The rethink

Covid log date 6.29.20.

It’s now been more than a hundred days since the giant office towers emptied into the Bay Street canyon below, as furloughed workers scurried furtively underground. Their last subway ride. For many, the final time rubbing shoulder-to-shoulder against a stranger. Without a mask. At that moment they were employees for whom ‘going to work’ had meant, well, going to work. Not going home.

But that was then. The changes since have been breathtaking. This week came more signals the world these souls knew, so distant back in February, is kaput – or soon to be. Witness the following words, part of a memo sent to the worker bees of a major financial outfit with offices in the cores of most big Canadian metropolises.

The question is: can we be effective at work without needing to be in the office all the time? Based on how the last few months have gone, the answer is a resounding yes. Looking ahead, my hope is to build an environment for my team that incorporates some of the flexibility we have gotten used to into the post-pandemic work world, whenever that arrives. Think in terms of a greater emphasis on results and output rather than evaluating people by their presence in the office or the hours that they work.

Can you imagine the big poohbah telling you that six months ago? Offices are optional. Hours uncounted. Remote is fine. Flex is the new religion. Stay in your skivvies, if you want, but remember to dress above the waist for Zoom. Results matter. No need to haul your butt downtown. Ever, maybe.

This all makes perfect sense for corporations. Dump the office overhead. Pare down the infrastructure. Let people stay at home and buy their own hand sanitizer. The bottom line actually gets fatter. Employees are less stressed. Child care issues resolved. The dog loves it. No commute. No traffic. No smelly transit buddies. No deathly elevators. Just a thick web of IT people hanging it all together. Yes, they work from home, too.

So will Covid turn out to be a long-term employment game-changer, for both corps and the folks who toil for them? If so, big ripples. Downtown cores, somewhat depopulated of commuters, will not sustain the thousands of small businesses who located there solely to suck off the foot traffic. Falafel and sushi booths, dry cleaners, dental clinics, office supply stores, and endless retail outlets, many located in the underground pathways that used to be clogged with people in business attire.

Urban condos? The impact could be huge over time. Fewer jobs in the canyon, so why would you compromise paying hundreds of thousands to live in 500 square feet of concrete? And besides making high-rise lifts totally terrifying, the virus is impacting the entire market. “The pandemic health concerns, coupled with reduced employment and hiring activity, has resulted in less immigration and reduced in-migration into the GTA,” says a report from Rentals.ca. “These consequences of the pandemic have significantly reduced rental demand at the same time as supply is increasing via short-term rentals and high-rise apartment completions.”

Meanwhile Airbnb has collapsed, throwing a ton of units on the market and depressing rents. “I live and own a downtown Toronto condo,” writes Greg.

A recent Toronto Star article stated my building was Airbnb’s 3 biggest revenue source for a single building. Since the state of emergency was declared short term rentals have been banned. The operations of the building, lobbies, concierge desk, elevators and common spaces have dramatically improved since, this building as I imagine most condo buildings were not designed to be hotels. The current state of the building is 46 units for sale, 146 for rent. The management office recently issued a memo saying to expect delays when registering new tenants due to the high volume.

Covid has also put the ice on immigration, while Ontario (and BC) still have an anti-foreigner buyer tax – which doesn’t look so genius anymore. And guess what happens when the pandemic eases and the Landlord/Tenant board gets back into operation, allowing owners to punt all those scuzzy renters who stopped paying? More supply on the market. Already rents are falling as available rental listings overwhelm demand. Rents are about 3.5% less than a year ago, and declining monthly.

And then there’s this: the pandemic flight to the boonies. Why pay $2.4 million for an okay house in mid-town Toronto (to have a 20 minute drive downtown) when you can get a mini-mansion for half that amount in Kingston, Grimsby or Kitchener – and work remotely? Why pay $800,000 for a 750-foot, two-bedroom condo on the 34th floor of a teeming downtown hi-rise when that will buy you a townhouse with a garage and an actual backyard in Burlington or Ajax?

It’s already happening, say the realtors. Sales in Halton are up 22% and in Durham by 8%, while falling 13% in Toronto. Same seems to be occurring in YVR, as activity flourishes in the Fraser Valley, on the Island and in the OK. It’s taking place in the States, too, as more New Yorkers and Bostonians head for the burbs.

After all, if you have to work from home, then home should be, like, awesome.

Bosses who talk nice to you, and valid reasons to ditch urbanity. Plus you can hide behind a designer mask. Nice work, bug.

177 comments ↓

#1 some guy on 06.29.20 at 3:09 pm

The city has been a bit nicer lately. No drunk out of towners, angry commuters, or lost tourists. The only people left are those that actually live here. As a result, there is more of a sense of community and laid back feeling I’ve been finding.

#2 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 3:09 pm

>The Re-Think.

On Behalf Of Environmentalists, I Apologize For The Climate Scare
June 29, 2020

THE AUTHOR IN MARANHÃO, BRAZIL, 1995

On behalf of environmentalists everywhere, I would like to formally apologize for the climate scare we created over the last 30 years. Climate change is happening. It’s just not the end of the world. It’s not even our most serious environmental problem.

I may seem like a strange person to be saying all of this. I have been a climate activist for 20 years and an environmentalist for 30.

But as an energy expert asked by Congress to provide objective expert testimony, and invited by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to serve as Expert Reviewer of its next Assessment Report, I feel an obligation to apologize for how badly we environmentalists have misled the public.

Here are some facts few people know:

Humans are not causing a “sixth mass extinction”

The Amazon is not “the lungs of the world”

Climate change is not making natural disasters worse

Fires have declined 25% around the world since 2003

The amount of land we use for meat — humankind’s biggest use of land — has declined by an area nearly as large as Alaska

The build-up of wood fuel and more houses near forests, not climate change, explain why there are more, and more dangerous, fires in Australia and California

Carbon emissions are declining in most rich nations and have been declining in Britain, Germany, and France since the mid-1970s

Adapting to life below sea level made the Netherlands rich not poor

We produce 25% more food than we need and food surpluses will continue to rise as the world gets hotter

Habitat loss and the direct killing of wild animals are bigger threats to species than climate change

Wood fuel is far worse for people and wildlife than fossil fuels

Preventing future pandemics requires more not less “industrial” agriculture

I know that the above facts will sound like “climate denialism” to many people. But that just shows the power of climate alarmism.

In reality, the above facts come from the best-available scientific studies, including those conducted by or accepted by the IPCC, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and other leading scientific bodies….

http://environmentalprogress.org/big-news/2020/6/29/on-behalf-of-environmentalists-i-apologize-for-the-climate-scare

#3 Captain Uppa on 06.29.20 at 3:14 pm

I have a family member who works for TD in downtown Toronto. He hasn’t had to work there since late March. He believes that they will have people return to the core. When I told him that I find it doubtful (as per Garth’s points), he refuses to believe it.

Me thinks he doesn’t want to be home lol.

#4 El Presidente on 06.29.20 at 3:14 pm

Now that is one fine looking deplorable.. a winner.

#5 Captain Uppa on 06.29.20 at 3:15 pm

Hey Garth, how does this bode for the inner burbs? I’m talking the likes of Etobicoke where prices are incredibly high.

#6 Theyounggreek on 06.29.20 at 3:18 pm

Working from home is great when the world is shutdown. What happens when the next Olympic Games, World Cup, world juniors, march madness, kids summer holidays roll around. I’m skeptical that productivity will remain high.

#7 jal on 06.29.20 at 3:22 pm

Those who can sell what they have can buy in the burg.
First timers, are few, who can afford to pay +3 time income.

#8 Dolce Vita on 06.29.20 at 3:24 pm

Some good news from StatCan:

Building permits, May 2020
The total value of building permits issued by Canadian municipalities in May bounced back 20.2% to $7.4 billion, following declines of 13.4% in March and 15.4% in April.

Though, they don’t segment the Residential data as:

“The Boonies”
“High Rise DT Concrete Condo COVID Petri Dishes, 500 sq. ft.”

Not all municipalities though. Immortal Infographic 1 map of the country:

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/200629/g-a001-eng.htm

#9 CraigFranz on 06.29.20 at 3:28 pm

It will not work. They won’t be able to afford even $800,000 houses either. Consumers are up their eyeballs in debt and just property taxes and mortgage payments of $4,000 a month with even 2.0% to 2.3% mortgage rates.

By the way, $4,000 a month is before taxes, C.P.P., E.I etc. is deducted from paychecks of $5,500 to $6,000. What about car loan debt, credit card debt, personal loan debt, payday loan debt etc. It is going to be an ugly next 3-5 years for sure.

Don’t forget house insurance, CMHC premiums, car insurance, car repairs, car and house maintenance, food, clothing and other expenses and cost of living, inflation increases.

#10 Dolce Vita on 06.29.20 at 3:36 pm

Some bad news from DivorceMagazine.com:

“We’re getting daily calls from people who aren’t used to having their spouse around 24-7, saying they’ve ‘had it’ and ‘want out’ of their marriage immediately,”

…says Toronto family lawyer, Barry Nussbaum of Nussbaum Family Law (also says his firm is experiencing a 20 per cent increase in inquiries).

So, I’m thinking some people will want to go back to the DT core to work after all…maybe even end up living there…alone.

#11 Trojan House on 06.29.20 at 3:39 pm

Anecdotally, I had a neighbour tell me that his company would not be returning to their office space and that they were going to give it up as all their employees could work from home. I don’t know the size of the company he works for or how many employees they have…

“Child care issues resolved.” I don’t think so, especially in Ontario where the it looks like part-time schooling will happen come the fall. This means that at least one parent will have to be home to provide childcare and the younger your kids are, the more care they need so kiss at least one day goodbye from working productively. I know it’s happening right now – my boss is constantly interrupted by her two year old!

Also, my wife works in daycare and they are allowed only so many kids at the centre due to the restrictions. Unless these are lifted, more kids will be at home so see above.

#12 Penny Henny on 06.29.20 at 3:41 pm

My wife and I were at the Niagara on the lake outlet mall today and was surprised at the length of the line ups to get into some of the stores. It’s a weekday. I can’t imagine what it would be like on a weekend.

Wait, wait and wait in line some more then you can enter the shop and look around and then off to the next shop where you wait in line again. It kinda reminded me of Canada’s Wonderland.
Spend the day and go on/into maybe 7 rides/shops.

Noticed that 30-40% of the stores are still closed even though they were allowed to open weeks ago.

One clothing store’s policy was you can’t touch any of the merchandise, if you would like a better look the staff will pick it up and display it for you. They tried to make this appealing by suggesting it was like having a personal shopper. We walked right out.

Another store said you were allowed to come in for 30 minutes but you couldn’t try anything on. Whatever.

#13 Penny Henny on 06.29.20 at 3:43 pm

Oh and another thing.
Stay the heck away from Welland this weekend, go to someone’s cottage instead.

#14 Lee on 06.29.20 at 3:44 pm

#10 Dolce Vita,

I blame lack of sports on TV. Marriages only work if men can watch sports at night.

#15 Michael King on 06.29.20 at 3:45 pm

Re: #2. Here is another view of climate disruption. Science is hard!
https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/06/29/arctic-heat-overwhelms-green-infighting-issues/

#16 Was telling my better half ... on 06.29.20 at 3:48 pm

the other day that the traffic here in 604 is like it was 40 years ago. I will actually drive into the big smoke now rather than take the transit for a day trip. Gas has almost doubled in price from it’s low though … I’m liking it.

#17 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 3:48 pm

If I did not have a paid off place, I would not be convinced as yet to buy far away from the city center hoping that my boss would be willing to let people work remotely for perpetuity. Once this is all over, they can just as easily rescind the online work variance and then one would have a long commute back into the city. Best to stay put, and wait until the dust settles. Much easier to buy a place than to get rid of it once the company changes its views.

#18 Do we have all the facts on 06.29.20 at 3:52 pm

Remember when Canada actually manufactured things like furniture, appliances and farm machinery. Then companies discovered that the cost of manufacturing in other countries increased profits.

The chatter about Canadians working from home and connecting on line got me wondering how long it might be before there was a shift to employing workers in foreign lands to perform tasks on line. Why pay $80,000 per year plus benefits if you the same work can be purchased for $30 or $40,000 per year without benefits.

Will our government have to place restrictions on the use of foreign workers? Will Canadian based companies be allowed to move a significant portion of their operations to less expensive jurisdictions?

you better start swimmin
Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a changin

Where should we start swimming to Bobby, we need your guidance?

