Save ‘The Last Dance’

DOUG  By Guest Blogger Doug Rowat

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What do they say about mullets? Business in the front, party in the back? Zoom meetings during the Covid-19 lockdown have become the mullets of 2020: suit and tie for the camera, anything goes below the waist.

I have to confess to my clients on Zoom, this is what’s most often going on below my waist:

But avert your eyes for a moment from the Cro-Magnon-man legs and notice the Air Jordans. Not only are they damn comfortable, but like almost everything else that I’ve purchased in my 23 years or so on Bay Street, there’s an investment angle.

The shoes are a retro version of Michael Jordan’s iconic “Bred” Air Jordans, which were famously banned (so the legend goes) by the NBA because they were in violation of its team uniform policy. Most things ‘Michael Jordan’ are good long-term investments anyways, but I was fortunate to own them just prior to the release of Netflix’s epic Chicago Bulls documentary “The Last Dance”. Below is their appreciation on StockX, a benchmark for the US$2 billion sneaker reseller market (possibly on its way to US$6 billion. Guess when the documentary was released?

Air Jordan Retro 1 High OG “Bred”

Source: StockX; chart reflects price movement since 2016 release date (US dollars)

Alas, if only I’d invested in Jordan’s 1986 Fleer rookie cards, which were going for US$40k-$50k prior to the documentary, but now routinely sell for US$75k-$85k in top condition (check out the ‘completed items’ on eBay and see for yourself). Given his enormous and enduring popularity, I doubt that their value’s peaked.

The coronavirus lockdown combined with the insanely popular Jordan documentary may have marked a tipping point for the entire sports card market and I continue to think that, if approached carefully, sports cards make an excellent alternative investment.

Gary Vaynerchuk is a fascinating American entrepreneur. Fascinating not only because he’s successful, having grown his net worth to more than US$150 million, but also because he makes an enormous effort to engage and educate the public through books and social media, and does it without a hint of elitism (sound familiar?). He’s famously said that he gets as excited by a one-dollar garage sale find that he can turn into eight dollars on eBay as he does from a large business deal. He makes the case for sports cards perfectly in this short interview.

What the video doesn’t show is Vaynerchuk’s further recommendation that you spend at least 80 hours thoroughly researching the market before you make even a single purchase. He also notes that concentration risk is a critical consideration—recognize the risks and don’t buy in a quantity that will derail your financial future. Understand also how the risks vary from one type of alternative investment to the next. Vaynerchuk has suggested that comic books, for instance, are lower risk than sports cards—Iron Man will never break a leg, but an athlete might. However, risks aside, an alternative investment should, above all, be fun.

I’ve covered all these points in my previous blog posts:

There’s nothing wrong with having a small allocation (perhaps 2–3%) of your overall portfolio held in something non-traditional.

Perhaps you collect wine, scotch, antiques, vintage cars or motorcycles, artwork, coins or stamps, vinyl records, classic movie posters, sports memorabilia or Star Wars collectibles (check out the Netflix show The Toys that Made Us—a rare Boba Fett action figure can put your kids through university). What’s important is 1) it’s enjoyable and remains so, and 2) you constantly educate yourself and purchase carefully, thus increasing the odds that your collection actually appreciates.

You also need to be fully aware of the risks of your investment. For instance, I know that sports card companies can easily disrupt the market by producing too much product. This is what happened in the mid-1990s when the sports card market was on life support due to oversupply. I’m also fully aware that fraud and counterfeiting are ongoing problems. But this is true of most other investments as well, including art and wine. Witness the collapse of the legendary New York art gallery Knoedler in 2011 or the uncovering of prolific wine fraudster Rudy Kurniawan in 2012.

So, what do I personally collect? Connor McDavid rookie cards…. He’s clearly lived up to the hype. We’ll see if my investment appreciates in 10 years, but it’ll be a lot more fun than investing in, say, a bond ETF. Don’t misinterpret: bond ETFs are crucial long-term investments, but they certainly don’t get the pulse racing.

Investing can be an anxiety-inducing emotional rollercoaster. But the smaller, non-traditional sleeves of your portfolio shouldn’t be this. They should simply be enjoyable.

Just look at that picture with my Air Jordans, my swim trunks and my hairy legs. Do you think I’m not having a great time?

Doug Rowat, FCSI® is Portfolio Manager with Turner Investments and Senior Vice President, Private Client Group, Raymond James Ltd.

 

101 comments ↓

#1 Flop... on 06.13.20 at 12:10 pm

Robax, thanks for relieving me of the title of most messed up legs on the blog…

M45BC

#2 Drill Baby Drill on 06.13.20 at 12:18 pm

Thanks a lot. I cannot unview the photo of your legs.

#3 Flop... on 06.13.20 at 12:19 pm

Robax, I saw a story on the news this morning of someone finding a vintage baseball collection up in an attic.

Something like six signed Babe Ruth cards, and some signed Lou Gehrig cards as well.

Apparently will be divided up and sold separately, expected to fetch millions.

Could probably get $27 for my Aussie Rules collection from the 80’s…

M45BC

#4 Cyclist on 06.13.20 at 12:28 pm

Doug – 2 things

1) either some LG shorts, Mypackage briefs or compression shorts and

2) shave the legs

#5 Handsome Ned on 06.13.20 at 12:37 pm

Many west coast anglers collect prewar Hardy brand fly reels. They were made for British atlantic salmon anglers, overbuilt by craftsmen. Since one had to be rich to afford fishing rights in the UK, they were happy to pay the equivalent of around 500 dollars for one of these reels. The beauty of these reels is that you can still use them for Steelhead fishing and they actually appreciate in value if they show some use. When one obtains one of these beauties it is fun to speculate who once owned it and maybe they were royalty or a famous angler like Hemmingway. There is nothing like the scream they make when a steelhead is ripping off line.

#6 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 12:39 pm

Well I guess that answers the question
Boxers or Briefs?

#7 JimP on 06.13.20 at 12:44 pm

Nice story, and each to their own, but it’s not really investing. It’s not even gambling, it’s just buying crap specifically produced for “collectors” (sports cards aren’t for kids any more, just delusional old guys thinking about future “value”) and hoping that a few gems will pop out of the dross that they can sell to some other “collector”.

They only have marginally more intrinsic value than Bitcoin in that you can at least look at them, but their monetary value is still a closed-circuit of like-minded “investors”, each the definition of a Greater Fool.

