assets will deflate it seems.

#18 Squire on 06.30.20 at 4:18 pm

#12 Retro Marxist on 06.30.20 at 4:10 pm
Make your bed and lie on it Max Bernier. Hating foreigners and non-whites would lead to more declines in tourists and demand for hotels and touristy businesses. COVID-19 was a Max Bernier’s dream come true!

———————————————
There wasn’t anything said by Max Bernier that was racist. Just because he had his opinion on how to govern etc doesn’t make him racist or not liking foreigners. I’m pretty sure if Trudeau said the same things he wouldn’t have been vilified. Remember, no matter what Trudeau does, he can do no wrong. The leftist hypocrisy is stunning.

#19 NewWest on 06.30.20 at 4:22 pm

There will be lots of good stuff that comes out of all this, I have no doubt. The community supported agriculture farm share I subscribe to reopened in February for new members and went from something like 130 to 200, the maximum they could handle. Local farmers working another year, and another 70 families getting good local food – that’s a win. The air is way better, more people walking and biking, everyone I know re-examining their lives and making different choices. But there will be a long transition that won’t be fun for many people.

When Army and Navy shut down, I knew things were going to get bad for retail. Army and Navy Department Stores survived a hundred years, through wars, the Great Depression, the inflation of the 70s and 80s. Great place to buy work clothes, housewares, and dry goods for a reasonable price and in walking distance in lower rent neighbourhoods. Had owned their buildings for many decades. They knew how to survive, and they can’t now. Says something.

It’s going to be interesting to see how the slow unwind affects the bigger institutions, too. I work in “higher education” and the rumours are swirling about big cutbacks in provincial funding, enrollments decreasing, and revenue down 15% or more this year from ancillary services that have basically shut down this year. I read an article about Dalhousie – they will have an anticipated deficit of 38 million this year, which is huge – to put it into perspective that is the entire cost of running a medium sized faculty for a year. Even if a university is sitting on fat endowments, they can’t use them for operating. And 95% of operating costs are in salaries and benefits. That means it won’t just be baristas and waiters losing their jobs. COVID didn’t cause it all, but it has definitely accelerated the trends in academia and revealed the over-optimistic projections. Not hard to see where that is going now.

I grew up poor. I’ll be fine, and my kids will too. Still, I keep getting an image of Bette Davis in “All About Eve” in my head – pausing on the staircase, turning to the party and saying “Fasten your seat belts, it’s going to be a bumpy night.”

#20 Lambchop on 06.30.20 at 4:24 pm

#169 Do we have all the facts on 06.30.20 at 2:39 pm
#161 Geddy Lee

Wouldn’t it be nice to see a similar chart for Canada.

Canada averages 25,300 deaths per month for those 65 years of age and up. That is over 100,000 deaths in any four month period Eg March to June 2020.

Over 90% of the 8,600 deaths attributed to the Covid 19 virus between a March and June were 65 years or older and many of those had more than one pre-existing health issue.

I have been asking for a comparison of mortality in 2919 and 2020 and all I get is blank stares.

What gives?

_______________

Well just out of curiosity I did some quick math last week with numbers from BC Statistics website. I used the numbers from January through May, inclusive.
I did not adjust for population growth, which averages at about 1.36% increase per year.
Number of deaths, from all causes, in 2019 was 16597.
Number of deaths, from all causes, in 2020 was 16961.
Total increase for Jan. to June 1, 2020 was 364 deaths.
Once you factor in population growth, it’s really not a big difference.
I don’t imagine the rest of Canada being much different.

Of course I’m not factoring in the decrease in deaths from work and travel related causes because of the lockdown, but I am also not factoring in the increase in deaths from medical and social causes because of the lockdown either.

#21 Dolce Vita on 06.30.20 at 4:24 pm

For those of you unaffected by GDP and/or flush with CERB money to spend, Canada is on the EU’s list of 15 nations that can visit the European Union (don’t ask, I didn’t make the list, in effect tomorrow):

Algeria, Australia, CANADA, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay and China only if reciprocal, and technically the UK still in the EU.

NOT SO EASY THOUGH. For example:

Italian Health Minister Speranza will quarantine even EU approved nations external to the EU for 14 days (you too Canada). Goes into effect tonight, valid until July 15th. “Not to nullify the efforts made so far against the epidemic”.

Best site so far to figure WTF is going on in each EU country go here (use the specific country site links for updates):

https://www.politico.eu/article/coronavirus-travel-europe-country-by-country-travel-restrictions-explained-summer-2020/

Also, for travel in the EU, there is an interactive map by the European Union you can click on to find more information on restrictions (of course, I set it to Italia, but click on other nations to find out more):

https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/ITA

—————————

Poset the 15 nation list on Twitter today, got a guy from Rwanda (not a follower, or following) tickled pink they could visit.

How did that happen?

WTF is Twitter up to with my posts (got an angry New York Times reporter implying I do not like Americans, OK, I did mention they were loud and dressed horribly…my bad, but I also mentioned I like Americans and miss them visiting Italia)?

Social Media. Sometimes just a bit too social.

#22 aW on 06.30.20 at 4:27 pm

Lost my job this week. :( Good luck out there, everyone

#23 Michael on 06.30.20 at 4:28 pm

https://99percentinvisible.org/article/cities-paved-dung-urban-design-great-horse-manure-crisis-1894/

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the world’s cities from horse manure.
The Canadian oil patch did.

#24 Re-Cowtown on 06.30.20 at 4:30 pm

#9 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 06.30.20 at 4:01 pm
In the 1840’s the price of whale oil was the equivalent today of $57 USD per GALLON. Hence, whales were hunted to the ends of the earth to fill the demand.

In 1853, a Canadian Geologist, Abraham Gesner, figured out how to distill kerosene from petroleum. The effect of his invention drove the price of whale oil down and collapsed the whaling industry.

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the whales from extinction. The Canadian oil patch did.

You’re welcome.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Cheap energy makes the world a better place. Who would have thought that?

#25 Pants are Falling on 06.30.20 at 4:30 pm

Went this week to the Promenade Mall just on the border of Toronto and Thornhill. Went looking for the Old Navy, looks like it has sailed. It disappeared during the lockdown and a few doors down there used to be a GAP store also gone. The old Sears location is being torn down to make room for condos.

Around the corner where I live the nail salon is gone, store sign disappeared.

#26 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 4:38 pm

@#18 New West
“And 95% of operating costs are in salaries and benefits. ”

++++
Yep.
The other known unknown is “Covid part Deux”.
Start getting kids back to schools and university’s and then have to pull them again.
The year will be a complete wash.
With no part time jobs to go to…..
I could see more than a few school/university permanent closures coming.
On line learning …….?

#27 Drinking on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm

Everytime I wish to buy a product from local stores that I use to support (prior to Covid) there is a sign stating that they could not make it; fortunately there are a few that are hanging on; doing my thing trying to support them but dam; nothing will ever be the same again.

#28 McSteve on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm

#9 Save the whales

…and Lithium batteries will make the oil sands obsolete…my hybrid Highlander gets the same mileage as a gas powered Accord.

#29 Deplorable Dude on 06.30.20 at 4:45 pm

So what’s happening in the US…..cases up but death rates continue to drop….hmmmm?

Maybe because massive increase in testing, and the younger less at risk generation now being infected?

We’ll know very soon…as death is a lagging indicator.

Hospitals are not overloaded….some are operating back at usual loads.

Interesting article explaining what might be happening in the US.

https://covidtracking.com/blog/why-changing-covid-19-demographics-in-the-us-make-death-trends-harder-to

#30 Josh in Calgary on 06.30.20 at 4:47 pm

#11 binky barnes on 06.30.20 at 4:03 pm,

The spousal RRSP depends on so many factors, but it can provide a nice bit of tax avoidance. If your spouse makes significantly less money than you, or is planning on being unemployed for several years it can make a lot of sense. Just remember that if you’re going to with draw the money you have to stop making contributions for 3 years or the income will go against your tax bill.

For example, my wife and I have decided to have her stay at home with the kids. Meaning she’s been unemployed close to 10 years. So I made my RRSP contributions into a spousal account for several years and then stopped for 3. Then you can take the money out at a very low tax rate (or no tax rate if you stay under the personal exemptions).

The TFSA is also a very good way to go and much more flexible. No tax rebate, but all gains are tax free and you have much more flexibility in accessing the money if you need to.

Ideally you would find a way to do both (use the tax refund to top up the TFSA).

#31 Deplorable Dude on 06.30.20 at 4:50 pm

#13 Madcat…” All in all… Not a good experience… I won’t be eager to go shopping again unless I absolutely have to…”

Amazon must be loving this…..we are now walking bio hazards…shopping in person is now an ordeal, not a pleasure….how long before folks just give up going to the local store?

I was shopping the other day in a store and got physically locked in, had to wait for the cashier to finish with a customer before she let us all out….that’s how they were controlling crowd numbers…..sheesh…

#32 cuke and tomato picker on 06.30.20 at 4:51 pm

My wife and I have been very careful and have not gone any place where people congregate. We now feel as people begin to go back to their old ways it is more important to physical distance. I am spending more money for gas for my lawn mower then our car.Living the charmed life in Victoria BC. We have not had any debt for 37 years.

#33 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 4:52 pm

#2 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 3:37 pm

Balanced and diversified. Check.
No Debt. Check.
Loading up on cash. Check.
Plan for disaster and hope for fair weather.
Waiting to “vultch”…….. (sorry MF but some people’s misfortune is other people’s….fortune).
——

Yep… Hope for the best, plan for the worst.

Our emergency fund is up to 40k now since the fat tax returns came in. I guess we’ll float it for a while and see how high the seas get.

My job really could evaporate (again) if this keeps up.

#34 Sherry on 06.30.20 at 4:57 pm

my hybrid Highlander gets the same mileage as a gas powered Accord.

24 Things Wrong With Electric Cars Millennials Choose To Ignore
https://www.hotcars.com/24-things-wrong-with-electric-cars-millennials-choose-to-ignore/

#35 Ace Goodheart on 06.30.20 at 4:59 pm

Have you guys seen this?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-we-charity-1.5631278

In order for students to get their grant money, they have to “volunteer” for a left wing socialist charity known as “We”.

The Charity has connections to Trudeau and his family.

If you don’t want to volunteer and be a good, card carrying socialist, no student grant money for you!

This is unbelievable. This reminds me of the “Hitler Youth” program.

Forcing students to become agents of left wing NGO organizations, in order to qualify for their student loan and grant funding?

This is a new low.

#36 Freedom First on 06.30.20 at 5:03 pm

Garth, thank you for keeping your Blog open and running through these times when Canadians need your help more than ever.

I too see the same things happening all around me, and though I have been living my life being diversified, balanced, and liquid, as well as debt free for decades, I am deeply saddened by what I see going on all around me.

This is a time for me also, in my own small way, to also try to help others in what ever way I can, more than ever before.

Freedom First

#37 OK, Doomer on 06.30.20 at 5:09 pm

#27 McSteve on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm
#9 Save the whales

…and Lithium batteries will make the oil sands obsolete…my hybrid Highlander gets the same mileage as a gas powered Accord.

******
As long as you’re OK with cobalt mined by child/slave labor then carry on. Me? I have a lot of problems with supporting child/slave labor so I can virtual signal by driving a hybrid/electric vehicle. I can’t go there, so I rely on ethically sourced Canadian Oil and Gas.

#38 Dolce Vita on 06.30.20 at 5:09 pm

#19 Lambchop

Not so fast.

Go to any Gov BC site and try and find number of tests for COVID etc. Good luck.

Hear no evil, see no evil, COUNT NO…

BC stats on COVID the last place for credulity I would source. For example, AND AGAIN, lgG 60,000 strong Spanish study put infection rate at 5% (lowest so far).

5 million souls in BC X 5% = ???? cases

BC Health Ministry “official” cases = 2904.