#19 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 3:54 pm

Will the empty cities with their devil may care attitude towards budgets have any money left for employee pensions?
Will the empty Universities bereft of foreign cash cow students have any money left for university employee pensions?
Will the feds actually cut govt staff when the recession hits and tax revenue plummets?
Will Trudeau be burned in effigy by 10’s of thousands of CERB recipients?

Only the Actuaries know for certain.

#20 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 4:05 pm

Will the empty Universities bereft of foreign cash cow students have any money left for university employee pensions?
——————
Not empty by any means, as with top schools in Canada all they need to do is go down the waiting list a little bit for local students with slightly lower grades… and I mean slightly. Short of funds with the tuition differential is a given, but we are not as bad off as in Australia which was way more reliant on international fees than the universities in Canada. Given that it is challenging to get a job now for the 18–22 year old group, and there is no use in considering doing a gap year to volunteer in Africa or travel, top universities in Canada will be just as packed in the fall as before, even with the online education.

#21 Dave on 06.29.20 at 4:09 pm

THere are 40 cases of Covid in one hi rise building downtown. Apparently there were some suites being rented through Air B and B. Why anyone would want to come to Calgary for any reason other than work or relatives beats me, but this underscores the demise of Air B and B…Note that we won’t see a drop off in international students thank to Trudoh, giving international students a $2000 check every month because of Covid. Nice that he’s got Canadian’s best interests at heart.

#22 Andrewski on 06.29.20 at 4:20 pm

Republicans rethink?

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/us-election-2020/trumps-growing-re-election-threat-republican-skeptics/ar-BB165QQi?li=AAggNb9

#23 D Apostrophe on 06.29.20 at 4:23 pm

I’ve been working around the world.. reporting to my directors in LA and NYC for 15+ years now. Not so hard for us highly skilled workers as we created this paradigm. Glad it works for the rest as well. You realize quickly what a waste all that travel time is.

#24 tbone on 06.29.20 at 4:25 pm

# 17 yvr
You have a valid point as my former employer is bringing
back the sales guys into the office after they were working from home for 2 years .
It appears that the inside staff did not have anyone to mentor them .

#25 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at 4:29 pm

For years I worked in a local government bureaucracy.
Good article below: unconstrained leadership, ideology and bureaucratic cowardice causing bad outcomes.

Who Killed more: Hitler-Stalin or Mao?
https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/05/who-killed-more-hitler-stalin-or-mao/

– leaders protecting themselves and their policies
– underlings taking no risk and saying nothing
– everyone recognizing the fiasco but powerless to stop it

I saw all of this in my career.

It is a bit scary how much damage can be done by just unintended consequences.
Likely the same formula for our federal governments ”Phoenix Project”

#26 Bob on 06.29.20 at 4:32 pm

Why pay $800,000 for a 750-foot, two-bedroom condo on the 34th floor of a teeming downtown hi-rise when that will buy you a townhouse with a garage and an actual backyard in Burlington or Ajax?

Better question: why pay $800,000 for a low-end living space at all when it’s 10 times the median household income and therefore absurdly overpriced?

#27 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 4:35 pm

@#20 yvr lurker
“the waiting list a little bit for local students with slightly lower grade”
+++

Local students don’t pay as much as foreign students for tuition hence my “cash cow” comment.

http://uwimprint.ca/article/the-real-reasons-why-international-students-pay-higher-tuition-fees/

Foreign student Tuition fees can be double, triple , even quadruple what a local student would pay.
Cash cows

#28 baloney Sandwitch on 06.29.20 at 4:35 pm

I think this work from home thing is stupid.
People who work in close knit teams will whup the remote retards. Its still a competitive world.

#29 Devil Anse on 06.29.20 at 4:39 pm

The work-from-home movement is appreciated by office workers not only to save on the commute, but also because white collar workspaces have become insufferably crowded open office hell holes. I last worked in one such place from 2008 to 2014. I got to know everything about my depressed middle-aged spinster pod-neighbour, who emoted on the phone daily to her friends about her sad, sexless life. I asked my ‘manager’ to move me repeatedly as her negativity and bad vibes were having an adverse affect on my productivity. I now work from home and sometimes have to travel to Toronto, but only once made the mistake of getting an AirBnb at the Ice Condos. I think I was on the 57th floor or something. Elevator line-ups, creepy people walking around, and a cigar store Indian for a security guard pretending all the people walking in and out were not short term renters. (Can I still say that?…sorry).

#30 Asterix1 on 06.29.20 at 4:42 pm

For those venturing to the GTA burbs, you will soon realize that prices are already too high for what you get! Not worth it (or anywhere in GTA)

https://www.finder.com/ca/cost-of-city-living

This grotesque housing bubble has removed much of the discount that you should be getting between buying in the core vs the burbs.

At the end of the day, prices will keep falling in the burbs, mid-town and the core. The peak was reached a few years ago, nothing but down. Unless you actually believe RE cartel stats and buckets of lies…

#31 Oracle of Ottawa on 06.29.20 at 4:42 pm

I think the potential was already there…working from home. Too many jobs require you to sit at a computer all day in a office. It doesn’t make sense when you can do the same thing at home. Imagine less traffic, less pollution and happier workers. There is a silver lining in all this. However downtown prices may see some downside for now, but there will be equilibrium. It will by the younger people who crave close proximities to bars and restaurants and the night life that goes with it. Since many don’t drive anymore.

#32 mitzerboyakaQueencitykidd on 06.29.20 at 4:44 pm

DELETED

#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at 4:46 pm

#18 Do we have all the facts on 06.29.20 at 3:52 pm

Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians.
Give it about five years for the systems to be established and standards of remote work performance understood and you will see the next leg up in Global Wage Arbitrage targeting White Collar work.

7.8 Billion competitors for your job soon, Welcome to the mega trend of a World Standard of living, much lower than what Canadians aver typically enjoyed.

Advice to the young; Get a Government job, a Trade or start an innovative business – ASAP.

#34 no blog for old men on 06.29.20 at 4:55 pm

both my wife and i are back at our dwntwn offices as of mid july. lots of arbitrary rule in place to go along with it sadly.

#35 Dee on 06.29.20 at 4:56 pm

Garth do you think we will see any companies (big or small ) file lawsuits against our federal or provincial governments for the destruction caused to their companies by government actions ? I am asking your thoughts because I have seen CEOs writing open letters and taking out newspaper ads etc.

#36 Camille on 06.29.20 at 4:58 pm

Skip, skip, skip… To forecast the future it’s best not to rely on the present so much. Everyone working from home, in the countryside is a fantasy. Wait and see.

I don’t recall a reference to ‘everybody’ being at home or bucolic. If only 20% change, the consequences could be profound. Exaggeration weakens your point. – Garth

#37 T on 06.29.20 at 5:18 pm

#28 baloney Sandwitch on 06.29.20 at 4:35 pm
I think this work from home thing is stupid.
People who work in close knit teams will whup the remote *******. Its still a competitive world.

—————

You don’t have to be together in the same room or the same floor to be a ‘close knit team’.

There is a lot of productivity to be gained when you can just click a button to be face-to-face with colleagues rather than finding a free room or space to discuss – and having the materials to be discussed right in front of you for real-time collaboration.

Poor choice of language, btw.

#38 Linda on 06.29.20 at 5:22 pm

The post Covid work world may indeed be very different. However the work from home benefits silver cloud will be offset by some rather nasty black clouds. For instance: child care. Oh, you work from home so child care is not an issue? If you are the only parent at home or a single parent, it will indeed be an issue. A small child isn’t going to patiently wait until the parent has finished their work related business. They will make one big fuss if they have to wait ‘forever’ to get a response. For the inexperienced, ‘forever’ is usually under a minute in duration before meltdown/catastrophe. Worse, they won’t wait & do whatever they think will fix the issue. Let me say that a certain kind of quiet is cause for experienced parental alarm, since it almost always means the child or children are doing something they KNOW will elicit parental disapproval. Said ‘something’ could easily involve an emergency trip to the local hospital/clinic or emergency services arriving at your door.

Second, as pointed out in today’s post many small businesses depend on all that foot traffic to operate. So they will have to relocate to where the action is – local neighborhood strip malls – but may simply fold due to the cost of revamping the business model to suit the new reality. Meanwhile, the local municipality is seeing a tremendous black hole of missing tax revenues. Guess what happens to residential taxes? Our own local councillor shared that our municipality anticipates a shortfall of some $300 million by end of year 2020 from Covid fallout. That is on top of a business tax revenue shortfall of roughly $300 million. Residential taxes had already increased quite substantially to our local Council shifted more of the burden to homeowners (can’t tax what isn’t there any longer).

Now add in things like salary reductions for those who are deemed to be living in lower cost of living locales – even as taxes must increase to offset the loss of business tax revenue without an increase in actual service offered – AND don’t forget to factor in an abrupt increase in the cost to purchase in those formerly ‘affordable’ locales as demand outstrips supply. Plus, who on earth is going to purchase the vacated downtown RE? Kind of difficult to buy if you can’t sell what you already have & especially if you have to sell at a loss in order to get out from under.

#39 WTF on 06.29.20 at 5:26 pm

#20 Tell that to Dalhousie, 50M (as in Million) shortfall in operating budget 2020

https://www.sootoday.com/global-news/dalhousie-university-could-see-a-loss-of-50m-in-upcoming-academic-year-2516877

Pension Liability OF Dal in 2017 was 270 Million!

https://cdn.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/dept/pension/Pension%20Valuation%20as%20of%20March%2031,%202017.pdf

Pretty Sure many Universities/Govts are in a similar position. 2017 Dal had full enrollment (before the pesky virus) still ran deficits, dropping the entrance requirements to ensure full attendance as you suggest wont really help much, Unless tuition quadruples.

Dal is already hacking but at the periphery, major surgery is required to fix the problem, I suspect it is similar with Govt at all levels. Spending like drunken sailors but no attention to the incremental deficits that have been piling up till it reaches a crisis.(Vancouver?) There will be a reckoning and it wont be pretty .

#40 Give Your A Shake on 06.29.20 at 5:36 pm

The last time the real estate market had a massive crash in TO was 1989. Many of the Gen Zee real estate mogul class were still in diapers. Everything has a time and place and markets self correct all the time. Tick Tock….

#41 AM in MN on 06.29.20 at 5:39 pm

It’s too soon to know the true amount of change/disruption this thing will cause.

People are people though, and if companies are going to engage in complex projects that include large technical/commercial/legal challenges, then people need to get together in person from time to time. There is no other way around it.

I have many times travelled to Europe or farther for a 2hr. meeting to save the hassle of going back and forth for 6 months to get everyone to understand everyone else. The conferences and tradeshows will need to start up again if business is to move forward. Need to be able to go to in-person project meetings, there isn’t a way around this.

In the US, the move to the suburbs and farther will be long lasting and based on personal safety. Even many of the white liberals who caused all this mess are trying to flee it. Talk to any real estate agent, or sold out gun dealer, it’s real.

Canada should be spared the worst of the craziness. People will always want to live near the transportation hubs or the waterfront though.

#42 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 5:41 pm

Wanna see an outraged wife point a gun at the back of her husbands head while screaming at BLM protesters?

Watch her walk BEHIND her husband with her handgun(finger on the trigger) and point it at the back of his head.

https://www.kmov.com/couple-points-guns-at-protesters-who-marched-to-mayor-krewsons-home-sunday/video_5b5f40d0-3636-5bd4-a4be-ef30632d1229.html

Unbelievable …….Darwin Award contender…….

#43 Mr Fundamental on 06.29.20 at 5:42 pm

This is just crazy talk, isn’t it?

“Think in terms of a greater emphasis on results and output rather than evaluating people by their presence in the office or the hours that they work.”

Why are we so hesitant to emphasize results and output? Somebody’s feelings might get hurt if we do, so we should probably avoid it.

#44 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 5:43 pm

#39

—————-
Dal had problems long before Covid. Have you counted the number of universities in Nova Scotia? Way too many for the population size

https://novascotia.ca/lae/HigherEducation/documents/Summary_from_the_Report_on_the_Higher_Education_System_in_Nova_Scotia.pdf

This is the essence of the problem. I was referring to UBC, UA, UT, McGill, Waterloo etc.. the top schools. Revenue shortfall for sure, but slightly lower entrance criteria for local kids who were usually the ones on the waiting list will guarantee a full slate in the fall. In BC, the “universities” ordained by Christy clark a few years ago (Kwantlen, Capilano etc..) where there is no engineering, no law, etc… may be the ones who are more impacted.

