No win

These are transformative days, n’est-ce pas? The biggest generation is into a shared economy – Uber, AirBnB, gig jobs and co-ownership. The hot word is ‘collaborative.’ Rugged individualism is out. Confrontation, too. Those who disagree with the consensus view, whether on climate, taxes or treaty rights, are paleo. Reactionary.

So, I said to Dorothy, whaddya think about me blogging on the railroad blockades?

“Don’t be an idiot,” she said, giving me that don’t-be-an-idiot look. “This isn’t a debate anymore. It’s black-and-white. You’ve got nothing to gain. Drop it.”

She’s right. So I’ll keep this post short. Maybe she won’t notice…

The T2 government has decided not to provoke the few Mohawk band members who have blocked CN’s main line in Ontario, choking off rail service in the eastern half of the country. The railway has laid off 1,000 workers as a result, so a thousand families will be without paycheques for a while. Containers are piling up on the dock in Halifax, and ships have stopped being unloaded. Supplies of everything from foodstocks to chlorine for hospitals, grain, manufactured goods and propane for home heating are halted. The economic losses are estimated to be $60 million to $100 million per week, and mounting.

The minister responsible for indigenous issues travelled to the blockade, legitimizing the civil disobedience there. He came to negotiate and possibly reopen an ancient treaty, to give the protestors some of what they demanded. After nine hours of talks, nothing. In fact details of the meeting were secretly recorded by the Mohawk participants, then released. Things had not gone well. Demands, no compromise. No end to the illegal blockade.

The protestors burned a court injunction that CN received to have them removed. Neither the RCMP nor the provincial police force have acted to uphold the injunction. The Trudeau government indicated it does not support any aggressive action to have the blockades removed, and prefers an open-ended process of exhaustive talks, leading to the possible rewriting of former agreements granting more land and money. The Ontario natives say they won’t move until indigenous lands in BC – where controversy over a gas pipeline rages – are cleansed of “red coats and blue coats.” In other words, no policing by federal or provincial governments.

The issues are complex. Many indigenous people in BC support the oil and gas industry with its superior-paying jobs. Some don’t. But then unanimity within any group is elusive. Usually democracy prevails, unless you believe in hereditary chiefs, accountable to themselves.

In any case, this has become a national crisis. An economic and financial one. Canada’s reputation as a reliable supplier is being tested. People are losing their jobs. Houses in the east will soon go cold, in February. The federal government looks paralyzed and dazed, seized by the political ghosts of Oka and Ipperwash. After Trudeau spent so much personal capital on indigenous issues, there is so little to harvest in return. Not enough good will or trust to deal with a relatively small number of rebels camped on the tracks.

As Dorothy reminded me, this is black-and-white. Supporters have turned it into a climate crusade, seeing the hereditary chiefs – and their Mohawk colleagues – as oppressed defenders of the earth, water and sky standing bravely against a rapacious, resource-hungry, wasteful society. It’s classic left-right warfare. No air in the middle for talk.

The resolution? Concessions or enforcement. The majority must concede, or we send in the cops. Given what the prime minister’s said so far, the outcome is clear. Collaboration.

You may have another word for it.

 

247 comments ↓

#1 Alberta Ed on 02.17.20 at 12:18 pm

We’re a country of laws, says our spineless prime minister. Apparently not principles, though.

#2 DFO on 02.17.20 at 12:33 pm

Name me one refinery that pipeline is going to or how we’re supposed to compete with the US oil megaterminals? Or how many full-time jobs that money pit will furnish? Last I heard it was about 20.

Before anyone gloats that BC needs Alberta oil to refine well there’s no refinery in BC that can handle the bitumen which is all Alberta is moving out right now.

Isn’t anyone curious as to why an energy corporation would sell a half built pipeline? As a gracious gesture to all Canadians? Maybe because it was unprofitable? Hmm, makes one think.

#3 TurnerNation on 02.17.20 at 12:37 pm

Circling back to yesterday blog.
Why YOLO and FOMO? Best passage I’ve seen; found on Reddit (the home of bots and intel posters, but some nuggets).

“”What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egotism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions.” In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that our fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that our desire will ruin us.”” <———–

#4 Kevin on 02.17.20 at 12:40 pm

Great summary, Garth. Thank you. I completely agree (as a moister).

May you and your family enjoy Family Day!

#5 eduardo de la conche on 02.17.20 at 12:44 pm

As it will soon impact the holly land of Quebec, whose premiere suddenly states that transport is a ‘federal’ issue (make your mind up QC…)

Some action might, uhmmm, ahhh, maybe, probably, I’d rather be in Barbados, be taken.