Again, if you like playing with hoarding useless consumerist crap then all power to you. No offence intended, but you’re playing, not investing. :)

#8 What free market? on 06.13.20 at 12:52 pm

“the Fed has made stocks the risk-free asset, it’s the Portnoys & Covid day traders who are the smart money… which is probably bad news for all those mature professional advisors and hedge funders who are generously paid to analyze fundamentals – well, they have all been made redundant.“

#9 the jaguar on 06.13.20 at 12:53 pm

Doug,

Are those your legs or are you riding a chicken?

#10 Andrewski on 06.13.20 at 1:00 pm

My late father was a prolific collector of rare WW2 memorabilia. I donated it all to a worthy non-profit museum. The learned curator told me that he had never seen some of the pieces that my Dad had in his collection. Last year a foreign diplomat had visited this small museum on a scheduled visit. He was to spend only 15 minutes there, but ended up taking 2 hours pouring through the treasure trove of documents! I feel great about having done that.

#11 Oakville Rocks! on 06.13.20 at 1:01 pm

Great Saturday post as always!

As far as collections go, I am sure there are many like me who cannot fathom collecting something that does not get used once in awhile, in some fashion. With respect to sneakers and sports memorabilia, I see more and more people are starting to use these objects as part of their decor and not just in man caves.

And I imagine I am not alone in thinking, $1200 for a pair of sneakers? wait what.. did Jordan sign them, wear them – that price is crazy. I loved the Last Dance, even with its many flaws and still love Scottie and the Worm more than Michael.

LETS GO RAPS!

#12 What free market? on 06.13.20 at 1:17 pm

“Powell is reinforcing the view that markets that are moving higher are functioning and markets that are moving lower are malfunctioning. The market is more broken today than it was on March 23rd, and it is entirely due to the Central Bank. The most remarkable aspect about Federal Reserve policy is that very little of it has been related to economics – only the markets.“

#13 conan on 06.13.20 at 1:18 pm

The hybrid Parliament that they are talking about will be social distancing meets zoom software. Most of the MP’s will be dialing in from home.

For those that do not know, Zoom software pans the camera to the person who is speaking. This is Kryptonite to hecklers, and will change Parliament forever.

There is a certain political party that does not really offer anything except heckling, and this is going to hurt them.

#14 What free market? on 06.13.20 at 1:23 pm

“we haven’t seen the last of these painful reversals, like we had yesterday or in the middle of the day [today], as we work off the most overbought market in history, or at least the most overbought market since S&P started measuring these things 35 years ago,”

#15 mike from mtl on 06.13.20 at 1:45 pm

Totally, hobby trading of actual stuff with an investment slant can be rewarding, but as with any investment they do have their seasons.. Beaniebabies!

Musical instruments or professional studio gear are definitely on the line between useful thing and ‘collector’ bubble. Even electronics, some can be extremely desirable to the right people and quite liquid, at the right price of course. Analogue ICs that are not made anymore, specialist fabrication that could only be done at scale, so on.

Shoe collecting though never made sense to me, I mean they’re clearly made to be used, and old pairs from what I understand are functionally useless / fall apart.

#16 Inequity on 06.13.20 at 1:51 pm

Scotch is wonderful thing to collect, unfortunately the ROI on empty scotch bottles is not helping me get to my retirement goal.

#17 SoggyShorts on 06.13.20 at 1:51 pm

#169 Willie the WASP on 06.13.20 at 1:11 pm
#167 SoggyShorts on 06.13.20 at 11:53 am

… My point is very simple. Canada was a WASP ruled society until probably late into the 20th century. Positions of power were dominated by WASPS. WASPs were by the very nature of being WASPs privileged like nobody else in society. You entered positions in industry and government because of your WASP background. That is the point I was making. I also suspect, it hasn’t entirely disappeared from Canadian society…
**************************
I think you need to
1. Check the definition of W.A.S.P.
2. Check your history.

#18 Sail Away on 06.13.20 at 1:53 pm

#5 Handsome Ned on 06.13.20 at 12:37 pm

Many west coast anglers collect prewar Hardy brand fly reels. They were made for British atlantic salmon anglers, overbuilt by craftsmen. Since one had to be rich to afford fishing rights in the UK, they were happy to pay the equivalent of around 500 dollars for one of these reels. The beauty of these reels is that you can still use them for Steelhead fishing and they actually appreciate in value if they show some use. When one obtains one of these beauties it is fun to speculate who once owned it and maybe they were royalty or a famous angler like Hemmingway. There is nothing like the scream they make when a steelhead is ripping off line.

——————-

I had an impressive record of losing decent fish by breaking them off with that click-pawl drag and palming the reel for resistance.

Finally went to a modern Ross reel with new tech drag. Much better success rate closing the deal. Hey, want to buy an old Hardy?

#19 Brian Ripley on 06.13.20 at 1:55 pm

According to https://news.artnet.com/market/art-market-auction-analysis-march-2020-1848597

“By the end of 2020, we’ll be lucky if sales were half of what they were last year,” said one analyst.

On my TSX Chart http://www.chpc.biz/tsx-indexes.html
…the Canadian commodities index is painting a deflationary trend as well.

#20 Jake on 06.13.20 at 2:12 pm

I personally collect vintage guitar pedals and synths. Not only do they go up in value but I also get to have fun making noise in my basement. Win win!!

#21 JWD on 06.13.20 at 2:18 pm

The problem is the pureness of days gone by. The 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and part of the 90’s nobody thought about collecting things like hockey cards. And now? How many people will hold onto a McDavid rookie card? Too many. But try and find a pristine Gretzky rookie card. Good luck. I know, I tried to collect them in ’79 and all the kids used to tear them up! Fortunately, there are still things that will come back to popularity and become valuable and collectable. I recently read about the increase in value of VW rabbits of the 80’s. Who knew! It’s certainly fun to guess what might be trending in the future and what might increase in value.

Another great post but maybe some matching Air Jordan shorts next time? :)

#22 Phil on 06.13.20 at 2:21 pm

I thought maybe you lost a bet with a sparrow Doug.
As a guy with stout sailor legs myself, I laugh heartily!
I do agree with your idea of having a fun part to your portfolio though.
I have bought and sold boats and guitars and usually made a tidy profit.
One thing about Kijiji investments; they almost never go to zero and you have fun while you own them.