#45 Stone on 06.29.20 at 5:45 pm

#28 baloney Sandwitch on 06.29.20 at 4:35 pm
I think this work from home thing is stupid.
People who work in close knit teams will whup the remote retards. Its still a competitive world.

———

You can think whatever you like. Working from home is great. So is the 6 figure salary that goes with it. I remember when I did the occasional GO Train trip into Toronto or back out. The people looked wonderful. Definition of wonderful would be hollow eyed, downcast, overweight, unhealthy, broken-souled, pathetic, desperate and unfashionable. Are you wonderful?

Yeah, The remote workers are the retards. Lol

#46 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 5:47 pm

oops wrong vid.

https://globalnews.ca/news/7119784/ken-karen-st-louis-protesters-guns/

#47 Don Guillermo on 06.29.20 at 5:55 pm

Todays photo is priceless! Love it.

I’m retired now but used to absolutely love working downtown. Alas, times have changed. I totally agree with #33 dogman01 below on this:

#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at 4:46 pm

Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians.
Give it about five years for the systems to be established and standards of remote work performance understood and you will see the next leg up in Global Wage Arbitrage targeting White Collar work.
7.8 Billion competitors for your job soon …

#48 Stone on 06.29.20 at 5:56 pm

#29 Devil Anse on 06.29.20 at 4:39 pm
The work-from-home movement is appreciated by office workers not only to save on the commute, but also because white collar workspaces have become insufferably crowded open office hell holes. I last worked in one such place from 2008 to 2014. I got to know everything about my depressed middle-aged spinster pod-neighbour, who emoted on the phone daily to her friends about her sad, sexless life. I asked my ‘manager’ to move me repeatedly as her negativity and bad vibes were having an adverse affect on my productivity.

———

Holy crap! Just had a moment of PTSD when I read that. I had an eerily similar experience. Strange (in a good way) how when you work remotely, you never hear a word from those same people ever again.

#49 Don Guillermo on 06.29.20 at 6:07 pm

“Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians”

This is the reason young folks like #7 Millennial Realist (Boomers, do you have any idea how massive the coming change will be?) are freaking out and want “Free Basic Income”, CERB or anything else they can get their hands on to subsidize their coffee shop jobs, They don’t have a hope in hell and WILL be run over.

#50 ABC on 06.29.20 at 6:08 pm

Whoa that boy at the far back has a hairline that is balder than a 50-year-old man…Trump and his GMOs I tell you.

#51 Toronto_CA on 06.29.20 at 6:09 pm

I think places will need to be commutable for the 1-2 days a week most people want to go into the office; office towers will still have people in them, just not as many at once and businesses that serve them like Garth says will have to adjust. 1 in 3 of anything will probably need to close, and ultimately if consumption stays somewhat constant they’ll be opening up something else to replace them.

You won’t need nearly as much dry cleaning, for one..or suits and ties and dress shoes.

Hopefully conferences, concerts, theatres, and other gatherings of people will come back in a few years post vaccine or herd immunity.

Definitely think we’re now past peak condo living for large urban centres. That is not a bad thing.

Public transit could go from moving large numbers of people short distances, to smaller numbers of people longer distances (in less time).

The caution against “recentism” is valid, but I do think the virus has been a catalyst for inevitable change due to faster, more reliable internet and telecommunication advances in the last 10 years.

#52 Inequity on 06.29.20 at 6:12 pm

#21 Dave

I don’t know that I agree. Calgary is a beautiful city to visit or live in. If housing/rent becomes more reasonable then all the better.

#53 Bill Grable on 06.29.20 at 6:21 pm

“The United Kingdom has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. The country has one of the highest death tolls from COVID-19 in the world, after the United States and Brazil.
Meanwhile, a recent forecast from the Bank of England predicts the United Kingdom is heading for its worst economic downturn in more than 300 years”.

Link: http://a.msn.com/01/en-ca/BB165Hmp?ocid=scu2

So – how are things shaping up for Canada, Mr. Turner?

*I was also shocked to see that the FED has resorted to buying equities to shore up a teetering DOW.

#54 yorkville renter on 06.29.20 at 6:22 pm

What these corps fail to recognize is that the Pandemic allowed EXISTING WORKERS and EXISTING SYSTEMS to work because everyone already knew each other and the business was operating like normal.

What happens when people start changing jobs?
How will a corporation build a culture with no one around?
How will perspective employees feel about joining a company where they know no one and won’t meet anyone?

This is all very very short-sighted… including the housing situation

#55 TurnerNation on 06.29.20 at 6:22 pm

Who is wearing the masks in Toronto?
Primarily it’s the young liberals from my cultural background. How can I tell they are liberals?
By looking at them. (The same way they can tell I’m infected – simply by looking at me. Yes that’s the clown world we live in.)
Anyway these people are also childless.
It used to be that people felt their purpose: serve and raise family and children.
No longer. I suspect the symptom is this: these people have chosen to serve The State.
Their mask is symbolic of their duties and submission to The State.
As in, they’ve learned to love Big Brother.

#56 Smartalox on 06.29.20 at 6:25 pm

Working from home for two months has been an eye-opening experience! My wife and I were planning to ditch high-cost Vancouver for a city in another province where we could afford twice the home we have now but at half the cost.

The original motivation was for us to be closer to aging parents, and have our child get some quality time with grandparents, but the recent travel interruptions and watching a friend’s family’s struggle to reunite as their mother succumbed to cancer last month put our plan in motion.

One hot area for growth ahead will be in installation and maintenance services for high-speed digital communications. Look for investments in fiber optics as city-dwellers expect 100Mbps speeds in the boonies.

Small town service providers should be gearing up for:
– on-site IT support services
– On-site meal preparation services
– On-site personal training

Expect package delivery to continue to expand as well. Especially if stores are going to make people line up, or refuse to let them try on the merchandise.

#57 raisemyrent on 06.29.20 at 6:29 pm

Great post as ever, but you can NOT work from home and take your children out of daycare at the same time lol

#58 the Jaguar on 06.29.20 at 6:38 pm

Funny how things work out. Only a few short years ago companies like Best Buy, Yahoo, IBM, Honeywell and Bank of America abandoned their telework initiatives saying ‘they wanted better communication, collaboration and teamwork by bringing employees back into the office.” Fast forward, StarDate 06/29/2020.
Being taken seriously as a ‘hipster’ has meant living in the gentrified urban core of north american cities. “Woowee…I live in Liberty Village in the heart of the GTA which makes me some kind of hipster rockstar!”, or something like that. Besides…that’s where the jobs are, as well as the bars, cafes, big sports arenas, and parks like Bellwood where mills can gather in big numbers to drink beer, poop in a residential alley, and locate a hookup. All within a quick commute via GoTrain back to the suburb where the parental safety net and sunday dinners can be reliably found. I see the hipsters as essentially ‘trapped in the spider web of their own making’. Work from your 500 square foot box and try to be brave. Be part of the change or be run over by it babydoll.
Meanwhile, back at the ranch, many on this blog have surmised that not everybody saw the glamour in that same high density, traffic, pollution and noise, crime, every unpleasant consequence of homelessness and drug use, etcetera. But the suburbs were undergoing their own transformation of too much sprawl, too many malls, parking lots, and other incredibly ugly buildings of questionable description going up next door. The same ugliness of the inner city was beginning to show up incrementally in quiet suburban greenspaces. Incompatibility began to set in.
Hmmmm. What’s a body to do? It depends on who you are and where you want to live. To escape both of the above debacles you have to put some serious distance between you and the GTA. Same is true of GVA. Helps if you are retired and free of entanglements like the parental safety net gig. Easier if you live in a more modest sized city like Calgary where a move to a small character town still gives you access to the big city amenities within a hassle free 20-30 minute drive. The key as always remains flexibility, personal and financial. Sounds like a cake walk, but those who possess these attributes are not as numerous as one might think.
Will there be some kind of ‘flight’ that takes place in the months and years ahead? I think it was already underway, and like the unwinding of supply chains and other alliances the ‘covid enlightenment’ has simply acted as an accelerant. Doesn’t hurt to tune in to the nightly news and see cities being burned, looted, statues toppled and emergence of eyesores like CHOP in the USA. What happens there eventually makes its way north.
I might call up the owner of the big house shown in the Instagram photo to the right on this blog. Maybe I can rent out the basement. Pretty sure it has an ocean view. Mercy.

#59 Brian Ripley on 06.29.20 at 6:44 pm

re: the above post from #2 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 3:09 pm

“On Behalf Of Environmentalists, I Apologize For The Climate Scare June 29, 2020 by Michael Shellenberger”

Here is a counter argument and critique of Michael Shellenberger:

https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/06/29/arctic-heat-overwhelms-green-infighting-issues/

And here is another critique of Michael Shellenberger:

https://nuclear.foe.org.au/michael-shellenbergers-pro-nuclear-lobby-group-environmental-progress/

#60 ElGatoNerodeYVR on 06.29.20 at 6:44 pm

The WFH senior management driven movement will end up same as of the other projects driven by MBA/CGA leaders who don’t have a (insert choice word) clue about how works actually gets done in amid size to large corporations. A few points from the top of my head :
Newsflash- Important work/tasks get negotiated in office drive-by’s and over lunch,coffee breaks , walks outside . Official meetings are for senior management to feel better. If you can not physically walk to somebody’s desk or bribe them with a coffee,lunch, and tell them that you need this now,it will not happen and people will ignore calls,texts,messages as they everyone is usually overtasked due to that 6Sigma lean improvement project last year which demonstrated without a doubt that everyone has 25% more time on their hands.
Mentorship will simply not happen ,proper training and mentoring depend on actual human connection in a focused environment.
Remeber also that a lot of work in any office is not quantifiable so it can not be measured. The stuff that can be measured is rarely progressive or innovative. Hence why senior management who generally speaking relies only on reports/dashboards have no clue whatsoever how the business actually runs.
Companies that will move mostly WFH will not survive on long term.The pendulum will swing back.

#61 FreeBird on 06.29.20 at 6:48 pm

#18 Do we have all the facts on 06.29.20 at 3:52 pm

Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians.
Give it about five years for the systems to be established and standards of remote work performance understood and you will see the next leg up in Global Wage Arbitrage targeting White Collar work.
———————
Agreed. Growing trend for yrs in both big to smaller biz esp in banks and big tech w/call support centres and IT/programming jobs. As you said field and level of job will widen. Initially advantage may be to employer based on travel restrictions both national and intn’l making moving for a job harder. Also in past where large corps or govt would transfer/place higher level staff to out of country offices now might set up remote work and or hire locally in same out of country office vs cost/logistics of transferring employees. Experience/expertise, skill, seniority, position will prob be factors in value to company incl how expendable one is. We’ll see what the future brings. Some free lancers in tech field have done well remotely for a few yrs. But agree prepare accordingly…on both sides.

#62 Bella Horrida on 06.29.20 at 6:48 pm

what you write is true, Garth: but does depend on teachers actually going back to work in September. Otherwise it’s another year of parents doing two jobs – teaching/childcare, plus their day-jobs. That can only last so long….

#63 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:50 pm

We fled to what I guess you could call the “exurbs” (2-4 acre parcels) some years back. It was mostly based on the value proposition. The houses of similar size on tiny little lots in the suburbs are almost as much money. And many of them are further away from the LRT once you wind through all the curvy roads to get out of there. Plus I prefer a bungalow to hiking up and down stairs all the time. Pretty hard to find those in town anymore. And the bungalow format leads to a much more useful basement.

There are a number of other advantages including on site RV parking, larger garages, covid activities like archery for the kids, room to fly your drone right in your own yard, gardens, and lots of room for the dog and “social distancing” gatherings. Taxes are lower too, at least where I live. The main downside? Lots of yard work.

Although the wealthy are out here sprinkled among us they are mostly over by the golf course or along the ridge. Most of the people we know out here are working folks often with both partners working. Middle to upper middle class I would say. So I find it kind of irritating when people assume we are all rich just because we chose to spend a relatively modest amount more money to have a little elbow room.

Now that we are out here I dread the day in the distant future we may have to move back to town.

Although covid type things played no role in our decision to move out of the city limits, oh boy did it turn out to be a blessing. Self isolation for us consists of gardening, archery, beating my son at pool, getting beaten by my son at ping pong, walking the dog on our relatively empty roads, having a camp fire, working from home, and on nice days visiting with the neighbors on the front lawn. It really hasn’t been that bad. But you need a garden tractor.