How about parliament calls for a new federal election this week? Are we turning into a joke?

#6 Sold Out on 02.17.20 at 12:46 pm

Welp, Trudeau is solely accountable for this mess, by going Chretien one better and talking out of both sides of his face. Apparently, the Mohawk are not as impressed by his facial hair faux gravitas as the average mill.

If Trudeau is foot-dragging to help kill resource projects, he should just come out and say it. People voted for him because he seemed to recognize that the environment and the economy both need tending, all while working towards reconciliation; now it seems that the economy is subordinate to everything else.

Playing hardball with FN’s over environmental issues is a non-starter with Trudeau’s mill base. I predict that FN’s win this round.

#7 wheretonow on 02.17.20 at 12:47 pm

The T2 government is such a FAILURE . Still can’t get over the fact that T2 was voted in again. Really wonder if it was the canadians that voted him in or Russian hackers ?? The non-resolution to the railway blockades will have at least one positive outcome , the Fall of the minority liberals , the sooner the better. They are so Useless.

#8 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 12:51 pm

Natives have thousands of years of proven, unprecedented, responsible, respectful relationship with Mother Earth, that defines their whole identity.

Noone with any decent knowledge about them can deny this from them anymore.

Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.

#9 G on 02.17.20 at 12:52 pm

Are we in the year 2020 or 1984?

The World Health Organization has held talks with tech giants to stop the spread of coronavirus “misinformation,” despite the fact that some things once labeled “misinformation” have since turned out to be true.

#10 1255 on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm

They’re supposed to care about jobs when thousands died when the Europeans came over and stole their land?

#11 Dr V on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm

The “Indian Act” gives power to elected “band councils”. As democratic as this may seem, the council is really only empowered within reserves. Control of unceded lands is not so clear, and is subject to treaty settlement. The hereditary chiefs must be recognized
by non-natives as having some power or authority
unless the Wet’suwet’en nation says otherwise.

Protestors are using the Wet’suwet’en as an excuse for their own causes – legit or otherwise. Protest all you
want, freely. As far as blocking rail, roads, and ports. that’s illegal. Move ’em out. Get Canada rolling again.

#12 Stoph on 02.17.20 at 1:00 pm

Could the rail companies and others affected sue the RCMP and government for failing to enforce an injunction?

#13 AACI Home-Dog on 02.17.20 at 1:04 pm

I say send in the army. The RCMP is busy enough with crack heads & speed freaks. If this was south of the border, I do not think it would have gone this far. Trudeau & Horgan both say we have to follow the rule of law, but it has already been approved by the Supreme Court ! Please grow a set, and end this…

#14 TurnerNation on 02.17.20 at 1:04 pm

Also from Reddit! This chart from months ago. See the circled point. This is why it’s happening now. This has been planned WAY in advance. NOTHING in this world is left to chance, it’s just a plan unfolding. Once you realize this you will be free.

https://i.redd.it/ivf61t3n0hb41.png

These theatrics we’re now seeing are masterfully organized and on point. So they call it a Theatre of War eh… The war of course is for our minds.
BTW I’d like to stop supporting this colonialist government by withholding my taxes. Anyday. Try it??

#15 PetertheSeparatistfromCalgary on 02.17.20 at 1:11 pm

Negotiating with these trouble makers sends the message that this type of destructive action works.

Sometimes we need to use tear gas to make Canada safe for democracy! This is one of those times.

#16 Jeroma on 02.17.20 at 1:12 pm

Can the railway sue the Indians?

#17 avocado latte on 02.17.20 at 1:13 pm

And jordon cove will prevail.

#18 G on 02.17.20 at 1:16 pm

Hi #6 eduardo de la conche, re: your “How about…”
Thought the same thing, If only wises did come true. They usually don’t. But might just end up in the same place again anyway.

#19 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:19 pm

I don’t recognize anything that includes “hereditary” in it. That includes the british monarchy (they’re just a tourist attraction like the circus anyways). We’re past that time. We live in a democracy.

The hereditary chiefs were fine with using the court system when it played to their favour. When it didn’t anymore, then the attitude changed to “we don’t recognize your laws or right of enforcement”.

I really wonder if anyone, including the hereditary chiefs, spent any time reading the treatises signed and what everyone’s actual rights and obligations really are in regards to them. I suspect we’d all raise our eyebrows if that was laid out for all to see.

Strange that no one wants to talk about that. Would I be called a racist for pointing that out?