#23 Ari Telias on 06.13.20 at 2:39 pm

Hello Garth Fans,
Reader since day one, I rarely post but saw so many motorcycle riders in the Lower Mainland read the blog and thought maybe a nice “Greater Fool” motorcycle ride could be organized.
If interested please contact me (I am submitting mail in post – not sure if it shows up), or through Linked-In, there is only one Ari Telias in BC.
Cheers

#24 Mullets Rock! on 06.13.20 at 2:51 pm

COVID will bring back the mullet for all!

#25 Doug Rowat on 06.13.20 at 2:59 pm

#7 JimP on 06.13.20 at 12:44 pm

Nice story, and each to their own, but it’s not really investing. It’s not even gambling, it’s just buying crap…

Again, if you like playing with hoarding useless consumerist crap then all power to you. No offence intended, but you’re playing, not investing. :)

Sports cards have been around for over 150 years, and many (Ruth, Mantle, Wagner, Russell, Jordan, Howe, Orr) have enduring cultural significance. These older cards have defied ‘bubbles’ and steadily appreciated.

Newer cards may or may not work out, but the 20-year track record says otherwise.

I’ve acknowledged the risk, hence why I say a couple percent is all such an investment should make up, but don’t dismiss it because you don’t understand it (and you clearly don’t).

Profitable investments start with curiosity not bold, ignorant proclamations.

Btw, if—just for fun–you’d listened to my Connor McDavid recommendation in my 2018 post here on the subject, you would have already doubled your money.

–Doug

#26 50 YEARS OF MAPLE LEAF INCOMPETENCE! on 06.13.20 at 3:04 pm

THE MAKE BELIEVES ARE 95 DAYS WITHOUT A LOSS!!

LOVE TORONTO – WOOHOOoooooooOOOOOOOO!!

#27 Doug Rowat on 06.13.20 at 3:06 pm

#11 Oakville Rocks! on 06.13.20 at 1:01 pm

Great Saturday post as always!

And I imagine I am not alone in thinking, $1200 for a pair of sneakers? wait what.. did Jordan sign them, wear them – that price is crazy.

If Jordan had signed and worn them they’d be worth US$560,000 (yeah, US$560,000):

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/michael-jordan-s-sneakers-fetch-record-us-560-000-at-sotheby-s-1.1437531

–Doug

#28 50 YEARS OF MAPLE LEAF INCOMPETENCE! on 06.13.20 at 3:07 pm

Doug, Doug, Doug…..why are you such a TORONTO HATER!!!???

Today is the First Anniversary of June 13, 2019, when the Raptors won the NBA Championship – and yet, you are showing a picture of Michael Jordan in a Bulls jersey!!??

Even though the victory celebration at City Hall had …..

ONLY ONE SHOOTING, FOUR WOUNDED AND ONE BABY DEATH!!!

PLUS THE GTA HAD BARELY A DOZEN HIT AND RUN DEATHS SINCE MAY!!

SO, WHAZZUP DUDE!!!!?????

WHY HATE THE BESTEST PLACE IN CANADA, IN THE WORLD!!??

Just this month, the GTA HAS HAD FEWER THAN 200 SHOOTINGS!!!

And…….

(drum roll please!!!!)

********************************************
THE MAKE BELIEVES ARE 95 DAYS WITHOUT A LOSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WoooHooooooooOOOOOOOoooOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!
********************************************

C-mon man, show some more respect to Toronturds and GTAHoles, Doug!

#29 brydle604 on 06.13.20 at 3:23 pm

I have been collecting and investing in Iconic HO Brass Canadian Pacific Railway steam locomotives and several Canadian National steam locomotives. Great fun and becoming rare, as they are no longer produced. Many have doubled in value from the price I paid for them.

#30 Doug Rowat on 06.13.20 at 3:23 pm

#21 JWD on 06.13.20 at 2:18 pm

But try and find a pristine Gretzky rookie card. Good luck. I know, I tried to collect them in ’79 and all the kids used to tear them up!

Another great post but maybe some matching Air Jordan shorts next time? :)

A ‘gem mint’ Gretzky rookie sold for US$465,000 in 2016:

https://www.beckett.com/news/psa-10-gretzky-rookie-sets-new-record-price-for-a-hockey-card/

A steal really. It’s hard to imagine it selling for less than a million if it came up for auction again now.

–Doug

#31 islander on 06.13.20 at 3:49 pm

4 Cyclist:
Really? – I’d say just keep all as is. (Shaved legs are great for competitive swimmers of all genders, but guys working from home?)

On that note – best to invest in Procter and Gamble (PG) stocks.
Should take off like a shot when guys start shaving their mugs again!

#32 Ronaldo on 06.13.20 at 3:51 pm

#21 JWD on 06.13.20 at 2:18 pm
The problem is the pureness of days gone by. The 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and part of the 90’s nobody thought about collecting things like hockey cards. And now? How many people will hold onto a McDavid rookie card? Too many. But try and find a pristine Gretzky rookie card. Good luck. I know, I tried to collect them in ’79 and all the kids used to tear them up! Fortunately, there are still things that will come back to popularity and become valuable and collectable. I recently read about the increase in value of VW rabbits of the 80’s. Who knew! It’s certainly fun to guess what might be trending in the future and what might increase in value.

Another great post but maybe some matching Air Jordan shorts next time? :)
—————————————————————-
My sons both collected hockey and baseball cards starting in 1979 until about 1986 as well as specific comic books. When they left home I offered to pay them face value for their comic collection which they accepted gratefully. They were all pristine and in acid free plastic covers. Several hundred of them. I stored them away and last year asked my younger son if he was interested in getting his collection of cards and comics from 30 years ago and he gladly took them. He went through and catalogued and repacked them. I asked what he thought the value was and he replied, about $5000. Not a bad investment given it cost me $300 to buy him out. This will go towards my grandaughters university fund or whatever.

#33 Ottawan on 06.13.20 at 3:52 pm

I collect Nickel Nickels from circulation.
Favorite finds are foreign coins circulating here in Canada. Have found coins from,
-Euro
-Bangladesh
-Bahrain
-Japan
-Jamaica
-Cayman Islands
-Dominican
-UK
-Bahamas
-New Zealand
-Czech Republic
-Egypt

#34 conan on 06.13.20 at 3:59 pm

Knew someone who had this 1950’s fridge in his basement. Ugly brown with lots of shiny trim on it. Sucked 100’s in power every year, but this piece of junk was big in Japan, worth 30 k.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCOE4ALOrKA

#35 Cyclist on 06.13.20 at 4:06 pm

31 Islander – yeah but the bedsheets just glide over you….

As an added benefit, the war wounds are dealt with much more neatly.