#64 TRON on 06.29.20 at 6:54 pm

Word of the day is METRICS kids and everyone who works for big corporations working from home will be measured.

Your CEO will want to make sure you’re working and expect a bigger workload with some serious measured results. There is someone out there to replace you and when your red/green report has a little too much red expect a performance improvement plan followed by a see ya later letter if you don’t pick up your socks.

The big winners in all of this are the corporate fat cats. Less overhead for brick and mortar, opportunity to measure real productivity and a host of recruiters with great recruits.

Work starts at 8 and finishes at 5 you’re now commoditized because we don’t get to see much of you and your winning personality.

#65 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:56 pm

#6 Theyounggreek on 06.29.20 at 3:18 pm
Working from home is great when the world is shutdown. What happens when the next Olympic Games, World Cup, world juniors, march madness, kids summer holidays roll around. I’m skeptical that productivity will remain high.

———————–

I’m guessing you haven’t really worked downtown before. All those events you mentioned cause productivity declines downtown as well as everyone heads to the pubs to watch. World cup is particularly bad as is anything hockey.

#66 yorkville renter on 06.29.20 at 6:58 pm

#42 – Fartz… it just goes to show why people who have guns are WAY more likely to be shot…

scared people using a tool they don’t really know how to use… it’s trouble all right

#67 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:06 pm

I like the work from home thing. My kids don’t need day care. I’m on my 3rd tank of gas since the end of March. Doing a lot of online buying, Princess Auto is still doing free shipping! Been getting a ton of work done outside when there’s nothing to quote.

Bad thing is the Rum sipping tee-off time has moved from an hour or two after supper, to just after Lunch…

#68 Wrk.dover on 06.29.20 at 7:07 pm

#44 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 5:43 pm
#39

—————-
Dal had problems long before Covid. Have you counted the number of universities in Nova Scotia?

————————————

More uni desks per capita than anywhere on Earth!

#69 Kat on 06.29.20 at 7:07 pm

@Lee #14.
We find shows we can watch together and have sex at night. Enjoy your sport watching.

#70 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:08 pm

#63 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:50 pm

But you need a garden tractor.
——

Minimum.

#71 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 7:10 pm

@#44 YVR Lurker
“I was referring to UBC, UA, UT, McGill, Waterloo etc.. the top schools. ”

++++

Dal is well regarded for its Law and Medicine curriculum.

And the topic of budget deficits in Federal, provincial, municipal and University’s all across Canada…….

The financial day of reckoning is upon all the govt agencies and their employees at these jobs who had their heads in the sand as far as accountability is concerned.
Generous wages, benefits and pensions are subsidized by taxpayers.
Raise taxes again to give more money to govt employees with unsustainable, guaranteed pensions?
I’m sure the unpensioned, non benefit, taxed to death, voting Millenials might have something to say about that in the near future.

#72 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:15 pm

Wow, things are looking up. If the world remains shut down much longer, I’ll spend all of September and October in the Chilcotin tipi throughout grouse, deer and matsutake (pine) mushroom season.

And if my Starlink beta testing gear arrives by then, I’ll be working from tipi (WFT). Here’s hoping.

#73 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 7:16 pm

#18 Do we have all the facts on 06.29.20 at 3:52 pm

The chatter about Canadians working from home and connecting on line got me wondering how long it might be before there was a shift to employing workers in foreign lands to perform tasks on line. Why pay $80,000 per year plus benefits if you the same work can be purchased for $30 or $40,000 per year without benefits.

————————-

That risk exists whether people are working in an office or from home. In fact I would suggest needing office space tips the scales even more in favor of offshoring. And it has already been happening for years, with from my observation India being the most aggressive at capturing computer work. Entire IT departments have been offshored this way, although to mixed results. Call centers too. It is a competition we’ve been facing to some extent or another for some years.

The best bet is to remain useful enough to your employer that offshoring isn’t worth the bother. Or take up a trade. They can move auto manufacturing to Japan and South Korea and indeed have but the mechanics still live right here. There are some professions that just can’t be offshored. Hair dressers for example. Dentists. Appliance repair. Carpentry. Whatever you call the guy who runs the paver on a paving crew. Arborists. The guy with the suck truck that cleans your septic tank. There are many jobs that are going to survive what happens as the internet demolishes “white-collar” work. But the advice is the same as with the oxygen masks on an airplane. “Put your own mask on first before helping others.”

#74 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:17 pm

#67 Kat on 06.29.20 at 7:07 pm
@Lee #14.

We find shows we can watch together and have sex at night. Enjoy your sport watching.

———-

Forget the sports! Your system sounds better.

#75 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 7:24 pm

#70 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:08 pm
#63 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:50 pm

But you need a garden tractor.
——

Minimum.

—————-

But as long as you stay away from the orange or green ones they aren’t that much money and last practically for life with proper maintenance. I have an orange one (came with the house) and it is I think about 10 years old and it has 280 hours on it. You should be able to get 1000-2000 hours with proper maintenance, maybe more. The other tools you need like weed snippers and leaf blowers you need for a postage sized lot too you just want bigger ones if you live in the exurbs.

#76 JohnAB on 06.29.20 at 7:25 pm

I am monitoring a few houses in my area (Bathurst Manor). One of them, that was more or less reasonably priced 1098k, sold. It was on the market for about two weeks. I was thinking “it probably sold for less”, but I was wrong. Sold for 1225k! Kaboom! “Sold over asking” signs are back in town. Get used to them.

#77 I’m stupid on 06.29.20 at 7:27 pm

We’ve seen the flight of manufacturing to third world countries, now we’re in the beginning stages of office work flight. Why would an employer pay 60-80-100k for someone working in their pjs when they can pay 60k and get 10 workers?

Why would an entry level employee not try to get as many remote jobs as possible and let English speaking university educated Indians just do the work while the official employee pockets the difference?

If this thing has legs and remote work is the new norm that’s exactly what I’m going to do. Why take a complicated 150k job when I could take 50 simple jobs that pay 40k. I’d do zero work but make 500k easy.

Just my opinion, think about it. Oh and good luck with protecting information.

#78 Ace Goodheart on 06.29.20 at 7:30 pm

They’re right about ditching the city.

This spring people from Toronto became lepers. Couldn’t go anywhere (there is a person who posts “GO AWAY COTTAGERS” on here every so often, they are referring to people from Toronto).

You can buy a piece of dung house here, for a million five or six.

Take that money to London, Ontario and here is what you get:

https://www.bungol.ca/map/42.984998&-81.237373&14?listing=991-wellington-street-london-x4785205-4133621

#79 Shirl Clarts on 06.29.20 at 7:31 pm

#49 Don Guillermo on 06.29.20 at 6:07 pm
“Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians”

This is the reason young folks like #7 Millennial Realist (Boomers, do you have any idea how massive the coming change will be?) are freaking out and want “Free Basic Income”, CERB or anything else they can get their hands on to subsidize their coffee shop jobs, They don’t have a hope in hell and WILL be run over.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

CERB doesn’t subsidize income, it replaces income due to JOB LOSS.

Regarding, UBI (or FBI as you call it) – if everyone who benefited from UBI actually HAD A JOB, then it would actually work, as intended. The main concern with UBI (and where it fails) is it might prevent some people from working at all.

Therefore, your comments actually support a UBI program.

Tsk tsk. Be more careful, Don G. You are getting run over by the facts (as per usual).

#80 Reality is stark on 06.29.20 at 7:33 pm

Better to have them work at home. I found you can only get 8 hours out of them in an office. I can often get 10-12 hour days out of them when they are at home.
They’ll work all night instead of watching TV.
It’s all about productivity.
The office is a chatfest and some of them don’t know when to shut up.
We want people to develop 7 day a week 12 hours a day work ethics to pay taxes to support all the SJW’s who feel that you owe them. That is how the world is supposed to work according to them.

#81 TurnerNation on 06.29.20 at 7:34 pm

—Before:

https://www.blogto.com/city/2016/06/west_queen_west_ranked_one_of_the_coolest_streets_in_north_america/

—After: the Globalists’ dropped their economic b0mb onto the city: from University Ave westward to Dufferin I see easily 50-60% vacancy rates. Gave up looking after there.
A few desperate holdouts sell beer and liquor out of an open window, store-front. And downwind a beer store.
They’ll stone you just like they said they would.

Our forum host’s flag is a beaut. I submit it also might hang upside-down.

#82 Steerage on 06.29.20 at 7:34 pm

Ah this would just perfect…..no reason we can’t add a flu pandemic at same time

https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/health-53218704?__twitter_impression=true

#83 Don Guillermo on 06.29.20 at 7:35 pm

#65 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:56 pm
#6 Theyounggreek on 06.29.20 at 3:18 pm
Working from home is great when the world is shutdown. What happens when the next Olympic Games, World Cup, world juniors, march madness, kids summer holidays roll around. I’m skeptical that productivity will remain high.
———————–
I’m guessing you haven’t really worked downtown before. All those events you mentioned cause productivity declines downtown as well as everyone heads to the pubs to watch. World cup is particularly bad as is anything hockey
*****************************************
True, but it’s a hell of a lot more fun goofing off in the downtown pubs.

#84 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:35 pm

#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at 4:46 pm

Advice to the young; Get a Government job, a Trade or start an innovative business – ASAP.
—- —

Yep, probably in that order too. Double the effort on this if you plan on living in places like Toronto where every employer has a stack of resumes 3 feet high, and where household incomes barely make the top ten in Canada, yet a dump shanty costs a million.

#85 Craig on 06.29.20 at 7:41 pm

One thing I don’t see talked about much is the future of business travel. I live in Calgary and prior to COVID I was in Ontario at least once a month. Bosses have now realized that is not necessary. Flight there and back 3 days hotels and meals all kaput. Times how many I wonder?

#86 Northstar on 06.29.20 at 7:46 pm

My personal Toronto real estate experience …

I’m born & raised in Toronto. My father recently passed away at age 92. I inherited his little tear down Toronto bungalow, Oakwood/ Rogers Rd area old city of York.

Listed it on market couple of days ago & it sold next day with multiple offers over $800K. It’s on a huge lot with parking for 2 cars, but literally falling apart kinda tear down house. Only value is the lot.

Can’t believe what it sold for ! It was purchased by a real estate couple who plan to build a nice big shiny new house to live in or rent out initially.

No way I thought it would sell so fast for mega dineros over asking price. I feel very lucky !!

Sold my bachelor condo in Liberty Village late 2009 & cried every time I looked at similar units selling prices recently & wished I hung unto it as a rental even.

I currently rent In Hamilton for super cheap. I might buy a house for cash in a smaller town like London etc, since I can work from home & prices insanely lower than GTA.

Looking to take half to buy a house & other half in a nicely diversified portfolio of ETF’s etc.

I’m 48 years old & I feel blessed with this windfall. My job is very secure, paid off house, no debts & a nice balanced portfolio so not putting all my eggs in one basket.

Enjoy reading your posts Garth & keep on rocking in a free world !! COVID-19 free hopefully soon !

#87 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 7:47 pm

#71
And the topic of budget deficits in Federal, provincial, municipal and University’s all across Canada…….

The financial day of reckoning is upon all the govt agencies and their employees at these jobs who had their heads in the sand as far as accountability is concerned.
Generous wages, benefits and pensions are subsidized by taxpayers.
Raise taxes again to give more money to govt employees with unsustainable, guaranteed pensions?
I’m sure the unpensioned, non benefit, taxed to death, voting Millenials might have something to say about that in the near future.

——
On this topic I guess you feel perfectly at ease to make one full swooping statement to cover everyone who is not in the private sector. Should there be a few nuances perhaps, or is everyone in the same bloated boat that needs torpedoing? Is this based on your many years of experience working in the myriad of possible Gov’t jobs? Do you have any first-hand knowledge of workloads, duties, responsibilities across all Gov’t sectors? Should the taxpayer be bothering with funding the BC Center for Disease Control, informing the Gov’t on the best course of action for Covid19, or should we all be working building condos for the private sector? Indeed some public sector jobs are not as valuable as others but a sweeping blanket statement regarding their priviliged status is just, simply, ignorant.

#88 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm

#81 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:35 pm
#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at 4:46 pm

Advice to the young; Get a Government job, a Trade or start an innovative business – ASAP.

———–

Yep, probably in that order too. Double the effort on this if you plan on living in places like Toronto where every employer has a stack of resumes 3 feet high, and where household incomes barely make the top ten in Canada, yet a dump shanty costs a million.