But you crunch away using their data. All the best. Besides, if it were true what you say THEN why is the BC economy not FULLY OPEN? According to your numbers there is no reason for it to be closed.

The same applies to the rest of the “COVID no biggie” goofs that frequent this Blog with their underwhelming Math.

Be grateful Canada basically “out of the way” geographically, closed its borders to Mary Mallon USA and learned from other countries that got hit before Canada (like Italia).

Be grateful the lockdown, masks and distancing worked. YOU WILL NEVER KNOW what would have happened had you not done it.

Thus, do not use numbers AFTER THE FACT of a successful avoidance of COVID to further BS “COVID no biggie” theories.

#39 Hughgo Agogo on 06.30.20 at 5:10 pm

It’s all Batfink’s fault

#40 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 5:11 pm

#146 JB on 06.30.20 at 10:39 am
#135 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 8:50 am

Another day another Billion or so tossed to Trudeau’s ‘PET” projects.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-theres-nothing-charitable-about-circumventing-parliament

No debate, no accountability, no problem.
Until the debt comes back to bite.
Trudeau the compulsive spender on a roll.
The govt employee pensions are getting shakier every day this guy burns though another billion in cash.
…………………

I wish it was his money and not ours.
———

Easy fix.

Avoid/offset taxation.

#41 Just In Time on 06.30.20 at 5:14 pm

Things are terrible in the States right now. Have family there and my partner’s company headquarters is located in one of the hotspots. ICUS at full capacity, Trump ignoring the problem, Mayors and Governors can’t agree on what to do. . .a real $hit storm. People fighting about wearing masks, not wearing masks. . .it’s the wild Wild West with everyone doing something different and more and more people getting sick. What I can’t understand is why Canadians keep buying real estate? I live in a semi rural area, that’s not all that great and every house recently listed has Sold. I asked one guy on my walk, how he did on the sale price and he said really well. Go figure, his house I thought was overpriced to begin with. Not sure why people keep buying. And the house are in the high 8’s. Canadian’s are crazy. What happens when the second wave hits?

#42 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 5:16 pm

Hey MF, how’s that Filipina girlfriend doing?

Seems like it’s been years since you’ve mentioned anything about her.

#43 n1tro on 06.30.20 at 5:16 pm

And so it starts….mandatory indoors until things flare up and then it will be mandatory outdoors. “Minimal enforcement”….until things flare up and it will be maximum enforcement. Mayor Tory is probably salivating at the mouth of all the upcoming money collected in the name of “saving lives”.

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/mobile/toronto-makes-it-mandatory-to-wear-a-mask-in-indoor-public-spaces-1.5005358

Too bad I have a “medical condition” that prevents me covering my face for extended periods of time. :D

#44 Andrewski on 06.30.20 at 5:17 pm

What’s happening in Hedge Fund Land?

https://www.wealthprofessional.ca/business-news/hedge-funds-liquidated-at-fastest-quarterly-pace-since-2015/331011?utm_source=GA&utm_medium=20200630&utm_campaign=Breaking-20200630%20B&utm_content=708606F6-5BE0-481F-9A9A-EC7E25C236A1&tu=708606F6-5BE0-481F-9A9A-EC7E25C236A1

#45 cramar on 06.30.20 at 5:20 pm

Well, the U.S. stock markets had their best quarter in 20 years! As I said before, there is a totally disconnect between the real economy and the stock markets Yes, yes, I know we can thank the FED for that. Just don’t look for the man behind the curtain. My prediction is that soon investors are going to realize it is all smoke and mirrors.

#46 interesting on 06.30.20 at 5:21 pm

@#33 Sherry on 06.30.20 at 4:57 pm
my hybrid Highlander gets the same mileage as a gas powered Accord.

24 Things Wrong With Electric Cars Millennials Choose To Ignore
https://www.hotcars.com/24-things-wrong-with-electric-cars-millennials-choose-to-ignore/
—————-

mostly boomers and genx driving electric cars though.

#47 Ernesto on 06.30.20 at 5:37 pm

DELETED

#48 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 5:39 pm

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/01/scurvy-disease-discovery-jonathan-lamb/

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save untold thousands of sailors from the dread disease SCURVY.

The Canadian oil patch did.

#49 Squire on 06.30.20 at 5:39 pm

#34 Ace Goodheart on 06.30.20 at 4:59 pm

—————————————————
being paid to volunteer by the Gov in this case is more about indoctrination via cunning means

#50 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 5:40 pm

@#34 Ace Goodheart
“In order for students to get their grant money, they have to “volunteer” for a left wing socialist charity known as “We”.

The Charity has connections to Trudeau and his family.”

++++

Yep.
I posted a link to Rex Murphy’s National Post comment yesterday.

Seems our PM (and wife) are close friends with the founders of WE

The Canadian Govt is giving the WE charity $900 MILLION dollars to hand out to who ever they see fit.

Proving once again if you are the Leader of Canada….
Charity does begin at home…

No parliamentary debate, no audit, just give away $900 MILLION dollars.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-theres-nothing-charitable-about-circumventing-parliament

#51 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 5:42 pm

#27 McSteve on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm
#9 Save the whales

…and Lithium batteries will make the oil sands obsolete…

————-

Fantastic! And as luck would have it, lithium mining is not environmentally harmful in the slightest.

oh… wait…

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/lithium-batteries-environment-impact

#52 Howard on 06.30.20 at 5:43 pm

#24 Pants are Falling on 06.30.20 at 4:30 pm
Went this week to the Promenade Mall just on the border of Toronto and Thornhill. Went looking for the Old Navy, looks like it has sailed. It disappeared during the lockdown and a few doors down there used to be a GAP store also gone. The old Sears location is being torn down to make room for condos.

Around the corner where I live the nail salon is gone, store sign disappeared.

——————————————-

It’s been a long slow decline for the Promenade, though I guess that’s the same trend as most suburban malls. 20 years ago you had to circle the lot a dozen times to find a parking spot. Many a teenaged Saturday night spent at the movie theatre there.

#53 Kevin on 06.30.20 at 5:43 pm

Not the Laughing Whale! I love their “Frankly Sumatra”!

#54 Alberta Boy on 06.30.20 at 5:45 pm

I want a new truck so bad Garth…..but it would be a poor choice right now. Thank you for knocking some sense into me on a daily basis!

#55 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 5:48 pm

#48 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 5:42 pm
#27 McSteve on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm
#9 Save the whales
…and Lithium batteries will make the oil sands obsolete…

————-

Fantastic! And as luck would have it, lithium mining is not environmentally harmful in the slightest.
oh… wait…

————-

That said, I do drive a Tesla. Because it’s awesome, though, not to ‘save’ the environment.

And it is indeed awesome.

#56 Howard on 06.30.20 at 5:48 pm

#15 Retro Marxist on 06.30.20 at 4:10 pm
Make your bed and lie on it Max Bernier. Hating foreigners and non-whites would lead to more declines in tourists and demand for hotels and touristy businesses. COVID-19 was a Max Bernier’s dream come true!

—————————————————

I think you meant to call yourself Cultural Marxist, not Retro.

#57 yvr_lurker on 06.30.20 at 5:51 pm

At best, Canada can avoid having a huge surge in Covid by keeping the borders closed and being smart about following rules of social distancing keeping up to around 60% of our previous level of contacts. However, with no travel and tourism being dead, there will be many small firms that will throw the towel in. Much better being up here than in the crazy U.S. where there is no cohesive nationwide plan to contain the virus that people are willing to follow. Until the U.S. recovers, we can at best just limp along. My bet is that the market will have a major correction in a few months to finally reflect all of this once the stimulus money is exhausted. l have hedged in this direction.

#58 baloney Sandwitch on 06.30.20 at 5:56 pm

Great post again. Sad, that I have no life and reading this blog is one of the highlights of my day. Thank god I am retired, things are getting hairy. Waiting for wife to retire (any day now, as she is closing her business). Then we take up gardening. Invest is scotts-miracle gro stock.

btw what is debt-snorfeling. Is snoreling a word? Do you mean snorkeling?

#59 The Taint on 06.30.20 at 5:59 pm

Yea. Not sure about Fauci. Seems like a little tyrant running around with a power complex. His hiistory might be a little questionable too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wW7lclOmgzE&feature=emb_logo

https://www.henrymakow.com/2020/04/Fauci-Criminal-History-of-Medical-Conspiracy.html

#60 Toronto_CA on 06.30.20 at 6:10 pm

Fauci just warned of 100,000 new cases per day. Sure, no biggie. – Garth

Deaths/day using a 7 day rolling has declined from 2,250 in April down to 595 yesterday. We have no idea how much the virus has gone through previously, when testing was minimal in March and April, nor how many asymptomatic cases there were and have been.

If we’re seeing way more cases and way less deaths in America, either they’re getting better at testing (which is key to stopping the virus), treatment is getting better, or the virus is somehow mutated into something less deadly. Or all 3.

The only way out of the virus is to let it run through without overwhelming hospitals. Lockdowns should be replaced with better testing, tracing, and protecting the vulnerable and front line workers who are near the virus constantly.

Otherwise the cure is worse than the disease, as every main street is finding out now. And suicides, substance abuse, domestic abuse, and all manner of deaths of despair creep up. Isn’t it estimated 60,000 preventable deaths occur for every 1% increase in the unemployment rate in the USA? So…yeah, the unemployment is going to kill more than the virus at this rate.

#61 Mithan on 06.30.20 at 6:14 pm

I love in winterpeg, you barely notice that things have shut down and everybody I talk too is doing fine….

#62 Inequity on 06.30.20 at 6:15 pm

#36 OK, Doomer

google “solid state battery john b goodenough”

#63 Camille on 06.30.20 at 6:16 pm

Very good recommendation regarding holding an investment portfolio; diversified, balanced and liquid. Thank you.
When it comes to mere mortals, like myself, there is no alternative.
Excellent history lesson on inflation, japan and investing for the average Joe, in a new interview with Hugh Hendry available free on YouTube.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U44_auRtR78

#64 Overheardyou on 06.30.20 at 6:16 pm

Good news is the best opportunities rise when there no hope

#65 Damifino on 06.30.20 at 6:18 pm

#40 Just In Time

ICUS at full capacity, Trump ignoring the problem, Mayors and Governors can’t agree on what to do. . .a real $hit storm. People fighting about wearing masks, not wearing masks. . .it’s the wild Wild West with everyone doing something different and more and more people getting sick.
—————————–

I’d guess the preppers are watching it all on solar powered internet from their armed bunkers high in the Montana hills. Maybe they weren’t so extreme after all.

#66 Do we have all the facts on 06.30.20 at 6:21 pm

I must admit I have lost faith in the current methods being used to evaluate the Canadian economy. Rather than focussing on the actual production of goods that could be sold at home or exported our economy has focussed on the delivery and consumption of services and the assumption of debt to support the purchase of housing.

The Organization for a Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) measures Multifactor Productivity (MFP) within all member countries. Since 2012 productivity within Canada has been steadily declining and shows no signs of improving. We are no longer viewed as innovators and spend very little on research and development compared to other countries.

The sale of non-renewable resources to the United States has shored up our balance of trade for years but the future for this sector seems a bit cloudy these days. Our GDP is currently being supported by the assumption of personal and government debt and all signs are indicating that a tightening of credit is in the cards.

In short Canada needs a plan based on improving productivity not cooking up ways to keep the masses happy till the next election.

Definitely time to shift gears!!

#67 Overheardyou on 06.30.20 at 6:22 pm

#151 JD on 06.29.20 at 9:04 pm

Thank you for the advice!

#68 Billy Buoy on 06.30.20 at 6:22 pm

As our fearless leader has mentioned many times:

“Never count out the USA.”

(The FED that is….best quarter since 87 ! Ha.)

#69 TRON on 06.30.20 at 6:24 pm

Housing is spiking because people are generally financially illiterate. Personally, I’m an econ drop out who never finished my degree. With discovering the internet 30 years ago I have continued my education and invest the time reading and watching anything financial. I try to find contradicting opinions and reliable sources. It’s all free and anyone can do it but most don’t because they are either not interested or not interested.

