Take control

DOUG  By Guest Blogger Doug Rowat

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COVID-19 has taken much from us.

Most of the control that we had over our daily lives is gone. We can no longer touch or be near many of the family members and friends who we love. We cross the street when others come near us. We can’t visit most of the stores that we used to. Same with restaurants. We certainly can’t vacation. And live sports? Concerts? All gone.

For those of us with children, we’ve been forced to become amateur teachers, or more often, amateur entertainers. For some, it’s negatively affected our health, or the health of those close to us. As we gaze at the rising infection rates, it seems at times too that we have no control over the virus’s spread. In short, we inhabit an anxiety-filled and frustratingly restrictive world at the moment.

However, this week I offer some simple ideas to take back some of the control that you may have lost over the past four months. Because I’m a financial guy, I’ll stick to ideas that can generate or save you a few dollars. All the ideas for relieving boredom and cabin fever I’ll leave to the YouTubers (though I will highly recommend Roger Federer’s volley challenge). My specific purpose here is to allow you to gain a bit more control over your finances.

10 ways you can take back control

So, 10 ideas that may be helpful to you and, in some instances, those in your community:

  • Read about the available government benefits (both provincial and federal) and claim what you’re entitled to. This is the obvious first step, and sufficient media and government attention has already been given to these programs, so I won’t belabour the details. Though, if nothing else, at least regularly check in here: www.canada.ca/coronavirus. Our clients have reported to me that, thus far, the government has been true to its word in delivering the CERB benefits within the three business days promised
  • Consider refinancing mortgages or lines of credit. There are a myriad of different mortgage types with varying durations and break penalties, so this won’t make sense for everyone, but it’s worth investigating. The prime lending rate in Canada has fallen from 4.00% near the start of the year to only 2.45% currently. With interest rates likely to remain at rock-bottom levels for the foreseeable future, there’s at least the potential to lock in a more favourable interest rate.
  • And after you’re talked to your financial institution, give your auto insurer a call. No one drives anywhere now; see if your insurer is willing to reduce your premiums. TD Insurance, for example, is already “temporarily adjust[ing] premiums to reflect changes in personal vehicle usage.” Many other insurers are following suit. If your insurer isn’t already offering to adjust premiums, a bluntly worded email or phone call threatening to switch to another insurer should do the trick.
  • If you have a full-service financial advisor, seek their advice. You hired your advisor to oversee and manage your investments, but you also hired them for long-term financial planning, risk management, tax strategies and so on. The advice offered might be as simple as optimizing the amount of this year’s RRSP contribution or it may involve a more detailed long-term wealth forecast. But regardless, now is the time to lean on them for their guidance and expertise. Those of you at a discount broker or roboadvisor? Well, best of luck.
  • Review your subscriptions and memberships. Are there are any that no longer have value? For example, most sports leagues and sporting events have been cancelled this year (or are at serious risk of being cancelled). Therefore my DAZN sports-streaming subscription at $150/year is looking pointless. Similarly, is there a gym or club membership that no longer has relevance and could be cancelled? Many readers can probably find similar savings that will only take a quick phone call or click of the mouse to realize.
  • Support your local businesses. This can be done with an outright donation or by continuing to use their services (takeout food, for instance). For those who are transaction oriented (e.g., I expect a good or service in return for any money I spend), a gift certificate is a great option. This way you can give local businesses the cash flow that they desperately need now, but you’ll still get something for yourself in return down the road. I did both the donation and gift certificate route with our local independent movie theatre, the Fox Theatre, which has been a wonderful source of both personal family and client entertainment in the past—therefore I want this neighbourhood business to survive long into the future.
  • Assess your skill set. Is there gig or part-time work that you could pick up? My daughter now takes music lessons remotely, for example, so if you can tutor (in whatever area of specialty that you may have) offer these services up to your community.
  • Examine your household budget. Obviously, the coronavirus has dramatically cut all our spending, but now is a good time to look at the expenses that you probably could permanently do without, or at least significantly cut back on, once things return to normal. I outlined the average expenses for Canadians in this blog post. When we’re finally let out of our cages, do you truly still need to spend a full $86,000 a year on household expenditures?
  • Obviously, a big community garage sale is not an option at the moment, but selling individual items online is certainly possible. Look carefully around your home—what would sell easily that you no longer want? For instance, it recently occurred to me that many Steve McQueen movies are overrated. (During the coronavirus isolation, for example, I re-watched The Magnificent Seven and it does NOT hold up well—watch Kurosawa’s The Seven Samurai instead.) Therefore I sold an old McQueen autograph and got a lot more for it than I expected. Look around, I bet there are many old treasures gathering dust that you could monetize—and you now definitely have the time to look. Canada Post remains open: but remember, the first hour of business is for those at higher risk (the elderly and those with compromised immune systems).
  • Take out loans from friends or family members. Obviously, this is a highly personal decision fraught with many complicated family dynamics, but for many, these are desperate times and there’s at least the potential to have a more flexible payback schedule than a loan from a financial institution as well as a lower (or even non-existent) interest rate. You know your family best, but I present this as an option of last resort that may be more appealing than an outright default, which would damage your credit rating.

Now, this is where I turn the blog over to you—the commenters. Traditionally, this has been where you tell us that the global economy is doomed (or will be saved), tell us that Trump is the greatest president ever (or the worst), or explain that the market is certain to move lower (or higher). And this is usually also where you attack crowdedelevatorfartz mercilessly (or defend them with equal enthusiasm).

However, in this instance, I ask you to set aside your normal blog-comment impulses and simply present your best ideas for saving (or earning) your fellow Canadians a loonie or two. In a time of crisis, every little bit helps.

I know you have it in you blog dogs. Impress me.

Doug Rowat, FCSI® is Portfolio Manager with Turner Investments and Senior Vice President, Private Client Group, Raymond James Ltd.

 

261 comments ↓

#1 Gino Dileonardo on 04.18.20 at 8:26 am

most people who borrow or lend money to family members have there relationships change significantly. The reason to borrow in this case is obvious, not due to bad personal decisions but repayments sometimes are sketchy and inconsistent or non existant.
money is truely a dirty thing to deal with, before it was figuratively but now i find it littlerly no one takes cash anymore.

#2 Penny Henny on 04.18.20 at 8:29 am

8:28 in the morning. New post.
What up with dat?

#3 Penny Henny on 04.18.20 at 8:48 am

#101 Blacksheep on 04.17.20 at 5:45 pm

But wont all this cause inflation?

You betcha and that is exactly what the worlds economic system needs to keep its 75 year old debt super cycle, airborne…..so you better get your $’s out of the bank and invest in something tangible.

////////////////

with all due respect to Garth, I know you don’t like gold Garth.

But what other tangibles are you referring to?

#4 binky barnes on 04.18.20 at 9:07 am

Argh….cannot believe I am not first by the proverbial “country mile”. Did these two characters (Gino & Penny) sleep on your couch or something last night, Doug?

BTW, reasonable common sense blog today–easy read that will hopefully help some ease the burden.

BB

#5 Reality is stark on 04.18.20 at 9:10 am

Let’s talk reality.
Taxes specifically.
Capital gains taxes on your principal residence are pretty much a done deal. However what is likely to be a shock to most Canadians will be the introduction of inheritance taxes.
I will give you an example. Your parent dies and all the money is in their bungalow in Etobicoke. They paid $100,000 for it and the estate sells it for 1 million.
The 900,000 capital gain is taxable at 50%, tax rate is 50%, so you cut a cheque to Trudeau for $225,000.
There is now $775,000 to distribute to the offspring. Of course the 25% inheritance tax kicks in, another $200,000 hit.
While we sit around discussing stupid little piddly points the elephant in the room just stole over $400,000 from you. Do you feel better now?
All those people who get double CERB payments and those getting $40,000 business loans who know they are about to declare bankruptcy with protected RRSP’s have no intention of paying the money back.
This is what kindness looks like in Canada.
I forgot to mention that public servants will be getting raises while your wages get cut if you are lucky enough to even find a job.
One other little point to mention. Real estate prices are falling, when it’s all said and done your inheritance may be one third of what you expected.

#6 KNOW IT ALL on 04.18.20 at 9:18 am

Instead of going to the strip-club I bought my wife lingerie and high heels. Saves a ton of cash in the short-run.

However be cautious…….. 9 months later could get you a mandatory and minimum 18 year sentence of ever-increasing monthly payments.

#7 binky barnes on 04.18.20 at 9:21 am

$ saving tip….

At the moment The Beer Store is not taking returns on empties, yet we know that the consumption of alcohol has not slowed at all (in fact, it has probably spiked). So people have a month’s worth of empties lying around taking up valuable space, starting to smell, etc.

Opportunity awaits! Get out there and rifle through people’s recycling bins looking for those empty bottles/cans. The other day I took my elderly mother-in-law’s recycling out to the communal blue-bin area in her apartment building. My eyes bulged when I saw the mountains of empties. And this building is filled with seniors! I actually considered backing up the CRV and loading the booty myself, but decided against it. You see the one flaw in my plan is that these bottles/cans have to be stored until this pandemic passes and The Beer Store resumes taking these items in

But there you go….build your fortune 10/20 cents at a time.

#8 Smoking Man on 04.18.20 at 9:24 am

The backlash of hording us like animals in cages will be huge.

Govt be afraid….

#9 Ballingsford on 04.18.20 at 9:31 am

How about if we spend some time lobbying that the city of Ottawa open the off-leash dogparks. Social distancing can be easily done there. Dogs must be getting bored too.
Then my highlight of the week wouldn’t be going to the grocery store.

#10 Squiggly on 04.18.20 at 9:31 am

Ironic isn’t it? Quebec passes a law making face coverings illegal…now it’s strongly suggested to wear a face mask! Let freedom reign I guess.

Now save some money….bought a Tushy bumsprayer online, had it delivered. Do away with toilet paper and enjoy a warm spray of adjustable pressure water to clean up with.
No more smearing, stay fresh and clean. Pays for itself quickly and you will Never go back to using T.P.!
You will thank me.

#11 The Tao of Steve on 04.18.20 at 9:45 am

Steve McQueen overrated?

Under appreciated and died too young – but not overrated. Most movies would not hold up well when compared to Kurosawa.

Next you will be complaining about Jimmy Stewart.

Besides it seems the Tao of Steve worked out well for you and his autograph so why besmirch his good name?

Who collects autographs today? I have Garth’s autograph on a book he wrote – wonder how much that would bring? And Dr. Phil’s now that I think about it.

The Tao of Garth? not likely.

Speaking of saving money, Goodlife immediately suspended payments when they were forced to close but because they are closed they will not allow anyone to cancel their membership. Has anyone tried?

I cancelled all my sports channels except DAZN but maybe I will do that as well.

Great Saturday post as always. –

#12 Flop... on 04.18.20 at 9:58 am

I was going to go around to David Thomson’s house and ask him for a cup of sugar.

Then I realized the federal government had left the whole pantry open…

M45BC

Mapping Each Country’s Wealthiest Person Around the World.

“The world’s 2,095 billionaires are found on every continent, just like the coronavirus, and billionaires have not been immune to its economic losses: the world’s top 100 wealthiest have lost an estimated $408 billion in the past two months. The United Nations estimates that 6.7% of working hours will be wiped out globally in the second quarter as a result.”

The Top 3 Wealthiest Individuals in North & Central America by Country.

1. Jeff Bezos, United States: $113B
2. Carlos Slim Helu & Family, Mexico: $52.1B
3. David Thomson, Canada: $31.6B

https://howmuch.net/articles/richest-person-world-2020

#13 Blammmo on 04.18.20 at 10:03 am

Shopify is offering 3 free months. Just saying. Could be a good time to start something you’ve always wanted to.

#14 Don't spend money on 04.18.20 at 10:04 am

Don’t spend money. String as many zero-$-days together as you can as often as you can.

#15 Flop... on 04.18.20 at 10:06 am

Robax, half the country is sitting on its bum.

The easiest way to save yourself some coin, right now, is that if something has fallen into disrepair, is to fix it yourself.

Some people have some spare time but not a spare dime.

There’s a YouTube video to fix everything.

The Internet even fixed me…

M45BC

#16 Anthony on 04.18.20 at 10:09 am

DELETED

#17 Owe Canada on 04.18.20 at 10:10 am

Last year, Canada’s big six banks accumulated staggering profits totalling $46.6 billion.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2019/12/18/how-15-billion-in-bonuses-leaves-bankers-gloomy.html

#18 Calgary Rip Off on 04.18.20 at 10:10 am

Already most should of put in excess money up to the max allowance isn’t it an RSP or something along those line for tax deferral? My wife organizes this and we do this once a year before tax time.

The next is mental principles. Part of the reason for this bat virus mess is humans trying ever incessantly to obtain something to lessen stress. The reality is that buying things in most instances doesn’t lessen stress but increases it. Asking why you are doing something before you are doing it is important. Chances are most are wasting their precious time and money.

Vacations and plane flights to some exotic locale are for the most part a waste of time and money and in many cases put the vacationer at risk financially and health wise. Certainly the memories established may be worth it. The person needs to decide. Being cooped up in a plane for many hours where you essentially have no rights is not my idea of a fun time. Most fun is decided mentally and why it is seen as fun to do all the work for vacationing seems wasteful.

What is key is essentials. Good food and health. Having these things will keep a person out of hospitals and away from doctors and save considerable time. As a person who works in a hospital I say that most medicine is pathetic and doctors for the most part are in a hurry because of finances and are focused on disease, not health. If a patient dies there will be a momentary glance and then onto the next patient. As demonstrated by this bat virus it is clear that the medical system has zero clue on how to deal with this virus regardless of whether it is natural or a bioweapon. Typical medicine is interested in building up evidence and then seeing reproducibility in high numbers of patients. As a single patient you may not have the same reaction as thousands of other patients. So the priority should be on budgeting money for proper nutrition, health, vitamin supplements and exercise. All these things should be done daily without fail. By doing all these things you will save time and money.

By deciding at each and every step whether you really need whatever you will save time and money. And stop comparing yourself to others. Most people really don’t care about what you drive, how you look or what you do. So stop buying things or looking a certain way for some perceived image.

If all this advice is followed unfortunately world economies would change vastly and many businesses would go under, it is a question of priorities. As a young child my mother always asked me, “When is it ever enough?” Shut off the commercials and live real.

#19 Bartman on 04.18.20 at 10:12 am

Hey Gino. Send all your used dirty paper money to me or old gold.

#20 My thoughts to your challenge on 04.18.20 at 10:20 am

How to save money!
Yes you can have every idea from Latte to travelling to buying used shoes. But you will not get the right answer.

Remember the women’s letter that was posted about paying money having someone do her laundry. And everyone jumped down her throat and offered advice.
Back then I offered one piece of advice and it holds true for everyone.
First set goals maybe use SMART but must importantly set them.
Second do what’s called setting priorities.
So take out a pencil write down your income
Next write so called fixed costs like rent mortgage heat and light.
Next subtract your saving goals, which aligns to your life’s goals and review every quarter.

what’s left is what you have to freely spend.
List all the things you like to spend money on, so first you need to track all your expenses for a month and you will be amazed!
Now prioritize your spending if you feel having someone do your laundry is important write it in.
If you feel drinking is Important write it down
When you have your list, now comes the hardest part….

If you spend more than you freely have, then prioritize expenditures till you get zero, but maintain your savings and your goals.
Telling someone to save $105,000 by not drinking lattes goes against human nature, who am I to tell you how to spend your money. It’s up to each individual to prioritize what they enjoy and live within their means.
You may have to make tough choices like buying a small vehicle or a used one, but again look at your savings goals rather then spending desires now.

My fathers advice still rings true save as much as you can but don’t forget to enjoy life.

Hence why I develop a priority list, because what’s important to me may not be important to you.

Thanks Doug!

#21 BlogDog123 on 04.18.20 at 10:27 am

1. Youtube video downloading. Use youtube-dl program to gather up your favourite videos and load them onto your tablet / microSD card. Motivational exercise videos, live music concerts, got talent shows, standup comedy… There’s so much out there and you can download them without the ads.

2. Get lumber delivered to your home to work on all those projects you’ve been deferring. Build your own vs. buy more expensive stuff for the spring outdoor/backyard.

3. Tune up your cellphone or internet package / plan. Do you really use 3 GB of phone data? Get a cheaper plan. Some internet plans can be tweaked to get the right amount of data/speed, to save some $$.

#22 Ordinary Blog Dog on 04.18.20 at 10:28 am

Trying to see how my previously ‘wasted’ dollars are now adding up as savings, now that I don’t (or can’t) indulge. Things I don’t buy now because I am not out and about: lotto tickets, pop and snacks, drive thru coffee and treats, gas, cheques – now use e-transfer, car washes, drive thru meals, impulse buying in stores, rounds of booze after golf, booze in general. I was thinking of a golf range membership this spring – not now. Was thinking of a new vehicle purchase, on hold for now. Still thinking about returning some Bell tv receivers for per month $ savings.

#23 Christine McGovern on 04.18.20 at 10:34 am

Try meal kit and food share programs! Most meal programs like Hello Fresh, Chef’s Plate, Goodfood etc. offer 50% off the first boxes and actually make them affordable! Just make sure to cancel them after you receive your discounted boxes if you don’t want to continue with the services.

When buying gift cards, check into local deals. Some of my favourite restaurants are offering 50$ gift certificates for $40 etc.

Try calling cell phone companies and seeing if you can change anything for a couple of months? I have not heard of anyone doing this – but worth a shot!

Of course, cook from home! Make large crock pot recipes. Spaghetti sauces. Frozen dinner pies. With the extra time, try making food and freezing half for a later date. When everything starts getting back, try avoiding going back to the usual spending ways of going out to dinner and instead, take out all the dinners from your freezer!

Cancel any trips for the next few months and see if you can get full refunds instead of credits.

#24 Prairieboy43 on 04.18.20 at 10:38 am

Purchase “Piggy Bank “. Fill it up over time, loose change. Roll up coins. Invest the $$$. $100-$200.00/annually.

#25 My thoughts on your income challenge on 04.18.20 at 10:38 am

Thanks Doug for allowing my posts
So now how to earn extra income.
This has been hard for me and yet there are endless opportunities in the world but wants right for me?

Things to consider
How much time can I devote
How much capital do I need to invest in my business
What are the risks
Maybe a gig job?
Finally can I do something myself?
I also like to think as savings money as earning money.

Here’s an example I got a quote to build a deck for $4,000
Then a friend said we can build this ourselves maybe in a day. Wood maybe 2,000. So do I have the expertise to build it myself myself while I save $2,000!
if you look at saving money as earning money it is one option. Yes I agree I can save all of it by not building the deck.

Long ago a friend told me if you go into business do what you are good at and familiar with.
For example I am an accountant, should I paint houses?
No, I should focus on what I am good at for example, doing bookkeeping, taxes and budgets.
So make a list of your skills whether it be teaching, driving a taxi, swinging a hammer or painting. Now look at what businesses or gigs align to your skills. Maybe you have a hidden talent.
And finally take a leap of faith and follow your intuition.
Cheers

#26 conan on 04.18.20 at 10:40 am

Pimp out people who cut hair for a living. Find them clients and get a cut of the action.