———–

Further to this, I’d suggest working toward becoming your own product. Engineering, doctoring, dentisting, financial consulting come to mind.

From the engineering side, if everything else goes sideways, water, sewer, roads, bridges and docks are still needed.

#89 Ballingsford on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm

The things I miss about going downtown to work are seeing my peers, having a good selection of places to get my lunch at, and going for a walk outside.

Being in this pandemic is making it harder and harder to plan my lunches.

I hope my boss keeps paying the rent for these reasons. Or, might have to ditch REIT ETFs.

#90 Yabut ... on 06.29.20 at 7:49 pm

#72 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:15 pm

Wow, things are looking up. If the world remains shut down much longer, I’ll spend all of September and October in the Chilcotin tipi throughout grouse, deer and matsutake (pine) mushroom season.
——————————————————-
I got the moose draw in 5-12 …. for the early draw … guaranteed meat …

#91 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.29.20 at 7:52 pm

@Tater-

The data used the most populated 100 counties in the US. You know, the Trumpland that you hate.

Keep searching, you’ll figger it out eventually. Maybe.

#92 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:52 pm

#29 Devil Anse on 06.29.20 at 4:39 pm

I last worked in one such place from 2008 to 2014. I got to know everything about my depressed middle-aged spinster pod-neighbour, who emoted on the phone daily to her friends about her sad, sexless life. I asked my ‘manager’ to move me repeatedly as her negativity and bad vibes were having an adverse affect on my productivity.
— —

Had one of those too years ago. I was next to a “stud” whose life centred around hooking up with Women. Every Monday am we’d all get the gory TMI details no matter if we wanted them or not. Amazed the guy isn’t dead of aids right now.

He could have helped out your pod-neighbour though :D

#93 JohnAB on 06.29.20 at 7:53 pm

About office work. WFH is temporary. I work of BoA and there’s lots of discussions about work from the office being more productive. So definitely getting back to 250 Yonge street after the lockdown. Might be next year, but definitely getting back.

#94 NoName on 06.29.20 at 8:09 pm

The beside savings on hand sanitizer other upside of working from home employer can offshore half of stuff without anyone noticing, workplace lateral communication will be non existant and bad design due to lack of collaborations is about to skyrocket. I am just wondering how home schooling will work out.

But what’s funny and interestingly at some point there was more UK army fighting luddites than fighting napoleon…

#95 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 8:18 pm

>Escape from Seattle. The CHAZ Combat Zone.

Teen, 16, is killed and 14-year-old is wounded after Seattle CHOP zone protesters fire into their jeep as they drove towards the barricades at 3am – as those inside cop-free area say they acted in self-defense and video shows a man yelling ‘You’re not dead yet?’

-A 16-year-old boy died and a 14-year-old boy was wounded after being shot at Seattle’s CHOP zone Monday

-Police said they are investigating after witnesses reported seeing a white Jeep SUV near a makeshift barrier around the Capitol Hill Organized Protest (CHOP) zone at about 3am on Monday just before the shooting

-Witnesses told 911 dispatchers that they saw several unidentified people firing shots into the Jeep, police say

-Both teenagers, who have not been publicly identified, were taken to the Harborview Medical Center in a private vehicle by people who identified themselves as ‘CHOP medics’

-The older boy died several hours later and police said the 14-year-old remains in a critical condition

-Detectives searched the vehicle for evidence on Monday morning but said in a statement that it was clear the crime scene had been ‘disturbed’

-Demonstrators have occupied several blocks around the Seattle Police Department’s East Precinct for about two weeks

-Protesters have claimed the shooting unfolded only after the vehicle plowed into the CHOP zone and those inside the car started shooting

-Those inside the zone say CHOP security, who are self-appointed and heavily armed, then returned fire

By ALAN BUTTERFIELD IN SEATTLE FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and EMILY CRANE FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 11:53 EDT, 29 June 2020 | UPDATED: 18:07 EDT, 29 June 2020

Surveillance video of a shooting at Seattle’s CHOP zone that left a black 16-year-old boy dead and a 14-year-old seriously injured shows gunfire ringing out as the Jeep the teens were in plowed into a barricade and a man screaming: ‘Oh you’re not dead yet?’….

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8471219/One-man-dead-wounded-Seattle-CHOP-zone-shooting.html

#96 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 8:20 pm

>Escape from Portland.

Downtown retailers still reeling from fiery riot and city’s meek response: ‘It was chaos’

Updated Jun 27, 2020; Posted Jun 27, 2020

Kassab family outside Kassab Jewelers

Noha Kassab, second from right, and her family stand outside their boarded up jewelry story in downtown Portland. By the time the Kassabs got to the store amid a riot in the early morning hours of May 30 every diamond and other precious gem in the store was gone.

By Jeff Manning | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Noha Kassab can divide her life as a downtown Portland merchant into two parts: The four decades leading up to the early morning of May 30 and the month since that night’s rioting, fire and theft.

It was shortly after 1 a.m. when Kassab, 58, got the frantic phone call from her daughter. People broke into the family store, Kassab Jewelers at Southwest Broadway and Alder downtown. Kassab called 911. She was told the police would be there when they could. Fifteen minutes later, she called again. Same answer.

Her sons and her son-in-law decided they needed to secure their store. “I begged my boys not to go,” Kassab said. “The cops had told me not to go down there. I was yelling at them not to do it.”

Downtown was a battle zone. Physical confrontations erupted in some stories where the owners tried to keep thieves at bay.

“It was chaos on the streets,” Rami Kassab said. “Broken glass was everywhere. There was yelling and screaming, teargas and grenades, people running down the street.”

What the Kassab brothers didn’t find was any jewelry. By the time they got there the store had been completely cleaned out….

https://www.oregonlive.com/business/2020/06/downtown-retailers-wonder-about-police-reaction-to-rioting-thieves-where-was-the-mayor.html

#97 Frank on 06.29.20 at 8:21 pm

Hi Garth – i recently read that no companies are issuing preferred shares this year. Given the low interest rate environment and high yields on preferreds, do you think the lack of supply will help drive prices higher (and yields lower) on preferreds?

#98 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 8:27 pm

#59 Brian Ripley on 06.29.20 at 6:44 pm
re: the above post from #2 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 3:09 pm

“On Behalf Of Environmentalists, I Apologize For The Climate Scare June 29, 2020 by Michael Shellenberger”

Here is a counter argument and critique of Michael Shellenberger:

https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/06/29/arctic-heat-overwhelms-green-infighting-issues/

JUNE 29, 2020

Arctic Heat Overwhelms Green Infighting Issues
by ROBERT HUNZIKER

…Clearly, too much heat has already overwhelmed the Arctic and Amazon rainforest ecosystems. Along the way, greenie frustration is finally coming to a head as environmentalists “catfight” in open public.

For example, Michael Moore and Jeff Gibbs’ controversial film Planet of the Humans (Rumble Media) serves as an opening salvo, exposing a green movement that has turned a light shade of brown. The film paints a painful picture of a movement that, in certain instances, has gone off the rails.

Both Moore and Gibbs are lifetime greenies born green. Their film has spooked the green movement into bouts of self-examination and ferocious anger directed right at them, bull’s-eye. After all, the film pulls no punches by highlighting several rash infections of hypocrisy in the uppermost ranks of environmental leadership, acceding to big corporate interests that frankly could care less about the health of ecosystems, other than purely for show.

Otherwise, if they, meaning big corporate interests and billionaires, really cared and were truly concerned, by now they would’ve thrown everything they’ve got, including the kitchen sink, at fixing the climate change conundrum. But, they have not done that, have they?

Still and all, if the intention behind the making of Planet of the Humans was a “wake-up call” (Hey fellas and gals, this is not working) then it was enormously successful. After release of the film, green protestors protested the filmmakers like crazy, but not in the streets. Evidently, Moore and Gibbs struck a chord.

But still, what has 33 years of green advocacy wrought? Answer: Record high CO2 in the atmosphere and nearly 80% dependency upon fossil fuels, same as 50 years ago. Which advocacy group celebrates that?…

https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/06/29/arctic-heat-overwhelms-green-infighting-issues/

#99 KNOW IT ALL on 06.29.20 at 8:37 pm

A GIFT FROM THE ALMIGHTY!

The RE market had to get SCOLDED one way or another.

Just imagine the REAL PAIN had this market not stopped going up?!?!

#100 Spia on 06.29.20 at 8:39 pm

Found this article. Scary to think that this is mainstream…. We are doomed…

https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p08jbbry/why-we-need-to-debunk-the-deficit-myth-

#101 kingston boy on 06.29.20 at 8:40 pm

@#54 yorkville renter on 06.29.20 at 6:22 pm
What these corps fail to recognize is that the Pandemic allowed EXISTING WORKERS and EXISTING SYSTEMS to work because everyone already knew each other and the business was operating like normal.

What happens when people start changing jobs?
How will a corporation build a culture with no one around?
How will perspective employees feel about joining a company where they know no one and won’t meet anyone?

This is all very very short-sighted… including the housing situation
————

bingo.
the WFH scenario will be short lived for about 99% of the working world.

#102 Grunt on 06.29.20 at 8:50 pm

Wonder if your company will provide you with a workhome? Think of the corporate intrusion on your private life. Telling you how you should live it. Think of the propaganda and surveillance. Think of what you lose if you’re fired. They’d own you body and soul, bread and board.

#103 Ballingsford on 06.29.20 at 8:51 pm

Off topic a bit, but son’s grade 7 teacher(s) said maybe to register him in English reading and writing.
Hes been in English French Immersion since Junior Kindergarten and is probably bilingual. English Mark’s on report card were only high 70’s. Math in high 90’s.
Trying to get him to read books over the last 3 months has been difficult.
Hes been walking, feeding, and socializing our dog in the dog park for our 80 lb chocolate lab, 8 months old, and still growing. And soccer is starting again. Also, hes 12, has a side job of walking neighbors dog twice a day, Mon- Fri for $50 a week.

I dont feel like a mean person for making him take 3 weeks of english summer school.

Hes been playing video games with his classmates and close friends since then. I need to allow that for his connection to friends and mental health.
I just posted this for others thoughts.

#104 NoName on 06.29.20 at 9:04 pm

#42 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 5:41 pm
Wanna see an outraged wife point a gun at the back of her husbands head while screaming at BLM protesters?

Watch her walk BEHIND her husband with her handgun(finger on the trigger) and point it at the back of his head.

https://www.kmov.com/couple-points-guns-at-protesters-who-marched-to-mayor-krewsons-home-sunday/video_5b5f40d0-3636-5bd4-a4be-ef30632d1229.html

Unbelievable …….Darwin Award contender…….


just something…

https://twitter.com/KatTheHammer1/status/1277691864313929728

#105 Wrk.dover on 06.29.20 at 9:08 pm

#95 Long-Time Lurker on 06.29.20 at 8:18 pm
>Escape from Seattle. The CHAZ Combat Zone.

Teen, 16, is killed and 14-year-old is wounded after Seattle CHOP zone protesters fire into their jeep as they drove towards the barricades at 3am

———————————————–

Aunt Bea said “Remember Opie, you get the best sleep before midnight.”

#106 Steve French on 06.29.20 at 9:10 pm

Greetings Sir Garth from Down Under:

Even current conditions, 2 questions regarding a B & D portfolio, which may be of interest to others:

– should I maintain my 3% position in REITs
– should I maintain my 3% position in corporate high yield bonds

Your insights would be much appreciated!

SteveO.

#107 Trojan House on 06.29.20 at 9:15 pm

Immunity passports coming to a country near you?

https://www.mintpressnews.com/mass-tracking-covi-pass-immunity-passports-slated-roll-15-countries/269006/

I’m sure most of you cucks and Karens in the comment section of this blog are going to be okay with this.

#108 Alphonse Kehaulic on 06.29.20 at 9:35 pm

Why in hades would a corp hire YOU to work from home in high-cost Kanada or any other Alpha-rated country when they can hire the good fellow in South Asia, Philippines or the Middle East for a third the price and get the same, or at least satisfactory, deliverables? Or when a robot can do it here? Give your heads a shake. Besides – not like houses in YYZ-YVR suburbia are bargains. And that’s before your utility bills show up.

I recall one of our famous social betters once saying, and I’m liberally paraphrasing, “Soon people will be piling into boats in droves to seek livelihoods in far flung countries.” He was talking about US – not them. Boats, not planes.