#36 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 4:14 pm

@#33 Ottawan

You should see the “collection” of foreign coins held by most large Canadain cities, parking meter coin collection depts..
I saw a photo of a room in Van that had pallets stacked with 50 gallon drums of ‘foreign coins” ( other than US) recovered from parking meters over the decades….too expensive to sort and send back.
Apparently British 5 pence coins have the same physical similarities to Loonies? ….. so…. a 5 pence coin would get you the same parking time as a Canuck $1 Loonie.
Seems to be droves of them at the Van coin depot.
Although cash in meters is dwindling year by year.
I still enjoy dumping nickels, dimes and the odd pennies into a Van meter when I know I’ll be parking in a metered area of the Lower Brain land…
Never loonies or twoonies.
They make zero money for their troubles, handling, processing, etc. crappy, almost useless, coins.

#37 Eco Capitalist on 06.13.20 at 4:30 pm

@ #29 brydle604

I have been collecting and investing in Iconic HO Brass Canadian Pacific Railway steam locomotives and several Canadian National steam locomotives. Great fun and becoming rare, as they are no longer produced. Many have doubled in value from the price I paid for them.
———-
Until Rapido releases them in plastic, anyway. ;-)
———-
I didn’t buy them to collect them, but I’ve found my Canon L series lenses don’t seem to depreciate so long as I take care of them.

#38 Palpha on 06.13.20 at 4:54 pm

I inherited a coin collection from my grandfather. No idea what they are worth or even where to start. I googled some of the coins and some are worth $100 or so. But others may be worth way more. I have no idea where to start and don’t just want to give this bag to some random person. Any ideas?

#39 Handsome Ned on 06.13.20 at 4:55 pm

#18 Sail away

I am with you on reels, I have a Loop Danielson disc drag that will stop a train. Hardys are fun once in awhile but knuckle busting is not. Still a Hardy perfect is worth about 700us and over 1000 with original leather pouch.

#40 Hipster on 06.13.20 at 5:00 pm

What about vintage electronics such as tube amps and tube mics from the 1950s?
People pay thousands of dollars for Neumann U47 and U67 clones.
Those microphones were manufactured in the 1950s and are worth tens of thousands of dollars today.

#41 espressobob on 06.13.20 at 5:33 pm

Bought a pair of new balance runners way back in the eighties, wear them occasionally over the years. The problem is these little puppies are getting quite aromatic to the point were my neighbors dog won’t go near me while wearing them.

Have considered listing these ripe beauties on eBay possibly for someone who has any issues with social distancing.

When it comes to my shorts, let’s just say a vaccine should be a priority.

#42 Willie the WASP on 06.13.20 at 5:33 pm

#17 SoggyShorts on 06.13.20 at 1:51 pm
#169 Willie the WASP on 06.13.20 at 1:11 pm
#167 SoggyShorts on 06.13.20 at 11:53 am

… My point is very simple. Canada was a WASP ruled society until probably late into the 20th century. Positions of power were dominated by WASPS. WASPs were by the very nature of being WASPs privileged like nobody else in society. You entered positions in industry and government because of your WASP background. That is the point I was making. I also suspect, it hasn’t entirely disappeared from Canadian society…
**************************
I think you need to
1. Check the definition of W.A.S.P.
2. Check your history.

_———————————————————

Let’s see White Anglo Saxon Protestant for WASP? On the history front, please enlighten me. I have several dozen books on Canadian history. Please, oh please enlighten me on wise one…

#43 Comic Carl on 06.13.20 at 5:39 pm

I bought an Amazing Fantasy #15 30 years ago, rated at 6.5 CGC for a mere $10k. Today it will fetch over $150k. For the non-comic books fans, this is the first appearance of Spiderman.

#44 Nonplused on 06.13.20 at 5:40 pm

This is good advice and there is some thinking to be done around this subject. For instance, my small collection of motorcycles declines in value every year but doesn’t become any less enjoyable.

However collecting for profit is difficult for most people. A good classic care in mint condition can easily cost $60,000 for example and then you have to store it and maintain it in prime condition. Very hard to actually make money that way. Collecting coins also requires a lot of expertise unless you are buying bulk silver but that is really more of a play on the silver price and there is a wide bid/ask as the easiest place to sell them is a coin shop and they need to make money on the transaction. Antiques are fun but hard to find and harder to sell.

But still, motorcycles and classic cars are fun, so if you have the money live a little.

#45 Nonplused on 06.13.20 at 5:42 pm

#38 Palpha on 06.13.20 at 4:54 pm

If you live in a major city there is probably a coin shop that can appraise the collection. Estates are where they source most of their coins. But they aren’t going to pay you what they will sell them for, perhaps about half.

#46 Guy Lafleur on 06.13.20 at 5:43 pm

The problem with the Connor McDavid rookie card is a massive supply of them. When the greats of yesteryear had their rookie cards, card collecting wasn’t what it is today. It is rare to find rookie cards from the 60s in mint condition.

#47 brydle604 on 06.13.20 at 5:45 pm

#37 Eco Capitalist
I have the Rapido Royal Hudson valued $700, My Brass Royal Hudson painted is worth $1400 usd.

#48 Brew on 06.13.20 at 5:46 pm

I should get back into cards. I have a Gretzky rookie ungraded.

#49 Lambchop on 06.13.20 at 5:47 pm

#30 Doug Rowat on 06.13.20 at 3:23 pm

A ‘gem mint’ Gretzky rookie sold for US$465,000 in 2016:

https://www.beckett.com/news/psa-10-gretzky-rookie-sets-new-record-price-for-a-hockey-card/

A steal really. It’s hard to imagine it selling for less than a million if it came up for auction again now.

–Doug
________________________

That just makes me cringe when I think back to when we would buy a $0.25 pack of O-pee-chees on the way to school.
First, jam that crappy gum on your mouth and chew till it hurts.
Second, find all the Gretzky rookie cards and tear ‘em up.

Nobody would let you shoot with a Gretzky, unless you added another card, sometimes 2.