Interesting is that everybody thinks they know what is a good way to invest because they follow the herd. The herd is buying homes, listening to politicians and giving the responsibility of their own health over to doctors who give them a prescription after they mess up their bodies with poor lifestyle choices. It is just the way things are good or bad.

So here is my take for financial survival through what will likely be the worse time anyone has ever seen. Drop any overhead that is a want and not a need. Sell your home if you think it will bring you wealth. Buy gold because nothing good is going to come from the insane monetary policies around the world. Start a garden to edge against inflation.

Keep your money in a balanced portfolio if you have a great broker who knows where to invest.

#70 FreeBird on 06.30.20 at 6:28 pm

#45 interesting on 06.30.20 at 5:21 pm
@#33 Sherry on 06.30.20 at 4:57 pm
my hybrid Highlander gets the same mileage as a gas powered Accord.

24 Things Wrong With Electric Cars Millennials Choose To Ignore
https://www.hotcars.com/24-things-wrong-with-electric-cars-millennials-choose-to-ignore/
—————-

mostly boomers and genx driving electric cars though.
—————-
Reports (pre virus) seem to show this. Mills (24-39yo) do buy green cars but more into car sharing along w/Gen Z. Budget may force them to keep sharing as long as car sharing cos promise ‘disinfected’ cars. Boomers (56-76yo), GenX (45-55yo).

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/hedgescompany.com/blog/2019/01/new-car-buyer-demographics-2019/amp/

https://www.truecar.com/blog/which-generation-is-going-green/

https://www.smartcitiesdive.com/ex/sustainablecitiescollective/new-study-millennials-prefer-car-access-over-ownership/32723/

#71 Stormy Daniels on 06.30.20 at 6:29 pm

Don’t worry Garth!

The Lunenburg Enquirer has offered me $80,000 for my story about you and Bandit :)

If I accept, they will sell out papers everywhere and make huge profits, and invest some of that money in the local economy, so it’ll be a win-win!

Unless of course you’d like to give me $130,000 to keep those nasty secrets private…….

#72 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 6:48 pm

@#59 bandit
“btw what is debt-snorfeling.”
++++

Pigs snuffle and snorfel(slang) .
Debt -snorfeling hogs at the “free money” credit trough.

#73 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 6:50 pm

DELETED

#74 jess on 06.30.20 at 6:50 pm

the virus is widespread now in usa

They Just Dumped Him Like Trash’: Nursing Homes Evict …
http://www.nytimes.com › 2020/06/21 › business › nursing-ho…
Jun 21, 2020 – Nursing homes across the country are kicking out old and disabled residents and … to try to clear out less-profitable residents to make room for a new class of customers … and weren’t an attempt to free space for Covid-19 patients. … them into homeless shelters, rundown motels and other unsafe facilities

============
advertisers leaving facebook
https://www.stophateforprofit.org/
The Shift
Reddit’s C.E.O. on Why He Banned ‘The_Donald’ Subreddit

#75 Drill Baby Drill on 06.30.20 at 6:52 pm

A ”slow fashion store” is a boutique clothing store for erotic dancers. They remove there laundry slowly.

#76 Cto on 06.30.20 at 6:54 pm

well Garth,…
Bidding wars, sold over asking signs everywhere.
Looks to me like the BOC and feds have averted another real estate correction by massive money Printing and 0 rates!
I new they would put a floor in it,…maybe even a leg or two up over the next couple years.
Its true that it is all manipulated today. All markets…
Central banks will never ever ever let true price discovery ever happen again.

#77 NewWest on 06.30.20 at 6:54 pm

#25 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 4:38 pm

I could see more than a few school/university permanent closures coming.
On line learning …….?

——————-
Universities in Canada are pretty uniformly going to on-line instruction for 20/21. The earliest that campuses will re-open for full “in person” instruction is fall 2021. While faculties did an amazing job in March going from in person classes to on-line in a week, it will be harder to re-start and will take longer.

I don’t see any public university closing outright, but there definitely will be rationalization of programs. The big unis like UofT, UBC, McGill have professional programs that bring in big bucks and will survive relatively unscathed. It’s the smaller universities that are going to have to get rid of programs, maybe even entire faculties, to keep the wheels on. These second-tier institutions compete with the community colleges and will find it difficult. (In BC lots of the community colleges were changed to “universities” a few years back, but they are still feeder institutions for the larger unis.)

It will also be interesting to see what happens with tenured faculty. 80% of university budgets pay for tenured faculty salary and benefits. I don’t think that is going to last. This may be the turning point for university tenure, reflecting the situation of academia being the last of the medieval guilds to survive in modern society. Can we really justify employment for life on public money, with very little oversight and very few consequences for underperformance?

There is also a touching faith in university administrations right now that students will enroll because they can’t find jobs and can’t travel for a gap year. Supposedly they will get student loans. I’m not sure about that. If one of your parents is out of work, are you really going to go into debt for a Sociology degree?

I’m hoping that there will be a thorough re-examination of the place of universities in our society. I know something has to happen – take a look at what is going on in Australia right now for one approach to change.

#78 E Richard on 06.30.20 at 6:55 pm

Finding in Nova Scotia many businesses do not want to be open to serve-sell to customers. Local bicycle shop only open 10-4, wtf I have a job, have had to order items from out of province. Next door neighbor had his bike sit for two weeks for a tune up, he pulled it and I tried my best with it so he can use at least since he has plenty of free time. Favorite restaurant closed on Sundays, why not a weekday instead?

#79 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 6:56 pm

#170 Tater on 06.30.20 at 2:40 pm Gets wrong, once again:

“#148 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 11:34 am
@Tater- So many assumptions so little time.

1) Blue vs. red states. So what? The point is the virus is a nothingburger to 99.999% of healthy people. You assume I care about US politics.
2) Fox News- I have not watched Fox News ever in my entire life. Don’t really care for TV much except for the NHL, the NFL, Car Shows, Star Trek, and good documentaries.
3) The study was done by Stanford University and was pre-published on a medical site. I have the link but I’m not giving it to you so you can do the standard lefty tactic of “discredit the source”. If you want it you’ll have to work for it. Interesting how the media buried it though given that it was first published June 6, 2020.
————————————————————-

You referred to the 100 largest counties as Trumpland, they absolutely aren’t as shown by their voting history.

Anyway, I’m done with you. The study you’re talking about is the Santa Clara anti-body study. It wasn’t released on June 6th and has been thoroughly debunked.

I’d love to be proven wrong, as it would mark a significant step forward in the understanding of this virus.”

————————————————————–
No, sorry no, this study is strictly math. But you do you.

So you’re wrong again.

#80 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 7:01 pm

#30 Deplorable Dude on 06.30.20 at 4:50 pm sez:

“#13 Madcat…” All in all… Not a good experience… I won’t be eager to go shopping again unless I absolutely have to…”

Amazon must be loving this…..we are now walking bio hazards…shopping in person is now an ordeal, not a pleasure….how long before folks just give up going to the local store?

I was shopping the other day in a store and got physically locked in, had to wait for the cashier to finish with a customer before she let us all out….that’s how they were controlling crowd numbers…..sheesh…”
—————————————————————-
Call your local Fire Dept. That is strictly against the Ontario Fire Code and it could have been a disaster.

#81 Wrk.dover on 06.30.20 at 7:07 pm

#59 baloney Sandwitch on 06.30.20 at 5:56 pm

btw what is debt-snorfeling. Is snoreling a word? Do you mean snorkeling?

——————————————–

We used to grow a pair of pigs every year from 60 to 200lbs. They enjoyed putting their heads deep in the water and blowing out through the nostrils while waving their snouts wildly from side to side.

I assume that is snorfeling.

#82 AGuyInVancouver on 06.30.20 at 7:10 pm

#77 Drill Baby Drill on 06.30.20 at 6:52 pm
A ”slow fashion store” is a boutique clothing store for erotic dancers. They remove there laundry slowly.
_ _ _
They better hope none of the dancers stopped in at this Covid hotspot Vancouver strip club:
https://globalnews.ca/news/7116966/possible-covid-19-exposure-at-vancouver-strip-club/

#83 Long-Time Lurker on 06.30.20 at 7:17 pm

>Thank you, Garth, for continuing your blog.

Three Ideas to End the Rot on College Campuses
COMMENTARY
By Charles Lipson – RCP Contributor
June 29, 2020

In the early 1950s, at the nadir of McCarthyism, the Cincinnati Reds baseball team was so fearful of anti-communist crusaders that it actually changed the team’s name. Overnight, they reverted to their original name, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, and then for several years became the Redlegs. The anti-communism was justified; the mob mentality was not. Today, we are all Redlegs. This time, the repression is coming from the left.

It’s not just that a careless word can cost your job, it’s that people tremble in fear that they might say the wrong word. Today, as in the past, the loudest, most extreme voices claim the right to control speech and judge whether it is worthy of being heard at all. The giants of technology and media have either bowed to these demands or embraced them enthusiastically. The result, as in the early 1950s, is a shriveled, impoverished public square. Genuine debate is suppressed, even in classrooms, which should nurture informed discussion with multiple viewpoints. All too often they have become pipelines for indoctrination…

…Can anything be done? Yes. And it should begin in universities, where so many of the problems began.

Universities must publicly reassert the first principle of academic inquiry: free and open debate is essential to research and learning. Bad arguments should be rebutted with better ones, bad data and methods with better ones. How do we know which arguments, data, and methods are bad? Only through vigorous debate…

…Whatever role Washington plays, universities need to act now, on their own, to reassert the core value of free speech in education. Free inquiry depends on free speech. These values are the bedrock of liberal education in democratic societies. Right now, that bedrock is being washed away in a tidal wave of irrational outrage.

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2020/06/29/three_ideas_to_end_the_rot_on_college_campuses_143564.html

#84 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 7:20 pm

Truth be told the pandemic is and always was largely outside of Trump’s control. The response is state by state, other than the closing of the borders, which he did, and making funds available, which he did.

I’m not sure I believe the Canadian numbers. We didn’t do anything all that much differently except maybe stay away from the beach and protests because it was too damn cold. Also no political rallies. I’m guessing those might be scrapped US side as well. If we thought the last US presidential election was a crap show, wait….

Anyway with the surging numbers in the US there goes any hope that the weather has an effect on transmission rates.

It also turns out that the hope that all we had to do was close the schools, work remotely, and wear a mask to Costco and things would be back to normal by July was a false one. July starts tomorrow (Happy Canada Day everyone! Such as it is anyway…) and it looks like summer will also be cancelled. The prospects that fall will also be cancelled look increasingly likely.

Even the prospect of local vacations look pretty grim for summer. What’s the point of taking your RV somewhere if everything is closed when you get there? And there is a feedback loop inherent in the process as exemplified by Garth’s coffee shop. Who is going to visit if they can’t even get a coffee? But how can they open if there are no visitors? It is a chicken and egg thing. It will take a long time to restart. That is why the government panicked and tried to keep everybody liquid. But it didn’t work.

And so we enter now into the summer of our discontent.

————————

It is hard to see how the torrent of deferrals and skipped rent payments does not turn into a torrent of foreclosures and evictions at some point in the future. The government will do all it can to delay the day of reckoning but eventually due process must run its course.

The CERB and other programs will also come to an end as they must. The idea so many hold that we collectively as “the government” can afford things that we as individuals can not will eventually prove to be the folly that it is. The relationship between productivity and income will have to be restored or the dollar will certainly collapse. As I’ve mentioned many times before, the dollar is not real any more so than an inch or an ounce, and its value lies in its scarcity relative to goods and services and its time value. The situation we are in currently, where a great many people are being paid money to not produce goods and services is simply not sustainable. If it were somebody would have figured out how to do it a long time ago and work would have long since been a thing of the past. But unfortunately someone has to work to provide goods and services or we would quickly resort to living off the land like a primitive tribe. That is just how the universe works, at least until they manage to automate absolutely everything.