#109 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 9:35 pm

@#72 sail away
“Chilcotin country….”
+++++

I took a 6 day rafting trip back in mid August 1996 from Chilco lake to the Chilcotin river to the Fraser river.
Excellent trip. Beautiful country.
Class 2,3,4 and a 30 second dishwash in class 5 rapids never ceased to amaze.
The Perseid’s meteor showers and the Northern Lights were spectacular.
I’m envious.

#110 Farm Wife on 06.29.20 at 9:39 pm

Folks in my neighborhood have been working from home for generations. It is amazing how many side gigs can be fit in between crops and cows.

We have welding shops,electricians , hair salons, small business book keeping, RV service shops and storage, boat repair,seamstress and tailor,renovation and fencing companys, auto repair paint and body shops, farrier, animal boarding kennels plus I may have missed a few.

I doubt very much that foreign workers will be taking over all these jobs in the near future or anyone else that isn’t rural as the hours are killer and the financial gains slim.

For most of us out in the boonies it’s a life style not a job and we make ends meet the best way we can.

#111 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 9:50 pm

@#87 yvr Lurker
“Is this based on your many years of experience working in the myriad of possible Gov’t jobs? Do you have any first-hand knowledge of workloads, duties, responsibilities across all Gov’t sectors?’
++++

Methinks Thou doth protest too loudly.
i have spend the past 40 years in the private sector in various jobs where I worked directly with govt workers.
While most were very nice people…..

The majority of the union protected, govt coddled “workers” would use ANY excuse to avoid work and or walk from a job.
Federal workers, provincial workers, municipal workers….I have and still do work side by side with them.
Lazy, arrogant, incompetent and duplicitous are but a few of the adjectives that come to mind to a workforce that has realized that once they are “permanent” employees….they are essentially bullet proof to termination..
That mindset doesnt foster a great deal of “work ethic”.

But, you are correct, my opinions dont add up to squat.

Lets just watch the over taxed, unpensioned, non govt “working” Millenials rise up and say “NO!” to subsiding another fat, lazy, overpaid, over protected, govt sloth’s GUARANTEED pension.

Thats why I, a private sector employee, has saved a sh!tload of money for my rainy day retirement……..

A day of reckoning is coming for those golden pensions govt “workers” count on……..and its coming even faster now than Trust Fund Trudeau is rolling the dice and urinating Canada’s credit rating against the wall.

#112 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 10:14 pm

@#79 Shirl Charts
“CERB doesn’t subsidize income, it replaces income due to JOB LOSS.”
++++

Funny, I thought CERB was a renamed welfare payment for people too undisciplined, too stupid or too lazy to save a few months worth of money for…..an unexpected job loss/ emergency?
Silly me.
I read the stats for almost a decade warning that Canadians were one missed pay cheque from living on the street.
What happened to the old fashion mindset of living without debt or having a lump of cash to get you through a “crisis”?
Personal responsibility?
Silly me.
The govt will bail us out, they always do.
Tattoos are a “must”, $1000 cell phones every two years on a credit plan are a must, a new leased car because I’m bored with the 4 year old car I’m driving, holidays to Europe “because I just need a change”…..are a must.

How many of these financial illiterates are drawing CERB while smoking $15/pack cigarettes.
The mind boggles.
Well CERB aficionados…..it aint over yet. :)
Covid part deux will begin in a few months followed by bankruptcies and Recession and Trudeau with be faced with the unenvious decision, “More CERB before the election or after the election.”
Either way.
CERB will end sooner than the average financial putz expects……and Trudeau, after all his billions of unaffordable, credit breaking, cash handouts…..will wear the wrath of the Cerbians.
Karma.

#113 Sail Away on 06.29.20 at 10:27 pm

#90 Yabut … on 06.29.20 at 7:49 pm
#72 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:15 pm

Wow, things are looking up. If the world remains shut down much longer, I’ll spend all of September and October in the Chilcotin tipi throughout grouse, deer and matsutake (pine) mushroom season.

—————-

I got the moose draw in 5-12 …. for the early draw … guaranteed meat …

—————-

Oh no. You said the G word!

You’d better do a few extra moose dances for that faux pas.

#114 no blog for old men on 06.29.20 at 10:28 pm

@#108 Alphonse Kehaulic on 06.29.20 at 9:35 pm
Why in hades would a corp hire YOU to work from home in high-cost Kanada or any other Alpha-rated country when they can hire the good fellow in South Asia, Philippines or the Middle East for a third the price and get the same, or at least satisfactory, deliverables? Or when a robot can do it here? Give your heads a shake. Besides – not like houses in YYZ-YVR suburbia are bargains. And that’s before your utility bills show up.

I recall one of our famous social betters once saying, and I’m liberally paraphrasing, “Soon people will be piling into boats in droves to seek livelihoods in far flung countries.” He was talking about US – not them. Boats, not planes.
——————————-
once farmed out some work to india. was cheaper but definitely not better. Also tried romania and south africa. ultimately the best but not least expensive option was to have the work done right here in Ontario.
If you in manufacturing or bus. admin, retail, financial planning then yes maybe learn a new skillset.

#115 jess on 06.29.20 at 10:31 pm

what say you?

“Many market watchers believe the Fed is simply removing BBB-rated bonds from the balance sheets of the big Wall Street banks before they are downgraded to junk, in order to prevent massive new loan loss provisions at the banks and continued pressure on their share prices.”
https://www.federalreserve.gov/publications/reports-to-congress-in-response-to-covid-19.htm

#116 Born Again on 06.29.20 at 10:59 pm

Repent, repent. The end is nigh. Repent, repent. We’re all going to die.

Seek the Lord Jesus Christ while there is still time. Blessings.

#117 Lambchop on 06.29.20 at 11:22 pm

#107 Trojan House on 06.29.20 at 9:15 pm
Immunity passports coming to a country near you?

https://www.mintpressnews.com/mass-tracking-covi-pass-immunity-passports-slated-roll-15-countries/269006/

I’m sure most of you cucks and Karens in the comment section of this blog are going to be okay with this.

_________________

Not a country near you, but to YOUR country.

From the article;

“ More practically, VST now has a direct partnership with the UK government and has secured contracts to deploy its technology in 15 countries, including Italy, Portugal, France, India, the US, Canada, Sweden, Spain, South Africa, Mexico, United Arab Emirates and the Netherlands.”

Talk about the ultimate control of our freedom.

#118 MF on 06.29.20 at 11:29 pm

#87 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 7:47 pm

#119 MF on 06.29.20 at 11:34 pm

#87 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 7:47 pm

Don’t even try. Fartz famously said on here he wanted an earth quake to hit, and people to suffer, and a poor government response -so he could prove his point about “government”.

It was pretty sick.

And he’s at it again:

#111 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 9:50 pm

“Lets just watch the over taxed, unpensioned, non govt “working” Millenials rise up and say “NO!” to subsiding another fat, lazy, overpaid, over protected, govt sloth’s GUARANTEED pension.

Thats why I, a private sector employee, has saved a sh!tload of money for my rainy day retirement……..

A day of reckoning is coming for those golden pensions govt “workers” count on……..and its coming even faster now than Trust Fund Trudeau is rolling the dice and urinating Canada’s credit rating against the wall.”

———————————————————–

-He’s got a sick point of view, where he seems to be okay with the suffering of others so he can make himself feel better about his worthless points of view.

Yeah fartz, you really know EVERY government employee out there….

MF

#120 Keith on 06.29.20 at 11:44 pm

@ #98 Long – Time Lurker

There’s a very famous billionaire with huge success with wind power in Idaho. Cheaper than any other utility in the state.

https://www.energyvoice.com/otherenergy/225324/buffett-touts-wind-energy-following-climate-change-criticism/

#121 WIN not Lose on 06.29.20 at 11:57 pm

Nice picture of US conservative Matt Couch

#122 Dean Mechineq on 06.30.20 at 12:00 am

Garth, it does not matter one puts their money these days and coming years. Canada will become a second rate country and we will see all our standard of living drop big time.

For all those that like the $2,000 a month CERB and other ideas from UBI to higher welfare, government dole get ready to live in poverty because that is where we are heading. If you think that the government can give you longer term a sustained $2,000 a month without working good luck in lalaland.

Also, get ready to pay for $2 a liter gas to start, $5-6 loaf of bread, pasta at $2 to $3 a pack etc. etc. rent, utilities, property taxes, insurance etc. etc. all going through the roof. You are all fools.

#123 Don Guillermo on 06.30.20 at 12:14 am

#79 Shirl Clarts on 06.29.20 at 7:31 pm
#49 Don Guillermo on 06.29.20 at 6:07 pm
“Remote = Anywhere in the world, people in India are just as smart as you. But they will work for much less and are much more motivated then most Canadians”
This is the reason young folks like #7 Millennial Realist (Boomers, do you have any idea how massive the coming change will be?) are freaking out and want “Free Basic Income”, CERB or anything else they can get their hands on to subsidize their coffee shop jobs, They don’t have a hope in hell and WILL be run over.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
CERB doesn’t subsidize income, it replaces income due to JOB LOSS.
Regarding, UBI (or FBI as you call it) – if everyone who benefited from UBI actually HAD A JOB, then it would actually work, as intended. The main concern with UBI (and where it fails) is it might prevent some people from working at all.
Therefore, your comments actually support a UBI program.
Tsk tsk. Be more careful, Don G. You are getting run over by the facts (as per usual).
***************************************
You’re right Shirly, I’m not as good with the free money acronym facts as you are but maybe we do agree on this. Your overlords can provide FBI so the marginals have just enough money to get by. Then they’ll take part time jobs that can’t be outsourced to get their iPhones and such. How else can successful people get Skip the Dishes or be Ubered home from trendy wine bars on Friday night?

#124 Nonplused on 06.30.20 at 12:15 am

#79 Shirl Clarts on 06.29.20 at 7:31 pm

UBI won’t work because there is nowhere to get the money. Just look at what the CERB did to the budget and it was by no means universal and hasn’t even run a year! Imagine if it were truly universal and ran every year! Yikes!

And no, taxing the rich won’t cover it. They don’t have that much money.

#125 dogman01 on 06.30.20 at 12:50 am

88 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm

“From the engineering side, if everything else goes sideways, water, sewer, roads, bridges and docks are still needed.”

I had heard engineering was really rough to break into for new out of school graduates?
I was camping and met up with my neighbor’s kid whom just graduated in this economy, he had that worry burden that young men carry when trying to break in.

#126 VicPaul on 06.30.20 at 2:11 am

#88 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm
#81 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:35 pm
#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20

[*See complete text above]

From the engineering side, if everything else goes sideways, water, sewer, roads, bridges and docks are still needed.

*********

….and electricity. Until we develop power crystals, electricity will still need to be generated and distributed throughout the land – and my electrician sons will be earning a living from the grid.

M56BC

#127 Hamish42 on 06.30.20 at 3:57 am

I have been doing the WFH gig for a few years now. It is fun to start with but has a lot of downside- the main one for me is not really being part of a team. Now I have a job where I work remotely but visit the main site every 4-6 weeks, this gives me some flexibility but keeps me part of the team. My guess for the future is lots of flex. working where folk spend 2-3 days a week at a central site with the rest travel/WFH. This will drive de-urbanisation, fewer office spaced needed, more desirable to live 1-2 h commute from the city.

#128 maxx on 06.30.20 at 7:39 am

“Operational efficiencies”……we’ll see how that plays out with the further declining work ethic and intrinsic laziness of many Canuckleheads.

“Oh, I was distracted by the dog, kid, spouse, pot boiling over….sorry.”

We’ve cut as many long-term connections with non-essential business as possible. The last thing we are interested in is doing the refund/price adjustment/correction tango with some worker, somewhere that is a pain to trace. Subscriptions, services,…pfffft.

Wasting money is painful enough but losing time to corporate “client care” is absolute torture.

#129 Tater on 06.30.20 at 7:52 am

#91 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.29.20 at 7:52 pm
@Tater-

The data used the most populated 100 counties in the US. You know, the Trumpland that you hate.

Keep searching, you’ll figger it out eventually. Maybe.
————————————————————-

What a wonderful study. Please share a link.

#130 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 7:58 am

@#119 MF on 06.29.20 at 11:34 pm
#87 yvr_lurker on 06.29.20 at 7:47 pm

Don’t even try. Fartz famously said on here he wanted an earth quake to hit, and people to suffer, and a poor government response -so he could prove his point about “government”.

It was pretty sick.

And he’s at it again:

#111 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.29.20 at 9:50 pm

“Lets just watch the over taxed, unpensioned, non govt “working” Millenials rise up and say “NO!” to subsiding another fat, lazy, overpaid, over protected, govt sloth’s GUARANTEED pension.