#27 Felix on 04.18.20 at 10:44 am

Hmmmmmeoowww…..best suggestion for saving money?

Get rid of all dogs and replace them with cats.

Just looking at today’s photo – one stupid canine attempting (yet again, sadly) to suffocate another.

Imagine the vet bills to pay as a result, especially in these times. Such a waste.

Get a cat instead, problem solved.

You’re welcome.

#28 mike in Airdrie on 04.18.20 at 10:54 am

Borrow from family or friends if you have too much family or too many friends.

#29 Leo on 04.18.20 at 10:57 am

The first step in cutting costs is to do (or update) a household budget. If you don’t know where your money is going, it is difficult to start looking at where you could cut.

#30 SHANE GALLANT on 04.18.20 at 11:00 am

To help businesses across Canada and since you get alot of people viewing your post. Why dont you let us post our business. Maybe we can help each other. a free advertising post.

Shane

#31 not 1st on 04.18.20 at 11:05 am

How do we keep the gov out of our pockets after all this?

That should be the focus of the next few blog posts.

Is CGE on stocks and RE the target of choice because I cant see increased taxes on any other part of the economy as sustainable.

#32 UmiouiuS on 04.18.20 at 11:12 am

” .. that Steve McQueen movies are overrated.”

Doug, strange timing that you mention Stevie McQueen.
I just watched ‘Bullitt’ last night. 1968. The famous car chase. Consider it one of the best movies ever made.

McQueen died 12 years later in Mexico. Asbestos.
But he would have gone sooner had he shown up to the Sharon Tate party on ‘Helter Skelter’ eve, as planned.

To my savings tip:
I’m watching movies courtesy of the free movie channels provided by Rogers cable, during Covid.

Can’t converse with wifey though .. her ipad earplugs are full-time lodged to her serious Netflix addiction.

Cheers all. Stay safe. No mask, no love ..

#33 Ballingsford on 04.18.20 at 11:14 am

Money making idea. Millenials weren’t around the time the pet rocks came out. They’d be ripe for picking. They could name them, take them to coffee shop to show friends over avocado toast, etc. They could even buy 2 to keep each other company.

#34 TurnerNation on 04.18.20 at 11:19 am

The best way to gain money is never to underestimate peoples’ self interest and greed. Or your own.

For the unbalanced, there are two US prison REITS with solid divvies if you believe current human behaviour trends will continue. Say, all those empty sports arenas..would make great mass holding or needle sites eh?

If this blog is expecting logic…witness the CERB benefit fiasco it also touched on. This anecdote I saw today:
Note this is just something I saw it is not my story. Humans. You never know what they will do under stress.

“””I worked as a manager in a large restaurant chain and one of the senior managers quit and I had to take over a bit. We had food start missing, employees started stealing food. One day I was doing a morning briefing while maintenance was replacing a vent. One of the employees asked what they were doing in the vent. I said “Oh they are fixing a broken camera” total lie. The next thing that happened was something I never considered. 5 employees quit, 2 confessed to eating food and begged not to be fired and 1 tried to snitch on all the people who stole. I literally screwed myself and had to do 5 peoples jobs and actively hire new people and train them. I learned my lesson not to give out any information that could cause a panic. This really opened my eyes to to power of suggestion.”””

#35 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am

My Third Cousin is 107

Two people including Ponzius doubted my claim he is my third cousin

#197 Your Cousin on 04.17.20 at 11:10 pm
173 Shawn Allen on 04.17.20 at 8:51 pm

“My 107 year old third cousin has actual personal memories of the Spanish Flu!”

Are you over 100 years old as well? This person cannot be your 3rd cousin. 2nd, 3rd, 4th cousin are all in the same generational line as you. Hence they are about the same age. You probably meant to say 1st cousin, 3 times removed…

*******************************
I have a family tree in Ancestry and the software indicates that George is my full third cousin. We share a set of great great grandparents who were both born in North Sydney Nova Scotia just prior to the year 1800.

People on the same generational line can vary quite a bit in age. For example, my oldest first cousin is 24 years older than my youngest brother – who is obviously also his first cousin. And the potential gap grows with each generation, right? George is some 48 years older than me. Admittedly a big gap. Maybe I come down from a line of the youngest sons from my great great grand parents while George comes dome from a line of older sons.

George enjoys life and would probably never waste time arguing about something like this.

#36 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am

But…… the personal attacks are so invigorating….

Amazon is still delivering.

Order a good book or three….its worked for me.
While your expanding your mind with new knowledge….you’re not spending money.

Look on the positive side blogdogs.
While I’m reading……I’m not here.

#37 YouKnowWho on 04.18.20 at 11:24 am

Why is Justin still is self isolation?

He is, right?

Wasn’t his wife given all clear 21 days ago?

#38 YouKnowWho on 04.18.20 at 11:27 am

Airline travel OK but now with mask?

How about NO PLANES FLYING damn it!

#39 Drill Baby Drill on 04.18.20 at 11:29 am

Discuss with all whom you owe money in as frank and open manner as possible. Do not let unpayed bills ride without doing this. Having a plan which is discussed with your creditors will alleviate much uncertainty and the stress that goes with it.

#40 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:29 am

#10 Squiggly on 04.18.20 at 9:31 am
Ironic isn’t it? Quebec passes a law making face coverings illegal…now it’s strongly suggested to wear a face mask! Let freedom reign I guess.

Now save some money….bought a Tushy bumsprayer online, had it delivered. Do away with toilet paper and enjoy a warm spray of adjustable pressure water to clean up with.
No more smearing, stay fresh and clean. Pays for itself quickly and you will Never go back to using T.P.!
You will thank me.
————–
That’s the spirit man.
A bidet in every bathroom.
I better get one, before the boarders buy them up.

#41 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:33 am

@#149 MF
What you say is 100% correct. Please stay.
Your posts are on point, and a great counter balance to the increasing amount of conspiracy theorist, cynical, selfish, arrogant, out of touch, and delusional reality this comment section has become.”
++++

Worried your cheering section will be reduced to one with Faron’s absence?
Perhaps i can contribute?
Clap….clap….clap

#42 YouKnowWho on 04.18.20 at 11:36 am

Did you guys ever realize how valuable hugs were?

Now they’re $750 fine, or maybe even arrest!

I’ve been forced to take my hugs underground.
Black market hugs I call them.

#43 VicPaul on 04.18.20 at 11:40 am

Good thoughts Doug, thank you. )

Because I’m quite frugal, I immediately consider the value of Ben Franklin’s quote, “a penny saved is a penny earned”. He could have added, if you let those pennies compound for years….Whoa!
Also, and I’ve mentioned this before, consumer culture in the west has inundated us with images of luxury and equated such with ” a successful life”. Human psychology plays an enormous role – the upshot as I see it…people choose not to delay their gratification so they may nurture their ego.
Obviously, many people have pulled forward future earnings (credit) to collect shiny stuff now. A bit of selective indulgence is healthy and even necessary as a form of external reward but, unchecked, it leads to where we are now – half of us unable to make our debt commitments.
Spend less, invest more…and play more golf.

M56BC

#44 MF on 04.18.20 at 11:40 am

A BlogTo article came up on my Facebook feed about how hard it is for some home owner who sold her overvalued house to some fool, and was having trouble moving during COVID.

One of the replies in the comments was about how her house was overvalued (true..they are all), and how the market will tumble.

Should have seen all the others jumping in to defend the housing market:

-It’ll never go down!
-Some house just sold over asking on my street!
-Yeah right!

Everyone is clearly in the “denial” part of the graph.

I could have posted how The ONLY thing holding down interest rates right now is the central banks purchasing billions and billions of dollars of bonds -which cannot continue indefinitely without consequences. None of those consequences are good for home owners.

It truly is amazing how insulated people are when it comes to housing and what is causing house prices to rise so much.

The economic impact of this pandemic will play out over 2 years or more here in Toronto, but it will NOT be immune to the coming debt crisis worldwide.

I wonder what BlogTo post I will see then? Probably people crying that no one will buy their over valued house…and the comments will be very different.

MF

#45 Doug t on 04.18.20 at 11:43 am

Charity starts at home?

#46 YouKnowWho on 04.18.20 at 11:46 am

2020 recap to date:

Philippine Taal Volcano eruption

Pandemic of Coronavirus

Chernobyl Forest fire – don’t worry! …not radioactive! For real, it isn’t!

Locusts! 2 wave now!

All we now need is:

The Big One – out west. We’re due.

Tsunami – probably a 2-for-1 with above

Some type of pork in flight.

I don’t know about you, but I already can’t wait for 2020 to be done. Wonder if it will go out with a whimper or a bang.

Personal update: I’m getting the sniffles. It’s a good thing!

Maybe I hit jackpot and got the Corona? If so, I’ll be the $6m Man soon – selling my precious plasma for a FAT premium! Take a number.

#47 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:48 am

Cancel your Playboy subscription.
Lot’s of free stuff on the Internet.
But you’ll be missing out on the excellent articles.

#48 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:51 am

#28 mike in Airdrie on 04.18.20 at 10:54 am
Borrow from family or friends if you have too much family or too many friends.
————-
If you have too many friends, you probably have already too much money.

#49 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:51 am

@#208 LP
“So get off your pet hobby horse about lazy, over paid teachers. The vast majority earn every cent they are paid.”

+++
Well.
Now that your daughter/teacher/martyr has proven that 28 students can be taught from home via the computer….Lets expand on that shall we?
In the vein of saving money for all…..

What is to stop the govt from reducing the amount of teachers and schools and teaching ALL students from home via computer?
No more schools, commuting, daycare, etc etc etc.
And if we go that route.

How about getting rid of expensive , unionized, pensioned, teachers and having A.I. teach the little mugwamps….?
You know.
Create a program that monitors the kids progress during and after each lesson ?
Think it cant happen?
Its happening now.
Dont think govts arent going to be looking at drastic ways to save money after this vast “societal experiment” is all said and done.
Closing schools where thousands of kids need to be bussed to each and every day would be an excellent start.
Schools that need to be heated, maintained, expanded, etc etc etc.
Schools, where the brats wear pink T-shirts and then immediately bully the fat or ugly kid down the hall….
Schools, that pass diseases like Corona 19 faster than an intensive care hospital ward in New York
Mega schools that didnt exist until large Cities and suburbs came into being after WWII
Schools.
Soooooo 1950’s Boomer mentality.
I’m surprised you brilliant Millennials haven’t wanted to tear down that last bastion of Boomer supremacy and go back to the electronic version of the little red school house.
Oh, right, the teachers unions would fight it tooth and nail…..gotcha.

#50 seeker on 04.18.20 at 11:53 am

We have always lived simply, have emergency funds and no debt so this is easy for us. But even so, we have forfeited the dog’s haircut, we do it ourselves, I admit she’s small and easy, but we use scissors and trim and even figured out how to get her face done by having one of us keep her busy feeding her treats while as we snips away the long hair around her face. We are gathering all the unnecessary things we no longer use in our basement ready for the garage sale when the time comes. We have recreated the dishes me sometimes order out, through youtube and online websites. We shop less for groceries and realized how we can really stretch it out for weeks, a great habit we want to continue.

#51 Doug Rowat on 04.18.20 at 11:53 am

#20 My thoughts to your challenge on 04.18.20 at 10:20 am

List all the things you like to spend money on…
Now prioritize your spending…
If you feel drinking is Important write it down

Glad you capped the “I”. Macallan 12-year. Check.

–Doug

#52 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:54 am

Spend some time with the Amish.
They’ll teach you how to live in this new/old world.

#53 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:56 am

And most of all.
Stay away from elevators.
Fartz is omnipresent.

#54 MF on 04.18.20 at 11:57 am

Good blog post about saving money and budgeting.

However, I don’t see this behaviour as important or crucial as it used to be.

Since 2008, all individuals who have engaged in more reckless financial behaviours have been rewarded by the system. Everyone who engaged in budgeting and saving and caution has been punished.

Basically the child who gave in to his urges and ate the dessert before the vegetables is rewarded these days, and has been since 2008.

I know I have stopped caring as much about saving, or debt. Why should I still care?

MF

#55 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 11:58 am

I am building miniature picnic tables for squirrels using 3/4”x 1 1/2” inch lumber. They are about 12”x 8”x 4”. I am dropping them off in selected locations like parks, walkways, back yards etc. and topping them off with a few peanuts. Kids love them and most people smile when they come across one. Squirrels like them too.

#56 Damifino on 04.18.20 at 12:04 pm

#18 Calgary Rip Off

Vacations and plane flights to some exotic locale are for the most part a waste of time and money and in many cases put the vacationer at risk financially and health wise.
———————————–

That’s my thinking too. I’ve lived in Vancouver all my life but I don’t claim it to be ‘the best place on earth’. I don’t need to be told what’s wrong with my city. Likewise, have a clear picture of it’s wonderment.

Considering other locales where I might have arbitrarily been born, a Vancouver residency is a pretty decent outcome. Millions take flights to YVR to experience an exotic destination. Yeah, I know that sounds funny. Especially if you’re from Toronto. Or Lunenberg.

Remember, somebody somewhere will take the trip of a lifetime to visit the same place you call home. Dwell on that for a while and consider this wise proverb:

“It does not further you to go anywhere”

That is, unless you live in an active war zone.

Then yeah, it probably would.

#57 Doug Rowat on 04.18.20 at 12:15 pm

#5 Reality is stark on 04.18.20 at 9:10 am

While we sit around discussing stupid little piddly points the elephant in the room just stole over $400,000 from you. Do you feel better now?
All those people who get double CERB payments and those getting $40,000 business loans who know they are about to declare bankruptcy with protected RRSP’s have no intention of paying the money back.
This is what kindness looks like in Canada.

Inspirational.

–Doug

#58 Yuus bin Haad on 04.18.20 at 12:23 pm

Discipline yourself to not spend more than you bring in.

Oh, wait … you should have been doing that all along.

#59 MaryEn on 04.18.20 at 12:28 pm

Renegotiate your rent, phone bill, insurance,bank’s monthly fees.

Check a new feature on CRA website if there are any uncashed cheques waiting for you from past years. Look for “Uncashed Cheques” after login. :)

Btw. A crisis is opportunity for buying and investing, not for saving and selling. If you have money-invest it. If you have a time-invest it. This could be a great opportunity to learn some new skills that can increase your income in near future. Just my 2 cents.

#60 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 12:34 pm

@#211 baloney sandwich
“I am in my 60’s. So I basically decided that I am shutting down. By the end of the year I will wrap up my small business. I should be able to claim some back taxes from the losses this year. Sure the loans, subsidies will like a ventilator for a while but in the end its euthanasia, i.e. insolvency. I am not putting a dime into the business.”
+++

I expect a ton of Boomer small business owners (25 %? 30% ?)will be doing the same.
It’s too late and takes too much time and energy to start over.
Plus, who’s gonna have the money to buy the fricken business when everyone else is broke?

You Millennials wanted us out of the way?
OK.
Have at ‘er….

#61 Stealth on 04.18.20 at 12:37 pm

Would you be able to perhaps talk to Ryan and do a future post on preferred shares? Not only is their current prospect weak but why are they classified under fixed income when they suffered more that equities.
In the past there was a discussion to keep them at certain percentage of your fixed income, however some of my fin advisor friends argue that they are only for pension funds to meet future obligations .
Thank you.

#62 bullwinkle on 04.18.20 at 12:39 pm

I have seen many unhappy cashiers and floor staff at various places. They have to work while others sit on their $2,000 per month.

There are now many people who don’t qualify for any benefits and would love some income.

These stores should lay-off employees (those that want to go) so they can do some collecting and hire those who want the jobs.

#63 Piano_Man87 on 04.18.20 at 12:40 pm

Return one of your kids to the kid store and ask for a refund.

#64 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 12:44 pm

I have my son and his friend busy painting the house, building fence, cleaning/maintaing sailboat, etc.

The quotes for house painting alone were in the $12-15k range. I’m a bit over $1,600 with most gear rentals and materials and the kids are learning good skills. Also a good time to fix all the little maintenance pieces in beautiful spring weather.

My wife and I have been doing lots of yard work these last few weeks and refer to it as our date times. Nice sense of accomplishment, drives to the dump, takeout lunches from A&W. Very pleasant. Relationship strengthening.

#65 Don Guillermo on 04.18.20 at 12:48 pm

#12 Flop… on 04.18.20 at 9:58 am

1. Jeff Bezos, United States: $113B
2. Carlos Slim Helu & Family, Mexico: $52.1B
3. David Thomson, Canada: $31.6B

******************************************
Hey, those three dudes could pay off most of Canadas CV-19 bill when this is over.

#66 Stoph on 04.18.20 at 12:52 pm

Grow a veggie patch (or get your kids to grow it). Sure, you’ll only save a couple of bucks, but you’ll have bragging rights in the summer when friends are over and you’re grilling zucchinis out of the garden.

#67 Sold Out on 04.18.20 at 12:58 pm

Maybe you can email any suggestions to this couple. They seem pretty clueless.

https://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/family-finance/lost-job-hefty-home-equity-lines-of-credit-mean-big-spending-cuts-ahead-for-this-ontario-couple 

#68 Wrk.dover on 04.18.20 at 1:04 pm

Buy tools. All of them. Every trade.

Last time I paid labor was in 1972. I was ripped off on a car repair 1000 miles from home.

#69 SCD on 04.18.20 at 1:05 pm

Thank you for your post and your suggestions Doug. They are very helpful.

#70 earthboundmisfit on 04.18.20 at 1:05 pm

Retired seniors, who qualify for diddly-squat of the Fed’s largess, should start lobbing for tax free withdrawls of up to 5K from RRSPs, RRIFs, LIRAs, and LIFs.

#71 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm

Wife is working reduced hours, I am laid off.

Funny thing is, we’re not hurting for $ one bit.

Wife works for Trudeau so she still gets full pay, I got 50% more CERB than I figure I should have (I could be wrong). CCB payments are up, General weekly expenses are down. We’ll probably get our tax refund this month too, the last few years it’s been a 5 figure deposit. I also spent some of my free time shopping for new auto and house insurance and saved almost 1000.00 per year. I’ve sold some stuff on Kijiji and put cash in pocket, with (much) more to list yet.

I have also been buying deals off Kijiji and saving a bundle too. The GTA traffic on these buying trips has been amazing – like none. 401 was smooth as silk moving at 135-145 most of the time (sweet!). I’m going to miss this part of cv-19 when it’s over.

Been trimming and removing a lot of the trees on my property that have become problematic. I’m bucking and stacking this wood which will (hopefully) heat my house next winter. 2 bush cords so far. This is just as good as $ in the bank.

Lots of work getting done, and I’m liking it. Don’t mind a bit if the restrictions drag on another month or so.

#72 David McDonald on 04.18.20 at 1:11 pm

Thanks for the tips. My personal contribution has been to spend a bit of money on local tradesmen for reno projects that could have been put off. We have also enjoyed takeout from local restaurants. I hope these people will still be in business when the emergency ends.

#73 Goober on 04.18.20 at 1:23 pm

I stumbled across this site today while researching the CERB for my son and figuratively p**ped my pants when I realized that something like this even existed. Ecomystical might not be the fanciful purveyor of fiction I thought he was.

https://ubiworks.ca/
Helping you create a Canada where everyone can pursue their potential
https://ubiworks.ca/#whoweare
We are a group of business leaders, economists, artists, public relations pros, and civic minded Canadians

Heaven help us all if this ever becomes mainstream.