#85 Paul on 06.30.20 at 7:20 pm

#40 Just In Time on 06.30.20 at 5:14 pm

Things are terrible in the States right now. Have family there and my partner’s company headquarters is located in one of the hotspots. ICUS at full capacity, Trump ignoring the problem, Mayors and Governors can’t agree on what to do. . .a real $hit storm. People fighting about wearing masks, not wearing masks. . .it’s the wild Wild West with everyone doing something different and more and more people getting sick. What I can’t understand is why Canadians keep buying real estate? I live in a semi rural area, that’s not all that great and every house recently listed has Sold. I asked one guy on my walk, how he did on the sale price and he said really well. Go figure, his house I thought was overpriced to begin with. Not sure why people keep buying. And the house are in the high 8’s. Canadian’s are crazy. What happens when the second wave hits?
111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
Catch this,Cheer up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLgWbH-qhVo

#86 Jessica Danshane on 06.30.20 at 7:27 pm

Garth, i hope Canadians get seduced by 2% mortgage rates because everyone was making fun of me for saving so much. It is old fashion they told me. I hope there are massive bankruptcies.

They have been fudging inflation numbers and stealing from savers and GIC depositors for over 20 years now and it is now the rest to feel the economic pain. They punish the prudent, responsible, hard working people and now they are going to see what happens.

If you even allow this post to be put through on your forum.

#87 Sherry on 06.30.20 at 7:37 pm

Nearly 150,000 people die each day around the world, according to 2017 data.

Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest killer globally.

This is how COVID-19 compares to other diseases for number of deaths.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/05/how-many-people-die-each-day-covid-19-coronavirus/

#88 jal on 06.30.20 at 7:39 pm

My income is a small pie. Those that want a bigger piece from my pie are making someone else piece of pie smaller.

Here is some small example,
First of July fireworks cancelled.
Thousands of dollars saved.
Yet, my taxes went up.

Many business adding covid19 surcharge.
Therefore, my small pie goes to less businesses.

Today the news reported that cost of food is increasing because of covid19.
I guess that I’m going to eat less and lose weight.

Not everyone can increase the size of their pie or dig into their savings/investments to cover increased costs.
Count yourself lucky.
Careful, It might be your turn next.

#89 Trojan House on 06.30.20 at 7:46 pm

#37 Dolce Vita on 06.30.20 at 5:09 pm

“Be grateful the lockdown, masks and distancing worked. YOU WILL NEVER KNOW what would have happened had you not done it.”

You can never prove this one way or the other. For example, some of the countries with the strictest lock down measures, I’m looking at Belgium, had some of the highest rates of Covid. In fact, Italia, was the same.

#90 will on 06.30.20 at 7:49 pm

This from Wikipedia:

Slow fashion, is a concept describing the opposite to fast fashion and part of the “slow movement”, which advocates for manufacturing in respect to people, environment and animals. As such, contrary to industrial fashion practices, slow fashion involves local artisans and the use of eco-friendly materials, with the goal of preserving crafts and the environment and, ultimately, provide value to both consumers and producers.

#91 Frank Saenz on 06.30.20 at 7:51 pm

If people are too stupid to take care of themselves and stay away from sick people then they deserve to suffer the consequences. Government is there just to keep the sheep in line.

#92 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 7:58 pm

@#79 New west
” This may be the turning point for university tenure, reflecting the situation of academia being the last of the medieval guilds to survive in modern society. Can we really justify employment for life on public money, with very little oversight and very few consequences for underperformance?”
++++
Interesting.
If tenured academia (and their support staff) start getting whacked it would create a bit of concern among the other employees as to the fiscal solvency of the coveted pension plan.
Govt to the rescue!
I wonder who the politically correct, anarchist social warriors will blame when their Prof’s get the boot?

#93 Trojan House on 06.30.20 at 7:58 pm

Seriously, people have to stop reading the fearmongering MSM headlines and research the actual numbers for what is going on in those so-called “hotspots” in the US.

The simple reason for the increase in numbers, and you can look it up if you don’t believe me, is the amount of testing has increased.

I will give you an example – Florida. FLA is by far out-testing anybody. Last week, they tested 70,000 people with about 9,000 testing “positive” which we know because that was the MSM headline of the week. Of course, there could be false positives as we all know. That being said, that is a 12% infection rate. The week before that, they tested about 58,000 people. Guess how many positives (false included)? About 7,000 or 12%. Actually their rates of “positive infection” have been consistently between 12 and 14%.

Now, the majority of people, as we all know, are asymptomatic, after that, very few have symptoms and even fewer, actually almost none according to doctors as reported in NPR the other day, are hospitalized. They have actually seen a decrease in hospitalization rates. And the mortality rate is much lower than at the outbreak.

People do your research before you start parroting what you read in the MSN. A good start with medrxiv.org. And if you want more mainstream, take a look even at CDC numbers. Sheesh!!!

#94 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 8:01 pm

Hey, is Trudeau lying about this contract? But, but… I thought only Trump lied? So confusing…

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/we-charity-co-founder-said-pmo-called-to-award-900m-student-grant-program-contradicting-trudeau/ar-BB16a6dE?ocid=spartan-ntp-feeds

#95 CJohnC on 06.30.20 at 8:06 pm

Don’t know why everyone thinks Canada’s borders are closed. They have never been closed. It is all smoke and mirrors. You can fly in from the US all you want. About 3600 a week do that. Internationally about 11,00 a week arrive internationally from all over. No restrictions

But , but…..they have to self isolate for 14 days…..good luck with that.

As for sources check with statistics Canada, except they don’t have half the numbers or google the question…..

#96 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 8:06 pm

#74 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 6:48 pm
@#59 bandit
“btw what is debt-snorfeling.”
++++

Pigs snuffle and snorfel(slang) .
Debt -snorfeling hogs at the “free money” credit trough.

I always visualized a dude shaving a line on a mirror, rolled up 100.00 bill at the ready.

Snorfeling up the debt…

#97 NewWest on 06.30.20 at 8:14 pm

#85 Long-Time Lurker on 06.30.20 at 7:17 pm

There is so much wrong with this. While I appreciate your outrage, “free and open debate”, whatever that is, won’t solve anything.

Universities run like businesses in the 21st century. If there ever was “free and open debate” (I am doubtful) it certainly doesn’t exist now in academia. Faculty are driven by getting research grants and publishing. Tenure depends on these things, with teaching and training students a distant second in priorities and importance. No one is going to rock the boat unless they are at the end of their careers with a fat salary and pension and no need to have a lab or students. A job for life after years of subservience is too important to risk for “free speech”. Ask any sessional instructor.

Students are commodities and consumers, just like the rest of us. The quaint concept of the citizen has long been discarded. Students are”bums in seats” and their tuition funds the research enterprise. Universities do what they must to keep them in the institution. Do you expect “free and open debate” anywhere else in society? Didn’t think so. Why, under 21st century capitalism, would universities be any different?

#98 Westcdn on 06.30.20 at 8:17 pm

I bought gold company shares about a year ago. They are doing well. I see the price is flirting with $1,800. I don’t know if it will be taken down hard soon or soar to $2,000. It is not my decision but I would bet on $2,000.

My preferreds took a hit today. I suspect dividend payments. Just the same, I happy to have bought in. I have a ways to go to recover my equity losses but I believe they are good companies and I will wait for them to prove themselves.

I bought Real Matter call options. One of the best decisions I ever made but I only put $700 into play because that was all I was willing to lose. My puts are not doing well – much to learn. There is nothing better than having luck on your side.

#99 Drew on 06.30.20 at 8:19 pm

If? orange face has been blowing the virus challenge for 6 months and has been trying to get people to stop measuring.

The dumbest incompetent ship sinks all vessels or however that saying goes

#100 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 8:26 pm

#10 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 06.30.20 at 4:01 pm

In the 1840’s the price of whale oil was the equivalent today of $57 USD per GALLON. Hence, whales were hunted to the ends of the earth to fill the demand.

In 1853, a Canadian Geologist, Abraham Gesner, figured out how to distill kerosene from petroleum. The effect of his invention drove the price of whale oil down and collapsed the whaling industry.

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the whales from extinction. The Canadian oil patch did.

You’re welcome.

————————

Where did you come up with that? Whaling for meat continued long after whale oil went out of fashion and whale were heading for extinction in the 70’s because of it. Whether Greenpeace deserves all the credit for saving them can be debated but an international moratorium on whaling was implemented with only Japan being allowed to harvest a small number for “research purposes”. If this were not done they almost certainly would be extinct today. Russia alone used to kill huge numbers just for the meat, being a relatively poor country at the time. Japan also.

#101 Oakville sucks on 06.30.20 at 8:26 pm

I won’t comment as I’m sure nobody cares what I have to say in a polarized world of Right VS Left.

#102 Dina Pulanzzo on 06.30.20 at 8:28 pm

Brian Ripley, this is BS. There will never be deflation look at everything from food to insurance gas, rent, taxes, fees, utilities, medication, healthcare, tuition costs etc. etc.

My property taxes alone in the last 5 years is up 50%, in 5 years among most things like garbage fees up 125%, auto, home insurance up 39%, grocery bill, food prices up 28%, water rates up 365% in 15 years, hydro, electricity prices, bills up 400% in the last 16 years, rent is up at least 55% up in 10 years, gas prices 50 cents a liter 22 years ago now 95 cents a liter still up 73% in this extraordinary corona slowdown. This is not last carbon taxes up again this year. Pretty soon we will have $2 liter gas within 4 to 6 years.

What about new taxes fro health taxes from $300 to $900 per person, higher income tax rates, carbon taxes, cap and trade, etc.etc. This is total BS, everything costs way more and more. This was started by Greenspan BS deflation lies back in 2002 to 2003 to accelerate the crashing of interest rates. What a bunch of lairs and thieves.

#103 Six Figs Ain't What It Used To Be on 06.30.20 at 8:32 pm

#74 Drinking

So, the baby boomer bulge isn’t quite there yet, but even without COVID there were going to be something like sixty million deaths globally this year. That’s 165,000 per day, and as the demographics shift over the next decade it’ll get way higher.

5,000/day, mostly of very advanced age? Come on man, we all die one day.

#104 Linda on 06.30.20 at 8:33 pm

Small business closures not a surprise. Was chatting to a relative who lives in Ottawa. He says the government is effectively shut down, downtown Ottawa a virtual ghost town with the expected effect on the small business that depends on business foot traffic. Lamented the fact that ‘100 year old businesses’ are closing down. Sad, but not unexpected given the circumstances.

As for the USA, not a surprise regarding the ‘resurgence’ of infections etc. Far too many believed that wearing masks/social distancing etc. wasn’t necessary. Doesn’t really matter their reason or lack thereof. Oddly enough, a virus doesn’t give a hoot about your beliefs. It just happily multiplies, infects & in this case kills without reference to race, creed, political leanings, sex or what have you. Hopefully the masses will eventually figure that out & start doing what needs to be done.

#105 Drinking on 06.30.20 at 8:42 pm

#106 Six Figs Ain’t What It Used To Be

Whatever man! Live the life you wish to live; meanwhile!

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8475795/Dr-Fauci-predicts-America-new-100-000-coronavirus-cases-DAY-compared-40-000-now.html

#106 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 8:45 pm

#90 jal on 06.30.20 at 7:39 pm
My income is a small pie. Those that want a bigger piece from my pie are making someone else piece of pie smaller.

Here is some small example,
First of July fireworks cancelled.
Thousands of dollars saved.
Yet, my taxes went up.

Many business adding covid19 surcharge.
Therefore, my small pie goes to less businesses.

Today the news reported that cost of food is increasing because of covid19.
I guess that I’m going to eat less and lose weight.