#20 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 1:19 pm

Settlers must take responsibility for what they have done, and failed to do, throughout “Canadian” history in dealing, so often unfairly, with our First Nations.

Treaties tell a different story about Canada from the self-serving narrative, largely promulgated by Boomers today who have done so well on the backs of everyone else.

Ok Boomers? Ok Settlers? The time to fix this is now.

Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

#21 Sail Away on 02.17.20 at 1:41 pm

Que sera, sera.

If this results in more engineering work, we’ll hire; if less, we’ll fire. Status quo will probably prevail.

#22 Michael Bruce Chase on 02.17.20 at 1:47 pm

If this pipeline is supported by first nations then maybe it’s time for first nations to step up and do something about the “protesters”. After all it’s in their interests and the interests of their children. Good jobs are hard to find, especially now since T2 is running the country into the ground.

#23 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:49 pm

#21 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 1:19 pm
Settlers must take responsibility for what they have done, and failed to do, throughout “Canadian” history in dealing, so often unfairly, with our First Nations.

Treaties tell a different story about Canada from the self-serving narrative, largely promulgated by Boomers today who have done so well on the backs of everyone else.

Ok Boomers? Ok Settlers? The time to fix this is now.

Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

———

You’re a naive fool. Let me simplify this for your shrunken snowflake brain. It’s very simple.

Throughout the history of “peoplekind”, there have been conquerors and the conquered as well as colonization. It is not an invention of white people. It has occurred on all continents and all ethnic and cultural groups even before we probably discovered fire. That’s what tribal warfare is all about. And it will continue to occur well after you and I are dust.

Even you support what I’m saying.

“Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.“

Do you see it? You! Yes you! Want to be the conqueror! Who wouldn’t want to be in that position? Of course we all want to be in charge.

How easy it is to crush the silliness of what you write.

And what does any of this have to do with boomers? Fool!

I’m sorry. Do you need a safe space to cry yourself out?

#24 G on 02.17.20 at 1:55 pm

FYI: If you really want to know what most of the world is being told about this COVID19!

How North Korea is reporting on coronavirus (English subtitles) Channel 4 News Feb 17 8min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI_MG3ZnDak

So when will this be on CBC? I’m guessing not since it mentions some people take 24 days to show symptoms!
And Canada is only doing 14 day quarantines!

#25 BlorgDorg on 02.17.20 at 2:00 pm

First, Dr. V – thanks for your intelligent response earlier today. You’re right about opportunity, and my generalization was (obviously) flawed. I like you and look forward to more of your insights.

Today’s post is spot-on insofar as individualism and confrontation (and I would add, independent thought) are unpopular in the extreme. We can debate the causes (spoiler: it’s social media, which panders to, and manipulates, base sociological needs developed over thousands of years).

But these are the tenets that capitalism was founded upon. Many Millennials suffer from “nobody told me to”; ie. the business of running the world is someone else’s problem. Some of this is folly of youth, but theres an epidemic of armchair judgement that gives rise to inanity like extinction rebellion, resource movement, etc.

I hope Garth is right, and it’s just “cute” — but I also share the fear that as younger generations start voting more and driving government policy, it will drag everyone down. Maybe it should. I see a lot of people, both young and old, who have never had to pay for their poor behaviour or bad decisions.

#26 TurnerNation on 02.17.20 at 2:06 pm

#21 Millennial Realist your post is anti immigrant.
Why are you against people coming here? You do know GTA’s population is set to increase by one million “settlers” in the coming few years?
Why are you bent on punishing them for settling here? Admit what you are thinking. There no place for h8.

#27 BS on 02.17.20 at 2:06 pm

prefers an open-ended process of exhaustive talks, leading to the possible rewriting of former agreements granting more land and money.

It is always about money. Everything. If you let them extort you they will repeat until someone with balls is elected.

Remember in the US what things looked like under Obama with the American Indians blocking the pipelines. Or with Isis terrorizing the world. Then Trump took over. Issues solved. You can’t solve these things with weak leaders.

#28 Raging Ranter on 02.17.20 at 2:07 pm

Thanks for this Garth. The malcontents who wish to purge us of our colonial sins must also understand that doing so will purge our ability to function as a country. That “colonialism” so disparaged today remains the backbone of the laws, institutions, and governance that allows Canada to exist and to function. No country can survive on a steady diet of official apologies, collective guilt, public shaming of our history, and deliberate state-sanctioned denigration of our nation’s founders.