#74 Flop... on 04.18.20 at 1:36 pm

The tale of two Vietnamese sandwich shops.

Well, it’s Saturday, and the sun is shining, that means it’s time to go for a walk and pick up some Banh Mi for lunch.

About a month ago both my regular places were open, depending on which direction I walked, one adapted, one did not.

The successful place made a few simple changes.

Wedge the door open, so no one has to handle the door.

Only one person in store at a time to place orders, and then wait outside six feet apart.

Since the restaurant side is closed, used some of the tables to barricade the counter area so no one can get up too close to the produce.

The other one, didn’t do anything different, door closed, no sign saying “We’re open for take-out”, no promotion.

They lasted two weeks and pulled the pin, probably never to return.

If you post something overly racist, sexist, or ageist on this blog, Thor Turner also serves up a BANH MI…

M45BC

#75 Fred on 04.18.20 at 1:37 pm

https://globalnews.ca/news/6831003/alberta-doctors-resigning-hospital-lac-la-biche/

lol

tip: vote Trudeau, he had Canada all ready for this.

#76 oh bouy on 04.18.20 at 1:42 pm

@#57 Damifino on 04.18.20 at 12:04 pm
#18 Calgary Rip Off

Vacations and plane flights to some exotic locale are for the most part a waste of time and money and in many cases put the vacationer at risk financially and health wise.
———————————–

Remember, somebody somewhere will take the trip of a lifetime to visit the same place you call home. Dwell on that for a while and consider this wise proverb:

“It does not further you to go anywhere”
-___________________________________

Meh, the right kind of travel can open your mind quite a bit.

#77 Doug Rowat on 04.18.20 at 1:44 pm

#32 UmiouiuS on 04.18.20 at 11:12 am

” .. that Steve McQueen movies are overrated.”

Doug, strange timing that you mention Stevie McQueen.
I just watched ‘Bullitt’ last night. 1968. The famous car chase. Consider it one of the best movies ever made.

McQueen died 12 years later in Mexico. Asbestos.

And a 2-pack-a-day Lucky habit. I agree with you about Bullitt btw. If only all his movies were that good.

–Doug

#78 LP on 04.18.20 at 1:47 pm

#75 Flop… on 04.18.20 at 1:36 pm

If you post something overly racist, sexist, or ageist on this blog, Thor Turner also serves up a BANH MI…

M45B
…………………………………

How can one be just enough racist, sexist, or ageist?

To quote a song (since you like songs, but you’re too young for this one): Is You is or is You Ain’t?

F72ON

#79 oh bouy on 04.18.20 at 1:47 pm

@#72 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm
Wife is working reduced hours, I am laid off.

Funny thing is, we’re not hurting for $ one bit.

Lots of work getting done, and I’m liking it. Don’t mind a bit if the restrictions drag on another month or so.
_____________________________

another month of this would be great for me.

wife and i working from home and loving it.
breaking up the day with some yard/house maintenance. home schooling thing kinda blows though.
May reno one of the bathrooms next week just to keep things interesting.

#80 Dr V on 04.18.20 at 1:50 pm

50 fartz – crushed it. good work.

61 fartz – Kinda in that boat. Hopefully have enough
put away, and a deal to sell. But I’ve noticed the
ambition of the younger set is lacking. No forethought.
They just want to work the 8 and get a paycheque, and
some benefits. And they still want houses. I try to
explain to them that I want them to learn the skills,
rather than have me (re)learn them and then leave in a
year or two.

But it wont be my problem.

#81 MA on 04.18.20 at 1:55 pm

Turn this current “negative” situation into a positive — cut all negatives out of your life for good. No alcohol, no weed, no pornography; invest in your health by eliminating all unnecessary junk food and start eating intelligently with healthy whole foods, also saving you money. Start exercising at home — you can save money, and also train as often as you’d like.

Learn a new skill. There are plenty of online resources available today to learn anything, many of which can help you land a new job in the future.

Take the opportunity now to invest in your mental health. Think positive and see the opportunities this current meltdown may afford you in pursuing personal growth and or change your previous circumstances; everything is in a state of change, you can change to and for the positive.

Take this time to re-evaluate what’s important in life. Lots of people are going to suffer because of the fallout created by our benevolent government, so reach out to people you care about. Let them know you’re thinking about them. Lots of dreams and lives have been shaken because of this virus spook — be stable in the storm and show that people can look to you for support.

#82 joblo on 04.18.20 at 1:59 pm

Save big, Stop buying McCain products, fries r crap.
Bonus, Mourno may face cranky at home.

#83 Dogman01 on 04.18.20 at 2:01 pm

Schools
50 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:51 am

Been wondering that recently, here where I am schools closed over a month and not a single Teacher Lay off, still paid, still pensionable time. OMG the disparity between a private sector worker and a Public Sector is incredible.

The schools have children’s mind space, The Teachers become like heroes for the Kids, it is where the young generate a social identity so they will never consider it as something that needs to be changed. It defines a social structure just as your brain is developing hence it is so important to the young.
Takes them into their mid 20’s to start realizing what an artificial environment it was.

Yes educational reform is long overdue, but the vested interests are just too powerful to allow changes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSxM6_zEw2k&t=78s

#84 Stone on 04.18.20 at 2:04 pm

#76 Fred on 04.18.20 at 1:37 pm
https://globalnews.ca/news/6831003/alberta-doctors-resigning-hospital-lac-la-biche/

lol

tip: vote Trudeau, he had Canada all ready for this.

———

Healthcare falls under provincial jurisdiction, not federal. What does that have to with Trudeau?

Seems more like the typical Conservative modus operandi to me. Who again is running Alberta? Hmmm….

Or is it Trudeau’s fault every time crowdedelevatorfartz lays a stinky?

#85 tbone on 04.18.20 at 2:17 pm

If you are foolish enough to lend friends or relatives money and think you will be repaid, just consider it a gift .
Especially relatives , they are the worst. lol .

#86 UmiouiuS on 04.18.20 at 2:18 pm

.. HOW A STIMULUS PACKAGE WORKS ..

It is a slow day in the small Saskatchewan town of Pumphandle, and the streets are deserted.

Times are tough, everybody is in debt, and everybody is living on credit.

A tourist visiting the area drives through town, stops at the motel, and lays a $100 bill on the desk saying he wants to inspect the rooms upstairs to pick one for the night.

As soon as he walks upstairs, the motel owner grabs the bill and runs next door to pay his debt to the butcher.

The butcher takes the $100 and runs down the street to retire his debt to the pig farmer.

The pig farmer takes the $100 and heads off to pay his bill to his supplier, the Co-Op.

The guy at the Co-Op takes the $100 and runs to pay his debt to the local prostitute, who has also been facing hard times and has had to offer her “services” on credit.

The hooker rushes to the hotel and pays off her room bill with the hotel owner.

The hotel proprietor then places the $100 back on the counter so the traveler will not suspect anything.

At that moment the traveler comes down the stairs, states that the rooms are not satisfactory, picks up the $100 bill and leaves.

No one produced anything. No one earned anything ..
however, the whole town is now out of debt and now looks to the future with a lot more optimism.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how a Stimulus Package works.

#87 Sankar on 04.18.20 at 2:24 pm

Save those commuting dollars. Everyday I dont take the train downtown, I put aside $13. Everyday wife does not drive to work, she puts aside $12. So, in a month that adds up to roughly $500. Keep aside another $5 spent on coffee and we saved about $600 in the past one month we have been home.

#88 WUL on 04.18.20 at 2:29 pm

Hi Doug,

Thank you for your work. It helps.

I took two steps to save some coin.

My mortgage came up for renewal. I amortized it to the moon and back. The money is essentially free on a fixed 2.6% fiver.

The second thing I did was take money out of my RRSP in the last week of December. This year will be the highest income year of my life. Paid off some expensive and stupid debt.

Total monthly savings = $1175 per month.

Oh, a third thing. I am lucky enough here in Fort McMisery to be able to purchase the River Valley beer products of Big Rock Brewery in Cowtown. $1.5833 per tin.

Hey Stampede City compadres, what’s the going tariff for these palate cleaners in the old home town?

WUL

M64YMM

#89 Brian Ripley on 04.18.20 at 2:30 pm

“…best ideas for saving (or earning) your fellow Canadians a loonie or two.” Doug Rowat

Some individuals will fall on hard times due to no fault of their own and if we have a progressive social contract that includes helping those in need in a timely manner with efficient institutional policies, then all of us will benefit.

“Libertarians” and the hard core on the political right of course will never support the idea of a central government organizing such a social contract.

But one APOLITICAL thing we could do as a society is TAX REFORM.

I have posted this before here on this blog and I have sent the information to media outlets, government agents and other people of influence with little effect and no response. One often hears at election time about tax reform, but if any reform happens, it amounts to carrot and stick measures that reward some or demands more of others.

So here it is, my post from 2012 entitled “The Automated Payment Transaction Tax”: http://www.chpc.biz/history-readings/apt

Snippets:

By capitalizing on financial data processing technology, it is possible to create a tax code for the 21st century that is astonishingly easy for all citizens to understand and administer because it eliminates the need to file tax or information returns.

The foundations of the APT tax proposal—a small, uniform tax on all economic transactions—involve simplification, base broadening, reductions in marginal tax rates, the elimination of tax and information returns and the automatic collection of tax revenues at the payment source. The APT approach would extend the tax base from income, consumption and wealth to all transactions.

To understand the mechanics of this micro tax on all transactions read the 41 page PDF: http://www.chpc.biz/uploads/9/7/9/5/9795010/taxation_for_the_21st_century.pdf

Based on U.S. economic data, the required tax to get to a revenue neutral state ended up to be only 0.30 percent or 0.15 percent to each side of any financial transaction.

That means that a federal government could dial up or down the transaction tax whenever fiscal policy required or did not require revenue to pursue social goals (infrastructure and social policy spending).

This is never going to happen in my life, but a new generation of data scientists could create this in Canada.

Even if a “revenue neutral” APT tax in Canada ended up to be 10% (5% on each side of any transaction, we would still be happy tax payers, eg:

You earn $100,000/yr, so you pay 5% tax ($5,000) on those income transactions.
You spend $80,000/yr on supporting your lifestyle, so you pay 5% tax ($4,000) on those Transactions.
Your total tax bill is $9,000/yr or 9% of your total income (from all sources)

The other sides of your earning and spending also pays 5% or $9,000 so the government treasury gets $18,000.

And the only thing we have left to argue about is fiscal policy or what as a nation should we spend our tax dollars on… new roads? new hospitals? new security measures?

AND we would not have to file a tax return or face hidden taxes.

You’re welcome.

#90 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

#91 espressobob on 04.18.20 at 2:42 pm

This is one of those times when plan B comes into effect. Being money conscious has it advantages.

Went cycling earlier today through the streets of Toronto. A pleasant destressing experience with little traffic. Picked up some coffee beans, wobbly pops and grub. Cathartic.

Going out on a stretch but wouldn’t it be fun if Doug did a zoom video conference with the blog dogs? Just a thought.

#92 Goldie on 04.18.20 at 2:48 pm

What i’d like to know is how did S Korea and Taiwan get away with not closing their economies and Canada had to ?

Shouldnt Trudeau answer this question ?

What a disgrace

#93 Flop... on 04.18.20 at 2:52 pm

#79 LP on 04.18.20 at 1:47 pm
#75 Flop… on 04.18.20 at 1:36 pm

If you post something overly racist, sexist, or ageist on this blog, Thor Turner also serves up a BANH MI…

M45B
…………………………………

How can one be just enough racist, sexist, or ageist?

To quote a song (since you like songs, but you’re too young for this one): Is You is or is You Ain’t?

F72ON

////////////////

Hey LP, you didn’t get the joke?

That is the last Vietnamese sandwich joke I will do on this blog.

It was sub-par!

Sub-par!

Get it…

M45BC

#94 Dr V on 04.18.20 at 2:57 pm

87 UmiouiuS – that story was posted hear during the last FC.

But it’s not about stimulus. It’s about liquidity. The tourist was Mark Carney.

And the towns collective balance sheet didn’t change.

But it’s a good story for people to think about.

#95 Jack on 04.18.20 at 3:01 pm

Just got my natural gas bill for march: $89 plus 17.50 carbon tax and then $14 hst on top of that. So 31.50 tax = 35%. Carbon tax goes up again next tear and likely hst too – I figure at least 40% and that’s after paying 42% income tax. Time to quit my job and join the druggies downtown.

#96 Dr V on 04.18.20 at 3:03 pm

89 WULly – why didn’t you wait to take out the RRSP money in January where you could have deferred the income for a year? I’m guessing you would still pay the same withholding tax either way.

My sister told me to get a HELOC before I retire. If a significant expense comes up, it may be worth paying it on credit, then taking the income in smaller chunks to
reduce the tax, or having to liquidate when investment values are low.

#97 Don Guillermo on 04.18.20 at 3:05 pm

#57 Damifino on 04.18.20 at 12:04 pm
#18 Calgary Rip Off
Vacations and plane flights to some exotic locale are for the most part a waste of time and money and in many cases put the vacationer at risk financially and health wise.
———————————–
That’s my thinking too. I’ve lived in Vancouver all my life but I don’t claim it to be ‘the best place on earth’. I don’t need to be told what’s wrong with my city. Likewise, have a clear picture of it’s wonderment.
Considering other locales where I might have arbitrarily been born, a Vancouver residency is a pretty decent outcome. Millions take flights to YVR to experience an exotic destination. Yeah, I know that sounds funny. Especially if you’re from Toronto. Or Lunenberg.
Remember, somebody somewhere will take the trip of a lifetime to visit the same place you call home. Dwell on that for a while and consider this wise proverb:
“It does not further you to go anywhere”
That is, unless you live in an active war zone.
Then yeah, it probably would
*****************************************

It’s incredible how quickly some Canadians are willing to give up their freedoms like sheep. Embarrassing actually.

#98 Deplorable Dude on 04.18.20 at 3:08 pm

Schools need to restart. This virus isn’t killing children. Tell the little darlings to keep their distance from granny and grandpa and get on with it. Parents can’t go back to work unless schools are open.

I wonder what our ‘curve’ would have looked like if we had just immediately locked down all care homes? In BC medium death age is 86.

#99 Dr V on 04.18.20 at 3:08 pm

74 Goober – many people dismiss a UBI immediately. But don’t view it as a “social justice” solution, view it as an economic solution. All sorts of tweaking would be required, but it would eliminate, or greatly reduce, a number of current income subsidy programs. The real
trick would be setting the level and conditions of it so
that there is still incentive (almost a need) to work.

#100 Penny Henny on 04.18.20 at 3:14 pm

#56 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 11:58 am
I am building miniature picnic tables for squirrels using 3/4”x 1 1/2” inch lumber. They are about 12”x 8”x 4”. I am dropping them off in selected locations like parks, walkways, back yards etc. and topping them off with a few peanuts. Kids love them and most people smile when they come across one. Squirrels like them too.
////////////////////

will the squirrels get fined by the by-law officer if they sit on your benches

#101 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 3:18 pm

“But one APOLITICAL thing we could do as a society is TAX REFORM.”

There is NOTHING more political than tax reform. Here’s how it works in the real world:

When Donald Trump signed his whopper Tax Cuts and Jobs Act two years ago, the bill contained clauses to offset the loss of revenue that would entail from shaving down the top individual tax rate relatively a little (from 39.6% to 37%) and slashing the corporate tax rate a lot (from 35% all the way down to 21%).

One of those changes limited the amount of losses that could be used to offset taxable income in any given year. Another limited the amount of losses from so-called “pass-through” businesses (i.e. businesses that don’t pay corporate taxes) that wealthy individuals could use to offset taxable income. These provisions particularly impacted real estate developers (!), hedge fund managers, and other high net worth individuals with volatile revenue profiles.

The second provision only affected people making at least $250,000, or couples earning at least $500,000.

The CARES Act sought to wipe out or alter both provisions. Republicans also tried to include tax relief for multinationals who offshore profits, but that provision was stripped out in favor of these first two loopholes, seemingly reflecting their importance to the caucus.

As Steve Wamhoff of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy points out, the changes on the use of “pass-through” losses only benefit a select group. “It has to be stressed that this exclusively helps wealthy people,” Wamhoff says. “It only has an impact on people already making over $250,000.”

Because the CARES Act was rushed to the floor, members didn’t have all of the information they might have wanted before the vote. After the bill passed, Democratic staffers sent these tax provisions in the CARES Act, sections 2303 and 2304, to the Joint Committee on Taxation, to be scored. They were stunned to learn they would cost $195 billion over ten years.

In other words, what seemed like a run-of-the-mill offhand legislative pork provision ended up dwarfing the airline bailout and other main parts of the bill.

“The cost of caring for this small slice of the wealthiest one percent is greater than the CARES Act funded for all hospitals in America,” says Texas Democrat Lloyd Doggett. “It’s greater than CARES provided for all state and local governments.”

The JCT analysis found that 80% of the benefit of the bill went to just 43,000 taxpayers each earning over $1 million a year. The average tax break for those 43,000 individuals was $1.6 million, an interesting number when one considers the loudness of the controversy over $1,200 relief checks for everyone else.
https://taibbi.substack.com/p/the-trickle-up-bailout

I love how somebody can purposefully and anonymously slip a $20 billion a year tax break into legislation. That kind of thing is bought and paid for, and we’ll never know who greased whose palm. America! Meanwhile the little people discuss the ethics of availing themselves to the small beer on tap for them.

#102 Doug t on 04.18.20 at 3:26 pm

#50 crowdedelevatorfartz

GRAND SLAM OUT OF THE PARK – spot on lol

#103 Alberta Ed on 04.18.20 at 3:28 pm

Ask yourself whether you really need that $200+ monthly data plan/cell phone package. There’s free WiFi practically everywhere.

#104 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 3:34 pm

@#84 Dogman01
“Been wondering that recently, here where I am schools closed over a month and not a single Teacher Lay off, still paid, still pensionable time. OMG the disparity between a private sector worker and a Public Sector is incredible.”

++++

Not to worry.
All levels of govt are burning through cash at an incredible rate.\
First the Cities go bust and layoff thousands.
Then the Provinces.
Finally the feds.

Let the thousands of laid off govt workers discover the “joys” of EI and growing bills……like the private sector has for the past 30 days.
I give it till June 30th…..max. before this economic disaster implodes.
Then….the govt will start re-opening the economy.
No other option.

#105 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 3:35 pm

#101 Penny Henny on 04.18.20 at 3:14 pm
#56 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 11:58 am
I am building miniature picnic tables for squirrels using 3/4”x 1 1/2” inch lumber. They are about 12”x 8”x 4”. I am dropping them off in selected locations like parks, walkways, back yards etc. and topping them off with a few peanuts. Kids love them and most people smile when they come across one. Squirrels like them too.
////////////////////

will the squirrels get fined by the by-law officer if they sit on your benches
…………………………..

By-law officers chased me out of the park with a butterfly net. City needs revenue so the squirrels have to be quick.