Not everyone can increase the size of their pie or dig into their savings/investments to cover increased costs.
Count yourself lucky.
Careful, It might be your turn next.
——

Good way of looking at it. I see my little pie as pre cut, ready to be served up. But I also know the government has a big pie, and if I do things right, some of the pie I must serve to others, I can replace with a slice of government pie, making my pie last a lot longer.

For instance, this spring I redid my driveway. All labour by me. This kept my pie as whole as possible by trading sweat for dollars, and avoiding taxes on labour, and a permit too. Last year I did the roof, material cost only, saved thousands on labour and permits/taxes. Just those two jobs saved almost 10 grand compared to farming it out.

Now, my pie is still pretty big, but has shrunk somewhat. So now, I add some government pie to replace the slice or two I had to serve up. The taxes/permits I did not remit, a healthy dose of CCB, and a big fat tax return all combine to almost make my pie whole again.

A little work and a plan keep the pie consumption resistant.

#107 Man of the cloth on 06.30.20 at 8:45 pm

Drove down the Don Valley Parkway today on my weekly visit to the office to catch up on some paperwork.

Got on to Queen St right away, travelling west toward Yonge. I was shocked at how many storefronts were boarded up with plywood, or had graffiti sprayed on the windows. So many simply closed. So many had signs “for lease”.

I have been doing this route for 35 years. Never seen anything like this. Reminded me of downtown Detroit in some respects.

Feel sorry for the tenants, their lives turned upside down. Feel sorry for the landlords(maybe I’m a little soft).

Anyway, I am confident things will turn around at some point, and TO will recover, but not without great suffering on many levels.

Be kind to others.

Many of us are lucky, and can weather the storm. That being said, many have no idea how this virus is affecting their neighbours.

#108 DrC on 06.30.20 at 8:47 pm

With all due respect Mr. Garth, but i see a lot of “sold over asking” signs lately. If you’re looking at asking vs sold prices you will be in for a big “surprise”, in Toronto for the detached and semi-detached. I see on average a 150k increase. And to be honest I just don’t see how the prices will go down later this year as much as they went up in June.

As stated here a few times, some markets are seeing pent-up demand meeting low inventory. The result is predictable. It won’t last. – Garth

#109 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 8:50 pm

#90 Sherry on 06.30.20 at 7:37 pm

Nearly 150,000 people die each day around the world, according to 2017 data.

Cardiovascular diseases are the biggest killer globally.

This is how COVID-19 compares to other diseases for number of deaths.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/05/how-many-people-die-each-day-covid-19-coronavirus/

——————–

Maths are hard. The problem is that covid is growing exponentially. Even your own article shows that it had moved into 3rd place by April 13-19. That was 2 months ago.

I’ve explained this before but perhaps it bears repeating. Covid does not spread linearly going 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 cases, it spreads exponentially going 1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128 until it runs out of people to infect. This is why it is so worrisome and it is why comparing covid deaths to the common flu is so misleading. In the US, it took covid only 3 months to surpass the annual flu average. So if you annualize it covid is at least 4 times as deadly as the flu, but if you use an exponential forecast it could turn out to be up to 16 times as deadly. Only time will tell and we’ll have to look to other countries like Brazil to see what would have happened without the measures taken.

Unfortunately, we don’t really have a lot of data yet but the data we have so far looks pretty bad. The speed that covid assumed leading cause of death in the US was spectacular, only 3 months. And that was with measures. Or look at how the Chinese responded once they realized they had a problem. Do you think the Chinese government would shut down industry over a few people dying? They are not known for their humanitarian side.

Experts do not know everything but it is best not to argue with a scientist about his area of expertise. What he doesn’t know you don’t know even more, perhaps drastically more. That’s why we have them.

You’d never let a bartender (no offense to bartenders could be anybody) design a large bridge. Nope, you get an engineer with 4 years of schooling and maybe 20 years experience with similar structures. Yet everybody out there seems to think they know more than Dr. Fauci. Guess what? You don’t.

#110 Happy Canada Day on 06.30.20 at 9:05 pm

Thanks for the post Garth and
Yes another birthday tomorrow hard to imagine what Canada will all look like a year from now.
I will admit I am very lucky and grateful for all I have. But I am still depressed by the thousands of lives that had dreams And now those have vanished.
I read this blog and some days it’s worrisome! you have millions unemployed maybe permanently, millions missing mortgages, perhaps 40 percent of small business going under,
Empty office towers and massive government debt. You said v shaped recovered and we all thought that. But now it’s not so rosy. We hold our breath for the United States which right now is a mess. I cannot see the future but based on allot of factors we are a long way off from a V shaped recovery. And yet the markets go up.
I listen to Berman and he like you says, stay fully invested but he adds have defensive positions.
Which when I asked, told me use call options as well as gold ETFs.
I wish everyone well and I am sure a year from now we will see light.

#111 Stone on 06.30.20 at 9:14 pm

#27 Drinking on 06.30.20 at 4:43 pm
Everytime I wish to buy a product from local stores that I use to support (prior to Covid) there is a sign stating that they could not make it; fortunately there are a few that are hanging on; doing my thing trying to support them but dam; nothing will ever be the same again.

———

Would that be the LCBO and The Beer Store still hanging on?

#112 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 9:15 pm

#7 Brian Ripley on 06.30.20 at 3:50 pm
My new post this week: Deflation Probability

http://www.chpc.biz/history-readings/deflation-probability

Bank of Canada Governor, Tiff Macklem said on June 22nd, “Our main concern is to avoid a persistent drop in inflation by helping Canadians get back to work.”

Apparently “deflation” is a scary noun.

————————-

Rick Ackerman also believes it’s deflation first then inflation. Good article here:

https://www.rickackerman.com/2020/06/why-inflation-doesnt-have-a-prayer/

I think that most of these graphs of the “wealth gap” and comparing the “wealth” of the top 1% to the bottom 90% are misleading. First of all 25% of the bottom 90% just got out of high school and may still be in collage. Silly. Wealth tends to increase with age.

But the second part that is silly when talking about the top 1% or maybe the 0.01% is that most wealth is “notional”. The rich do not have a swimming pool full of gold coins in the basement like Scrooge McDuck. They have factories, farms, mines, oil wells, real estate, soft ware companies, tow truck companies, rail roads, and the like. Nobody knows what that stuff is worth when you try to sell it. All we know for sure is that cash equivalents like bonds pay crap right now so Microsoft must be worth something. But all that worth is notional. You never really know what a position is worth until you have to liquidate in short order. And if everybody is doing it at the same time, whew. Turns out it was worth a lot less than you thought.

Remember folks (for Flop again), the value of anything is only that which someone else will pay you for it. And that assumes the potential buyer has any money. If he doesn’t it ain’t worth nothing.

#113 Westcdn on 06.30.20 at 9:39 pm

I met my new neighbor. He is wealthy from what I saw. He is a single father with a son named Ryan and he is Brian. Should be easy for me to remember. He looked at me as if I just crawled from under a rock. I hope things go better from here.

He did invite me to visit later. He had a privacy fence built – interesting it is half wall. I guess he likes my birch tree and backyard. The renovations on his house continue. I am looking at a $1m home beside me. I thought the asking price was stiff.

I told him he bought a good home and I have no doubt he drove a hard bargain. He extended the fence between us and insisted my sidewalk was repaired. I didn’t realize I was encroaching on his property.

The privacy fence solves my problem of painting.

#114 Duck Confit on 06.30.20 at 9:40 pm

Garth, about a month or so back you had mentioned that you see opportunity in the REIT sector…. yesterday’s blog post (“the rethink”) seems like you may have changed your view, although not specifically mentioning REITS, it seems your bearish on the future of office/downtown/apartments. Any thoughts? Thanks.

#115 Dee on 06.30.20 at 9:41 pm

#20 Lambchop – here’s some info that was on the news last week. In Alberta for a 7 week period the death count was consistently higher then the historical baseline with an extra 402 deaths but only 40 were coronavirus connected. In BC there were 372 more deaths then in any of the previous 5 years and only 99 of those were confirmed Covid cases…. uhhmmmm kind of makes you think doesn’t it ???? I guess that’s why one article I read said we will lose 165 million people to starvation from the lockdowns this year but hey no one seems to care about that do they? I’m no mathematician but how many covid19 deaths have we had? and if you multiplied that by 100 would you reach 165 million??

#116 Tim123 on 06.30.20 at 9:42 pm

I wonder whether deflation will be coming in 2021. Some economists are projecting that it is a possibility. It is good advice to play defense in the markets. The equity markets are doing great so for traders who have been in the markets and going long and short on equities, this is a great market. I will take some lottery shots on some leaps for beaten down equities near the end of the year in the event a vaccine is found in 2021.

#117 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 9:51 pm

@#97 Sail away
“Hey, is Trudeau lying about this contract? But, but… I thought only Trump lied? So confusing…”

+++++
ahahahaha.
I cant just hear Trudeau at tomorrows cottage Canada Day presser……..

“Ahhhh, ummmm, errrrrr, ahhhhhh…..I ahhhh, ummm, errrrr, I ahhhhh, was misquoted”

#118 PetertheSeparatistfromCalgary on 06.30.20 at 10:01 pm

Covid19 deaths in the USA peaked on May 6, 2020 at 2701. June 29, 2020 only 338 people died of this virus.

If cases are rising why has the number of deaths fell so dramatically?

The link below shows you a graph of number of Covid19 deaths in the USA over time. It is update frequently.

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=covid19+deaths+usa

#119 Mattbg on 06.30.20 at 10:02 pm

Interesting news from the US where banks that are not allowed to report deferred payments to credit agencies are now nervous to lend because they can’t assess the risk knowing that those details are missing from credit reports.

They are looking for “alternate” data sources about client creditworthiness to enable them to lend more confidently.

#120 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 10:03 pm

@#103 nonplused
“Whaling for meat continued long after whale oil went out of fashion and whale were heading for extinction in the 70’s because of it.”

+++++

Yep.
The last whaling station closed in BC in the 1960’s.

https://www.vicnews.com/opinion/b-c-whaling-an-uncomfortable-history/#:~:text=The%20last%20station%20operating%20was,stations%20processed%20approximately%2025%2C000%20whales.

Winter Harbour was a bit more interesting.

https://www.columbiavalleypioneer.com/news/winter-harbour-survival-on-the-edge-of-vancouver-island/

West Coast of northern Vancouver Island.
I hiked around there in the 80’s.
Moss covered wooden boardwalks, ruins of buildings…..
A rainy, gloomy, surreal experience.
Canada’s history.

#121 Leo Trollstoy on 06.30.20 at 11:07 pm

Covid cases are BS stats used to get media their eyeballs and ad revenue

More testing = more cases

No testing = no cases

Cases = red herring to scare sheeple

#122 rogersroasterz on 06.30.20 at 11:12 pm

Garth

Time to wake up and smell the coffee. Why not buy your buy the roasting equipment from the out of business coffee shop for pennies on the dollar? You could then generate your own virtual smell smell and live off of the aromatic memories?

#123 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 11:15 pm

#123 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 10:03 pm

Hmm your article makes me think I had the date of the moratorium incorrect. I thought it was the 70’s.

So I went to wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling

So I guess Canada banned it in the late 60’s but world wide it continued until the mid 80’s. Apparently it still continues to some level. Stocks are still way below what they were 100 years ago. We did nearly wipe them out.

#124 Ace Goodheart on 06.30.20 at 11:22 pm

RE: #52 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 5:40 pm

There’s an update on this.

“We” is now paying teachers $12,000.00 each to recruit 75 students into the “volunteer” program, with each student getting a $5000.00 grant in exchange for “embracing socialism and socialist ideals and values” and acting as agent and promoter for “We” political goals.

This is disgusting.

Taxpayer money getting thrown around.

Students being made to declare allegiance to socialism, so they can get an education.