The sins of our forefathers were many. They must be acknowledged, examined, and never repeated. But they cannot be used as an excuse to rip away at the foundations of the country so that some proper thinking elites in government, the media, and academia can assuage their guilt. Above all, this country needs to work.

#29 DON on 02.17.20 at 2:07 pm

I own a home/land. Someone else comes along (with guns) and asks me to sign a treaty to keep the home and some of the land.

What will make hereditary chiefs ensure democracy is reflected and everyone shares in the money generated within their jurisdictions?

If you get in the way of much needed supplies to hospitals, clinics, grocery stores, heat well then we have a problem. If my child is on the other side of that blockage we’ve got an even bigger problem.

It has taken almost three weeks for an investigative journalist to come out with the heart of the matter. Like the gig community, the media has turned to ‘bit’ reporting to create sensationalism and follower ship. They release bit and pieces at a time with no over all thought of how everything fits together.

I want to hear what the band members are thinking, not all hereditary chiefs are against the pipeline. Get them all on a show and let’s hear it. No secrets no this no that, just hard conversations.

#30 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 2:10 pm

Actually.
I’m rather enjoying watching Trudeau get politically nuked by his own politically correct pandering to each and every Social cause out there.
Lets give everyone equal rights and see where that ends up……special interest groups holding us all for ransom until we turn the clock back 400 years and or hand over billions….guess which one we will do.
Pathetic….. and political / economic suicide.

The public wants LEADERS not hand wringing, mewling, spineless politicians hoping to negotiate their way out of a situation they themselves created.
Pink T-shirts or….. the War Measures Act, send in the Army, send in the police, fill the jails, feed them bread water and beans, hold them for months, release them when they have lost 25% – 50% of their body fat.

OR. pull the police away from the road blocks and let the public work it out….should take about 2 days .

#31 Joseph R. on 02.17.20 at 2:11 pm

Maybe the PM will use the protest to reject the application of the Teck Frontier Mine project, due by the end of this month.

#32 binky barnes on 02.17.20 at 2:16 pm

If we only had a seat on the UN security council that would solve it…..

^^^ Funny Stuff :)

Yet, sadly, I believe there are many Canadians who have no idea how the UN–or its SC–functions, and who actually think what our illustrious PM has been doing in Africa is somehow noble and important. Some Canadians are easily duped. Meanwhile the country’s downward spiral continues at breakneck speed.

#33 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 2:18 pm

@#9 Akashic delusions
“Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.”
++++
ahahahahaha.
Does that include the First Nation’s that want the pipeline?
The First Nations protesters burning tires at the blockades?

Dont be so naive.
Its about power and money…the planet be damned.

Thanks for the laugh.

#34 Yukon Elvis on 02.17.20 at 2:20 pm

#11 1255 on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm
They’re supposed to care about jobs when thousands died when the Europeans came over and stole their land?
…………………

They are immigrants too. They came from Asia. They don’t own the land any more than I do.

#35 I’m stupid on 02.17.20 at 2:38 pm

I’m tired of people believing they’re owed something just because a wrong was committed to “their ancestors”.

Let’s talk facts. There isn’t a person alive who’s ancestors weren’t screwed over by others. Even the First Nations killed each other.

Garth says things are never different but this time they are. In the past people conquered by force now they conquer with pitty. He who can sell the saddest story wins.

Give me a break.

#36 joblo on 02.17.20 at 2:41 pm

Is it impossible to build these things on crown or private land?

#37 Dogman01 on 02.17.20 at 2:41 pm

I have always found Garth’s comment section a decent aggregator for interesting links, opinions and topics.

I am finding the Canadian MSM outlets, CBC and CTV, pushing an agenda\bias that has lost touch with my reality, to the point where I cannot trust them any longer. (I find them interesting only to understand what narrative is being fed to the busy population and what subjects are now taboo)

I have found the Economist in depth but not much Canada coverage.

Some of the National Post articles smell of commune sense.

Suggestions?

Is there a Canadian events commentator (like Garth is for Financial wisdom) that is worth following? Pod caster or Blog host?