#106 WUL on 04.18.20 at 3:43 pm

#97 Dr V on 04.18.20 at 3:03 pm

89 WULly – why didn’t you wait to take out the RRSP money in January where you could have deferred the income for a year? I’m guessing you would still pay the same withholding tax either way.

i’m dim…i’m dim…i’m dim

Doc,

Shoulda thought of that. Moolah mgmt. is not my strong suit. Fortunately I never had enough to invest in a restaurant. I’m hustling now to escape the boney grasp of the taxman.

My physician says my prognosis looks good. I cannot even remember when I injured my prognosis. Maybe rollerblading.

Cheers, Sawbones.

WULLY

#107 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 3:44 pm

#93 Goldie on 04.18.20 at 2:48 pm
What i’d like to know is how did S Korea and Taiwan get away with not closing their economies and Canada had to ?

Shouldnt Trudeau answer this question ?

What a disgrace
……………………………….

They have been thru this before. They were prepared.

#108 Phylis on 04.18.20 at 3:46 pm

#96 Jack on 04.18.20 at 3:01 pm Which reminds me of looking for savings… program your thermostat. Its getting warmer, maybe even do some fine tuning.

#109 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.18.20 at 4:03 pm

@#87 UmiouiuS on 04.18.20 at 2:18 pm

Saw that one before but it’s still a great analogy.

#110 the Jaguar on 04.18.20 at 4:10 pm

Heavens to murgatroyd, Doug! All Steve McQueen ever did was try to execute a poor imitation of James Dean like every other actor of his generation. I’m a Gene Hackman fan for what it’s worth. If blog dogs want a little inspiration they could watch Hoosiers. The lead character played by Hackman was inspired by Garth Turner.
As for ‘taking back control’, my suggestion would be to never have given it up in the first place. One doesn’t need a crisis to come along to know that self discipline and sustainability is a goal everyone should work towards. Learn to cook and enjoy healthy meals from whole foods, start and continue a home exercise program that doesn’t require expensive equipment like Pilates or even the good old Canadian 5BX. Gyms are the exercise equivalent of cruise ships (ugh) and you can’t take them with you when you go on vacation. Examine and look to pare down your electronic charges (cable, cell phone plans) and consider other attractive options like meaningful podcasts where you actually learn something new. Borrow a book from Dorothy.
If all of that seems a bit overwhelming for those stuck in the fetal position these past few weeks try feeling grateful for everything and everyone you have in your life. For being alive. As an Albertan who has witnessed the evisceration of our oil and gas industry, the 2013 Calgary Flood, the devastating Fort McMurray Fire, the Kenow Wildfire where we almost lost the Prince of Wales Hotel save for the magnificent efforts of all, but especially the Calgary Fire Department, and as we await the outcome and possible cancellation of the annual celebration (Calgary Exhibition and Stampede) which has defined us for more than 100 years, I feel lucky to living in this great province. And notice I used the word “possible” cancellation of the Stampede, because I prefer to keep hope alive and believe in miracles.

#111 Ida on 04.18.20 at 4:11 pm

Consider the possibilities of virtual travel. A couple of years ago I visited Pompeii. In the middle of August it was hot, humid and crowded. We took the wrong train to get there and ended up sitting in a little station for 2 hours waiting for another train to take us back.

The streets were cobbled inside the ruined city were uneven and I mostly had to look down to avoid stumbling as opposed to viewing the ruins. I could only speculate as to the significance of various sites. No place to sit down and soak in the atmosphere. I missed seeing the amphitheatre. After a couple of hours I was sweaty and thirsty and generally wiped out.

Later at home I watched an on-site and in-depth Youtube video of Pompeii narrated by a knowledgable and interesting person. I got a lot more out of it than the actual visit. Some of the BBC Earth programs are excellent. Something to think about.

#112 yvrguy on 04.18.20 at 4:14 pm

#48 Stone on 04.18.20 at 11:49 am
Rebalance your portfolio if you haven’t done it yet. Did it about 3 weeks ago and have watched the acceleration back up. Sitting at -5.27% YTD as of end of the day yesterday.

If you’re at a discount broker and you haven’t done it yet, what are you waiting for? For those at a roboadvisor or with a full service advisor, if they haven’t done this for you yet, fire them with full prejudice.

/////////

Definitely. I rebalanced on 3/16. Sitting at -2.35% YTD. Rebalanced again on 4/14 to sell the winners and prepare for the next leg down. I would be pissed if I had an advisor and they didn’t do the same.

#113 If'n your handy with a ... on 04.18.20 at 4:18 pm

gun … shoot your own meat. But just make sure you are good at it because if not it’s WAY more expensive than buying it. And cut it up. Same with fish. And plant a garden if you have room. Can’t beat home grown ‘maters. It’s all way better for you too. Make your own “panty dropper” too. Sugar is dirt cheap. Blackberries are for the taking around here. Easy … but requires time.

#114 yvrguy on 04.18.20 at 4:21 pm

Rebalance with getpassiv. Super easy and they implemented limit orders now, which you definitely want to use in this volital environment.

#115 earthboundmisfit on 04.18.20 at 4:22 pm

WUL “I am lucky enough here in Fort McMisery to be able to purchase the River Valley beer products of Big Rock Brewery in Cowtown. $1.5833 per tin”

You have a strange definition of lucky. Big Rock brews swill.

#116 LP on 04.18.20 at 4:25 pm

#94 Flop… on 04.18.20 at 2:52 pm

I’m getting slow and sluggish out of boredom. I can only read so many books, watch so much tv, knit so many rows. Didn’t pick up on your “joke” (really ??). But good on you for trying.

#117 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm

#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

—————

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.

#118 604sam on 04.18.20 at 4:28 pm

Doug, excellent idea for a blog post.

I work in heavy construction and recently got a good promotion and a big raise, so oddly enough during this pandemic I am making more than I ever have. However, this doesn’t change my penny pinching attitude and I’ve always tried to avoid lifestyle creep as it is. Here’s a few tips from a millennial east van renter:

Doug you might not like this one: Buy Irish whiskey instead of scotch. There are some wonderful options. Half the price. Writer’s Tears and Red Breast are both good ones. I love whiskey but have never like those ultra-peaty scotches that taste like a house fire. Irish is really worth a shot.

Always brew your own coffee. Always! If you work construction like me- and survive on Gatorade- make your own. Those guys you always see at the gas station at 530am before work in high-vis vests, that guy is spending 500$ a month on coffee/gatorades/smokes. It is SO easy for those mini purchases to add up.

Quit smoking. I did in may of 2014. Used to smoke a pack a day. I’ve probably saved around 20 grand on smokes since then. Champix worked for me.

Make big batches of food. The freezer is your friend. Freeze your giant pots of homemade pasta sauce in individual ziplock bags. Meal plan. YouTube is a wonderful resource for that kinda thing. Spend 2 hours on the weekend making and freezing 30 breakfast burritos.

If you’re a commuter like me: drive the speed limit. Driving at 85mph uses 40% more fuel than at 70mph. Also inflate your tires to a few PSI over the max rating. Just because fuel is so cheap doesn’t mean we have to waste it.

Also- like flop says- try some Banh Mi. If you’re going to order out, small family owned restaurants, especially Vietnamese ones, are affordable and have large portions. And are delicious. Get some viet subs, bring a blanket and eat them in the park.

Walk your dog more- ok this isn’t really a money saving tip, but you might as well.

Cheers guys! Also- remember to wash your hands!

#119 Brian Ripley on 04.18.20 at 4:30 pm

“But one APOLITICAL thing we could do as a society is TAX REFORM.”: #90 Brian Ripley on 04.18.20 at 2:30 pm
AND
“There is NOTHING more political than tax reform. Here’s how it works in the real world.”: #102 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 3:18 pm

Thanks for the response Figure it Out.

You are supporting my argument, that tax reform is needed in Canada.

If a micro flat tax on ALL transactions as offered by the “The Automated Payment Transaction Tax” solution replaces the existing Byzantine tax model we have now, the only argument left is what we do with the revenue neutral tax collected into our treasury.

That argument would be debated in every election cycle.

#120 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 4:37 pm

Everyon in debt?

#87 UmiouiuS on 04.18.20 at 2:18 pm
.. HOW A STIMULUS PACKAGE WORKS ..

It is a slow day in the small Saskatchewan town of Pumphandle, and the streets are deserted.

Times are tough, everybody is in debt, and everybody is living on credit.

***************************************
Your story also indicates that in all cases the debt was owed to someone else in town. One person’s debt is another’s receivable.

Among this group there was no net external debt they should owed each other money.

Credit and debt are and have been the grease of the economy. Little moves without it.

I suppose the economy has a love/hate relationship with debt. Mostly love.

#121 BS on 04.18.20 at 4:46 pm

102 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 3:18 pm

“But one APOLITICAL thing we could do as a society is TAX REFORM.”
__________________________________

The one thing both of you lefties miss is when you tax something or reduce taxes on something or give out free stuff behaviors change.

On the transaction tax you would have an underground economy and transactions would be done with cash, bitcoin or what have you. Tax revenues would decrease as the transaction tax was increased. There would be no incentive to report transactions like now because in this system there would be no tax write offs on expenses like now.

Trumps tax cuts increased tax revenue. Yes US government revenue went up after the tax cuts. Lower taxes increase economic activity which in turn increases tax revenue even if the tax is at a lower rate. That is the way it works. Increasing taxes brings in lower tax revenues. Just ask Trudeau.

For the free $1200 if net tax revenues go up after giving out $1200 cheques (and factoring in the $1200) then that would be a good thing. But they won’t. Free stuff never increases tax revenue. it reduces it because it discourages economic activity and the free stuff has to be paid for by someone else which means they have to pay more which discourages them from earning more. People have an incentive not to work (free stuff) and a disincentive to work (pay more taxes to cover the free stuff). You end up with less people working and more people collecting free stuff. It keeps going until nobody works. Like communism. It fails.

#122 Not So New guy on 04.18.20 at 4:49 pm

Post on Craiglist that you will pay $1000 for the best offer of toilet paper.

Toilet paper hoarders will compete with each other for your offer. You should be able to at least get it for 50 cents on the dollar if you hold out long enough

You can get years of supply that you can stuff in your garage. The stuff will never go bad whereas it will match the price of inflation since it is such a vital good as time has proven

So your TP investment should earn you a good YOY rate until it runs out

#123 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 4:54 pm

#118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm
#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

—————

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.
………………………

You go ahead and boycott whomever you want you virtue signalling boob. The rest of us will boycott the country that sent the virus.

#124 FreeBird on 04.18.20 at 4:55 pm

I posted tips to save money not long ago here (last week?) but couldn’t find for quick copy/paste so here’s the list…

-most local library websites offer free e/audio book, movie etc rentals. Some apps better so try a few
-many are doing virtual parties and game nights (days) online. If you know a senior who misses their weekly or card game look into connecting them online
-lots of free crosswords, online learning sites for various subjects incl free public courses from large universities/schools worldwide (for all ages)
-for more affordable food and if you have access to local farmer’s market or small farms look them up online and see if they offer seasonal baskets. Share the basket and the cost. Just put in new bags, use sterile gloves, etc and drop off at door. Many sml farmers now delivering. Local fresh food and support local vendors
-use drying racks for clothes
-do what your grand/parents did and make bulk marks then freeze it’s much cheaper. Stretch out soups, and other dishes with pasta and rice and lots of veggies. Ditto with potatoes. Most can be frozen to save cooking
-we just looked at our car ins and took off things we didn’t need and yes changed mileage (good tip Doug Thx)
-do same w/ ALL bills incl utilities, cable TV (we stopped years ago and use Netflix and Chromecast for free YouTube videos to big screen (cheaper and as easy as Amazon firestick)
-stop window shopping online or watching the shopping channel while bored. Seriously.
-we clean almost everything w baking soda, vinegar, hydrogen peroxide ex clothes. Turn normal hand cleaning liquid into foam hand wash (google it) to save money on hand washing.
-there’s more but I’ll sound like my mom or dad

Good luck! Hope any of this helps (again) :)

#125 FreeBird on 04.18.20 at 4:59 pm

Typo (iphone is great)… make bulk ‘meals’ ahead. Obv.

#126 Not So New guy on 04.18.20 at 5:08 pm

#56 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 11:58 am

I am building miniature picnic tables for squirrels using 3/4”x 1 1/2” inch lumber. They are about 12”x 8”x 4”. I am dropping them off in selected locations like parks, walkways, back yards etc. and topping them off with a few peanuts. Kids love them and most people smile when they come across one. Squirrels like them too.

=========================

Get an internet address like

squirrelpicnictables.com

Carve it into the tables. You’ll have business out the ying/yang

#127 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 5:11 pm

“Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.”

Nothing xenophobic at all. Thumbs up to Taiwan, to HK as long as it can keep some semblance of freedoms, and of course we love most of the Chinese diaspora throughout the world. It’s the state that has over a million of its citizens in concentration camps, for their religion/ethnicity — that’s what is WAY OVER the line most humans concur with.

#128 Never Lend To Family on 04.18.20 at 5:39 pm

“Take out loans from friends or family members. Obviously, this is a highly personal decision fraught with many complicated family dynamics, but for many, these are desperate times”

Never do business with a family member as it will be sure to ruin Christmas. If you feel you must support a family member best to make it a gift and hope they somehow return the favor down the road.

For me it would be extremely difficult to loan or gift money to any of my family members because even though I know they are broke and always have been, it hasn’t stopped them from taking annual or semi-annual flyaway vacations while I was busy topping up my RRSP’s and paying off my mortgage. It is the whole “The Ant and the Grasshopper” thing. Plus I don’t have the money to float everybody, and my own kids are in trouble too (and not eligible for CERB because they are in school). Plus I am still reeling over the losses to my “balanced portfolio”, so I am not feeling all that financially secure myself. Plus I am married, so making handouts could quickly spiral out of control. Why would my relatives be eligible but not my wife’s? It is a conversation I would rather not have.

So any handouts would have to come from my parents, but from what I know of his business he has probably suffered a significant reduction in income and isn’t eligible for CERB either. Also there would be the tricky question that arises when parents gift money to one kid and not the others. That sort of behavior has already caused a pretty big rift in my family. What parents often view as “need” can easily be interpreted as favoritism.

So think long and hard before loaning money to family, and if you do don’t expect to ever see it back. If they don’t have the money now, there is no reason to assume that they will anytime soon or that repayment will seem more important than a trip to Mexico to them.

The truth of the matter is that we are not all in this together. Past behaviors do not get forgotten.

#129 BrianT on 04.18.20 at 5:43 pm

#124 Yukon-getting into bed with the totalitarian dictatorship of Communist China has made a number of Canadians very rich while harming our country permanently. If we don’t Social Distance from Communist China going forward Canada is going to be in for a world of hurt-this is only the beginning.

#130 rosie on 04.18.20 at 5:50 pm

I have made it a point for a few years to avoid China made products, especially appliances and electronics. The quality is just not there. Formally top name brands have moved production to China, price the same, quality not. If you look you can find many products made in North America, Europe and assorted Asian countries. For example: coffee maker, Netherlands; coffee grinder, Italy; espresso machine, Spain; kettle, Belgium; food processor, Germany; blender, USA; toaster 30 years old, Toronto. All major appliances, North America. All electronics, Japan, Thailand. You just have to look, ask questions and do some research.

#131 Drinking on 04.18.20 at 5:56 pm

Bunch of us reverted back to our youth days by bartering. Just traded off 4 good shape winter tires that were off a car that I sold for roof work.
As I mentioned previously; plant a garden, or create your own small garden in planters.
As Flop mentioned; watch some YouTube videos and do the repair yourself.
Another poster mentioned crock pot cooking and freezing it.
I think that I will start making my own beer; any good personal recipes out there? :)

All great ideas!

#132 Paul on 04.18.20 at 6:08 pm

8 Smoking Man on 04.18.20 at 9:24 am
The backlash of hording us like animals in cages will be huge.

Govt be afraid…
……………….”……………………………………………………………
Plus all personal liberties are being walked on.
Walk in through a park maybe ok.sit on a bench to catch a breath $750 fine ,tightening yolk bit by bit.
Now this 10 cops bullying one guy for a good deed.
Calgary man fined $1,200 for feeding homeless

#133 MF on 04.18.20 at 6:12 pm

#41 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:33 am

“Worried your cheering section will be reduced to one with Faron’s absence?
Perhaps i can contribute?
Clap….clap….clap”

-Having a cheering section here is like being given a razzie award.

It’s not me I’m worried about it’s you, and your unhealthy obsession with teachers -the ultimate scapegoat for ALL the world’s problems in your eyes.

Did you want to be a teacher when you were younger and failed? Did a teacher steal your girl friend when you were younger or something? It’s honestly unhealthy.

MF

#134 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 6:20 pm

“You are supporting my argument, that tax reform is needed in Canada.”

Needed or not, I don’t think it is ever going to happen. I’ve been reading about tax reform since I was little (yes, I was a bit precocious, and read strange stuff). It doesn’t generally happen. What have we had in Canada? Mulroney got rid of the 13.5% manufacturers’ sales tax and replaced it with the broader GST. No major positive reforms since.

Every carve-out and exception in the tax code is worth a LOT to some narrow slice somewhere — sometimes only a few tax lawyers understand who benefits and how much, sometimes only one does. Those carve-outs were hard won with lobbying, campaign contributions and boozy dinners. And they would be a much greater loss to those few taxpayers, who are willing to PAY, than they’d be a gain to the average voter. It would probably be better to look at tax as an INDUSTRY rather than policy. The lawyers, lobbyists, accountants and bankers work hand in glove with the politicians and senior civil servants. Look at most senior politicians from say twenty years ago, and they’re part of the industry. John Manley, Peter MacKay, what do they DO in the private sector? They practice lobbying and tax.

The insiders don’t want that gravy train to end, nor do the beneficiaries. Even in the unlikely event that Canadians managed to elect a large slate of tax reformers, the civil service and the industry would soon cut them down to size, tying them up with study groups and working papers that dragged on until that parliament was dissolved.

Sorry.

#135 Long-Time Lurker on 04.18.20 at 6:22 pm

>We’re out of toilet paper! The end is here! It’s all over!

Wood chips to make pulp for toilet paper in short supply, Commons committee told
BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

Posted Apr 17, 2020 2:40 pm PDT Last Updated Apr 17, 2020 at 2:50 pm PDT

https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/04/17/wood-chips-to-make-pulp-for-toilet-paper-in-short-supply-commons-committee-told/

#136 Nonplused on 04.18.20 at 6:31 pm

#5 Reality is stark on 04.18.20 at 9:10 am
Let’s talk reality.
Taxes specifically.
Capital gains taxes on your principal residence are pretty much a done deal. However what is likely to be a shock to most Canadians will be the introduction of inheritance taxes.

——————–

Capital gains on principle residences are unlikely because they would make it prohibitively expensive for people to move. We’d all be taking out bigger mortgages just to pay the tax. Also it would be inconsistent with Canadian tax principles because a primary residence is not considered a business or commercial investment. It’s not “capital” per se.

We already have an estate tax on everything else. Everything is deemed to be liquidated in the year of death and taxes are due as such. RRSP’s get cashed out, businesses are deemed sold, so is the cottage, everything. The tax bill can be quite staggering because often the RRSP will be in the top tax bracket. And if you can’t sell the cottage you got to come up with cash. Want to keep the family business? Cash that out too.