#125 LunarNotion on 06.30.20 at 11:22 pm

Thanks for this post today Garth. Paying attention to how this pandemic has affected all the creative and ambitious people who stuck their neck out to set up shop and make our high streets unique is important. I bet even the trolls here who would call 100K Covid deaths a nothing burger (without even considering morbidity) felt a tingle of humanity. Seriously though, keeping an eye out for those in our own neighbourhoods and trying to support them is classy and the right thing to do.

#126 Lambchop on 06.30.20 at 11:32 pm

#38 Dolce Vita on 06.30.20 at 5:09 pm
#19 Lambchop

Not so fast.

Go to any Gov BC site and try and find number of tests for COVID etc. Good luck.

Blahblahblah…

Thus, do not use numbers AFTER THE FACT of a successful avoidance of COVID to further BS “COVID no biggie” theories.

______________

I merely did the math on TOTAL deaths in BC, from ALL causes, presumably including this version of a Coronavirus.
Numbers on how many people have died are really only available AFTER THE FACT, because you have to die before they can count you.
Nowhere in my post did I even mention any “covid avoidance“ whatever you’re going on about.

You’re right, it’s very difficult to find numbers on covid deaths, which is why I used numbers that are available, which would include any covid deaths. Just trying to make a comparison to last year’s numbers, to try to get a feel for how bad this pandemic actually is. I would expect to see a greater increase YoY than what the numbers show, based on the constant fearporn.

But please, project your anxieties and anger all over me and everyone else here who would like some answers, and keep telling us how wicked awesome italia is and we’re all so dumb for not doing what you tell us to. It’s endearing.

#127 SoggyShorts on 06.30.20 at 11:37 pm

#109 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 8:45 pm

For instance, this spring I redid my driveway. All labour by me. This kept my pie as whole as possible by trading sweat for dollars, and avoiding taxes on labour, and a permit too. Last year I did the roof, material cost only, saved thousands on labour and permits/taxes. Just those two jobs saved almost 10 grand compared to farming it out.

*********************
I must admit, I find your tales of labor inspiring. If I wasn’t before your posts, I am now certainly convinced…to be a renter for life.

#128 Barb on 07.01.20 at 12:16 am

Looking the same around this town, too.
Closed, closing out, thank you to our customers, good-bye, signs.
And all that creates is MORE online shopping.

We haven’t had ANY debt for more than 20 years and have always live frugally, never carried credit card balances.

And never denied ourselves what we agree is important: good food, warm clean home, maintained and safe vehicles. Had wonderful trips all over the world, but no destination appeals to us any more if we have to get on a plane.

A simple life feels so rewarding.
Because it is.

So sorry about Dorothy’s bookstore and the coffee shop closing.

#129 pacific on 07.01.20 at 1:14 am

Re: Lithium Mining

Low impact, using existing wells and infrastructure.

Alberta Advantage.

https://www.e3metalscorp.com/

Who made Lithium mining safe for the environment?

The Canadian oil patch did.

#130 Gordon Gordonne on 07.01.20 at 1:16 am

DELETED

#131 Karlhungus on 07.01.20 at 1:28 am

Residential construction is booming in Edmonton

#132 fishman on 07.01.20 at 2:22 am

B.C. Packers quit whaling in 66/67 because they killed off all the whales on our coast. Ran out of product. In 71 I deckhanded all season in Hecate Straight, Dixon Entrance & West coast Charlottes & saw 2 whales. And those only because my skipper had been a sniper in the war & had got the job as harpooner on one the converted minesweepers they used for whaling. He spotted the blow & laid his vessel up perfectly so they passed right in front.
In 71 Greenpeace made their first voyage. That was to Amchitka to protest American nuclear testing. I remember fishing in Hecate Straight & my skipper talking on the big phone to his buddy who captained the Phyliss Cormack (a big old halibut schooner)they had renamed Greenpeace as they were just getting out of radio range leaving Dixon Entrance & entering the Gulf of Alaska.
It was a few years later that Greenpeace went after the Russian whalers. Credit where credit due. It was those guys that were the point of the spear that stopped an extinction. Paul Watson & Bob Hunter jumped on the back of a dying whale. Pretty gory, blowing frothy blood 20 ft. in the air.
Anyways cheer up bloggies. Your getting it right from the h- o- r- s- e- s mouth. There’s lots of whales on our coast now. Lots like everywhere. Well everywhere there is feed. Lots of Killer whales & Sperms driving fishermen off some of the best grounds since the Alaskans taught them how to be garbage whales. thousands of Greys go by every spring. Humpbacks homesteading all over the coast. The odd big Blue. More & more Sperms. Imagine a beast that is 70 ft. 65 tons diving alongside a 50ft. 50 ton vessel. When that might tale comes out of the water close by its a Holy Jeez ,moment.
I can see it now. The whales have driven me off. Lil potato has inflated my savings down to tea & porridge. In the twilight of my career I end up running a puker boat out to the 100 fathom edge to give a boatload of wretching puking landlubbers their Holy Jeez moment. Garth starts calling me Cap’n Ahab.

#133 jane24 on 07.01.20 at 4:09 am

Here in Britain there are now so many small empty shops that the govt announced today that all can be converted into homes WITHOUT any planning permission or zoning concerns. Conversions will just need building regulations to ensure they are safe. Small commercial landlords will be saved. Shove in a kitchen and full bathroom and sell the joint.

#134 Neo on 07.01.20 at 7:09 am

Fauci just warned of 100,000 new cases per day. Sure, no biggie. – Garth

Fauci also warned 1,000,000 Americans would die from Covid as well….I mean, they went from 30,000 a day in testing in the south on April 1st to over 200,000. They are now testing the general population instead of just health care workers and people with symptoms. That means more asymptomatic younger people who aren’t going to die.

Just a little perspective Garth. When Florida hit 9,500 cases their deaths were 37. When NY hit 9,500 cases their deaths were 800 a day because Cuomo was sending elderly from old folks homes back to the LTC and ended up infected hundreds of people. Not like Florida is full of spring chickens.

It is so unseemly of you and other Trumpers to try and justify sickness and death because of a political agenda. Go away. Forever. – Garth

#135 Do we have all the facts on 07.01.20 at 7:48 am

# 124 Leo Trollsky

What really smells of a deliberate fear mongering campaign, led by the original predictors of Armageddon, is the deliberate avoidance of any information related to comparative mortality rates between March to June 2020 and March to June 2019.

From the moment the World Health Organization circulated the International Guidelines for a Certification and Classification (Coding) of Covid 19 as a Cause of Death I began to question their motives. When UO7.1 was established as a separate classification for all deaths where the Covid 19 virus was detected at the time of death my suspicions increased.

The number of deaths being attributed to the Covid 19 virus in North America now included thousands of deaths where the primary cause of death was a serious health condition that existed long before the Covid 19 virus was ever identified.

Pneumonia triggered by the Covid 19 virus may have contributed to, or accelerated, death but the primary cause death was an underlying pre-existing condition that had seriously compromised the immune systems of individuals 65 years of age or older.

My point is that in Canada over 25,000 citizens 65 years of age or older die every month from a wide variety of causes including viral infections. In 2019 the primary cause of death was classified under an Internationally recognized system that did not include the UO7.1 Covid 19 classification.

In 2020 any death where the Covid 19 virus was detected and might have contributed to death was classified under UO7.1 and reported to the general population as a death caused by the Covid 19 virus. This created an impression that the Covid 19 virus posed a serious health threat to the general population.

A comparison of mortality rates in 2020 with mortality rates in 2019 would seem an obvious way to accurately measure the impact of the Covid 19 virus. The fact that in July 2020 our governments still seem to be avoiding such an obvious comparison worries me.

How about you?

#136 Cto on 07.01.20 at 7:48 am

As stated here a few times, some markets are seeing pent-up demand meeting low inventory. The result is predictable. It won’t last. – Garth

Come on Garth…this market, especially the Toronto market is 100% manipulated by BOC and the feds.
You made the same statement in 2010, and they turned around and held rates for the decade.
They have made it crystal clear that they will do anything to keep the housing bubble afloat!
Many believe and seem to be proven that it is the only Canadian investment that will rise and endure every storm because our tax money will always prop up the foundations.

Low rates help affordability, however with 15% unemployment and eight million on the dole plus a 12% drop in GDP, my statement holds. It will not last. But believe what you want. – Garth

#137 Another Canadian Expat on 07.01.20 at 7:52 am

Wow looks like Mr/Ms/Mrs (is that woke enough or do I need to add “cis” somewhere?) Cottagers Stay The H*ll Away!!! was right, the Canadian hotspots are apparently Lake Winnipeg and Thunder Bay lol

Makes one ponder the credibility of the sea of red in USA, and no I’m not talking about the upcoming Nov election results… ;-)

Stay safe dawgs and wash your paws!!!

#138 TurnerNation on 07.01.20 at 8:21 am

That red map. Since when is peoples’ personal health status and private health records broadcast to the world?
Who gains? The people controlling our minds.
That’s what this is about. Your new daily rituals, all people talk about. This is the new world order religion.
As our old system crumbles.
Compassion and fun has ben removed. The governments orders no singing in public in my province. People love these strict new communist protocols.

You must believe! There is a chance, maybe it says:.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/testing/serology-overview.html

“A positive test result shows you may have antibodies from an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. However, there is a chance a positive result means that you have antibodies from an infection with a virus from the same family of viruses (called coronaviruses), such as the one that causes the common cold”

Updated June 30, 2020

#139 Brett in Calgary on 07.01.20 at 8:59 am

Short answer – we don’t know. Possible answers: 1) deaths lag infections so we could just be waiting for another burst of deaths, 2) more prevalent testing means we are detecting more cases (they were always there, but we are seeing more), 3) young are primarily being infected now and they don’t die from COVID, 4) the current virus strain is weaker than earlier in the year. I tend to feel it’s a combination of these.

===============================
#121 PetertheSeparatistfromCalgary on 06.30.20 at 10:01 pm
Covid19 deaths in the USA peaked on May 6, 2020 at 2701. June 29, 2020 only 338 people died of this virus.

If cases are rising why has the number of deaths fell so dramatically?

The link below shows you a graph of number of Covid19 deaths in the USA over time. It is update frequently.

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=covid19+deaths+usa

#140 Bezengy on 07.01.20 at 9:18 am

Happy Canada Day Everyone!

2020 is 50% done….now there’s a reason to celebrate. Up here in Ontario’s far north cottage country things are busier than ever. Lots of people off work even though the mines are still going strong. Renovations everywhere and homes selling too. Downtown areas busy too yesterday, but it was the end of the month. Everyone cashing their Trudeau buck checks I guess.

#141 Dharma Bum on 07.01.20 at 9:25 am

363 Mithan

I love in winterpeg, you barely notice that things have shut down and everybody I talk too is doing fine….
——————————————————————–

You can’t kill something that’s already dead.

#142 Dharma Bum on 07.01.20 at 9:45 am

#107 Linda

Oddly enough, a virus doesn’t give a hoot about your beliefs. It just happily multiplies, infects & in this case kills without reference to race, creed, political leanings, sex or what have you.
——————————————————————–

So, in other words, the virus is an equal opportunity non-prejudicial Social Justice Warrior.

I knew the lefties were responsible for it!

#143 kingston boy on 07.01.20 at 9:47 am

***Breaking News*** In his continuing campaign against the WHO, the POTUS has asked the FBI to investigate Roger Daltrey and Pete Townsend. Asked to comment on the investigation the President said, “I just want to make sure we won’t get fooled again”. When asked a follow up question by a female CNN reporter, the President sneered, “Who are you?” On another topic, when asked to comment on the ongoing protests the President claimed that “my generation does not know how to deal with this teenage wasteland”.

#144 TurnerNation on 07.01.20 at 9:53 am

By the way, this new world order is being rolled out under the guide of ‘public health’. Guess what the don’t care about YOUR health.
Individual rights and compassion are not part of the New System. Let me give you concrete:
– They did not care you could not get preventative treatment, cancer treatment or even physio for injuries during the lock down.
– They did not care you could not get dental care. A cornerstone of overall health.
– The effects on mental heath of totalitarianism are legion. They don’t care. Your health is meaningless, you should be drugged up by Big Pharma and local Weed/Head shop anyway. The battle in this WW3 is for your head/mind.