I coulda been a kajillionnaire.

#50 ALFRED E. NEUMAN on 06.13.20 at 6:07 pm

Doug, good gams brother. Some Nureyev in the family?

Musta bin a bummer having casts on both legs at once, and for so long. Betcha you’re real happy they’re off.

And hey, do not worry. Those muscles will return.

It was Kris Kristofferson who once said:
“They say the first thing to go is your legs, then its your reflexes, then its your friends.”

Mebbe so. But this ‘ZZ Top’ fave has lotsa legs, reflexes, and friends:

https://youtu.be/eUDcTLaWJuo

#51 Oracle of Ottawa on 06.13.20 at 6:07 pm

I collected coins, stamps, hockey and baseball cards when I was a kid. My coin collection got stolen. I think I tossed my card collection way back not foreseeing that it had intrinsic value and I auctioned my stamp collection for a little profit. There’s no kids in my family that were interested in this kind of stuff that I could pass it down to. I am a bit of an audiophile and appreciate good sound and good music. I guess you could say people who invest in bitcoin are betting as much as those investing in basketball shoes. What it boils down to is the price is reliant on what someone is willing to pay for it.

#52 The Mandrake Mechanism on 06.13.20 at 6:08 pm

Job well done – now if people only spent 80 hours on education when they bought real estate. No need to do that for paper if you have guys like Garth or Doug at the helm – they’re reading and researching even in their skivvies as photos have now proven.

I worked with the boss’ son one year – he 22 me 50 – and he bought and sold sneakers on the side – hold and wait flip for profit. For a moment I thought this kid and his ilk are the future of Canada and the future looks good. I always warm up to a card carrying capitalist.

For us early and late baby boomers we have found ourselves sitting on goldmines because of our childhood loves – sports cards, vinyl records, books, comics, and other “collectibles” – hey they were just toys to play with back in the day…still are today quite frankly.

I’m a huge fan of the rock group KISS so my 70’s collection of their stuff is big money, as opposed to the overpriced items they have over manufactured and over distributed in the last 20 years. Just like KISS memorabilia you must find the great fool to sell to and I see them at every KISS Expo I attend annually.

I play in a KISS tribute band but my Gibson Les Paul Ace Frehley Budokan does not get used – mint condition – bought for $2K CDN now valued at $7K CDN as they are no longer made after a limited edition run. I would still need the greater foolish emotionally charged guitar player on eBay or Craigslist to get that price.

My vinyl records and hockey cards have one thing in common – I don’t price out the collection – I talk about it by weight – I have over 500 lbs of hockey cards and over 1,000 lbs of vinyl. Try listing that on the TSX. All bought for pennies on the dollar of course.

I think that Doug and all of us would agree that it’s a very tricky game to play, but whether it’s Superman Comics, Air Jordans, Duplexes, or ETF’s you need to buy…low…sell…high. You need to spend 80 hours (or 10,000 hours?) on your new investment muse du jour…and like mullets, a rock n roll tour bus is where the business is in the front and….well you know the rest.

KKR NYSE Feb 14th $33.54 USD, $29.15 June 12th

YAMCY OTCMKTS Feb 14th $52.64 USD, $50.54 June 12th

TOPPS – private

Upper Deck – private

Sigh…..

#53 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 6:27 pm

@#38 Palpha
“I inherited a coin collection”
++++

Well.
Since the collection is free.
Spend a little time on the internet cataloging each coin as to value.
tons of websites out there

#54 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 6:30 pm

@#35 Cyclist
“As an added benefit, the war wounds are dealt with much more neatly.

++++
yep.
Nothing like the anticipation of ripping a band-aid off a hairy leg or arm.

#55 Sail Away on 06.13.20 at 7:12 pm

My wife has two big stamp collection books from her grandad. I spent an hour sorting through values and was up to around $97 in $2, $3, $4 increments, and maybe 1/100th through before absolutely losing all interest and sticking them back in the bookshelf. There they shall remain forevermore.

#56 Wrk.dover on 06.13.20 at 7:14 pm

Anthony Wiener got his butt kicked for a pic like that.

Maybe some ladies collect them though.

But something is missing.

#57 My eyes! My eyes! on 06.13.20 at 7:23 pm

Some things can’t be “”unseen”.

I’ve been wearing “lounge pants” for 3 months now. My kids ride me about the plaid but they are comfy and don’t expose them to tragedies that will scar them for life such as this.

#58 akashic record on 06.13.20 at 7:28 pm

Showing off in Michael Jordan’s iconic “Bred” Air Jordans with straight knees just ain’t gonna cut it.

#59 Doug Rowat on 06.13.20 at 7:33 pm

#49 Lambchop on 06.13.20 at 5:47 pm

That just makes me cringe when I think back to when we would buy a $0.25 pack of O-pee-chees on the way to school.
First, jam that crappy gum on your mouth and chew till it hurts.
Second, find all the Gretzky rookie cards and tear ‘em up.

Nobody would let you shoot with a Gretzky, unless you added another card, sometimes 2.

I coulda been a kajillionnaire.

—-

Apparently, this gentleman took a perfectly good wax box from Gretzky’s rookie year, a US$60,000 investment, and decided to rip it open.

Forward to last 20 seconds. Now, that’s gambling.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qNruArbVB3A

—Doug

#60 McSteve on 06.13.20 at 8:23 pm

I collected old silver coins. When money was actually money.

I used to collect hockey cards. All the best ones are in plastics sleeves but all the rest were in a bunch of bags that I stuffed in a box and carried around for 35+ years. My 9 year old has found them and he thinks he’s won the lottery. All the Leaf heavyweights like aging Mike Palmateer, 15th year Borje Salmings and the air brushed Mel Bridemans.

#61 Pete from St. Cesaire on 06.13.20 at 8:34 pm

With collectible stuff you’ve got to know what you’re doing. Certain brands are always a good bet: McIntosh, Leica, Patek Philippe, Ferrari, etc.
But don’t buy stuff just to keep it around; if it was made for using, use it.
I used to catch people’s ire for running my E-Type in the winter, but that’s what cars are for.
Nothing sadder than a Stradivarius sitting in a glass, climate controlled case, never again to make the beautiful music from which it gained it’s reputation.

#62 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 8:55 pm

@#56 Wrk.Dover
“But something is missing.”
++++

He’s a financial adviser …not a porn star.