We are already at peak taxation. There just isn’t anything left to tax and nobody has any money to pay it.

#137 Sam on 04.18.20 at 6:35 pm

Rebalance your portfolio if you haven’t done it yet. Did it about 3 weeks ago and have watched the acceleration back up. Sitting at -5.27% YTD as of end of the day yesterday.

………

yikes!! why so poorly? nearly flat here . Do have a heavier tilt on tech

#138 Nonplused on 04.18.20 at 6:37 pm

#47 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.18.20 at 11:48 am
Cancel your Playboy subscription.

People still have Playboy subscriptions?

#139 not 1st on 04.18.20 at 6:38 pm

I have got to hand it to our govt. They tried to divide us on every issue, climate, race, gender etc.

But that’s nothing compared to pitting those who don’t want to work versus those who want to work to pay for those who don’t want to work.

You cant make this up.

If we have to carry vaccine papers after this, then so should every virtue signally SJW be identified also so business owners can refuse to serve them.

#140 Nonplused on 04.18.20 at 6:45 pm

#63 bullwinkle on 04.18.20 at 12:39 pm
I have seen many unhappy cashiers and floor staff at various places. They have to work while others sit on their $2,000 per month.

Yup, welcome to the socialist utopia. I don’t like the program in the first place but if it would have included everyone it could be viewed as a nice little danger bonus for all the stock boys and cashiers (and nurses). They are literally risking their lives and the way this program is structured they are basically being told not only do they have no choice but they get nothing for it.

Governments always make things worse.

#141 Off Duty on 04.18.20 at 6:46 pm

Negotiate a cheap lease for a neighbors house that is sitting empty after his son returned over seas after schools closed. Offer him a reduced rate in cash on a yearly lease and then rent it to another neighbor who just sold their house at the peak and is looking for a year long lease in the hood. Make a decent % return on your money for the effort!

#142 Damifino on 04.18.20 at 6:50 pm

#98 Don Guillermo

It’s incredible how quickly some Canadians are willing to give up their freedoms like sheep. Embarrassing actually
————————————

What do you mean give up? The point I’m making is that although I’ve always been able to go wherever I wanted and could easily have afforded it, I’ve never been much inclined to do so.

I went to Taiwan once for a few months for work. It was undoubtedly an interesting place and I’m not sorry I went although I picked up an awful flu on the flight back that led to pneumonia. It took weeks to recover and I was much younger then. Not sure how I’d fare now.

(BTW, let me say I respect Taiwan for the effective response they’ve mounted against this virus and their stoicism in the face of Communist Chinese bullying. Still, I have no wish to return).

Hopping on a plane for a week the Grand Caymans is, for me, an uninspiring concept. I like home, and for me, that just happens to be Vancouver.

I tire quickly of ‘travel chauvinists’ I meet at gatherings who spend hours comparing their impressions of Lisbon in spring. Have you seen the Amalfi coast? No? Cretan.

#143 Barb on 04.18.20 at 6:52 pm

$86K for house expenditures?

Wow…

#144 Canadian Moose on 04.18.20 at 6:55 pm

FLIPP App is a tremendous money saver. It’s local to the area you live and type in what you want eg. Wine and voila you get all participating vendors who have wine specials from their weekly flyers. Boom! Savings galore.

Trump is the worst president of my time. No use for his narcissism, tweets and bullying but the best comedy of any generation has evolved because of him! Thanks Trumpy!

Thoughts from the Hinterland! Cheers!

#145 VicPaul on 04.18.20 at 6:55 pm

#128 Figure it Out on 04.18.20 at 5:11 pm

“Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.” -Sail away

Nothing xenophobic at all. Thumbs up to Taiwan, to HK as long as it can keep some semblance of freedoms, and of course we love most of the Chinese diaspora throughout the world. It’s the state that has over a million of its citizens in concentration camps, for their religion/ethnicity — that’s what is WAY OVER the line most humans concur with.

*********

Then why were they (China) given a seat on a UN Human Rights tribunal in the last three weeks? And why isn’t anyone appalled by this? Anyone else notice the constant messaging in the last two months about how concerned we should be about racist viewpoints directed at china – Yep, the communist propaganda/disinformation machine is in high gear. …keep an eye on Africa – chinese level of influence will shift from offering financial help to struggling African countries to owning them through political influence/coercion.
On a lighter note, handed out work packages last week to parents of students and this week the blog and Zoom meetings go live – Geez, I love this job! So much so that, in four years when I retire with a full indexed pension (that we wrested control from the criminal cristy government – fully-funded) I’ll come back as a Teacher on call – just in the mornings for play money – and golf in the afternoon…you know, when I’m in town.

Might be room in the foursome….comin? Hot Dogs on me…helps build up some more intestinal gas ;}

M56BC

#146 not 1st on 04.18.20 at 6:58 pm

Trump is a 73 yr old out of shape, older man. And he can still run circles around our PM.

Trudeau works what, 30 minutes a day then goes back into his gopher hole. Wont reopen parliament, takes softball media questions for 15 minutes then hones his super Mario skills the rest of the day while ordering skip the dishes in.

Our provincial premiers aren’t in hiding. Chrystia Freeland and Tam have pressers out in the open. And then the loony tunes cheer Trudeau for setting such a wonderful example. By his accounts, its like he is storming the beaches at Vimy single handedly.

Canadians sure have a low expectation in a leader. I weep for this country and what it has and will become under this childish leadership.

#147 Penny Henny on 04.18.20 at 6:59 pm

604sam’s post reminded me of this but here are some recent meat purchases. His/her advice was to buy on sale and freeze.

2 whole chickens, 45 cents per pound , last day before best due date, cooked one and froze one

5.5 lb pork chops- 1.99 a lb, two of us will get close to 3 meals out of that with leftovers the next day

3 lbs ground pork- placed in bags and in the freezer

3 lbs lean ground beef- placed in bags and in the freezer

2 striploin roasts- 2.99 lb- in the freezer

this was all in the last week!
Get creative with the menus.
Lots of recipes on you tuba

#148 BS on 04.18.20 at 7:11 pm

#143 Damifino on 04.18.20 at 6:50 pm

Okay you traveled to Taiwan once for business and got the flu and you are commenting on the travel? Hilarious. Sucks you spent your whole life not traveling if you had the means. Clearly you do not know what you have missed.

I also live in Vancouver but I can’t think of anything I enjoy more than traveling. Never gotten sick on a trip once. The Amalfi coast is spectacular btw. Pure heaven.

#149 G on 04.18.20 at 7:44 pm

FYI, see link.
An interview with a Dr. working on an anti-cancer vaccine that thinks it could help with covid19.
Of course it still needs to go through testing.
Interview starts at 21min of the 50min YouTube.

Democrats POLITICIZATION of Virus & COVID-19 CURE | Special Guests Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong & Jenna Ellis
Rudy W. Giuliani April17, 50min, @21min Dr. interview.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUBdpUtzNGM

#150 Wrk.dover on 04.18.20 at 7:47 pm

Probably good idea not to mention any real money saving tips if Bill Morneau is going to cherry pick them here for specific tax increases though.

So far so good everyone. Sorry Doug.

#151 JacqueShellacque on 04.18.20 at 7:50 pm

#32 “McQueen died 12 years later in Mexico. Asbestos.
But he would have gone sooner had he shown up to the Sharon Tate party on ‘Helter Skelter’ eve, as planned.”

It’s also possible with Steve there, the whole scenario would’ve played out differently. He wasn’t a typical H’wood type, having served as a Marine, and often did his own car and motorbike stunts. I suspect would’ve given the hippie-dippier stoners at least as much as they could handle.

As much as I appreciate the spirit of the post, economizing isn’t saving. Often people think if they can figure out a way to economize, they will be able to save. But that’s putting the cart before the horse. Pay yourself first (save), then sort out the economizing as you prioritize spending what’s left over. No need to overthink it, otherwise you risk being ‘penny wise, pound foolish’. You’ll figure out on your own soon enough how to minimize being a sucker to billion-dollar corps and squeeze maximum enjoyment out of your discretionary spending.

#152 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 7:51 pm

#118 sail away please do over to communist China. Stay there. Please lol

#153 Sold Out on 04.18.20 at 8:00 pm

#122 BS on 04.18.20 at 4:46 pm

Trumps tax cuts increased tax revenue. Yes US government revenue went up after the tax cuts. Lower taxes increase economic activity which in turn increases tax revenue even if the tax is at a lower rate. That is the way it works. Increasing taxes brings in lower tax revenues. Just ask Trudeau.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

The Wall Street Journal doesn’t agree with you. All it did was enable stock buy backs and add to the deficit. That’s what you righties don’t get.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/did-the-u-s-tax-overhaul-do-what-it-promised-11578114001

#154 Hank the Hermit on 04.18.20 at 8:08 pm

#152 JacqueShellacque on 04.18.20 at 7:50 pm
#32 “McQueen died 12 years later in Mexico. Asbestos.

“It’s also possible with Steve there, the whole scenario would’ve played out differently. He wasn’t a typical H’wood type, having served as a Marine…”

Here is my favourite Steve McQueen quote:

“I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth.”

Steve McQueen

#155 Wally Wingnut on 04.18.20 at 8:22 pm

Replace your cats with pet rocks. About the same amount of affection without them trying to eat you in your sleep.
Cost less too.
Forget about anything Hollywood for the next 6 months. Cancel everything, if it wasn’t in the “can” your not going to see new shows for at least this time.

#156 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.18.20 at 8:26 pm

#118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm sez:

“#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

—————

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.”
___________________________________________
Wow. Who’da thunk it? Someone found a chink in your armor!

#157 You Ain't Seen Nuttin Yet... on 04.18.20 at 8:28 pm

#147 not 1st on 04.18.20 at 6:58 pm

“Canadians sure have a low expectation in a leader. I weep for this country and what it has and will become under this childish leadership.”

Versus your megalomaniacal hero Trump? Who tweets in support of ending lockdowns in Democratic states? Your weeping will be over what is coming to the citizens of the USA in the coming months as their premature return to normality is going to give the virus the acceleration it needs to really overwhelm the US of A. Stay tuned to what your hero is going to do to his country in the next couple of months. Get your tissues ready…

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/04/trump-tweets-support-anti-lockdown-protests-200417191437581.html?utm_source=website&utm_medium=article_page&utm_campaign=read_more_links

#158 King Solomon on 04.18.20 at 8:34 pm

#129 Never Lend To Family on 04.18.20 at 5:39 pm

Your post is filled with wisdom and sagacity. Blog dogs should print it out and post in on their fridges. King Solomon himself would have been proud of your words..

#159 toronto1 on 04.18.20 at 8:40 pm

DEFER any big ticket purchases
Thinking of buying a new car– forgot about it- wait another year- same with toys- boats- sleds etc…

Thinking of buying a house– DONT DO IT- wait at least a year

save every dollar you can- quit smoking/drinking/gambling, only buy what you need…

barter what you have for what you need- buy used bigger ticket items if you need them etc… TV’s, tools, tires and rims etc….

doesnt matter if your well off or not– hold on to every penny you have

never before has this many people been out of work- no one knows what comes next but with a decrease is consumption and surge in supply coming up soon– prices of assets only have one direction to go and that is down.

#160 Drinking on 04.18.20 at 8:42 pm

#152 JacqueShellacque

I get your point but many have paid themselves first only to see it wiped out. As Wrk. dover mentioned that if Morneau is a fan then the less the better.

Economizing certainly helps with the accumulation of cash flow once needed; whether it is to jump into the market or whatever else; cash is King right now!

#161 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 8:43 pm

#153 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 7:51 pm

#118 sail away please do over to communist China. Stay there. Please lol

——————

Judge not, etc.

What makes you think you have the inside scoop?

#162 Blog Dog Party on 04.18.20 at 8:44 pm

#72 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm

“Been trimming and removing a lot of the trees on my property that have become problematic. I’m bucking and stacking this wood which will (hopefully) heat my house next winter. 2 bush cords so far.”

When this pandemic is over, how about having a blog dog party at your place? I’ll bring the booze. Sounds like you have the space for a blog dog get together. We could even pool our money and bring in our fearless leader Mr.Turner as a guest speaker…

#163 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 8:44 pm

Things getting crazier all the time. How on earth would anyone’s retirement savings evaporate over this latest stock market correction. My own balanced fund is only down 3.8% ytd. Does this guy really have a clue what he is talking about? Should I be asking for a bailout as well? This is totally nutso.

”Speaking to reporters outside Rideau Cottage on Thursday morning, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said his government is concerned with retirees who may have seen their retirement savings evaporated in the recent stock market tumult cause by COVID-19.”

https://globalnews.ca/video/6702126/coronavirus-outbreak-trudeau-concerned-about-retirees-who-may-have-lost-their-retirement-savings

#164 Farmer Fred on 04.18.20 at 8:50 pm

#67 Stoph on 04.18.20 at 12:52 pm

“Grow a veggie patch (or get your kids to grow it). Sure, you’ll only save a couple of bucks, but you’ll have bragging rights in the summer when friends are over and you’re grilling zucchinis out of the garden.”

Grow kale in that patch. It is the vegetable that never keeps giving. This year, I didn’t uproot it for winter and it has started up again and we are eating kale in April. A champion plant among vegetables.

#165 Drinking on 04.18.20 at 8:50 pm

One last point towards this article. Buy a fishing license; learn to fish if you have done so before.

If you are into fresh wild meat; learn to hunt, plenty of courses out there for you. Canada deer population is as great as the Prairie Gophers due to the bamby generation.

I know a few mills that took this on and never looked back; feed their families on wild meat; have not shopped at grocery stores for meat in a few years.

Great recipes out there!

#166 Farmer Fred on 04.18.20 at 8:51 pm

Correction on my previous post on kale. I mean to say,

“kale is the vegetable that never STOPS giving…”

#167 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 8:57 pm

#118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm
#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

—————

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.
—————————————————————-
Maybe we should cut off all of our exports to China as well and see how that would work out for us. I suspect not so well.

#168 Cousin Jimmy on 04.18.20 at 9:00 pm

#35 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am
“My 107 year old third cousin has actual personal memories of the Spanish Flu!”

Are you over 100 years old as well? This person cannot be your 3rd cousin. 2nd, 3rd, 4th cousin are all in the same generational line as you. Hence they are about the same age. You probably meant to say 1st cousin, 3 times removed…

*******************************
I have a family tree in Ancestry and the software indicates that George is my full third cousin. We share a set of great great grandparents who were both born in North Sydney Nova Scotia just prior to the year 1800.

People on the same generational line can vary quite a bit in age. For example, my oldest first cousin is 24 years older than my youngest brother – who is obviously also his first cousin.
————————————————————–

You are still wrong. Let me make it plainer for you, A 2nd cousin shares a great grandparent as you, a 3rd cousin shares a great, great grandparent as you. Get new software because it is clueless. Do you and this 107 year relative share the SAME great great grandparent? If you do, then you should submit your claim to the Guinness Book of World Records….

The proper term would be that he is a first cousin 3 times removed. This chart explains it…

https://sites.rootsweb.com/~itacsnf/san_fele/relationships.html

#169 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 9:03 pm

Perpetual Government Money and Deficit Machine?

Something like this:

The central bank buys government bonds from banks, simply electronically printing money to do so (politely called providing liquidity). The central bank as a vast buyer pulls the interest rate way down.

This allows the commercial banks to buy more bonds from treasury or to make additional loans which adds to the money supply and some or much of that money can be used by the borrower (or some indirect recipient several transactions down from the borrower) to purchase new government bonds from the government treasury department.

The government treasury department is thus able to sell bonds easily at very low interest rates to finance vast deficits for peanuts in annual interest. The vast deficits are used to pay people and companies vast amounts at least temporarily.

The new government debt need never be paid off as why would any government want to pay off debt that is costing almost nothing in interest.

What could go wrong?

How has this turned out historically if it has ever been done at scale?

#170 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 9:12 pm

Nonplused at 137 said:

We are already at peak taxation. There just isn’t anything left to tax and nobody has any money to pay it.

***********************************
Well, corporate taxes could likely be raised. We have had an international race towards zero on that. Rates are close to half what they were circa 1990.

Many corporations are highly profitable. And there are ways to tax their income where earned so that a corporation selling to Canadians can’t escape tax by pretending to live in Luxembourg. (Many do).

If someone needs to pay more tax, I’d look to corporations.

Or what the heck scrape all tax and just issue bonds to the moon and have the central bank buy the bonds with money created from nothing to somehow force the interest rate low. Nice trick.

#171 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 9:14 pm

@#134 MF
“It’s not me I’m worried about it’s you, and your unhealthy obsession with teachers -the ultimate scapegoat for ALL the world’s problems in your eyes.”
++++
Don’t waste one single split grey hair on my mental health.
Any time I’m feeling low I go for an elevator ride.
Perks me right up.
Actually if you meticulously reread all of my 90,283 comments you will notice I loathe the deification of all public servants that receive endless accolades for…..doing… their… jobs….
Very WELL paid jobs I might add.
Not just teachers.
I think we should generously tip our hard working govt slaves at the end of every shift.
Cash , of course…so they don’t have to declare it to that other govt pariah…the tax man.

That would show our true appreciation for the thousands of govt employees that have won the public servant lottery and earn generous salaries, generous pensions, generous benefits and jobs for life so that, when they hold us hostage at the next union contract negotiations……we tell ourselves….its about the kids/ healthcare/ garbage collection/ whatever….

While the rest of us non union losers go through our daily grind to earn enough money to pay the bills and save up enough money to maybe, j-u-u-u-st maybe, put some money away for an unguaranteed, private retirement fund at the end of 45 years of saving drudgery….A pension that is at the whim of each and every precipitous drop in the stock market….. we can be happy and smile in the knowledge our ever increasing taxes will protect their guaranteed for life pensions…

#172 IVoteIndependent on 04.18.20 at 9:22 pm

Eat dandelion salad. Save money by not buying lettuce. Dandelions are in season in your yard. Pick ’em young, before they get milky and bitter. They are tasty, healthy for you, and eating them now will get them out of your lawn so you don’t have to fight with more of them later.

#173 stage1dave on 04.18.20 at 9:33 pm

Accentuating the positives, or at least looking for a few…cool!

1) Im spending a bit more time with family; double edged sword…alternating between “why don’t I know this person better?” to “I can’t believe we’re related”…oh well

2) Work is still steady, but I find myself negotiating more on price…better that than waiting for the phone to ring. I’d prefer to still have a business when this hysteria is over, and I can only watch so much Netflix.

3) Playing lots more guitar

4) Looks like that 59 Invicta is coming off the frame this spring after all!