Thats why I, a private sector employee, has saved a sh!tload of money for my rainy day retirement……..

A day of reckoning is coming for those golden pensions govt “workers” count on……..and its coming even faster now than Trust Fund Trudeau is rolling the dice and urinating Canada’s credit rating against the wall.”

———————————————————–

-He’s got a sick point of view, where he seems to be okay with the suffering of others so he can make himself feel better about his worthless points of view.

Yeah fartz, you really know EVERY government employee out there….

MF
—————-

the dude definitely carries some heavy resentment in life.

#131 Penny Henny on 06.30.20 at 7:59 am

Re car insurance.

Hey Ponzi you’re gonna like this little tidbit.
I just received a letter from my car insurance company telling me I’m entitled to a $100 refund on my policy due to Covid and less people driving.
This will be in addition to the 10% discount I will receive when my policy renews also because of this Covid stuff.
What makes this much more amazing is that full coverage on my 2017 Mustang Convertible is only $584 a year to begin with.

#132 Tater on 06.30.20 at 8:04 am

#91 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.29.20 at 7:52 pm
@Tater-

The data used the most populated 100 counties in the US. You know, the Trumpland that you hate.

Keep searching, you’ll figger it out eventually. Maybe.
————————————————————–
To quick to post last time and forgot to add that the biggest 100 counties voted overwhelmingly blue in the 2018 Presidential election. 88 of them voted for Clinton.

I know, facts aren’t your strong suit. Much happier to plaintively mewl whatever you’ve been fed by Fox News.

#133 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 8:28 am

@#119 MF
“Yeah fartz, you really know EVERY government employee out there….”
++++

Occasionally i meet a hard working , dedicated, intelligent govt worker who is courteous, caring and kind……then I wake up……
:)

#134 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 8:38 am

Hmmmm.
Another virus from China?

https://www.reuters.com/video/2020/06/30/chinese-researchers-warn-of-new-virus-in?videoId=714944453&videoChannel=117760

Well at least G4 is easier to say than Covid19

#135 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 8:50 am

Another day another Billion or so tossed to Trudeau’s ‘PET” projects.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-theres-nothing-charitable-about-circumventing-parliament

No debate, no accountability, no problem.
Until the debt comes back to bite.
Trudeau the compulsive spender on a roll.
The govt employee pensions are getting shakier every day this guy burns though another billion in cash.

#136 Gordon Gordonne on 06.30.20 at 9:15 am

Yeah, the good old days. When Health Commander Tam called us out as race-bigot-xenophobes and slapped us down with ” Covid won’t effect Canada”.

” You won’t know how to wear a mask properly” she chided us. ” Stopping flights from China won’t do anything because infected persons would find a way in”. She must have been referencing Roxbury Rd.

This article attached was from last Feb., when our political Spartacus Trudeau stamped on a group of a wonderfully illiteration of ‘Chinese Canadians from Calgary’ for handing him a 100 thousand name petition for asking that he at least install health checks at the ports of entry and supply PPE at hospitals, which he was arrogantly refusing.

https://globalnews.ca/news/6546569/china-coronavirus-flights-canada/

But that’s where it all went wrong. Trudeau denied but artfully disappeared into his cabin. Tam went south with her every call. The WHO lied. And here we are. 9000 Canadians dead. Vote Trudeau , he has awesome ‘ fill in the blank’, something if you think he’s doing a great job. It was a really bad year for Canada.

He can’t breath life back into the dead but he thinks his career is salvageable if he can give away enough money. And I get bribing Canadians before an election. But what good is it doing to give away billions to Ethiopia etc?

#137 Justin S on 06.30.20 at 9:20 am

Child care issues resolved.

Working from home does not resolve child care issues at all. In fact, it makes things much more stressful having a kid(s) around instead of at daycare/school.

I can’t wait to get back in the office. Working from home 24/7/365 sucks. Kudos to anyone who can handle it, but it ain’t for me. I prefer socializing with co-workers/friends, going out for lunches, going to the gym, etc. Zoom and online meetings only do so much – humans need actual face-to-face interaction.

For anyone ‘escaping’ to the soulless suburbs, enjoy! I’ll take a hard pass.

#138 MF on 06.30.20 at 9:23 am

3 dogman01 on 06.29.20 at

More motivated than Canadians?

Speak for yourself, thanks.

https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/calling-home-rogers-brings-remaining-customer-service-jobs-back-to-canada

MF

#139 Dharma Bum on 06.30.20 at 9:30 am

Yes, the changes will be EPIC.

Soon, millions of employees will be able to stay at home, waste tons of time, pretend to work while surfing the net and gossiping on Facebook, and find things to complain about INSTEAD of doing exactly the same things at a corporate office space.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsayg_S4pJg

#140 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 9:40 am

@#130 Kingston penitentiary civil servant
“the dude definitely carries some heavy resentment in life.”

++++

Nah, just tired of paying higher and higher taxes to fund unnecessary govt jobs.
I cant wait to see which govt agency will require addition funds to “top up” their guaranteed pension plans next.
Vancouver City clowncil seems to be hitting a fiscal wall these days.
BC Ferries Bankrupt, BC Hydro teetering,
Yep, you cant expect unpensioned, private sector, Taxpayer slaves ( the vast majority of voters) will tolerate the whining from overpaid, over pensioned govt workers forever……….eventually even Canadian sheeple will revolt.

Count on it.

This is my non-resentful “Happy Face” :)

#141 Alex on 06.30.20 at 10:28 am

The comments section is pretty bleak these days. Petty discussions between adults acting like children.

Nothing related to the economy to discuss? This is a financial blog.

Have you guys noticed friends/colleagues/acquaintances being more responsible with money? Savings rate must have increased recently as everyone gets ready for further rocky roads. Some positive from this mess!

#142 Sail Away on 06.30.20 at 10:31 am

#125 dogman01 on 06.30.20 at 12:50 am
88 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm

“From the engineering side, if everything else goes sideways, water, sewer, roads, bridges and docks are still needed.”

I had heard engineering was really rough to break into for new out of school graduates?

I was camping and met up with my neighbor’s kid whom just graduated in this economy, he had that worry burden that young men carry when trying to break in.

—————

Depends a bit on the discipline. Civil engineering is always needed although they may have to travel for an initial position. Once registered, opportunities are everywhere.

Specialty niche focus might be a bit harder to place. I often hear concerns from new grads but have never met an engineer unable to find a job. There are many who choose not to accept an offered position, though. Flexibility is important and will often require relocation.

#143 Sail Away on 06.30.20 at 10:34 am

#126 VicPaul on 06.30.20 at 2:11 am
#88 Sail away on 06.29.20 at 7:48 pm
#81 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:35 pm
#33 dogman01 on 06.29.20

[*See complete text above]

From the engineering side, if everything else goes sideways, water, sewer, roads, bridges and docks are still needed.

—————

….and electricity. Until we develop power crystals, electricity will still need to be generated and distributed throughout the land – and my electrician sons will be earning a living from the grid.

M56BC

—————-

Absolutely. Anything essential to life.

#144 JB on 06.30.20 at 10:35 am

Urban condos? The impact could be huge over time. Fewer jobs in the canyon, so why would you compromise paying hundreds of thousands to live in 500 square feet of concrete? And besides making high-rise lifts totally terrifying, the virus is impacting the entire market. “The pandemic health concerns, coupled with reduced employment and hiring activity, has resulted in less immigration and reduced in-migration into the GTA,” says a report from Rentals.ca. “These consequences of the pandemic have significantly reduced rental demand at the same time as supply is increasing via short-term rentals and high-rise apartment completions.”
………………………………………………………………..
Condos and hi rise workplaces all pose the same issue. Lifts! My wife works at a hospital and now takes the stairs up to the floor where she works as the lifts are packed and nobody is regulating them.
I personally will not get in a lift, no thanks. I really feel for all of those retires that are stuck 20 floors up and have to take the elevators just to get to their cars or go for a walk. It is like walking the gauntlet.

#145 JB on 06.30.20 at 10:37 am

No word on the street as to the wanderings of Smoking Man? Have not seen a post from him for weeks here.

#146 JB on 06.30.20 at 10:39 am

#135 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 8:50 am

Another day another Billion or so tossed to Trudeau’s ‘PET” projects.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-theres-nothing-charitable-about-circumventing-parliament

No debate, no accountability, no problem.
Until the debt comes back to bite.
Trudeau the compulsive spender on a roll.
The govt employee pensions are getting shakier every day this guy burns though another billion in cash.
………………………………………………………………….
I wish it was his money and not ours.

#147 JB on 06.30.20 at 10:45 am

India banned Tic toc and others. Good for India the Chinese apps are rife with buried backdoor Trojans and malicious tracking software. they should ban them here in the west as well.

https://www.reuters.com/video/business

#148 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 11:34 am

@Tater- So many assumptions so little time.

1) Blue vs. red states. So what? The point is the virus is a nothingburger to 99.999% of healthy people. You assume I care about US politics.
2) Fox News- I have not watched Fox News ever in my entire life. Don’t really care for TV much except for the NHL, the NFL, Car Shows, Star Trek, and good documentaries.
3) The study was done by Stanford University and was pre-published on a medical site. I have the link but I’m not giving it to you so you can do the standard lefty tactic of “discredit the source”. If you want it you’ll have to work for it. Interesting how the media buried it though given that it was first published June 6, 2020.

#149 where have you been? on 06.30.20 at 11:45 am

@#141 Alex on 06.30.20 at 10:28 am
The comments section is pretty bleak these days. Petty discussions between adults acting like children.

these days???
twas ever thus.

#150 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 11:47 am

@#140 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 9:40 am
@#130 Kingston penitentiary civil servant
“the dude definitely carries some heavy resentment in life.”

++++

Nah, just tired of paying higher and higher taxes to fund unnecessary govt jobs.
I cant wait to see which govt agency will require addition funds to “top up” their guaranteed pension plans next.
Vancouver City clowncil seems to be hitting a fiscal wall these days.
BC Ferries Bankrupt, BC Hydro teetering,
Yep, you cant expect unpensioned, private sector, Taxpayer slaves ( the vast majority of voters) will tolerate the whining from overpaid, over pensioned govt workers forever……….eventually even Canadian sheeple will revolt…

not from that kingston.
cheer up fella, it’s a short ride.

#151 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 11:50 am

@#139 Dharma Bum on 06.30.20 at 9:30 am
Yes, the changes will be EPIC.

Soon, millions of employees will be able to stay at home, waste tons of time, pretend to work while surfing the net and gossiping on Facebook, and find things to complain about INSTEAD of doing exactly the same things at a corporate office space.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vsayg_S4pJg

the amount of comments here would go up exponentially.
no longer just a bunch of old retired dudes complaining.

#152 TurnerNation on 06.30.20 at 11:51 am

Watch your travel rights/abilities folks.
Big closures to small areas, this means fewer tourists too.
It appears they are winding down this tax slave camp we live in, time to herd us into the big cities.

https://aircanada.mediaroom.com/2020-06-30-Air-Canada-Discontinues-Service-on-30-Domestic-Regional-Routes-and-Closes-Eight-Stations-in-Canada

#153 fused on 06.30.20 at 12:07 pm

#147
Everything that was put on clipboard on android phones went to TicTok, mined all your passwords, tracked all your locations and activities.
Just look at what Tim Hortons was gleaning from their app.
http://www.ctvnews.ca/business/tim-hortons-app-under-investigation-over-data-concerns-1.5004323

#154 TurnerNation on 06.30.20 at 12:17 pm

Here come the final death blow to bars, restaraunts.
Have fun hanging out in a medical ward. I won’t be.
They told us day one, #stayhome.
In the New System travel, hanging out with people, must be trained out of us. We are in the compliance phase of this global rollout

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/mandatory-masks-toronto-brampton-mississauga-1.5632435

#155 MF on 06.30.20 at 12:31 pm

@#140 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20

When evaluating evidence, anecdote is considered the lowest of the low. Forgettable and worthless.

That’s the evidence you’ve provided about “overpaid” government workers.

In the past, on this blog, I posted links showing most government employees make a modest salary. You chose to ignore the whole thing apparently.

Everyone pays taxes, even government employees. That line is tired.