– You are forbidden by law from hugging a relative in an old age care home. 6 feet away.
– The lockdown prevented not ONE death of old persons. Now they will die of decay and lonleiness. The New System doesn’t care

– Kids are the main target. They are making things so bad this September – masked, muzzled, 6 feet apart, no recess, no playing, no extra cirricular activities – that you will want to have them #stayhome, which is what they sold us on Day One. You will be paying full taxes for this reduced system of course.

Daycare spots are being savaged in the name of the madness known as “distancing” – the greatest social and economic weapon ever.
Parents will work from home and #stayhome.
Kids will be educated by the New World Order tech companies, schools already adopted Google Classroom.
Expect much gender and diversity programming for them.
The schools just north of GTA are closed. But the rainbow flag still was put up. Why. Have a look as you drive by . This is the most important thing in the new system.
Programming the children.

Say good bye to restaurants and bars in GTA..new mask rules are designed for the final blow. Have fun eating in a medical ward. I won’t be.
I knew bartenders who earned 6-figures over two jobs. No longer, UBI is the Maximum Wage/Income in the New System.

#145 Cottagers STAY THE HELL AWAY! on 07.01.20 at 9:55 am

DON’T COME UP HERE.

#146 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 07.01.20 at 9:55 am

#103 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 8:26 pm
#10 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 06.30.20 at 4:01 pm

In the 1840’s the price of whale oil was the equivalent today of $57 USD per GALLON. Hence, whales were hunted to the ends of the earth to fill the demand.

In 1853, a Canadian Geologist, Abraham Gesner, figured out how to distill kerosene from petroleum. The effect of his invention drove the price of whale oil down and collapsed the whaling industry.

So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the whales from extinction. The Canadian oil patch did.

You’re welcome.

————————

Where did you come up with that? Whaling for meat continued long after whale oil went out of fashion and whale were heading for extinction in the 70’s because of it. Whether Greenpeace deserves all the credit for saving them can be debated but an international moratorium on whaling was implemented with only Japan being allowed to harvest a small number for “research purposes”. If this were not done they almost certainly would be extinct today. Russia alone used to kill huge numbers just for the meat, being a relatively poor country at the time. Japan also.
+++++++

The only reason that there were any whales left for Greenpeace to save was due to the Canadian Oil Patch, which did the heavy lifting of destroying the market for whale oil by providing a cheaper, better alternative.

Without the switch to petroleum products whales would have been extinct long before Greenpeace showed up.

To give credit where due, Greenpeace stood on the shoulders of the Canadian Oil Patch to save the remaining whales, but make no mistake; without the Canadian Oil Patch whales would have been extinct long before Greepeace founders parents were born.

The Stone Age didn’t end because they ran out of rocks, they found something better to use. Likewise, the “Whale Oil Age” didn’t end because they ran out of whales. They found something better to use.

And that was petroleum. And the Canadian Oil Patch did that.

#147 Stone on 07.01.20 at 10:01 am

#104 Oakville sucks on 06.30.20 at 8:26 pm
I won’t comment as I’m sure nobody cares what I have to say in a polarized world of Right VS Left.

———

I think we can all come to a consensus and agree that Oakville sucks.

#148 Do we have all the facts on 07.01.20 at 10:03 am

#139 cto

Even if mortgage rates were reduced to absolutely zero and the repayment of debt was stretched out to the full 30 years a household would have to come up with $2.78 per month to retire every $1,000 of mortgage debt.

Additional carrying charges in most markets will exceed $450.00 per month.

What Garth is pointing out is that the number of Canadian households capable of purchasing a house at current price levels has declined substantially over the past few months. Without sustained demand house prices will fall to a level where demand will increase.

Short term activity driven by lower interest rates cannot be sustained without an increase in the average income of households looking to purchase their first home.

The current metrics support a move to lower average house prices and a decrease in demand until the average household income of prospective buyers qualifies for a mortgage. Unemployed and underemployed households will not qualify for a mortgage no matter how low the interest rate is.

Facts are facts. Wishing for government driven magic has run its course. The era of market manipulation has ended and prospective homeowners must now look reality right in the eye without the prospect of an immediate return on their “investment”.

Caution is urged.

Based on a debt service ratio of 35% a qualified household would require a minimum income of 63,000 per year.

In 2019 the median household income was slightly less than $63,000 per year which indicates that in 2020 50 % of all Canadian households would not qualify for a $500,000 mortgage even if the interest rate was 0.0%
households

#149 Looking up on 07.01.20 at 10:12 am

124 Leo Trollsky

What really smells of a deliberate fear mongering campaign, led by the original predictors of Armageddon, is the deliberate avoidance of any information related to comparative mortality rates between March to June 2020 and March to June 2019.

From the moment the World Health Organization circulated the International Guidelines for a Certification and Classification (Coding) of Covid 19 as a Cause of Death I began to question their motives. When UO7.1 was established as a separate classification for all deaths where the Covid 19 virus was detected at the time of death my suspicions increased.

The number of deaths being attributed to the Covid 19 virus in North America now included thousands of deaths where the primary cause of death was a serious health condition that existed long before the Covid 19 virus was ever identified.

Pneumonia triggered by the Covid 19 virus may have contributed to, or accelerated, death but the primary cause death was an underlying pre-existing condition that had seriously compromised the immune systems of individuals 65 years of age or older.

My point is that in Canada over 25,000 citizens 65 years of age or older die every month from a wide variety of causes including viral infections. In 2019 the primary cause of death was classified under an Internationally recognized system that did not include the UO7.1 Covid 19 classification.

In 2020 any death where the Covid 19 virus was detected and might have contributed to death was classified under UO7.1 and reported to the general population as a death caused by the Covid 19 virus. This created an impression that the Covid 19 virus posed a serious health threat to the general population.

A comparison of mortality rates in 2020 with mortality rates in 2019 would seem an obvious way to accurately measure the impact of the Covid 19 virus. The fact that in July 2020 our governments still seem to be avoiding such an obvious comparison worries me.

How about you?

———————-

What worries me is the explosion of Covid cases in the us because it was not taken seriously.

Ignore Covid 19 at your own peril.

#150 Lorne on 07.01.20 at 10:16 am

#135 fishman on 07.01.20 at 2:22 am
B.C. Packers quit whaling in 66/67 because they killed off all the whales on our coast. Ran out of product. In 71 I deckhanded all season in Hecate Straight, Dixon Entrance & West coast Charlottes & saw 2 whales. And those only because my skipper had been a sniper in the war & had got the job as harpooner on one the converted minesweepers they used for whaling. He spotted the blow & laid his vessel up perfectly so they passed right in front.
In 71 Greenpeace made their first voyage. That was to Amchitka to protest American nuclear testing. I remember fishing in Hecate Straight & my skipper talking on the big phone to his buddy who captained the Phyliss Cormack (a big old halibut schooner)they had renamed Greenpeace as they were just getting out of radio range leaving Dixon Entrance & entering the Gulf of Alaska.
It was a few years later that Greenpeace went after the Russian whalers. Credit where credit due. It was those guys that were the point of the spear that stopped an extinction. Paul Watson & Bob Hunter jumped on the back of a dying whale. Pretty gory, blowing frothy blood 20 ft. in the air.
Anyways cheer up bloggies. Your getting it right from the h- o- r- s- e- s mouth. There’s lots of whales on our coast now. Lots like everywhere. Well everywhere there is feed. Lots of Killer whales & Sperms driving fishermen off some of the best grounds since the Alaskans taught them how to be garbage whales. thousands of Greys go by every spring. Humpbacks homesteading all over the coast. The odd big Blue. More & more Sperms. Imagine a beast that is 70 ft. 65 tons diving alongside a 50ft. 50 ton vessel. When that might tale comes out of the water close by its a Holy Jeez ,moment.
I can see it now. The whales have driven me off. Lil potato has inflated my savings down to tea & porridge. In the twilight of my career I end up running a puker boat out to the 100 fathom edge to give a boatload of wretching puking landlubbers their Holy Jeez moment. Garth starts calling me Cap’n Ahab.
……
So fishman, what type of fishing did you or do you do? I can relate to your story as I did salmon trolling in the 70’s while going to university. Actually still get out sports fishing and just back from Winter Harbour….and lots of whale sightings!

#151 ain't life rand on 07.01.20 at 10:28 am

@#148 Cottagers STAY THE HELL AWAY! on 07.01.20 at 9:55 am
DON’T COME UP HERE.

SEE U SOON!

#152 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.01.20 at 10:31 am

@#127 Ace Goodheart
“This is disgusting.
Taxpayer money getting thrown around.

++++

Yep. With no parliament and no debate.

Billions of OUR dollars being tossed to the wind on Emperor Justinian’s whim ( and Proconsul Butz’s whispered advice).
WE but one of many politically correct, social justice, billion dollar, hand outs.

And the Conservatives are breathtaking in their silence.

#153 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.01.20 at 10:38 am

@#135 fishman
interesting observations.
Hopefully there will be enough food for these aging giants to eat in 100 years.

https://www.pugetsoundinstitute.org/2019/08/are-the-orcas-starving-scientists-say-its-not-that-simple/#:~:text=While%20many%20scientists%20agree%20that,inbreeding%20within%20the%20small%20population.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-461703/Whale-survives-harpoon-attack-130-years-ago-worlds-oldest-mammal.html#:~:text=A%20giant%20bowhead%20whale%20caught,more%20than%20a%20century%20ago.&text=Biologists%20claim%20the%20find%20helps,oldest%20living%20mammal%20on%20earth.

#154 JB on 07.01.20 at 10:41 am

#97 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 8:01 pm

Hey, is Trudeau lying about this contract? But, but… I thought only Trump lied? So confusing…

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/we-charity-co-founder-said-pmo-called-to-award-900m-student-grant-program-contradicting-trudeau/ar-BB16a6dE?ocid=spartan-ntp-feeds
……………………………………………………………….
All I can say is politicians!

Happy Canada Day, it may be a the last one!

#155 JB on 07.01.20 at 10:43 am

#148 Cottagers STAY THE HELL AWAY! on 07.01.20 at 9:55 am

DON’T COME UP HERE.
…………………………………………………………………….
I’m already up there, see that’s me across the lake waving the big Canadian flag at you with a beer in my hand playing some Tragically Hip Tunes. Come on over for a beer and a hug, we can be friends.

#156 TurnerNation on 07.01.20 at 10:47 am

This is what is planned . An all in one temperature scanner. With biometric facial recognition.
As I said this time communism will not be enforced by people. No by the AI.
Zero compassion. Everybody must prove their health.
Guilty otherwise. All 7 billion sheep recorded tracked. In my province the government regulates my breathing. That’s right no singing allowed in public places. Every step you take is regulated – distancing.
We are in the re-training and compliance stage

There’s no way they are giving up on this control system:
https://www.captivate.com/scan

#157 IHCTD9 on 07.01.20 at 10:48 am

#130 SoggyShorts on 06.30.20 at 11:37 pm
#109 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 8:45 pm

For instance, this spring I redid my driveway. All labour by me. This kept my pie as whole as possible by trading sweat for dollars, and avoiding taxes on labour, and a permit too. Last year I did the roof, material cost only, saved thousands on labour and permits/taxes. Just those two jobs saved almost 10 grand compared to farming it out.
*********************

I must admit, I find your tales of labor inspiring. If I wasn’t before your posts, I am now certainly convinced…to be a renter for life.

———

Yep, I ain’t lying about any of it. Just about every year there is at least one sizeable repair, upgrade, reno of some kind. I like most of the work, but not all of it.

The amount of work I’ve done to this place over the last 19 years is ridiculous. Seriously!