5) May paint a few cars this year, something I bailed on in 2013. Better that than “Unemployment Enjoyment”

6) The wife has finally convinced me to Kijiji my stash of car parts, or at least try to! But I think she really wants to start actually using the downstairs bathroom and shower, which is where most of ’em are stashed…

7) Selling a few hundred old sportcards I had put away for exactly this purpose; strangely the bidding has been strong (so far) and prices good. Auction house I’m using figures with all the lockdowns more people are sitting at home and bidding? Regardless, I’ll take the cash…can’t move any of my autographed pics btw, ’cause all of ’em start with “to Dave…”

8) Vintage tshirt views and sales crashed hard thru Feb/Mar then came roaring back last week…huh? Guess all the garage sales/flea markets and thrift stores are shut down

9) No progress yet on the quitting smoking, I apparently require some form of stress relief! Watching Mr. Trudeau fudge his way thru another daily briefing, or Mr. Kenney butcher any reasonable form of spoken grammar thru his will probably have me at over a pack a day by month’s end. WTF ever happened to the Kings’ English?

And that’s before I nod off trying to pay attention to yet another provincial health official drone on about infection rates, recovery rates, and sadly, death rates…I feel like my head is being slowly filled with glue.

#174 Ustabe on 04.18.20 at 9:36 pm

People! Its not about spending less than you earn, its all about earning more than you spend.

After high school I spent two years in Pukatawagon, MB trading furs. Came back with a whack of money and went to university. Didn’t like my cash flow, siphoning off my savings to pay tuition, utilities, nights out so I bought a laundromat near student housing. A couple of years later I was just hanging around waiting for my wife to complete her schooling so I bought a pizza joint just off campus.

Suddenly all the mis-ordered or non delivered pizzas made their way to my laundromat, doubling its take in a couple of months. So my pizza place got the write down of the food shrinkage, my laundromat got a huge bump in business because value added and then!…then the Saskatchewan government loosened the liquor laws allowing small lounges to be attached to mom and pop type restaurants (How Boston Pizza got its significant start, btw). Money, money, money!

All you strong, conservative folks arguing with one another over who is Internet tougher, who is more pure in their alt-right dogma, who are lining up at the $$$ trough of a government you didn’t vote for led by a man you apparently despise trying to tell me I need to drop my cell plan for a cheaper one only tells me one thing.

True entrepreneurial progressive conservatism is well and truly dead and few of you will ever make it beyond pay stub to direct payroll deposit because you are given a softball chance to really offer some sound advice for going forward on today’s blog and all you can do is come up with snark for your fellow posters and “plant a garden”.

Yeesh.

#175 Where's My Money Going Greedeau? on 04.18.20 at 9:38 pm

Re: #71 earthboundmisfit on 04.18.20 at 1:05 pm
Retired seniors, who qualify for diddly-squat of the Fed’s largess, should start lobbing for tax free withdrawls of up to 5K from RRSPs, RRIFs, LIRAs, and LIFs.
+++++++++++++++++++++++
I second that!!!!!
Not getting one penny right now!
**********

#176 John in Mtl on 04.18.20 at 9:50 pm

@ #118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm
Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn?
Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.

(Sorry Garth and Doug, I can’t keep quiet on this one. Delete if you must, its your place, not mine.)

Nothing xenophobic about it at all, if it were another country, they would get as much flack as china. There is ample evidence out there that China bears a lot of responsibility for this mess. And I’m not talking about the wet markets problem; rather, it has to do with the fact that they witheld crucial information back in december 2019 about human to human transmission, and accused and silenced doctors from open and honest discussion concerning this new illness. And, since the top of the pyramid in China doesn’t like to hear “bad news”, lower rung managers fear to speak and report “inconvenient truths”, therefore they also did not act in a timely manner.

Further, it was at the time that new year celebrations were about to begin, and china didn’t want to crash the big party everyone was looking forward to; so they let their people travel from Hubey province all over china and the world, seeding the virus everywhere. 5 million people left Hubey with the majority leaving from Wuhan, the center of the outbreak.

Now, the WHO. The WHO dropped the ball on this one big time, mostly because they didn’t want to “upset” china, and china has the WHO (and Dr. Tedros) in their back pocket. Then there’s the whole matter concerning the “pandemic bonds” which would have paid out million$ to “investors”, had a pandemic not been declared before july 2020.

As for individual countries and their reactions/actions during this pandemic, it is clear that most also dropped the ball for any number of reasons, not the least of which being “not upsetting china”. Plus, all the so-called public health “experts”, what a bag of contradictions they have each blurted out so far; its hard to make heads or tails out of what they propose as a solution to the problem. There seems to be 2 or 3 camps, each competing with each other: “I’m right”; “no, I’M right”…

And, don’t get me started on all the possible conspiracy theories… Will we ever really know? Unless you’re in the .001% club, its like George Carlin called it: “its their club and you ain’t in it”. Neither am I.

Obviously, there has to be a post-mortem of this event and an international inquiry of some sort to determine who will pay the bills for this global mess. However, I’m not hopeful the truth will ever be found because… politics, influence, power and money; always “money”. Humans have always been deceptive to one another if it suits the agenda.

It is high time we revisit “globalism” and put back in our systems some form of robustness and redundancy in the supply chains. The “JIT” concept has left us very vulnerable and helpless in so many ways. Heck, we, as a nation, would have a hard time making something as simple as shoes for everyone nowadays; let alone TV’s and other tech stuff.

#177 not 1st on 04.18.20 at 9:53 pm

#158 You Ain’t Seen Nuttin Yet… on 04.18.20 at 8:28 pm

haha friendo, I will take Trump in a heartbeat over Trudeau.

Probably he will be taking over Canada anyway when we run into a sovereign default. Thank god we are right next to the USA. A little further away and we would just be another Venezuela in the waiting.

#178 John in Mtl on 04.18.20 at 9:57 pm

@ #111 the Jaguar on 04.18.20 at 4:10 pm
One doesn’t need a crisis to come along to know that self discipline and sustainability is a goal everyone should work towards.

Man, I wish they taught that in school nowadays. That, and financial literacy. To me, both these are the foundations of how to live well and navigate in this life.

#179 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 10:00 pm

#80 oh bouy on 04.18.20 at 1:47 pm
@#72 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm
Wife is working reduced hours, I am laid off.

Funny thing is, we’re not hurting for $ one bit.

Lots of work getting done, and I’m liking it. Don’t mind a bit if the restrictions drag on another month or so.
_____________________________

another month of this would be great for me.

wife and i working from home and loving it.
breaking up the day with some yard/house maintenance. home schooling thing kinda blows though.
May reno one of the bathrooms next week just to keep things interesting.
——

I’m planning some “Reno’s” too! The last Kijiji run was for a big stainless steel drop in laundry tub. 550.00 new, never been out of box, got for 225.00 from a friendly Spanish dude in the gta. Building a counter about 6’ long, with the tub on one end for the laundry room.

I’m also thinking of expanding the garden this year too. Veggies and spices. If this drags on, I may even build a chicken coop and get some chicks. I have a BIL who did this and is happily harvesting 5-6 eggs per day, and will have a freezer full of birds by the fall. Sounds like a good way to pass the time, and save some $ :D.

#180 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 10:03 pm

#168 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 8:57 pm

Maybe we should cut off all of our exports to China as well and see how that would work out for us. I suspect not so well.
………………………..

What the hell does China buy from us?
In the months since Meng Wanzhou was arrested, China has increased retaliatory economic pressure on Canada, and the casualties have included Canadian soybeans, canola, pork and beef.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-the-chinese-ban-on-canadian-agricultural-exports-is-increasingly/

China’s sudden ban on Canadian beef and pork imports “will create a huge financial loss” for the sector that counts the Asian country among its top five international markets, says an industry group.

https://globalnews.ca/news/5435149/china-canada-meat-ban-industry/

#181 BS on 04.18.20 at 10:06 pm

#154 Sold Out on 04.18.20 at 8:00 pm

#122 BS on 04.18.20 at 4:46 pm

Trumps tax cuts increased tax revenue. Yes US government revenue went up after the tax cuts. Lower taxes increase economic activity which in turn increases tax revenue even if the tax is at a lower rate. That is the way it works. Increasing taxes brings in lower tax revenues. Just ask Trudeau.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

The Wall Street Journal doesn’t agree with you. All it did was enable stock buy backs and add to the deficit. That’s what you righties don’t get.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/did-the-u-s-tax-overhaul-do-what-it-promised-11578114001

Tax revenue increased. The fact some companies used the tax savings they received to buy back shares is irrelevant.

#182 Steve French on 04.18.20 at 10:07 pm

Remember blog dogs…

“Chaos isn’t a pit. Chaos is a ladder.”

– Petyr Baelish (aka Littlefinger)
Game of Thrones

#183 Stoph on 04.18.20 at 10:07 pm

Ideas on how to make more money:
1. Get a better paying job. Take a look on Indeed to see if there’s a better gig out there.
2. Start a business. No better time to get started than now if you’re sitting at home collecting CERB waiting to get back to work. Keep track of expenses for write-offs.
3. Go back to university and become a doctor or other highly paid professional if you’re young enough to make it worthwhile.

#184 BS on 04.18.20 at 10:18 pm

#168 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 8:57 pm
#118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm
#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

—————

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.
—————————————————————-
Maybe we should cut off all of our exports to China as well and see how that would work out for us. I suspect not so well.

It would work out fine in the long run. Canada sells mostly commodities to China. If China doesn’t buy from us they have to buy from someone else who will then have less to sell to others. We can sell to those other markets. Besides as manufacturing moves back to North America there will be more demand here and I suspect China’s economy is in big trouble after the world digests what they have done. They will be need less of everything as manufacturing moves away.

China is holding or citizens hostage is solitary confinement right now and just released a virus on the world. Is that someone we want to do business with? It is like doing business with the mafia. At some point things will not work out well. We are at that point now.

#185 Cousin Jimmy on 04.18.20 at 10:20 pm

#169 Cousin Jimmy on 04.18.20 at 9:00 pm
#35 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am
“My 107 year old third couscin has actual personal memories of the Spanish Flu!”

Perhaps, I should have asked this question from the start. How old are you? That might explain being a 3rd cousin with a 107 year old…

#186 Lost...but not leased on 04.18.20 at 10:26 pm

#152 JacqueShellacque on 04.18.20 at 7:50 pm
#32 “McQueen died 12 years later in Mexico. Asbestos.
But he would have gone sooner had he shown up to the Sharon Tate party on ‘Helter Skelter’ eve, as planned.”

==================================

NOBODY died at the Sharon Tate party….check out Miles Mathis research.

#187 Dsve on 04.18.20 at 10:28 pm

Real money saving tips:

1) Shoplift your groceries.
2) Stiff your landlord on rent
3) Steal from cars in parking lots
4) Setup ponzi scheme

#188 Fartzy's Friend on 04.18.20 at 10:34 pm

#36 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am

“Look on the positive side blogdogs.
While I’m reading……I’m not here.”

But I like your presence here Fartzy! You are spot on with your comments. Keep ’em coming!

#189 Cheese on 04.18.20 at 10:35 pm

With no job, very little savings and no prospects at 38, I feel there is no hope left.

Remember Albert Camus

#190 Ontario Ollie on 04.18.20 at 10:36 pm

#181 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 10:03 pm

You are spot on with your comments on China. I like your straight shooting style!

#191 binky barnes on 04.18.20 at 10:37 pm

True entrepreneurial progressive conservatism is well and truly dead and few of you will ever make it beyond pay stub to direct payroll deposit because you are given a softball chance to really offer some sound advice for going forward on today’s blog and all you can do is come up with snark for your fellow posters and “plant a garden”.

Yeesh.

_________________________________

Hey, hey, hey! Let’s not forget I came up with the “pop bottle” plan. And what about the guy who wanted to turn his wife into a stay-at-home stripper. Clever &%#@. The entrepreneurial spirit is not totally dead.

BB

#192 Farmer Fred on 04.18.20 at 10:39 pm

#180 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 10:00 pm

“I’m also thinking of expanding the garden this year too. Veggies and spices.”

Plant kale. You will eat it until winter and don’t uproot it as it will start up again in the spring, tastier than ever. It is the champion of vegetable plants in my books. Tastes great cooked or raw in a salad.

#193 yvr_lurker on 04.18.20 at 10:53 pm

#177 John in MTl

———————–

Very well put and it echos how I feel about this. However, I would add that China ignored the many scientific studies that indicated that there were dangerous contagions associated with live animal markets. They did not learn much from the episode with SARS, and after around 2010 it was business as usual with their cultural practices eating whatever moves. The likelihood of transfer of coronaviruses to humans from these markets was well-predicted by scientists.

We should not resume globalization the way it was, as given the secrecy and non-transparancy associated with the Chinese leadership there would be no way for the western world to verify that these markets are shut down. We need a social distancing from China going forward and many more goods (and especially vital medical supplies and pharmaceuticals) need to be sourced more locally. It will be very hard for T2 to push forth on his previous globalization agenda, as I am sure there will be many in Canada that will see globalization in a different light.

Finally, I do not see this as a xenophobic comment. I do not believe that China intended to send a fireball throughout the world all the while hurting their economy as well. I do not believe it was leaked from a lab. However, their negligence in ignoring warnings over the past decade and their role in covering up the seriousness of the initial outbreak renders them a rather unsuitable partner to be too close to. We still have no idea how many died in their outbreak; all of sudden their numbers have had a big revise upwards. What exactly can we believe that is uttered by their Gov’t, especially that they are actively try to silence scientists investigating the origins of the outbreak so as to “control” the narrative.

The rest of the world just can’t shut the economy down every 5 years when they have another big OOPS. I have been to China about 10 times over the years for work. I’ve made my last trip.

#194 Gary on 04.18.20 at 10:58 pm

Cut off exports from China, you are dreaming. Next time you go to Canadian Tire or China Tire, try buying something not made in China. ALL my heart meds are made in China, even the fresh Garlic in the Safeway.

#195 Rural Rick on 04.18.20 at 11:05 pm

Learn to cook.

#196 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 11:18 pm

#157 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.18.20 at 8:26 pm
#118 Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 4:26 pm sez:

“#91 Habitt on 04.18.20 at 2:39 pm

Please don’t buy Chinese goods unless absolutely necessary. Buy North American or european. You get what you pay for. Gotta give China all the grief we can.

——————-

Hmmm… should we also boycott other ethnicities? Where exactly is the line to be drawn? Please expand upon this seemingly xenophobic view.”

——————-

Wow. Who’da thunk it? Someone found a chink in your armor!

——————-

My philosophy is equal fairness to all. No extra fairness to the group in vogue, FN recently, for example, and no reduced fairness to the group being blamed for something, Chinese, in this case.

Never ever will I officially recognize any traditional unceded bullshit and likewise won’t gratuitously denigrate a group; Chinese being one, FN being another, and Trump and his team as a third.

#197 Stoph on 04.18.20 at 11:37 pm

Ask for a raise (and be ready to explain why you’re worth it.)

#198 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 11:39 pm

#181 Yukon Elvis on 04.18.20 at 10:03 pm
#168 Ronaldo on 04.18.20 at 8:57 pm

Maybe we should cut off all of our exports to China as well and see how that would work out for us. I suspect not so well.
………………………..

What the hell does China buy from us?
————————————————————–

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/200218/dq200218b-eng.htm

#199 kommykim on 04.18.20 at 11:41 pm

RE: #172 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.18.20 at 9:14 pm
While the rest of us non union losers go through our daily grind to earn enough money to pay the bills and save up enough money to maybe, j-u-u-u-st maybe, put some money away for an unguaranteed, private retirement fund at the end of 45 years of saving drudgery….

=======================================

So join or form a union and get some of those juicy benefits for yourself. Like Doug says, “take control” instead of getting depressed or angry.

#200 Canadians on 04.18.20 at 11:44 pm

appear in no rush to get back to work

is it the weed? the booze? the free money?

what’s wrong with this country?

#201 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 12:02 am

#163 Blog Dog Party on 04.18.20 at 8:44 pm
#72 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm

“Been trimming and removing a lot of the trees on my property that have become problematic. I’m bucking and stacking this wood which will (hopefully) heat my house next winter. 2 bush cords so far.”

When this pandemic is over, how about having a blog dog party at your place? I’ll bring the booze. Sounds like you have the space for a blog dog get together. We could even pool our money and bring in our fearless leader Mr.Turner as a guest speaker…
———

Sounds good, everyone bring a saw, gloves, and safety glasses. I think Mr Ustabe is quite skilled with a BBQ, maybe he would offer to feed us, while we take in the TI crew talking politics, finance and canines. Maybe we could also get WUL to make the trip to tech us how to do a proper wheelie with a tractor, waddaya say WUL? I’ll give everyone a tour of the bunker complex, and every aspiring Cat Skinner gets a free ride on the tracklayer of their choice (except WUL, he’ll figure out out to catwalk the thing – too risky!). Maybe Flopster could make the trip too, he might like to see a decent SFD that does not cost 1 million!

#202 V-shaped narrative collapse on 04.19.20 at 12:11 am

People who are hoping for a quick v-shaped recovery are in for some hard times. First of all, the narrative that the overseas oligarchs are going to swoop in and buy up whatever is for sale in Vancouver and Toronto is absolutely false, since China’s economy is collapsing at this very moment because literally 10’s of millions of workers are being laid off from massive factories in light of complete obliteration of demand in the US. LOTS of chinese banks are on the verge of declaring bankruptcy. How do v-shaped cultists translate this reality into strong demand for $2 million condos in Toronto and Vancouver? On the contrary, since a lot of these increasingly bankrupt oligarchs took out loans IN CANADA in order to finance purchases of entire FLOORS of condo buildings, the CANADIAN BANKS who underwrote these loans are going to be busy sending out missed payment notices, which means they’ll be getting a torrent of margin calls from their counter-parties. How exactly does this support the narrative of strong demand for real estate in the world-class cities (/s) of Vancouver and Toronto? Even Poloz is now saying the recovery will take a couple of years
https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/bank-of-canada-a-couple-of-years-needed-to-make-up-lost-ground-once-outbreak-over

#203 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 12:25 am

#174 stage1dave on 04.18.20 at 9:33 pm
——

I always get a laugh when I hear of yet another car guy who also plays an instrument!

I just bought a new axe, a Schecter Damien Platinum 7 string. It, like your guitar, is seeing a lot more action this past month! My previous electric was actually my first, it’s been in service since I bought it in ‘89. I’m going to do a “resto-mod” on it (I’m guessing you know what that term means). Re-fret, “ebonized” fretboard, as yet undetermined finish, Tusq nut, Grover tuning machines, and a single EMG 81 active pickup in the bridge position with a single volume knob. It’s about the only purchase of my formative years that I still own.

I was a die-hard foxbody stang guy for near a couple decades, owned 5 of ‘em and most of them were street/strip cars. I had accumulated a mountain of parts. I started selling in 07, and it took years to unload everything. I still have the carcass of my old 10 second ‘84 GT, an MSD distributor, and a pair of stock mid 80’s 5.0 tails. That’s about it.

#204 George on 04.19.20 at 12:30 am

haha friendo, I will take Trump in a heartbeat over Trudeau.

Probably he will be taking over Canada anyway when we run into a sovereign default. Thank god we are right next to the USA. A little further away and we would just be another Venezuela in the waiting.

……..

you betcha. You’re taking to a wall. Canada is nearly entirely dependent on the US. A reality that is often forgotten by Canadians. A country of debt slaves, conforming soldiers. The country will probably be okay with a shutdown for 6 mths, lol. Dumb as a box of rocks

Trudeau is putting the nail in the coffin.