MF

#156 jess on 06.30.20 at 12:46 pm

rethinking ‘lies’
This former U.S. health insurance exec says he lied to Americans about Canadian health care

‘I feel terrible about my role in that,’ says Wendell Potter who now leads Medicare for All Now
CBC Radio · Posted: Jun 29, 2020 6:21 PM ET | Last Updated: June 29

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/this-former-u-s-health-insurance-exec-says-he-lied-to-americans-about-canadian-health-care-1.5631874

#157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm

#151 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 11:50 am
@#139 Dharma Bum on 06.30.20 at 9:30 am

Soon, millions of employees will be able to stay at home, waste tons of time, pretend to work while surfing the net and gossiping on Facebook, and find things to complain about INSTEAD of doing exactly the same things at a corporate office space.

————-

the amount of comments here would go up exponentially.

no longer just a bunch of old retired dudes complaining.

————-

Nah. The demographic of this blog doesn’t really change. There’s the odd outlying disaffected, old-before-their-time millennial like yourself, MF, Sunshowers, etc., but they usually don’t last too long since there are other shinier whinier blogs more aligned to an entitlement mentality.

#158 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 1:01 pm

For all the Tesla and Elon fans it’s the ten year celebration. Read more about our hero here:

https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-10-yr-ipo-anniversary-top-moments-in-tsla-history/

#159 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 1:16 pm

@#155 MF
“Everyone pays taxes, even government employees. That line is tired.”
+++

Of course everyone pays taxes.
But once again, you ignore the proven facts that govt employee pension plans are not 100% funded by the govt employees contributions.
Any and all shortfalls are backed by the govts responsible for paying retired govt employees(Fed, Prov, Muni).
Those govt use the taxes of EVERYONE to “top up” pension shortfalls.
Which as the population ages, fewer full time govt employees are hired, ….contributions are only going to get worse.

Each of the three random news article mention billions in shortfalls that are balanced with taxpayer dollars.

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/public-service-pension-plan-faces-4-4b-shortfall-that-liberals-are-legally-bound-to-make-up

https://theindependent.ca/2018/05/12/whats-behind-the-canadian-pension-crisis/

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article/public-sector-pension-reform-less-advertised

Unlike the private sector that must watch their privately funded retirement funds shrink with the markets and suck it up.
Govt employees know that the govt will pay and pay and pay because they can just keep raising taxes to fund these generous guaranteed pension schemes.
70% of the population doesnt have a guaranteed pension plan and and to expect the majority to quietly continue to fund a portion of your plan is hubris.

But , I’m just farting in the wind.
It wont just be me that refuses to re-elect a govt that increases taxes just top shovel it out in generous pensions to retired govt “shirkers”…..it will be 70% of the pop.

#160 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 1:34 pm

Looks like we’re canceling an August Europe trip due to uncertainty.

Oh well- my wife’s disappointed, but for me there’s no better place than home. Especially today with the sunny skies, north wind blowing in more of the same, orcas and porpoises in the water, calm and quiet with dogs crashed out in the sun on the deck, son labouring away on a new brick barbeque, haha.

#161 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 2:03 pm

OMG! Sweden’s overall death rate is off the charts due to Covid!

No, not really.

https://imgur.com/0Io76kz

#162 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 2:09 pm

@#157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm
#151 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 11:50 am
@#139 Dharma Bum on 06.30.20 at 9:30 am

Soon, millions of employees will be able to stay at home, waste tons of time, pretend to work while surfing the net and gossiping on Facebook, and find things to complain about INSTEAD of doing exactly the same things at a corporate office space.

————-

the amount of comments here would go up exponentially.

no longer just a bunch of old retired dudes complaining.

————-

Nah. The demographic of this blog doesn’t really change. There’s the odd outlying disaffected, old-before-their-time millennial like yourself, MF, Sunshowers, etc., but they usually don’t last too long since there are other shinier whinier blogs more aligned to an entitlement mentality.

sorry dude, didn’t mean to trigger you.
It’s a beautiful day, try to get outside.

cheers

#163 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 2:15 pm

#161 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 2:03 pm

OMG! Sweden’s overall death rate is off the charts due to Covid!

No, not really.

https://imgur.com/0Io76kz

————

That’s awful! Err, sorry… I meant totally normal, average and unremarkable.

#164 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 2:17 pm

#162 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 2:09 pm

sorry dude, didn’t mean to trigger you.

It’s a beautiful day, try to get outside.

cheers

————

It’s ok, I’m in my safe place per post #160.

And rich. That helps.

#165 Faron on 06.30.20 at 2:23 pm

#157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm
#151 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 11:50 am
@#139 Dharma Bum on 06.30.20 at 9:30 am

…they usually don’t last too long since there are other shinier whinier blogs more aligned to an entitlement mentality

Or we spend a few weekends with good company IRL and read thoughtful articles, books or whatever and come to realize that this comment section is as addictive, useless and as toxic as hard drugs.

#166 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.30.20 at 2:23 pm

@ MF

Just in case you skipped the National Post article.
Here it is a part summation;

“Auditor General Michael Ferguson warned in a 2014 report that the liabilities in pension plans for public servants, military and RCMP — then $152 billion — could increase with prolonged low interest rates and employees living longer in retirement.

Public servants are already working fewer years and living longer in retirement on their pensions — about 27 years longer — than when the plans were created more than 40 years ago.

A further increase in life expectancy of one to three years could boost the plans’ actuarial obligations by between $4.2-billion and $11.7-billion. The plan has also faced the volatility of the market since the 2008 financial crisis and low interest rates, increasing the cost of pension obligations…..”

So.
As I have repeatedly said ad nauseaum ;

Govt employee pension plans are unsustainable in their current financial form.

To expect unpensioned Canadian taxpayers to continue to fund the shortfalls, year after year after year……is self entitled arrogance….. but on further reflection…..not a far reach for most public sector employees demanding their “deserved” defined benefit pension payments.

#167 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 2:31 pm

@#164 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 2:17 pm
#162 kingston boy on 06.30.20 at 2:09 pm

sorry dude, didn’t mean to trigger you.

It’s a beautiful day, try to get outside.

cheers

————

It’s ok, I’m in my safe place per post #160.

And rich. That helps.

ahh, good for you fella.
everybody on the internet is rich though :)

#168 IHCTD9 on 06.30.20 at 2:37 pm

#75 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 7:24 pm
#70 IHCTD9 on 06.29.20 at 7:08 pm
#63 Nonplused on 06.29.20 at 6:50 pm

But you need a garden tractor.
——

Minimum.

—————-

But as long as you stay away from the orange or green ones they aren’t that much money and last practically for life with proper maintenance. I have an orange one (came with the house) and it is I think about 10 years old and it has 280 hours on it. You should be able to get 1000-2000 hours with proper maintenance, maybe more. The other tools you need like weed snippers and leaf blowers you need for a postage sized lot too you just want bigger ones if you live in the exurbs.
— —

I have an orange one too, about 730 hours on it, and still going strong. Excellent cut.

I’ve found it’s worth buying the good stuff. As I get older I just want the tools to work when I need them. Don’t have the tolerance to fight with my equipment anymore.

Case in point, the old 99.00 RYOBI weed whacker I bought when I moved here. Ran like $h!t 99% of the time. Single .060 line, no clutch so the string spun even at idle. Took 10 minutes of yanking the string, pumping the primer, and farting around with the choke to start it. Double that time for first start up in the spring. Liked to stall the minute you put it down.

Bought 500.00 Sthil. Twin .120” line, clutched hub, 2 line fills does the entire season. 1-2 pulls for a “burble”, then 1 pull after releasing the choke and it’s running, every time – even first start up. Awesome machine, better in every way over the POS 99.00 RYOBI.

#169 Do we have all the facts on 06.30.20 at 2:39 pm

#161 Geddy Lee

Wouldn’t it be nice to see a similar chart for Canada.

Canada averages 25,300 deaths per month for those 65 years of age and up. That is over 100,000 deaths in any four month period Eg March to June 2020.

Over 90% of the 8,600 deaths attributed to the Covid 19 virus between a March and June were 65 years or older and many of those had more than one pre-existing health issue.

I have been asking for a comparison of mortality in 2919 and 2020 and all I get is blank stares.

What gives?

#170 Tater on 06.30.20 at 2:40 pm

#148 Bytor the Snow Dog on 06.30.20 at 11:34 am
@Tater- So many assumptions so little time.

1) Blue vs. red states. So what? The point is the virus is a nothingburger to 99.999% of healthy people. You assume I care about US politics.
2) Fox News- I have not watched Fox News ever in my entire life. Don’t really care for TV much except for the NHL, the NFL, Car Shows, Star Trek, and good documentaries.
3) The study was done by Stanford University and was pre-published on a medical site. I have the link but I’m not giving it to you so you can do the standard lefty tactic of “discredit the source”. If you want it you’ll have to work for it. Interesting how the media buried it though given that it was first published June 6, 2020.
————————————————————-

You referred to the 100 largest counties as Trumpland, they absolutely aren’t as shown by their voting history.

Anyway, I’m done with you. The study you’re talking about is the Santa Clara anti-body study. It wasn’t released on June 6th and has been thoroughly debunked.

I’d love to be proven wrong, as it would mark a significant step forward in the understanding of this virus.

#171 MF on 06.30.20 at 2:41 pm

157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm

Been here nearly a decade now. Entitled enough for you?

How long have you been here?

MF

#172 ain't life rand on 06.30.20 at 3:34 pm

@#171 MF on 06.30.20 at 2:41 pm
157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm

Been here nearly a decade now. Entitled enough for you?

How long have you been here?

MF
——————————–

he’s only been trolling here for 6 months or so.

#173 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 4:20 pm

#172 ain’t life rand on 06.30.20 at 3:34 pm
@#171 MF on 06.30.20 at 2:41 pm
157 Sail away on 06.30.20 at 12:48 pm

Been here nearly a decade now. Entitled enough for you?
How long have you been here?
MF

—————

he’s only been trolling here for 6 months or so.

—————

That’s about right. I followed for maybe two years before posting, posted thoughtfully for about a year, and have now been trolling for 6 months.

Let’s say 3.5 years.

#174 Linda on 07.01.20 at 12:40 am

#159 ‘Crowded’ – correction regarding the ‘70% who have no pension plan’. Unless all of those working beavers have been paid under the table, they have all of them been paying into the CPP (QPP in La Belle Province). Which are – wait for it – defined benefit pension plans, which their employers also pay into unless they too are part of the black market. Said defined benefit plan is adjusted annually for inflation to boot. What the much quoted 70% may not have is a secondary work based pension plan. That does not however take away from the point that most Canadians do in fact have a DB pension plan.

#175 Westcdn on 07.01.20 at 4:17 am

I worked at a logging camp at Beaver Cove for a few summers. My father loved me because I had survival skills. Across the wake was an old whaling station called Telegraph Cove. It was a pile of ruins at the time but it still had a great deck. Someone bought it and converted into a tourist trap – actually very pretty. Plus Robson Blight is just around the corner and fishing is good – think tyee.

My sister caught the biggest Ling Cod I ever saw. It got away because the hook separated. It looked liked a whale to me. Speaking of whales, I took my sister on a ride on small roundabout boat.

I spied a pod of orcas coming toward us. So I parked the boat in their path. When they got close I decided to move but the boat did not cooperate. It turned out a cotter pin on the propeller had left its job. While trying to fix it the pod passed under us. Scared me as those things are big.

#176 John Zani on 07.01.20 at 9:14 pm

Bill Grable, who cares it is a biggest hit in 300 years to the UK economy. Interest rates are so low and crashed by the Bank of England that some are negative never in history and just recent 1 year ago the lowest interest rates in over 500 years. What did you think that they would only screw savers, fixed income and fixed rate investors. they are coming for everyone.

#177 Jake Simpson on 07.01.20 at 9:27 pm

Linda, the C.P.P. is a joke compared to public sector, government workers pension plans. It covers most people anywhere from 20% to 25% of their last paycheck value.

Someone making their last paycheck $4,000 a month is likely getting maximum $1,000 a month in C.P.P. This is based on about 30 to 35 years of working life. Most DB, defined pension plans covering government workers is at least 70% and some as high as 90%. This is a big difference with most government workers pension plan holders getting $3,000 to $5,000 a month. Guess what, we the taxpayers which is only one taxpayer are paying big time for them for 3 levels of government workers pensions Federal, Provincial, Municipal and their agencies.

There are many other benefits government workers get as well from medical, healthcare not covered through regular provincial plans like OHIP and they also get funerals tax free paid out as high as $10,000. Please don’t compare the very inadequate C.P.P. which is fully taxable as well.