#63 JacqueShellacque on 06.13.20 at 9:03 pm

Doug,

I find this post hard to square with this site’s disdain for crypto. Crypto solves a problem (distributed trust over untrusted networks) that has potentially endless practical applications not even conceived yet. Sure, it’s unclear whether any of that potential will ever play out, maybe it’ll be seen in 50 years the way we look at phrenology today. And the Lindy effect tells us it’s more likely the sports memorabilia market will be around longer than crypto, simply because it has been. But doesn’t something with potentially unlimited applications seem like a better bet than going long on fragile items like sports cards that are easily damaged and subjectively valued in a way that can’t always be squared with supply and demand? With a little bit of crypto you’re diversifying your portfolio to include any possible future use of it (if any, I know there may be none). With McDavid rookie cards, you’re betting on the future regard of the career of a professional athlete whose time to make an impact is limited, and who plays in a backwater city for the 4th and definitely least popular N American sports league. Seems like the definition of Garth’s one-asset approach.

#64 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.13.20 at 9:33 pm

Collectables and their values

Stamps

https://mashable.com/2014/06/17/stamp-auction-20-million/#:~:text=David%20Redden%2C%20Sotheby's%20Vice%20Chairman,17%2C%202014%20in%20New%20York.

Coins

https://www.cnbc.com/video/2016/03/18/this-is-the-worlds-most-valuable-coin.html#:~:text=The%20first%20ever%20Flowing%20Hair,valued%20at%20over%20%2410%20million.

Big Balls of String

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biggest_ball_of_twine#:~:text=In%20Branson%2C%20Missouri%2C%20a%20ball,of%20World%20Records%20in%201993.

No value but a bizarre collectible …… that can kill you.

#65 LP on 06.13.20 at 9:46 pm

#38 Palpha on 06.13.20 at 4:54 pm
re your coins:
Look up a numismatist on google in any large city. You will have to pay a fee for the job but he/she will put a value on your collection and maybe even put you in touch with someone who will buy individual coins or the whole collection.

Conversely, there are books in which you can look up values for yourself.

#66 Flop... on 06.13.20 at 9:51 pm

Crowdie 8:55 pm
@#56 Wrk.Dover
“But something is missing.”
++++

He’s a financial adviser …not a porn star.

///////////////////

Doug Rowat stars as Dirk Robax in Hard Times On Bay Street…

M45BC

#63 JacqueShellacque on 06.13.20 at 9:03 pm

#67 KNOW IT ALL on 06.13.20 at 9:54 pm

I COLLECT COMPANIES THROUGH PURCHASES OF THEIR STOCK!

SUPER ENJOYABLE AND VERY LOW-RISK WHEN YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR DOING.

#68 Westcdn on 06.13.20 at 10:49 pm

It is interesting what the wealthy value. In the medieval days it was real estate, then gold and then art. I got a kick out of visiting Italian estates and churches. They always had “art”. Most of it was glory based but replaceable – the grave yard speaks volumes when you pay attention to dog awful statements.

I care about life but I realize things will be bought or sold. Animals are grown for a reason…

#69 Ponzius Pilatus on 06.13.20 at 10:53 pm

Picture this:
A guy comes into Doug’s office.
Guy: Doug,I’ve got 500 k to invest. What do you suggest?
Doug: Well, the market is kinda slow right now, but could I interest you in a pair of game worn Michael Jordan basketball shoes?
In the background.
Garth: Doug, could I talk to you for a minute?
To be continued……

#70 James on 06.13.20 at 11:05 pm

Ryan,

What do you think about the major tech stocks like Facebook, Zoom, NVidia, etc.

They’re way above their pre-virus levels…. do you think they’re overbought?

And if the virus recedes, maybe they’ll drop since they’ll be less need to work from home?

#71 NFN_NLN on 06.13.20 at 11:11 pm

#48 Brew on 06.13.20 at 5:46 pm
I should get back into cards. I have a Gretzky rookie ungraded.

An authentic Brent Gretzky, wow… that’s worth upwards of $1.98

https://www.comc.com/Cards/Hockey/1989-90/7th_Inning_Sketch_OHL_-_Base/75/Brent_Gretzky/138651

#72 NSNG on 06.14.20 at 12:45 am

The problem with these collectible markets is not the product so much as the traffickers that have grown an industry around it. To get a $20 comic appraised and properly sealed will probably cost you as much as the comic is worth or more.

The only wise thing to do was buy an old expensive item when you are a kid and keep it for retirement. What kid can afford or think of buying a $1000 collectible when he is young unless he is an absolute fanatic?

Time is your best friend with these items and you need a lot of it. Unless you inherit a collection you probably won’t see a significant appreciation and the highway robbers trafficking in the items are going to take you for whatever they can get away with.

One rule of investing is that you buy into a highly liquid market so that offloading is not a problem. Many of these markets don’t have a lot of buyers

#73 SoggyShorts on 06.14.20 at 12:58 am

#63 JacqueShellacque on 06.13.20 at 9:03 pm

How does crypto have “potentially unlimited applications “?
Blockchain, sure but “cryto” is just currency, like Bitcoin, no?

When people say “I have 5% of my PF in Crypto” I always thought they meant Bitcoin/Etherium etc and not companies working on developing applications for blockchain technology. Am I mistaken?

#74 Tim123 on 06.14.20 at 1:33 am

I think it’s a great idea to have a speculative portion of investments. I personally use 5% to 10% of my equity portfolio in speculative instruments. For example I may find a stock that I think is going to do really well based on my research so I might buy call options for that stock even if the stock hits losing money. It would be a speculative play but I find when you do hit on these speculative plays, it can really add some alpha to your returns. You do have to be very wary of cutting your losses sometimes.

#75 JWD on 06.14.20 at 2:12 am

Apparently, this gentleman took a perfectly good wax box from Gretzky’s rookie year, a US$60,000 investment, and decided to rip it open.

Forward to last 20 seconds. Now, that’s gambling.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qNruArbVB3A

—Doug
——————————————————————–

Thanks for that – never seen that video. Can’t believe he pulled it on the last package.

My mom tragically threw out my shoe box collection as I was about to leave home at 20 in the late 80’s cleaning up my room which most certainly contained a few Gretzky cards. Not to mention Messier, Kurri, Coffee. All rookies in ’79.

Pains me to think about what was in there. I guess that’s why these things are so rare and valuable.