#205 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 1:16 am

#67 Stoph on 04.18.20 at 12:52 pm
Grow a veggie patch (or get your kids to grow it). Sure, you’ll only save a couple of bucks, but you’ll have bragging rights in the summer when friends are over and you’re grilling zucchinis out of the garden.
——

IMHO, the best thing about having a veggie garden is convenience. For a few months, you run out there and get a few tomatoes and cucumbers or whatever before making supper in like 5 minutes – too easy.

Taste too. Garden carrots make non-organic carrots taste like you’re eating a 2×4.

Herbs right from the garden can’t be beat. Rosemary out of the garden is 10x better than store bought – super potent! Fennel, dill, parsley too. Kids grow cat mint for our old crusty bastard male kitty also – just to see him happy once and a while.

I don’t get into preservation, but those few months when I can get pretty much anything I want 100’ from my front door is sweet!

#206 Never Lend To Family on 04.19.20 at 1:28 am

#159 King Solomon on 04.18.20 at 8:34 pm
#129 Never Lend To Family on 04.18.20 at 5:39 pm

Your post is filled with wisdom and sagacity. Blog dogs should print it out and post in on their fridges. King Solomon himself would have been proud of your words..

———————-

159 I am not sure whether you were being sarcastic or not, and I had to look sagacity up, but it seems like a compliment. But let’s just say I have had some interesting experience with the matter of family and business and loans. Don’t know how much detail to go into but 9 out of 10 times it is a disaster. The 1 time it isn’t a disaster the kid probably doesn’t need the money. And it is very disheartening as a child that worked hard, went to school, paid off their student loans, struggled to pay off the mortgage, etc. (poor me) to watch your parents pay to cover their grasshopper children who are still partying in Mexico when they can get a flight. That is money they need for the retirement home in not too many years. What’s going to happen when it runs out? Are they going to step up and cover the bills? (There is no evidence that they could or would.) So then it comes to me, and me only. Sorry mom and dad, it was probably a bad idea to pay for all of that for only certain kids and then tell my daughter to her face that university was “a 4 year party and a waste of time”. Those things said will not be forgotten and I don’t know if they can be unsaid. Ever. Especially since my kids have taken university that has a career path even if they maybe partied a little. (STEM and Education)

The fact of the matter is parents, if you start gifting to one child or grandchild and not the others, Christmas will be ruined. And you ruined it. I don’t care if you only have so much money and can only help one. This isn’t Oxfam, where you pick a child based on a post card. The ones who are doing ok chances are they had to work hard 5 days a week fixing transmissions or unplugging toilets, while the ones who aren’t doing well played video games and went to Mexico. There will be resentment as you show your preferences to the kids that suck up the best.

The best way to parent is to not parent at all. And the older the kids get, the more important that is.

#207 Nonplused on 04.19.20 at 1:40 am

#171 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 9:12 pm
Nonplused at 137 said:

We are already at peak taxation. There just isn’t anything left to tax and nobody has any money to pay it.

***********************************
Well, corporate taxes could likely be raised. We have had an international race towards zero on that. Rates are close to half what they were circa 1990.

———————–

Taxing a corporation is just taxing the owners, and for the most part we already do that.

Also capital tends to go where it is treated best, so governments cannot assume that capital and those revenue streams are captive. Remember, Encana, which was Alberta Energy Company and Pan-Canadian, is now a US company. They will leave if you tax more than the next state over. That’s also why CP moved from Montreal to Calgary. There is no such thing as unlimited taxation. At some point people say there is no point in working or running a business, or spending all this time and money becoming a doctor. You can actually tax things to death.

#208 SoggyShorts on 04.19.20 at 2:42 am

#105 BS on 04.17.20 at 5:50 pm
#38 conan on 04.17.20 at 3:46 pm

Why don’t you compare Republican US states to Democratic US states. The top 10 are all democratic governor states.
*******
Without even looking at the list I think you should be able to tell the difference between a pandemic in NY and some flyover red state….

#209 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.19.20 at 5:29 am

Fartz,
I know your Grade1 teacher smacked you with the ruler because you were an obnoxious, mouthy pupil.
But, it’s time to let it go.
Let it go.

#210 Ponzius Pilatus on 04.19.20 at 5:42 am

#136 Long-Time Lurker on 04.18.20 at 6:22 pm
>We’re out of toilet paper! The end is here! It’s all over!

Wood chips to make pulp for toilet paper in short supply, Commons committee told
BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

Posted Apr 17, 2020 2:40 pm PDT Last Updated Apr 17, 2020 at 2:50 pm PDT

https://www.citynews1130.com/2020/04/17/wood-chips-to-make-pulp-for-toilet-paper-in-short-supply-commons-committee-told/
——————–
No problem here.
Just got a bidet installed.

#211 Alan Greenspan on 04.19.20 at 5:51 am

#210 Nonplused on 04.18.20 at 12:15 am

” The idea that you can issue debt that isn’t backed by something and then not pay it back is what hyper-inflation is made of.”
—————————————————————
All you armchair economists and your talk of inflation need to get a reality check. The Bank of Japan has done more quantative easing than the rest of the world in the past 30 years and they are in a deflationary environment. Why? Where is your predicted hyperinflation? Educated yourselves before you post your nonsense…

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/022615/why-didnt-quantitative-easing-lead-hyperinflation.asp

#212 King Solomon on 04.19.20 at 5:59 am

#196 Never Lend To Family on 04.19.20 at 1:28 am
#159 King Solomon on 04.18.20 at 8:34 pm
#129 Never Lend To Family on 04.18.20 at 5:39 pm

———————-

“159 I am not sure whether you were being sarcastic or not, and I had to look sagacity up, but it seems like a compliment. ”

I was not being sarcastic and it was a compliment indeed. Your further thoughts on the matter are excellent as well and should serve as a warning to those who do not heed your sagacious advice.

#213 Blog Dog Party on 04.19.20 at 6:08 am

#202 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 12:02 am
#163 Blog Dog Party on 04.18.20 at 8:44 pm
#72 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 1:06 pm

When this pandemic is over, how about having a blog dog party at your place? I’ll bring the booze. Sounds like you have the space for a blog dog get together. We could even pool our money and bring in our fearless leader Mr.Turner as a guest speaker…
———

“Sounds good, everyone bring a saw, gloves, and safety glasses. I think Mr Ustabe is quite skilled with a BBQ, maybe he would offer to feed us, while we take in the TI crew talking politics, finance and canines. Maybe we could also get WUL to make the trip to tech us how to do a proper wheelie with a tractor..”

I’m all in! I grew up on a farm and can wield a chain and drive a tractor saw with the best of them. Let’s keep in touch and I will contact the mighty Garth and see how much financial coaxing he needs to come out and address his blog dogs. Should be a hoot!

#214 BillyBob on 04.19.20 at 6:38 am

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.”
– Mark Twain

As one who’s spent over 15,000 hrs of his life in the sky operating one machine or another traveling to locales both exotic and mundane…the quote would indicate a few posters need to travel more, not less…it’s amusing to see YouKnowWho still getting triggered over flights. The low-information & IQ society we live in, in full glorious display.

I applaud the concept behind today’s post – it’s always good to periodically review ones expenses and remove any unnecessary clutter. But ultimately it’s only a bandaid solution that may field a few temporary bucks – for most people the problem is their whole attitude to money, saving, and living within their means.

Throwing a few things on Craigslist isn’t going to change that. People “deserve” their nice treats!

Everyone gonna punish China by not buying Chinese. Surrrree you’re not. Canadians are the cheapest bas…I mean, “thriftiest”, folks on the planet. If it’s 10 cents cheaper and made in China, they’re all over it like white on rice (see what I did there?). The only way folks would stop buying Chinese-manufactured goods is if they were manufactured somewhere with even cheaper labour.

Exact same grasping mentality that grabs all the “free” government goodies regardless of need or legitimate entitlement. Don’t kid yourselves, just embrace it.

#215 BillyBob on 04.19.20 at 6:48 am

#55 MF on 04.18.20 at 11:57 am
Good blog post about saving money and budgeting.

However, I don’t see this behaviour as important or crucial as it used to be.

Since 2008, all individuals who have engaged in more reckless financial behaviours have been rewarded by the system. Everyone who engaged in budgeting and saving and caution has been punished.

Basically the child who gave in to his urges and ate the dessert before the vegetables is rewarded these days, and has been since 2008.

I know I have stopped caring as much about saving, or debt. Why should I still care?

MF

===============================================

It’s loser capitulation thinking like this that is behind your inability to succeed in life.

I can assure you that being an ant in a world of grasshoppers has worked out extremely well for me. Especially now, as there is an actual crisis. My aviation colleagues who “ate their dessert first” are losing their minds. I am enjoying the time off after decades of hard work.

This is the time to care MORE about saving and debt, not less. Why am I not surprised that you can’t see that?

But go on, embrace your own bitter words and let us know how that works out for you.

#216 John in Mtl on 04.19.20 at 7:44 am

@ #194 yvr_lurker on 04.18.20 at 10:53 pm
Re: #177 John in MTl

You have many valid points as well.

Problem going forward, as I see it, is the unwillingness (by interested parties) to restructuring of this globalization; and getting PM Tru-doh! to stand up for our country. He can admire china and its ideology all he wants on a personal level; he needs to understand that in this respect, he doesn’t speak “for all canadians”. Give us the means to determine our own future!

@ #195 Gary on 04.18.20 at 10:58 pm

This is precisely what needs to change. It will be hard for many to wean off the drug of cheap goods because, as Oscar Wilde put it: “nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing”.

@ #185 BS on 04.18.20 at 10:18 pm

I would make the same arguments – we will find other customers for our commodities and it would be a good thing to bring back some of that manufacturing to Canada. If we get smart and creative we can export quality finished goods to the world instead of merely being “hewers of water and cutters of wood” (or something to that effect, I forget the exact statement).

#217 Remembrancer on 04.19.20 at 8:25 am

#183 Steve French on 04.18.20 at 10:07 pm
Remember blog dogs…

“Chaos isn’t a pit. Chaos is a ladder.”

– Petyr Baelish (aka Littlefinger)
Game of Thrones
—————————————————————-
And how did that work out for him in the end? Oh ya…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24zxhpRB8kg

#218 NoName on 04.19.20 at 8:52 am

@195 garlic worries

Funny thing way back only garlic in store was one from filipins, it was packed exactly same only difference was label, I remember it like it was yesterday. That was way I was buying, so when I noticed that store start sellimg commie garlic I walk to organic section and picked some that is made elsewhere, usually locally made, it is 3x more for 3x less of garlic but in my opinion is worth it. So that covers fresh garlic.

If you need garlic that will be boiled Costco have califirnia garlic, or dryed garlic. Actually you can grow enough garlic for family on balcony or window lid. Garlic is only thing that grows ok in or 12sq-ft garden.

Now that I am on garlic topic, if you have Bucher near buy go and by some cow liver aks him to cut it thin, thinner the better 1/4 inches or less.

Place it on pre heated oil, (will spay, use deepest cooking pot you have helps with cleaning dove and it’s safer) does not need that much time to bee cooked on each side When is done sprinkle with fresh diced garlic and salt. Beside good taste this recipe promote buy locally and also as a added bonus repels vampires.

#219 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 9:11 am

#207 Nonplused on 04.19.20 at 1:40 am
#171 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 9:12 pm
Nonplused at 137 said:

We are already at peak taxation. There just isn’t anything left to tax and nobody has any money to pay it.

—————

Well, corporate taxes could likely be raised. We have had an international race towards zero on that. Rates are close to half what they were circa 1990.

—————

Taxing a corporation is just taxing the owners, and for the most part we already do that.

Also capital tends to go where it is treated best, so governments cannot assume that capital and those revenue streams are captive. Remember, Encana, which was Alberta Energy Company and Pan-Canadian, is now a US company. They will leave if you tax more than the next state over. That’s also why CP moved from Montreal to Calgary. There is no such thing as unlimited taxation. At some point people say there is no point in working or running a business, or spending all this time and money becoming a doctor. You can actually tax things to death.

—————

Good points, NP, especially that capital goes where it is treated best.

US corp tax is actually higher than Canada, but the thing to remember is that corp tax is only on profits. Higher corp tax results in more equipment investment and higher wages since all companies will increase expenses before giving cash away to the govt.

The main problem in Canada is red tape. Especially for the resource sector, it’s far more difficult to do business here, since politics beats the law. No company will stand for their business being shut down because of govt pandering to special interest groups. Especially when the country right next door is open for business.

#220 Pascii on 04.19.20 at 9:12 am

My wife’s massage therapy clinic closed over a month a ago due to the virus which effectively sent her income to zero. Meanwhile I’m being furloughed at work one week per month until further notice. That being said, we somehow are not lacking money at all. Food on the table, beer in the fridge, mortgage and bills paid. We’re just spending way less (pretty much zero) on useless crap and take out food. I’ve reduced my phone data plan to talk and text. I’ll just use wifi at home and work I guess.
We just got a free blender with the RBC points we racked up and never used. So smoothies for all.
Life is not that different from a comfort level standpoint. We can’t wait to return to normal living as now we see how much more money we can save just by being more conservative and less impulsive with purchases.

#221 Stone on 04.19.20 at 9:20 am

#138 Sam on 04.18.20 at 6:35 pm
Rebalance your portfolio if you haven’t done it yet. Did it about 3 weeks ago and have watched the acceleration back up. Sitting at -5.27% YTD as of end of the day yesterday.

………

yikes!! why so poorly? nearly flat here . Do have a heavier tilt on tech

———

By all means, please show your portfolio makeup and how you achieved that result. It is all ETFs, right? I’d love to learn.

#222 TurnerNation on 04.19.20 at 9:25 am

From yesterday blog
“In a few weeks, with millions hooked on the dole and a black hole in public finances, it will end”

I’ve got a strong idea now. That the government will end payout of interest on all government issued bonds, Tbills. Compound interest may be banned.
Not a default per se only turned into zero coupon bonds.
There are countries where charging of interest is forbidden by practice.
What do some say here…all wars are bankers wars?
It has been declared.

#223 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.19.20 at 9:45 am

@#175 Ustabe
“all you can do is come up with snark for your fellow posters ”
++++

Any self made rich entrepreneur that uses the word “snark” has to be ……
Mr Buffet? When did you start commenting here?

#224 George on 04.19.20 at 9:46 am

Since 2008, all individuals who have engaged in more reckless financial behaviours have been rewarded by the system. Everyone who engaged in budgeting and saving and caution has been punished.

……….

disagree. Rewarded? how is declaring bankrupcy a godo thing? In a crisis bust those with cash are king. We get to cobble depressed assets.

2008…and now 2020. The system will bail out corps, privatize the gains , socialize the losses. At all costs the FED will keep printing. As long as the USD is king of the castle all is good. Canada as always will follow the health of USA.

many bell weathers r yielding over 6-7% now. Like stealing.

#225 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.19.20 at 9:47 am

Latest stats for Ontario, the only one I’ve found that breaks out deaths by age:

As of April 17

Under 19: DEATHS 0 IFR 0%
20- 40: DEATHS 1 IFR 0% (Their stat as listed)
40- 59: DEATHS 30 IFR 0.9%
60-79: DEATHS 149 IFR 6.4%
80+: DEATHS 334 IFR 16.7%

The IFRs above are “Infection Fatality Rates” basically deaths divided by confirmed tested cases. Estimates range from 50 to 80 times the “confirmed’ number for the actual number of infected which would lower the fatality rate drastically.

The lockdowns have done nothing. It’s obvious where the point of failure is. Let’s spend our resources on that.

#226 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 9:52 am

#193 Farmer Fred on 04.18.20 at 10:39 pm
#180 IHCTD9 on 04.18.20 at 10:00 pm

“I’m also thinking of expanding the garden this year too. Veggies and spices.”

Plant kale. You will eat it until winter and don’t uproot it as it will start up again in the spring, tastier than ever. It is the champion of vegetable plants in my books. Tastes great cooked or raw in a salad.
—-

Unfortunately, I was permanently traumatized by Kale as a youth. My Dutch parents fed us kids way too much Kale, usually in despicable forms such as “Boerenkool”. I’ve never planted any Kale since, lest my Mother get her hands on it!

#227 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.19.20 at 9:53 am

@#169 Cousin Jimmy
“That might explain being a 3rd cousin with a 107 year old…”
+++

You missed the clue that Shawn dropped…..”his great great great grandpa from North Sidney Nova Scotia”……

Which means , in the generational, confused, gene pool of that Thespian “fight club” known as…. North Sidney…… they’re ALL cousins……mighty purty too!

#228 SoggyShorts on 04.19.20 at 10:03 am

#221 Stone on 04.19.20 at 9:20 am
#138 Sam on 04.18.20 at 6:35 pm
Rebalance your portfolio if you haven’t done it yet. Did it about 3 weeks ago and have watched the acceleration back up. Sitting at -5.27% YTD as of end of the day yesterday.
………
yikes!! why so poorly? nearly flat here . Do have a heavier tilt on tech
———
By all means, please show your portfolio makeup and how you achieved that result. It is all ETFs, right? I’d love to learn.
**********
Mmhmm, I’d also like to see this flat PF.

SOGG is down 9.61% YTD after being up 23.23% in 2019
+11.07% since inception Jan 2019

#229 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 10:16 am

Some people actually think manufacturing is returning to Canada from China?

Okay then. You do know China can build a factory in a month, right? Canada might be able to build one in 10 years… unless protesters appear. Then all bets are off.

Let’s try this: I will buy only items built completely in, or from parts manufactured 70% or more in China and you do likewise for North America.

Talk again in 5 years. You might have to write a letter in pencil to let us know how it goes…

#230 Dharma Bum on 04.19.20 at 10:21 am

Save money by eating rice and beans, baby, rice and beans!

Have a vegetable or 2 every day.

You’ll be healthier, leaner, and meaner.

By the way, all of this is just mother nature’s way of thinning the herd. Those of us that make it will be stronger moving forward.

Good luck to all. Hope to see you on the other side.

#231 BrianT on 04.19.20 at 10:21 am

Kyle Bass discusses the China mess https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exASOIXH8So

#232 MF on 04.19.20 at 10:21 am

#215 BillyBob on 04.19.20 at 6:48 am

I’m actually doing very well, thank you.

Meh I try not to get personal with people, but your persistent personal attacks are hilarious.

Didn’t you have dependency issues when you were younger? Isn’t that why you left Canada?

Listening to someone who can’t even control their own personal cravings give advice on austerity is hilarious.

I’ll be okay. It’s you I’m worried about.

MF

#233 crowdedelevatorfartz on 04.19.20 at 10:23 am

@#200 CommisarKim
“So join or form a union and get some of those juicy benefits for yourself.”
++++

Once AGAIN your typing skills exceed your reading and comprehension skills.
I have repeatedly stated my loathing for unionized govt “workers” with bullet (my shout out to Steve McQueen) proof jobs, pensions etc.
The same drones that punch in for an 8 hour shift with the enthusiasm of a surly teenager facing a hard days work.
You know the govt workers you experience on a day to day basis…. with a surly attitude, the efficiency of a turtle on Valium, and the knowledge that no matter how lazy, how arrogant, how obnoxious they are……their jobs are chiselled in stone.
I have private sector union staff working for me.
The excellent ones are paid an excellent wage and benefits. I have no control over their pension which we also pay into monthly as part of their agreement. The pension plan they are invested in is crap and I have repeatedly talked to them about it…but thats another story for another day….
The company also hands out performance bonuses annually if they, and the company does well.
The hardest worker received a 10k bonus this Spring for the 2019 work year. The worst worker received nothing due to the fact that he is constantly late and regularly misses Monday or Friday….. I took great pleasure in telling him to stay home for 2 weeks in March because of the Covid19 protocals. His attendance has improved.
So, you see, I have no problem with unions in the private sector.
These guys do good work for good pay BUT I dont deify them. They arent God or His disciples. They are well paid union workers. Nothing more, nothing less.
Who’s union pensions are affected by the whims of the stock market. 2008 caused a reduction in their pension plan payments, across the board.