#38 Dogman01 on 02.17.20 at 2:44 pm

“Force, he believed, was the last resort of incompetence; he had said so frequently enough since this operation had begun. Of course, he was absolutely right, though not in the way he meant. Only the incompetent wait until the last extremity to use force, and by then, it is usually too late to use anything, even prayer.” ― H. Beam Piper

#39 JacqueShellacque on 02.17.20 at 2:47 pm

When there is a dispute, one must look at the demands, and whether they are reasonable and justified. In this case, FN occupying the rail line in Belleville claims to be demanding RCMP leave the territory of a band from BC. In and of itself it doesn’t seem too bad. Often it’s what’s left unsaid that matters though: they are not addressing the reason the redcoats are present on that land, which is to enforce an injunction supported by many of the BC band’s members. The strategy they’ve chosen is meant to be maximally disruptive, so in essence the Belleville band is attempting to use the pressure that inevitably builds from squeezing the world’s 10th largest economy to force other FN people to go along with them. Even before you get to the economic impact, the disproportion alone is incredibly unfair and makes a mockery of any claim to justice. This is a bad enough situation, but it gets worse when one considers how poorly placed our elites are to deal with this sort of crisis, given their own overwrought rhetoric on FN issues. Unfortunately then it looks like this will get worse before it gets better. Next up will be blockades of Ontario’s 400-series of highways.

#40 Kurt on 02.17.20 at 2:53 pm

#2 DFO on 02.17.20 at 12:33 pm
The pipeline in question, coastal gaslink, is a NATURAL GAS pipeline. It goes to a soon-to-be-built NATURAL GAS LIQUIFACTION PLANT. It does not need a refinery, it does not compete with oil terminals. The reason we have the problem we have right now is people like YOU. Many years ago, the performance art collective General Idea did a piece (which I watched at the National Gallery in Ottawa) call “Shut the F___ Up”, mocking critics of modern art. I suggest you look it up on youtube and absorb its message regarding commenting on things you know nothing about.

#41 Phylis on 02.17.20 at 2:57 pm

Will butts come back to save the day? Gerry, what to do, what to do?

#42 NoOneOfConsequence on 02.17.20 at 2:59 pm

It’s pretty simple really.

Clearly we need the other people in the band(s) to step up here.
If it’s ok to stop the economy for everyone else, then it’s ok to stop the economy for the band(s) doing the stopping.

Cut them off. Now. Every offending band. Power, gas, money, roads, the whole works. If they want to be a separate nation – outside of the arrangements that everyone else has made, so be it.

This isn’t every band – most of them support the agreement reached.

A couple of rogues looking to blackmail everyone should not stop the process.

#43 Jay Currie on 02.17.20 at 3:07 pm

I have some respect for the actual FN people involved in this. However, the Wet’suwet’en FN needs to figure out its position as a community on the pipeline. Apparently, roughly 80% of that community is in favour. And there is some indication that the dissenting hereditary chiefs may be getting Tides Foundation money. This needs to be sorted.

I have zero respect for the silly white kids “standing in solidarity” with Wet’suwet’en. They have no idea about what’s in the pipeline, the question of FN soverignty or, from the interviews, very much else. A whiff of pepper spray and a few nights in jail would be useful here.

Mainstream media seems to be like a cat with a laser pointer. If the white radicals are “sincere” they are covered with uncritical reverence. I can’t wait for the whole MSM edifice to collapse as the result of losing audience and advertising.

The Libs are simply elected versions of the virtue signalling middle class white “studies” majors. A bit of pepper spray and incarceration would do them the world of good. Or, at least, sober them up. JT and his Cabinet are entirely clueless. They are of a generation in which firm action is viewed as confrontational and therefore “inappropriate”.

JT and Horgan might want to get in touch with Premier Silver of the Yukon. After years of hard work, the Yukon, its FNs and its resource developers have created a consultation and co-operation regime which should serve as a model for the rest of Canada. The Yukon proves that reconcilliation and development can occur.

#44 Canadians with Less Rights on 02.17.20 at 3:10 pm

At what point are all Canadians equal? It doesn’t matter what your race is it doesn’t matter what your religion is it doesn’t matter what your heritage is all Canadians are equal with equal rights. No one is above the law, no one gets special tax exemptions. It sounds like an equity issue where some Canadians get far more privileges exemptions and passes then others. I truly suspect that if I and some of my friends blocked a national Railway we would be quickly escorted off site and jailed. I guess it seems that some Canadians are above the law and can do whatever they like. I’m also guessing that T2 has packed his bags and it’s off to the sunny south now that he has held his meeting back here in the north.

#45 Not a mill on 02.17.20 at 3:14 pm

#21

You and other on here can’t be serious. I’m so tired of natives demanding more and more when what happen long time ago was that a piece of land was conquered.

Deal with it like everyone has in the past. All parts of europe was conquered many times by different rulers and when that happen people adjusted.

Why do we have borders and armies? I mean, if someone was to take over our government then I guess my rights would still be protected right?

#46 Raging Ranter on 02.17.20 at 3:14 pm

1970: Just watch me.