I’m doing all new eaves trough next week…

#158 the Jaguar on 07.01.20 at 10:56 am

+++”Eight years ago Filipe Masetti Leite saddled up and set off from the Calgary Stampede on a remarkable adventure. On July 3, 2020, his journey will be complete.

In 2012, at the Calgary Stampede’s Centennial celebration, Masetti Leite swung into the saddle and began chasing an extraordinary dream passed down from his father and inspired by the legendary long-riders of the past. He embarked on a 12 country, 25,000 km journey on horseback across North and South America, through some of the most beautiful and most challenging country on Earth. From his adopted country of Canada, Masetti Leite made his way to his native Brazil, then on to the very tip of South America, Ushuaia, Argentina.

To complete the journey and achieve his long-time goal, last year he once again set off on horseback from Alaska with the goal of returning to Calgary in time for the Stampede. After pausing for the winter months and the uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Filipe Masetti Leite is now riding his final 800 km along remote roads, headed to Calgary.

He will be a parade marshal without a parade, but that will not stop the celebration of his incredible achievement.”+++ (Calgary Exhibition and Stampede)

Covid may have the world in a full nelson, but the Stampede flags have been raised and are flying in the city. The BeeMo Kid’s Pancake Breakfast will still be held on a drive through set up. And corn dogs and mini donuts are still available from the food trucks. ( maybe bring your personal defibrillator with you).
And the fireworks will still happen at 11:00 pm. Higher and bigger than before, for the whole city enjoy.

You can’t kill the Stampede spirit. It’s been a tradition for more than 100 years. When Felipe arrives we’ll be ready to welcome him. We won’t let him down.

#159 Sail Away on 07.01.20 at 11:02 am

And, sadly, Cirque du Soleil files for bankruptcy protection.

#160 slam on 07.01.20 at 11:31 am

#9 House Lust on 06.30.20 at 3:59 pm

This blog has a tendency to make you think logically, especially with real estate. Next is a balanced portfolio.

#161 Had my own Holy Jeez moment ... on 07.01.20 at 11:34 am

fishman
Imagine a beast that is 70 ft. 65 tons diving alongside a 50ft. 50 ton vessel. When that might tale comes out of the water close by its a Holy Jeez ,moment.

once while a bud and I were salmon fishing off of Tsawwassen in a 12 foot aluminum. Looked to the south (American waters) and saw a pod of orcas heading right for us. They never turned and surfaced all around our yacht and just continued on in a straight line. Holy Jeez was an understatement.

#162 kc on 07.01.20 at 11:39 am

Happy Can-Covid-Day …

No fireworks, No street parties of old, No beer gardens, No Parades, No kids standing shoulder to shoulder singing proud our national anthem.

Welcome to the “NEW NORMAL” this is what we have to look forward to for the next 5 years.

Contact Tracing, Social Distancing, Mask Wearing, Temperature Checks, Vaccine Mandatory, Daily Updates, Scare Tactics of Death & Infection, Tax Dollars Wasted (and never a cure), Celebrating Front Line Workers (for doing their job).

Store Closures, Pub & Restaurant No Go Zones, Fear Your Neighbor, Report Your Neighbor.

Propaganda Machine Running 24/7, Just Flatten the Curve …

HAPPY CANADA DAY …

#163 Ronaldo on 07.01.20 at 11:59 am

#124 Leo Trollstoy on 06.30.20 at 11:07 pm
Covid cases are BS stats used to get media their eyeballs and ad revenue

More testing = more cases

No testing = no cases

Cases = red herring to scare sheepl
————————————————————–
Current update on Covid 19 in B.C.

174 deaths of a total tested of 193,752.
.09% death rate.

Since January 1st. 183 days, 174 deaths.
.95 deaths per day.

https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/a6f23959a8b14bfa989e3cda29297ded

#164 Phylis on 07.01.20 at 12:01 pm

#160 IHCTD9 on 07.01.20 at 10:48 am Side question, i found some old buckets of driveway sealer (unopened) in the back corner of the garage from previous owner. Prob atleast 10 years old. Any idea if they are still good? (Figured you might know off the top of your head) thx.

#165 Mr Canada on 07.01.20 at 12:11 pm

AC announced yesterday the “indefinite” cancellation of 30 domestic flights primarily to the Maritimes and between cities like Halifax and Moncton. Unknown to most people, tens of thousands of Americans and many in Canada are still flying domestically yet our science “experts” have done ZERO analysis on the probability of spreading COVID-19 via Air Travel. This should be a national priority to provide confidence and peace of mind to Canadians and for the benefit of our economy yet the mushy media continues to ask soft ball questions to our politicians and so called health “experts”. Shameful.

#166 Looking up on 07.01.20 at 12:20 pm

This is what is planned . An all in one temperature scanner. With biometric facial recognition.
As I said this time communism will not be enforced by people. No by the AI.
Zero compassion. Everybody must prove their health.
Guilty otherwise. All 7 billion sheep recorded tracked. In my province the government regulates my breathing. That’s right no singing allowed in public places. Every step you take is regulated – distancing.
We are in the re-training and compliance stage

There’s no way they are giving up on this control system:
https://www.captivate.com/scan

——————————

Actually it’s aliens. Those damn aliens.

#167 whiplash on 07.01.20 at 12:22 pm

#165 kc

Happy Can-Covid-Day….

No fireworks….

Where I live fireworks was eliminated a number of years ago by the Trudeauites, might scare the animals,
I guess the cracks of thunder that shake the house to the foundation and can last up to an hour or more don’t count.

#168 Don Guillermo on 07.01.20 at 12:26 pm

#162 Sail Away on 07.01.20 at 11:02 am
And, sadly, Cirque du Soleil files for bankruptcy protection.
****************************************
Must of been the clowns that did them in …

********************************************
#10 Greenpeace Never Saved the Whales on 06.30.20 at 4:01 pm
In the 1840’s the price of whale oil was the equivalent today of $57 USD per GALLON. Hence, whales were hunted to the ends of the earth to fill the demand.
In 1853, a Canadian Geologist, Abraham Gesner, figured out how to distill kerosene from petroleum. The effect of his invention drove the price of whale oil down and collapsed the whaling industry.
So, it is very true to say that Greenpeace did not save the whales from extinction. The Canadian oil patch did.
You’re welcome
***********************************
And now, those same whales hate the double hauled oil tankers while loving the huge cruise ships, ferries and freighters loaded up with coal. Ungrateful ba$tard$!

#169 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.01.20 at 12:39 pm

Trump.

Worst President ever……..

https://nationalpost.com/news/world/trumps-calls-with-world-leaders-including-trudeau-are-so-bad-that-his-advisers-consider-him-a-security-risk-report/wcm/abe470b8-38ac-4141-95f3-d3d92c9c9e53/

#170 Sail Away on 07.01.20 at 12:54 pm

#171 Don Guillermo on 07.01.20 at 12:26 pm
#162 Sail Away on 07.01.20 at 11:02 am

And, sadly, Cirque du Soleil files for bankruptcy protection.

————-

Must of been the clowns that did them in …

————-

Haha- yep. Bunch of clowns trying to run a business…

#171 JUST LQQKING on 07.01.20 at 1:46 pm

#109 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 8:45 pm
For instance, this spring I redid my driveway. All labour by me
Last year I did the roof, material cost only, saved thousands on labour and permits/taxes
——————
How did you re-do your driveway?…pavers…concrete…asphalt…gravel?…or did you just roll 5gal of sealer on?
the roof on an average house is about 20 sq….so the labour on that would we around $2000…there are no permits req’d…and you would have to pay the sales tax at home depot same as everyone else…saving around $10,000 on those 2 items is a stretch?

#172 Don Guillermo on 07.01.20 at 1:54 pm

#170 whiplash on 07.01.20 at 12:22 pm
#165 kc
Happy Can-Covid-Day….
No fireworks….
Where I live fireworks was eliminated a number of years ago by the Trudeauites, might scare the animals,
I guess the cracks of thunder that shake the house to the foundation and can last up to an hour or more don’t count.

*****************************************
Here is a video of some serious fireworks. It happens in Mazatlán Mx every year during carnival and represents a re enactment of an 1864 naval battle against a French invasion. Animals be damned!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Faa2-BEYYM

#173 Sail Away on 07.01.20 at 2:54 pm

#172 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.01.20 at 12:39 pm
Trump.

Worst President ever……..

————-

I don’t put a lot of stock in opinion pieces with anonymous sources. Just saying.

Can you imagine if Trump sole-sourced $900M (x10 for US, so let’s say $9B)? All media heads would explode.

#174 maxx on 07.01.20 at 2:58 pm

@ #14

About a month ago, I went into a pharmacy which was truly making it up as they went along. Management at this place are not the swiftest at the best of times.

“You can’t wear gloves, you must take them off!” I did a 180-degree turn stating very clearly so that other patrons could hear: “out of the question!!”. Within days, this idiotic policy had magically changed.

Stupid businesses treat people badly. Smart ones take this golden opportunity to position themselves for the long run.

One bank grills you as to your motives for having the nerve to turn up in person, followed by the standard textbook lecture on doing internet banking. I give the gargoyle at the door all sorts of reasons that are impossible to do on the internet to get rid of it and then carry on as I wish. Yet another, the red bank, is a total dream to deal with. Welcome! No, or very little waiting, smiles all around. What a complete and utter contrast.

#175 unbalanced on 07.01.20 at 2:58 pm

Phylis @ 167. The sealer should be good. Just stir it up throughly

#176 Crazed and a liitle confused on 07.01.20 at 3:23 pm

To poster #22 aw
My heart goes out to you. Its a tough market out there. My research complex . Did not renew 2 contracts of techs here. They are also unemployed as of june 30.
Take care and good luck

#177 Jane fincher on 07.01.20 at 3:39 pm

Back in 2003 we got a you know what moment. We got rid of our second car, we paid cash for a brand new car in 2006 which is still working in good condition 14 years later and modest $6,000 repairs over these 14 years, no more leasing cars, we both quit smoking, we don’t eat out anymore and we shop for groceries, deals and cook everything at home now, we do all our home repairs, home maintenance, we got rid of our cable and satellite service, we got rid of our mutual funds and other high fee investments, bank accounts, low interest paying GIC’s, accounts, we don’t go on vacation which we used to go at least 2 times a year, we got rid of our aeroplan and other pointless miles, points cards, credit cards and we only have one credit card because of certain items we need to buy as we have no choice to use it.

We did all this because our cheap employers and cheap banks did not want to pay a higher decent wage, benefits, interest for our hard work, expertise, skills and savings. It is a good thing too because we calculated everything and it even shocked us.

It was $675,645.23 over 17 years. This is just our savings from all this stuff we really don’t need now we realized it after 14 years. It also generated $466,124.16 interest over that time too. This stuff is all done on our spreadsheets so it is easily referred to and calculated. It should of been at least double that at the very least if the moneymasters in the world were not so cheap. We both got laid off in summer 2018 so we made a really great move to save ourselves. We have no debts and we just live off our RRSP’s interest only and long term bonds interest, max out our TFSA’s.

I am glad we can live off only $16,500 a year and next year as our C.P.P. comes in we both turn 60, early, reduced but who cares, they must pay now as we paid for 36 years, we will have $1,156 a month coming in.

This means our monthly savings will be boosted from $2,100 a month to $3,000 a month into monthly savings even if we just leave it and never invest, put in something again. If they are cheap, we have became and will stay cheap. What is good for the gander is good for the goose.

#178 Phylis on 07.01.20 at 6:58 pm

#178 unbalanced on 07.01.20 at 2:58 pm Thx much!

#179 Keith in Rio on 07.02.20 at 1:01 pm

DELETED

#180 Mrs Fool on 07.02.20 at 1:37 pm

Thank you Garth and Dorothy for making this land a great place to live (not to mention Bandit huge contribution ;)
The lockdown was particularly hectic and stressful for me, but I always found in your blog the spark I needed to keep going.
Bonne Fête!