Once again I shall state, for the rabid, drooling public service sector workers .
You are very well paid.
You dont work any harder than the private sector ( and in most cases would run screaming from a similar position IN the private sector).
Your wages are equal to and usually exceed the private sector.
Your benefits are gold plated and are better than 90% of the private sector.
Your pensions are NOT affected by war, disease or famine because the taxpayers of the land will top up any shortfalls.

So, dont be surprised if the great unwashed taxpayers of the land dont all prostrate themselves at your feet or ruin a good set of pots and pans at 7pm every night….when you do the job you were hired for are paid to do.

The taxpayers that have reached their financial tipping point and are watching a Liberal govt totally out of control urinating billions upon billions of tax dollars against a massive wall of debt.

Think your pension and benefits cant be cut?

Just wait.

#234 Doug Rowat on 04.19.20 at 10:26 am

#214 BillyBob on 04.19.20 at 6:38 am
I applaud the concept behind today’s post – it’s always good to periodically review ones expenses and remove any unnecessary clutter. But ultimately it’s only a bandaid solution that may field a few temporary bucks – for most people the problem is their whole attitude to money, saving, and living within their means.

Throwing a few things on Craigslist isn’t going to change that.

Selling household items was one of 10 suggestions, which I figured most cynical commenters would key on to dismiss the entire list. You did not disappoint.

It’s also a 700-word blog post. It was only intended to make a small contribution to people’s finances. Did you expect it to solve the recession? Fix all investor misbehaviour?

You could have made a small contribution yourself. But you didn’t.

–Doug

#235 Figure it Out on 04.19.20 at 10:28 am

“My philosophy is equal fairness to all. No extra fairness to the group in vogue”

Yeah, we’re going to look like fools when organ harvesting and concentration camps become popular in Western democracies. Long live moral relativism!* Have you put up any Big Letter posters this week, Sail Away? The Party is watching.

* – until such time as the Party decrees that moral relativism is revisionist thinking… then it’ll be off to the gulags for any of us who don’t change our outlook quickly enough.

#236 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.19.20 at 10:29 am

One more set of stats that will really underline when the point of failure is. In Ontario there have been 514 deaths, of which 234 have been in long term care homes.

Here is a breakdown of the percentage of deaths by age group:

Under 19: DEATHS 0/514 = 0%
20- 40: DEATHS 1/514 = 0.19%
40- 59: DEATHS 30/514 = 5.84%
60-79: DEATHS 149/514 = 28.99%
80+: DEATHS 334/514 = 64.9%

#237 Bytor the Snow Dog on 04.19.20 at 10:31 am

Sorry. Should have said 233 were residents of LTC Homes, 1 employee.

#238 Dharma Bum on 04.19.20 at 10:36 am

Screen every traveler coming into this country with a fine toothed comb. A full on medical test. Quarantine them in a locked room while waiting for results, before letting them in.

This problem came into our country from the outside.

Tighten the border. Tighten immigration. Our loosey goosey attitude toward travel and immigration is why we are now suffering.

Canada first.

#239 Foggy on 04.19.20 at 10:42 am

#27 Felix on 04.18.20 at 10:44 am
Hmmmmmeoowww…..best suggestion for saving money?

Get rid of all dogs and replace them with cats.

Just looking at today’s photo – one stupid canine attempting (yet again, sadly) to suffocate another.

Imagine the vet bills to pay as a result, especially in these times. Such a waste.

Get a cat instead, problem solved.

You’re welcome.
——————————————

I agree with you 100%.

Get a cat, then when it gets sick you can just take it out back, put it down and bury it as there is no emotional attachment.

But a dog, no way, truly man’s best friend. That dog gets sick and you’ll want to spend $$$ to get them healthy again.

Big savings there!

#240 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 10:50 am

Re: Tesla, Musk, ventilators, etc

A discussion about what jerks do to stay true to their nature. No good deed goes unpunished:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.teslarati.com/elon-musk-tesla-ventilator-controversy-risk/amp/&ved=2ahUKEwjujJLf3fToAhWdGTQIHQuwAREQyM8BMAB6BAgKEAQ&usg=AOvVaw1aiaRZIgLibhnn3u5Vvd_u&ampcf=1

#241 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 11:06 am

#218 NoName on 04.19.20 at 8:52 am

Now that I am on garlic topic, if you have Bucher near buy go and by some cow liver aks him to cut it thin, thinner the better 1/4 inches or less.

Place it on pre heated oil, (will spay, use deepest cooking pot you have helps with cleaning dove and it’s safer) does not need that much time to bee cooked on each side When is done sprinkle with fresh diced garlic and salt. Beside good taste this recipe promote buy locally and also as a added bonus repels vampires.

———————–

Delicious. My favourite is deer, elk, moose liver in camp as fresh as possible, cooked in fat trimmed from the kidneys. Fantastic with fresh garlic (I grow way too much Russian Red to ever use up).

#242 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 11:17 am

#238 Dharma Bum on 04.19.20 at 10:36 am

Screen every traveler coming into this country with a fine toothed comb. A full on medical test. Quarantine them in a locked room while waiting for results, before letting them in.

This problem came into our country from the outside.

———————

DB, it’s not actually a problem. If they didn’t trumpet it as a GLOBAL PANDEMIC, nobody would have noticed.

You know why everyone beeps, sirens, air horns every night at 7pm? It’s to wake up the healthcare workers in the empty hospitals.

#243 Figure it Out on 04.19.20 at 11:32 am

“Estimates range from 50 to 80 times the “confirmed’ number for the actual number of infected which would lower the fatality rate drastically.”

Eh? I’m guessing around 2-3x. Based mainly on the Diamond Princess, the Theodore Roosevelt, and Iceland. The first two tested everyone, and Iceland tested a random(ish) sample of 5% of the population.

DP’s population skewed older and sicker (for the 2,666 passengers, average age 69) + somewhat younger and healthier (1,045 crew, avg 36), and found an asymptomatic infection percentage of 37%.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_on_Diamond_Princess

TR looks about 60% asymptomatic. Younger, healthier crowd on board that.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-usa-military-sympt/coronavirus-clue-most-cases-aboard-u-s-aircraft-carrier-are-symptom-free-idUSKCN21Y2GB

Both ships would represent worst case scenarios for spread within a community because of tight quarters, shared dining etcetera. Kinda like nursing homes and NYC. So I can’t see spread in other urban areas being worse.

Iceland found about a 1% infection rate, with half of them asymptomatic at the time of the test.

So I don’t see infection rates running at 50-80x confirmed cases anywhere where there’s at least some testing… I’m not married to this theory, and am open to reading other data.

#244 Blacksheep on 04.19.20 at 11:35 am

#101 Blacksheep on 04.17.20 at 5:45 pm

But wont all this cause inflation?

You betcha and that is exactly what the worlds economic system needs to keep its 75 year old debt super cycle, airborne…..so you better get your $’s out of the bank and invest in something tangible.

////////////////

“with all due respect to Garth, I know you don’t like gold Garth.

But what other tangibles are you referring to?”
——————————
I used to be a pretty serious Gold /Silver bug before the GFC to the point of selling my primary res to buy bullion and renting for 5 years. It worked out fine, but I got lucky because metals never performed like they traditionally should have.

Today, is just more proof of this.

With the amount of $’s sovereigns are creating currently, Gold should be breaking $ 3000 an once / USD and its barely moved.

I don’t think we will see crazy inflation, but enough that you will go backwards much faster than the officially mandated C.B. rate of 2% ann while sitting in cash.

I believe the “Inflate or die” saying applies here.

I still have a modest holding of Silver Maples for comfort sake, but beyond that I’d look for something considered an asset, not a liability to hold.

I’m sure Garth could suggest some ideas….

#245 Blacksheep on 04.19.20 at 11:39 am

Above post responds to Penny # 3.

#246 Shawn Allen on 04.19.20 at 11:41 am

My 107 Year Old third cousin

Cousin Jimmy at 169 responded to me:

You are still wrong. Let me make it plainer for you, A 2nd cousin shares a great grandparent as you, a 3rd cousin shares a great, great grandparent as you. Get new software because it is clueless. Do you and this 107 year relative share the SAME great great grandparent? If you do, then you should submit your claim to the Guinness Book of World Records….

*********************************
My friend, it’s fine to be skeptical and you are right to point out that 1st cousin three times removed etc is different than full third cousin.

But yes, in fact 107 year Reverend George Allen now of Bridgetown Nova Scotia and born in my home town of North Sydney Nova Scotia is indeed my full third cousin.

Yes we share the SAME set of great great grand parents that being James Allen 1788-? born in North Sydney to one of the earliest settler families and his wife Margaret Sparling born 1798 in North Sydney also to one of the earliest settler families.

My third cousin, George Allen born in 1913 is 48 years older than me. I don’t think that is so unusual across that many generations. As I mentioned my oldest first cousin was born 16 years before me and 24 years before my youngest brother, so that is 24 years age difference just at the first cousin level. Now imagine my oldest first cousin has a child at age 20 (he did) and imagine my youngest brother had a child at 40 – that would be I believe 44 years age difference at second cousin level.

The only thing unusual here is that George is still living at 107 and still very lucid and enjoying life (except as he said in the interview not liking the lock down in his retirement home).

I mentioned George the other day because he was interviewed about his memories of the Spanish Flu when he was 5 years old

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-april-10-2020-1.5529055/this-107-year-old-remembers-the-1918-spanish-flu-and-sees-the-similarities-with-covid-19-1.5529264

#247 akashic record on 04.19.20 at 11:45 am

#229 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 10:16 am

Some people actually think manufacturing is returning to Canada from China?

Okay then. You do know China can build a factory in a month, right? Canada might be able to build one in 10 years… unless protesters appear. Then all bets are off.

Let’s try this: I will buy only items built completely in, or from parts manufactured 70% or more in China and you do likewise for North America.

Talk again in 5 years. You might have to write a letter in pencil to let us know how it goes…

Americans are way ahead of your thinking.
I have no doubt they actually learn from this and act.

https://www.zerohedge.com/technology/monumental-failure-institutional-effectiveness-marc-andreesen-urges-west-its-time-build

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/kyle-bass-blasts-chinas-most-lying-coercive-manipulative-government-knowingly

#248 BrianT on 04.19.20 at 11:46 am

#236Bytor-even those stats pumped out by the guv are purposefully misleading-the physical difference between the average 60 yr old and the average 79 year old would be roughly similar to the difference between the 60 year old and a 31 yr old-by lumping all those deaths into “60-79” the reader assumes a big drop off starting at 60-it is far more likely it starts at 75-and this way of presenting the stats hides that reality.

#249 Shawn Allen on 04.19.20 at 11:47 am

#186 Cousin Jimmy on 04.18.20 at 10:20 pm
#169 Cousin Jimmy on 04.18.20 at 9:00 pm
#35 Shawn Allen on 04.18.20 at 11:23 am
“My 107 year old third couscin has actual personal memories of the Spanish Flu!”

Perhaps, I should have asked this question from the start. How old are you? That might explain being a 3rd cousin with a 107 year old…

**************************
Right, 59, don’t assume everyone is on here is your age. The years go by fast, George would probably tell you the same.

Don’t assume that fact that third cousins are on average of similar age means that ALL third cousins are abut the same age.

#250 Flop... on 04.19.20 at 11:51 am

#202 IHCTD9 on 04.19.20 at 12:02 am

“Maybe Flopster could make the trip too, he might like to see a decent SFD that does not cost 1 million!”

/////////////////////////////

Happy Sunday Trackie!

I think, actually I know, this isn’t a real estate blog much anymore, and I have been keeping my findings to myself regarding the market,but since you gave me some rope, I will attempt to hang myself.

This house in my hood just sold for 950k for those still interested in what’s going on.

The will blow the other 50k on a garden full of kale, I am told…

M45BC

http://remax-selectvanbc.com/officelistings.html/listing.r2443120-3234-prince-edward-street-vancouver-v5v-3×5.91560576

#251 BoomerKid on 04.19.20 at 12:05 pm

Learn new life skills. Look at your pre-corona expenses and figure out what skills would easily help you save money. Did you eat out all the time? Hire a housekeeper? When you can do things yourself, it saves so much money! Plus you just become a more awesome, competent person overall and you gain self-confidence. So learn to: 1) Cook from scratch, 2) Mend your clothes, 3) Clean your house, 4) Basic car maintenance, 5) Grow your own herbs, etc.

Also, if you are precariously on the edge with little/no emergency savings and you happen to have a low interest HELOC or line of credit, consider taking out a small emergency amount of money (3-6 months expenses) and putting it in a savings account (preferably at another bank). These are recall loans and I wouldn’t be surprised if the banks reduced the limits as credit tightens. It could help you through the few months you need and prevent catastrophic financial problems like taking on high-interest credit card debt, missing rent/mortgage payments, or liquidating your RRSP just as the markets are down, etc.

#252 mnpr on 04.19.20 at 12:24 pm

Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 11:18 pm

My philosophy is equal fairness to all. No extra fairness to the group in vogue, FN recently, for example, and no reduced fairness to the group being blamed for something, Chinese, in this case.

Never ever will I officially recognize any traditional unceded bullshit and likewise won’t gratuitously denigrate a group; Chinese being one, FN being another, and Trump and his team as a third.

________________________________________

gotta say, SAIL AWAY… as much as I appreciate your obvious intelligence and your outlook… and enjoy your posts… you lose this argument.

#253 5Inatrailer on 04.19.20 at 12:37 pm

I don’t often read the comments but thought today’s would have been valuable. I was mostly (not moistly) wrong. Ugh people…

Thanks to the posters who STAYED ON POINT. My 0.2:

I found this blog 10 years ago via a link mentioned in Mrmoneymusche.com. He’s a wickedly clever dude who saw the world with a unique frugal view and was generous enough to share. Some of my favourite points:
1.) have a group of friends to share tools
2.) be optimistic: someone somewhere will always overcome. Society is generally progressing
3.) don’t get bogged down in tiny details exaggeration
4.) a millionaire is made $10 at a time.

Sorry I’m too lazy to post a link but there’s 100s of good entries on his blog. You may not find all of his posts useful but overall, He has a unique lens to view the world and it’s made my life better because he shared it. Hopefully it will do the same for you.

#254 maxx on 04.19.20 at 12:59 pm

Our knowledge-based business is (for the moment) 100% on-line. We grossed in 3 weeks what we did in 2019. Paypal did a check on us because of the spike. We work from 9am to about 10pm (for now) and are more tired than usual, but it’s amazing that things happen so dramatically – and so fast. What an eye opener.

We offered freebies to the public at large for a month because of the boredom so many are suffering and thought we could put our feet up to forward plan during April. It had the opposite effect and we’re selling like mad.

Not sure that this will continue at this pace for the rest of the year, but we’re now finding and squeezing more efficiency out of our system. Current overhead less than 200$/month, not counting our salaries. Internet business rocks!

As for the other points – done and done. Except for the garage sale part. I’m buying. The deals are insane.

#255 maxx on 04.19.20 at 1:17 pm

@#14

That’s a habit many could benefit from.

#256 Headhunter on 04.19.20 at 1:28 pm

De-Coupling from the machine. Saving quid, why wouldn’t ya?

Double edge sword our economy is based on consumption. Just reading the comments today for sure this contraction will be a big one. Herd Mentality.

More people cutting back may well equal less people working.

Im gonna spend er whilst I can. May buy an ATV. No money on the other side its only good here.

#257 Ronaldo on 04.19.20 at 2:03 pm

#250 Flop

26.4% below 2018 assessment. Nice. Lot’s more to drop yet.

#258 Sail Away on 04.19.20 at 2:05 pm

#252 mnpr on 04.19.20 at 12:24 pm
Sail Away on 04.18.20 at 11:18 pm

My philosophy is equal fairness to all. No extra fairness to the group in vogue, FN recently, for example, and no reduced fairness to the group being blamed for something, Chinese, in this case.

Never ever will I officially recognize any traditional unceded bullshit and likewise won’t gratuitously denigrate a group; Chinese being one, FN being another, and Trump and his team as a third.

———–

gotta say, SAIL AWAY… as much as I appreciate your obvious intelligence and your outlook… and enjoy your posts… you lose this argument.

———–

Such is life

#259 Ronaldo on 04.19.20 at 2:07 pm

#242 Sail Away

Good one.

#260 Now That My Money's Gone, Greedeau! on 04.19.20 at 3:51 pm

We were taken control of long ago
“After 1970, there was no longer a split between “secret” propaganda films and the mainstream. They were one and the same. What was initially limited to Laurel Canyon has since spread across all of LA. Military intelligence has engulfed the whole city, and the fake Tate event was the big final bite. A large portion of mainstream movies since 1970 have been propaganda films of one sort or another, and even the ones that are made mostly for money are filled with propaganda as well. There is no longer any split between CIA and Hollywood. Hollywood is basically a subdivision of the CIA and military intelligence. The entire entertainment industry is a vast subdivision of military intelligence, including music, TV, art, film, and a majority of the internet. This is what the Matrix really is: not a dream induced by robot bugs, but a waking false reality created by uber-directors. ”
Taken from: The Tate Murders were a False Flag
and the Greatest Unknown Success Story of Project CHAOS.
https://stillchillinonhistory.blogspot.com/2016/11/part-2the-tate-murders-were-false-flag.html
Most media is a product of disinformation and Goebbels type brainwashing. How come all we see now Covid news plastered everywhere. They have to convince us of this plan-scam-demic and nothing works better than a 24/7 barrage of news bytes. 90% of news nowadays is Covid related.
They’ve come for your mind and you are succumbing.
Who of you watched the “One World” concert last night? What is more blatant than that?

#261 milly on 04.20.20 at 9:39 am

A little late, but as a frugal Canadian my tips:

-Thrift clothing (esp if you are a woman). Cull your wardrobe down, and promise to toss an item for every new item in. This helps to curb unnecessary shopping.
-Use hair schools for cheap but good haircuts
-Choose 1 streaming service, no cable.
– Use the library
-Learn to not center meals around a big piece of meat. Learn to make curries, stews, pastas, soups etc. Also learn how to make veggie meals with tofu, lentils etc. This will save you a lot on your grocery bill.
– Live within your means. Renting a 1bdr and sharing 1 car helps keep expenses low.
-be willing to repair rather than replace. It’s easier to figure out how with the internet.
– Find a hobby that could be a side hustle.
-Find enjoyment in cheap entertainment. Video games, board games, reading, movies, baking etc.
-For important items, buy good quality and buy it once.