2020: Just watch me do nothing.

#47 Barb on 02.17.20 at 3:15 pm

H was a little more (ok, a lot) blunt than Garth, suggesting T2 shouldl do what Daddy did:
Enact the War Measures Act.

Justified by the impact to the nation of Canada, which is what WMA is for.

Send in the RCMP? Check
An injunction? Check

Not much else is up anyone’s sleeve to fix this.
Barring of course, tribal warfare.

#48 Ed McNeil on 02.17.20 at 3:17 pm

DELETED

#49 Chemisttime on 02.17.20 at 3:19 pm

Here’s THE solution.

We have surveillance to identify EVERY blockaded there. We identify them and days onsite. Now we have a list of names.

We have CN and effected parties give an accurate (and audit-able) number for losses. We hand this to CRA.

The CRA then begins with chequing and savings accounts for the amounts owed by blockades (I guarantee there won’t be many of them once this happens). Liens are issued on real estate, land, and garnishees on present and future wages. This is real, 100% debt. Not a threat. Just unbiased calculations.

After the fact we pass a law (retroactively) for economic terrorism. There won’t be a next time.

#50 Kurt on 02.17.20 at 3:20 pm

#20 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:19 pm
“I really wonder if anyone, including the hereditary chiefs, spent any time reading the treatises signed and what everyone’s actual rights and obligations really are in regards to them.”
No-one has spent any time reading treaties because THERE AREN’T ANY. This is a tremendous problem in British Columbia – European and Chinese people just moved in, settled down, didn’t have a war or anything. We (as in Canada) could just make a law that all non-treaty land belongs to the crown, but that’s the rub: modern ethics requires that we somehow learn to get along with the aboriginals instead of having a war with them, winning it and dictating terms. It means applying the laws and the constitution of Canada as best we can. It lead to the concept of aboriginal title, as documented in the Tsilqot’in decision. Many commentors acted as though the sky was falling, but the decision actually established a very high bar for awarding aboriginal title which, as far as I can tell, the Wet’suet’en cannot possibly clear. If we are to respect the rule of law in this admittedly very messy situation, CGP must be allowed to proceed, even if it means arresting large numbers of protestors.

#51 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 3:22 pm

@#22 Call in the UN
“If we only had a seat on the UN security council that would solve it…..”
++++
Nah, aid/ bribery money sent to Africa ends up in Swiss bank accounts…

I’d rather give the $500 million directly to the Aboriginals here so the money will flow eventually back to the Canadian govt…. through taxes.

#52 Retired on a Gulf Island on 02.17.20 at 3:25 pm

Actually, T2 and Horgan have demonstrated the effectiveness of a new form of dispute resolution.

Any time you have a concern about something, just set up a blockade and inconvenience as many people as possible until the government has addressed your concerns to your satisfaction.

Simple.

#53 Kevin on 02.17.20 at 3:26 pm

It’s ridiculous to read some of these comments blaming T2. Like a NDP or Conservative government would be able to avoid first nation issues and pipelines and oil. Is T2 responsible for what TC Energy does?
What a bunch of non-sense. It’s hard to believe how stupid some of Garth’s readers are.


Sold Out on 02.17.20 at 12:46 pm
Welp, Trudeau is solely accountable for this mess, by going Chretien one better and talking out of both sides of his face. Apparently, the Mohawk are not as impressed by his facial hair faux gravitas as the average mill.

If Trudeau is foot-dragging to help kill resource projects, he should just come out and say it. People voted for him because he seemed to recognize that the environment and the economy both need tending, all while working towards reconciliation; now it seems that the economy is subordinate to everything else.

Playing hardball with FN’s over environmental issues is a non-starter with Trudeau’s mill base. I predict that FN’s win this round.

#54 fishman on 02.17.20 at 3:27 pm

I was in this right from the beginning. Bagman for the Survival Coalition & its political leader John Cummins. Bagman for the cases we brought to the Supremes starting with Sparrow. We made the laws by going to court. We made the laws by losing the court cases.
What did we get from ROC. Mocked,dismissed, ignored.
The most painful was rejection from our own. Peter McKay fed us the Kelowna Accord poison pill over Alliance -PC amalgamation to CPC. Harper never spoke another word to John Cummins in the 9 years he was in caucus.
What do us old B.C. Reformers think of this mess we’re in? Looks good on you’all. Schadenfreude is sweet.
And the best is yet to come.
Two laws for two governments in one country was just the start. We got 180 governments making our laws with the adoption of UNDRIP. That’ll take decades to sort out. 35 years so far for Big Potato’s Constitution. UNDRIP going to be an add on or a precursor? Who the hell knows.The fix is in for Supreme appointments. We can’t change our constitution, we can’t fix or modify it. I wanna be an Americun.