#76 Wrk.dover on 06.14.20 at 7:14 am

I gave this some thought. My favorite collection is days. Approaching 24,400 of them now. My wife collects travel memories, with a quarter of her net. I’m along on that ride. Name an obscure town in any state, province, or mainstream Caribbean Island, I’ve got a collection of fond memories there (food). Same RE for 40 years so, yeah, many material collections too.

I just don’t collect stuff to flip. Seems like a sad goal, when you can do so much more with life on a hundred a day after savings and taxes.

#77 Do we have all the facts on 06.14.20 at 8:17 am

I am pretty sure Dr. Pangloss would have been a sneakerhead if overpriced running shoes had been all the rage in 1759.

Optimism based on the belief that the passage of time alone will increase the price, but not necessarily the value, of all assets must be tempered by reality.

Remember Beanie Babies and Cabbage Patch Kids.

#78 Toronto_CA on 06.14.20 at 8:29 am

I bought a rare painting in 2012 for $3k USD.

A collector is chasing me (the artist gave him my contact details) and so far he’s offered me more than 5x what I paid.

However, I love the painting so I’m not selling. I think the problem is that the people that want to fork out big dollars are very few. If they die or lose their interest (or fortunes) you may not get anywhere near the current “market value”.

Still…I like having a original painting from a famous artist. Anyone have any tips on artwork as an investment?

#79 cto on 06.14.20 at 8:36 am

Doug

Do you think there is an upside for the oil industry coming down the pipeline?
Pun intended…

I have a little bit of money outside of my main investment portfolio, id like to play the market with.

I am wondering about oil/energy related ETFs, or a mix of related stocks.

I know the world is in a funk right now but it doesn’t seem possible that when it rises out of the fog, we will have a replacement energy source for oil.

Following the words of warren Buffet, buy when all others are afraid.

#80 Doug Rowat on 06.14.20 at 9:16 am

#63 JacqueShellacque on 06.13.20 at 9:03 pm

Doug,

I find this post hard to square with this site’s disdain for crypto. Crypto solves a problem (distributed trust over untrusted networks) that has potentially endless practical applications not even conceived yet…. With McDavid rookie cards, you’re betting on the future regard of the career of a professional athlete whose time to make an impact is limited, and who plays in a backwater city for the 4th and definitely least popular N American sports league. Seems like the definition of Garth’s one-asset approach.

I’ve acknowledged the potential of blockchain before while raising concerns over the specific crypto currencies themselves. It’s also Sunday morning and I haven’t even had my coffee, so I’m not debating it now.

However, one thing I can say definitively, in my experience, there’s a zealotry associated with crypto currency investors. Our clients who absolutely insist on investing in it never own it at a prudent weighting.

With respect to McDavid, those are legitimate risks. But Lemieux and Gretzky also played in backwater cities–if you’re good the market finds a way to reward it.

There’s also absolutely nothing wrong with building a collection of more established stars from many sports. You can be more conservative even within a risky investment.

Hence why owning an emerging market ETF is better than owning a specific emerging market stock.

–Doug

#81 Dharma Bum on 06.14.20 at 9:25 am

I collect bottles and cans.

I push ’em around in a grocery shopping cart.

When I get a bunch, I cash ’em in.

Yup, I’m a bum.

#82 Bezengy on 06.14.20 at 9:35 am

I’m inspired. Do I pull out the ole Kawasaki Samurai?, or maybe my Honda “Postie”, or shall I begin the long awaited R60 Beemer cleanup? Time to think about cashing in perhaps.

#83 TurnerNation on 06.14.20 at 9:43 am

A 905’er north of the city reports most everyone in their block has some type of indoor or outdoor home improvement underway. Awash in spending. Must be government employees..
Perhaps hunkering down instead of selling their home?

–The big picture. As Agenda 21 is being rolled out watch for the small re-training they are doing to us. In this Phase 1 re-edition/Compliance stage.
Globalists openly state on their “Sustainably” websites that at least 30% of the Earth must be made off limits to humans.

Atlantic Canada is allowing travel only with their region. (Freedom of movement is a biggie for our elites. They have you standing on your mark 6-6-6 feet apart at all times. Like children. Or prisoners).
They are prepping us for low/no travel.
When they eventually ban gas cars the range of your electric vehicle will a few hundred clicks anyway – especially in sub-zero weather.
This will limit your travel to local only. Which is what they are training the Atlantic coast currently.

Flying? Expect more crackdowns and hassles. Carbon taxes and high fixed costs likely will render it the domain of the rich. As it was 80 years ago.
Our elites. Dialing us back to the stone age.

Toronto announced its first Modular condo project.
Google search for Pack em and Stack em housing.
This is a known feature of Agenda 21.

—>This is all moving so fast. The old system is being destroyed. Wait for my next post. In March the Minneapolis police publically signed up with a new A.I. policing system. In March. From a public press release. This is all planned out folks. They got us good. <——

#84 NoName on 06.14.20 at 9:49 am

#78 Toronto_CA on 06.14.20 at 8:29 am
I bought a rare painting in 2012 for $3k USD.

A collector is chasing me (the artist gave him my contact details) and so far he’s offered me more than 5x what I paid.

However, I love the painting so I’m not selling. I think the problem is that the people that want to fork out big dollars are very few. If they die or lose their interest (or fortunes) you may not get anywhere near the current “market value”.

Still…I like having a original painting from a famous artist. Anyone have any tips on artwork as an investment?

Offer a dude fractional art ownership keep a painting as a custodian and its win win for both of you. Easy peasy…

#85 Fused on 06.14.20 at 10:06 am

#70 James
If you believe that is the market direction look into buying puts on those companies.

#74 TIM123
I have done very well with calls and have switched to puts now as I believe the market is over bought and novice investors will panic on another sharp correction.
I am picking my positions and allocate 1% of my portfolio to options as my play money, with no attachment to that amount it is easier to make plays and any gains stay in my options trading account. I am hoping to be able to generate $20k-$30k year from options eventually as a fun hobby.

#86 TurnerNation on 06.14.20 at 10:38 am

How long until permission is required for travel within Kanada? Sounds crazy but Quebec locked down their borders a few months ago.
Atlantic Canada is in a bubble.
US border is closed. Crazy right?