#55 whiplash on 02.17.20 at 3:31 pm

Let’s see: trespass, obstruction to the public or police officer, mischief, unlawful assembly, disobeying order of the court.
Time to drop the hammer on these misfits!

#56 Kurt on 02.17.20 at 3:36 pm

#11 1255 on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm
“They’re supposed to care about jobs when thousands died when the Europeans came over and stole their land?”
Actually, it’s hard to steal something you CAN’T own. This is the tragedy of many treaties here on the Prairies – the aboriginals were nomadic and their language did not contain the concept of land ownership. The Treaty 7 nations thought they were signing a peace agreement, not a land transfer.
As for the Wetsuet’en lands, the problem is that they WEREN’T stolen, because the British authorities didn’t fill out the paperwork to steal it – there was no declaration of war, no treaties, nothing. Now we are stuck with trying to figure out who actually owned what (if anything), and who was just passing through. The Tsilqot’en decision established the standard for awarding aboriginal title, but I’ve seen nothing about the Wetsuet’en attempting to establish a claim; I suspect that is because they can’t.

#57 Dave on 02.17.20 at 3:40 pm

One country one law for everyone.

If any other minority group pulled a stunt like this…go directly to jail.

Protest all you like….have debates….but no one has the right to shut down industry and take food off of hard working peoples tables.

#58 dosouth on 02.17.20 at 3:41 pm

Great post and stating the obvious and what most Canadians are thinking, enough already. Glad Dorothy is in it for the long haul…..

#59 Marco on 02.17.20 at 3:45 pm

Well, T2 is afraid of Oka repeat. Could harm his image on the world scene. Otherwise, you would have free rein with Indians. Like in the past, no?

#60 CJohnC on 02.17.20 at 3:49 pm

Dorothy says it is black and white. T2 says we are a country of laws. All good. It is black and white. Enforce the law. Send in the army if the police can’t get the job done.

#61 Kurt on 02.17.20 at 3:50 pm

As regards the route of Coastal Gaslink and the environmental impact of such, have a look at this:
https://goo.gl/maps/oixtaVNqnkvrx8NB7
Now, imagine a line between Telkwa and Terrace. Follow the river from Telkwa up to the pass North of Howson Peak. Zoom in on the pass. Note that there are already a road and a power line through the pass. Scan along the route towards Telkwa. Observe the clear cuts, roads and other disturbances.
There is much more to an environment assessment than a quick look at air photos, but some people have been pushing a false narrative that the pipeline will be a tremendously destructive disturbance in what would otherwise be wilderness. This is a flat-out lie.

#62 45north on 02.17.20 at 3:57 pm

The T2 government has decided not to provoke the few Mohawk band members who have blocked CN’s main line in Ontario, choking off rail service in the eastern half of the country. The railway has laid off 1,000 workers as a result, so a thousand families will be without paycheques for a while. Containers are piling up on the dock in Halifax, and ships have stopped being unloaded. Supplies of everything from foodstocks to chlorine for hospitals, grain, manufactured goods and propane for home heating are halted. The economic losses are estimated to be $60 million to $100 million per week, and mounting.

Trudeau talking about the SNC Lavalin thing, said he would always stand up for Canadian jobs. That promise doesn’t seem to mean that railway workers will be continuously employed. And it doesn’t seem to mean that people whose jobs depend on the railway will have jobs. Where is his concern for jobs? He isn’t really concerned.

He created the Minister of Middle Class Prosperity. The idea is that everyone contributes to the economy and by optimizing their efforts, people can stay in or join the middle class. Cutting the rail line is an attack on the middle class. Where is his concern for the middle class? He isn’t really concerned.

Of course, everybody knows this. The Premier of Ontario knows this. He controls the Ontario Provincial Police and he could have the protesters thrown in jail and their equipment confiscated. Then he could call an election.