I’ll tell you. Our lives are ruled by the telescreens.
Look around. Everyone is healthy. But the telescreens tell us we are sick.
No symptoms and health = sickness. In the new system. Everything was inverted on Friday the 13th in March. Global lockdown and to roll out the new system.

If the telescreens tell us HIGH numbers in Province A. People in Province B will clamor, keep those diseased animals outside and away from us!
Our elite rulers pull all the strings. Especially the telescreens – which you take as gospel. Those #s rule our lived now.
Thinking and individual rights are selfishness in the new system. People will become sick and die if you are selfish! !!!!!!

#87 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.14.20 at 11:17 am

@#67 KNOW IT all
“…..WHEN YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR DOING.”

+++++

I find that hard to believe when you dont even know how to turn the CAPS LOCK BUTTON OFF!

#88 Sail Away on 06.14.20 at 11:25 am

CHAZ? CHOP?

From ‘My Northwest’: “There apparently wasn’t agreement on the change, so bickering and a small skirmish ensued.”

https://www.google.com/amp/s/mynorthwest.com/1945236/rantz-chaz-chop-name-change/amp/

A small skirmish. Looks like they are modeling after question period.

#89 Westcdn on 06.14.20 at 11:26 am

I will be disappointed if the young guys working next door are gaming the system to qualify for CERB. I believe it says it takes 1k$ in 4 weeks to get it until October.

The new owners cut down a tree and I am getting serious morning heat. The thunderstorm that reportedly wasted Calgary missed me. I got a few droplets of heavy rain and refiled my rain barrels.

I expanded my garden – new challenges. I am finding seeding to be an issue plus it requires more attention than planned. I saw a bobcat pass my front window. First I ever saw.

#90 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.14.20 at 11:54 am

@#81 Dharma Bum
“I collect bottles and cans.
I push ’em around in a grocery shopping cart.
When I get a bunch, I cash ’em in.
I’m a bum.”
+++++

You’re not like all the other Bums are you?
Please tell us if you rinse them out before selling those precious collectibles.

Anyone out there have a wristwatch previously owned by Paul Newman?

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/paul-newman-rolex-daytona-auction-most-expensive-watch-ever#:~:text=The%20Paul%20Newman%20Daytona%20is%20now%20the%20most%20expensive%20wristwatch%20ever%20sold.&text=Paul%20Newman's%20wife%2C%20Joanne%20Woodward,reference%206239%2C%20to%20be%20exact.

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.14.20 at 12:07 pm

@#88 sail away

“modeled after Question Period”

++++

Well, there’s the obnoxious, screeching, gibbering monkeys flinging insults while posturing for any audience…..and then there is the Seattle protesters…….

#92 Ronaldo on 06.14.20 at 12:12 pm

#89 Westcdn on 06.14.20 at 11:26 am
I will be disappointed if the young guys working next door are gaming the system to qualify for CERB. I believe it says it takes 1k$ in 4 weeks to get it until October.

The new owners cut down a tree and I am getting serious morning heat. The thunderstorm that reportedly wasted Calgary missed me. I got a few droplets of heavy rain and refiled my rain barrels.

I expanded my garden – new challenges. I am finding seeding to be an issue plus it requires more attention than planned. I saw a bobcat pass my front window. First I ever saw.
—————————————————————
Sounds like you need a holiday.

#93 IHCTD9 on 06.14.20 at 12:16 pm

I collect yellow iron from the 50’s.

The more I repair them, the more they appreciate.

#94 Jimers on 06.14.20 at 1:36 pm

Cant agree more Doug, as a tinkerer I’ve always loved playing with technologies, ever since I built my first ZX-81. So When Bitcoin came along it was a no brainer to spend a few hundred bucks to buy a couple dozen. What a joy it was when I finally figured out how to download them to my HW wallet, almost as much fun as selling them to pay off my mortgage.

#95 Ronaldo on 06.14.20 at 2:29 pm

#93 IHCTD9 on 06.14.20 at 12:16 pm
I collect yellow iron from the 50’s.

The more I repair them, the more they appreciate.
—————————————————————-
Especially for you IH.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXdFEuQpsv8

#96 JacqueShellacque on 06.14.20 at 2:43 pm

#73 SoggyShorts

“How does crypto have “potentially unlimited applications? Blockchain, sure but “cryto” is just currency, like Bitcoin, no?”

Good point Soggy, a little sloppy of me to mix these terms, but crypto could be the lubricant that runs them, and will be the easiest way a retail non-venture capitalists who don’t know a blockchain enterpreneur can invest (if it is an investment, maybe it isn’t). If it’s crypto that powers the platform, and the platform enables the applications (if any, again maybe there will be none) then with say 1-2% of one’s portfolio there could be potential.

Doug: I get your points, but with pro sports memorabilia, I just don’t see a future there: we’re culturally fragmented so you don’t have an entire population of people who’ll have grown up watching hockey and want McDavid cards in 2060. That’ll be true of baseball too. Part of what attracts people to sports memorabilia is the shared cultural history. No one whose parents were born outside Canada cares about things like the ’72 series or the Oilers cup runs in the 80s.

Lemieux and Gretzky played at a time when their sport didn’t have to compete with whatever could be streamed at any given time. These sports leagues are big and seemingly profitable, but that also means fossilized business models that are fragile to changing tastes. People could flat out lose interest and the suits who run these leagues would have no idea how to bring them back.

#97 Sail Away on 06.14.20 at 2:49 pm

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 06.14.20 at 12:07 pm
@#88 sail away

“modeled after Question Period”

—————

Well, there’s the obnoxious, screeching, gibbering monkeys flinging insults while posturing for any audience…..and then there is the Seattle protesters…….

—————

True. Unfair comparison. The Seattle protesters are far more civilized.

#98 Sail Away on 06.14.20 at 3:02 pm

My theory is that all protests were instigated by facemasks.

For those who dive or surf: putting on a skin tight wetsuit makes you feel like a superhero.

Likewise, facemask/bandit.

#99 not so liquid in calgary on 06.15.20 at 5:41 am

In reference to your photo… someone needs to stop skipping ‘leg days’.

#100 garyw. on 06.15.20 at 3:24 pm

Please everyone, help Doug get over 100 comments! If he doesn’t meet his quota, we may be subjected to more pictures of his legs!

#101 Pelican on 06.15.20 at 4:44 pm

Ok. Over 100 comments now. And he has nicely shaped legs btw.