#63 Lambchop on 02.17.20 at 3:59 pm

From Coastal Gaslink’s website:

“In the letter to the OW, Coastal GasLink outlined the reasons for rejecting the alternate route including the following key aspects:

8 additional major river crossings
An estimated 77-89 additional kilometres of environmental disturbance
A 48-inch pipeline could not physically be constructed in certain locations and therefore deviations would be required for between 35 and 40 per cent of the alternate route
The pipeline would be constructed in close proximity to the communities of Houston, Smithers, Terrace and Burns Lake, which would preferably be avoided for construction disruption and operational safety reasons
Environmental field work and Indigenous engagement with 4 new Indigenous communities to the north of the project that would have delayed the project by a year or more
A reduction in economic benefits for the Wet’suwet’en people
An estimated increased capital cost of between $600 and $800 million plus one year delay negatively impacts the viability of the LNG Canada project
In the August 21, 2014 letter, Coastal GasLink did offer an alternate route called the Morice River North Alternate (MRNA), approximately 55 kilometres in length, that would have moved the pipeline 3 to 5 kilometres away from the Morice River (Unist’ot’en) healing centre. Coastal GasLink also offered to arrange for an overflight for the Hereditary Chiefs to view the alternate routing.

No response to our offer of overflight was ever received, nor did we receive a response to our August 21, 2014 letter.“

The letter to WFN:

https://www.coastalgaslink.com/siteassets/pdfs/whats-new/2020/2020-02-14coastal-gaslink-statement—pipeline-route-selection/cgl-statement-route-selection-august-21-2019.pdf

#64 ray on 02.17.20 at 4:00 pm

And yet in China a complete auto manufacturing plant can go from a green field to initial consumer production levels in less than a year. This story confirms my bias that average Canadians are going to be financially worse off as time goes on. Stocks like GoEasy (gsy.t), a lending company somewhere in between banks and pay-day lenders will continue to do better

#65 Chimingin on 02.17.20 at 4:02 pm

Could we just get over the “invaded and stole their land” thing? Jeezus, it’s 2020. Pull them off the tracks by force or run them over. They are terrorists and should be treated accordingly.

#66 Henry on 02.17.20 at 4:05 pm

It seems to me all this is part of a well thought out chain of events by the US to take control over weak entity who by the grace of God had a chance to sit on enormous riches… all this chaos to add gas to the fire of Alberta secession which i see as very real now… and voila, the ripe fruit falls into the waiting hands. Problem is they probably won’t treat AB properly either so don’t even know where to stand on this issue…

#67 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 4:06 pm

Trudeau must be livid.

The protests cut his Barbados trip short…. which begs another question.

When did the Aga Kahn build a house in Barbados?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-aga-khan-bahamas-rcmp-1.5382374

#68 earthboundmisfit on 02.17.20 at 4:09 pm

Armored water cannons.

#69 Page on 02.17.20 at 4:13 pm

Whatever the hell concessions are needed to get that unhinged Pam Palmater off of my damn television screen will be well worth it.

#70 Bob in Hamilton on 02.17.20 at 4:14 pm

“The resolution? Concessions or enforcement. The majority must concede, or we send in the cops. Given what the prime minister’s said so far, the outcome is clear. Collaboration.
You may have another word for it.”

My word…..CAPITULATION. What a great country we are….

#71 Dogman01 on 02.17.20 at 4:15 pm

#48 Raging Ranter on 02.17.20 at 3:14 pm

1970: Just watch me.
2020: Just watch me do nothing.

————————————————–

^ Worth repeating.

Same problem new tools:

“a whiff of pepper-spray” subtract 200 years and “a whiff of grape-shot”

Let’s see who is sovereign in Canada. Not sure if this bunch has the will to maintain its sovereign power – I suspect the other side has the will but simply last the means.

Putin and Xi must smell an opportunity to fund\support a disaffected minority, and cheaply destabilize an obviously vulnerable western government.

#72 Not 1st on 02.17.20 at 4:20 pm

While I am firmly against economic disruption and flouting of our laws, never forget that Trudeau shovelled $125B into a black hole in his first term. His $187B infrastructure funds was solely used for commuters in Toronto and Montreal. He dropped $2B in Africa this week.

That was enough money to replace every home on every reserve in Canada plus build a water and sewer system for them.

Wouldnt you be mad too?

#73 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 4:24 pm

#35 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 2:18 pm

@#9 Akashic delusions
“Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.”
++++
ahahahahaha.
Does that include the First Nation’s that want the pipeline?
The First Nations protesters burning tires at the blockades?

Dont be so naive.
Its about power and money…the planet be damned.

Thanks for the laugh.

Natives took exceptional care of this land for thousands of years.

Their teachings about every living spirit sharing Mother Earth is more comprehensive than anything else in this topic.

They actually lived what they preached.

How do you – we – compare?
What track record do you – we – have when it comes to Mother Earth?

Should you laugh or cry?

#74 Stone on 02.17.20 at 4:24 pm

#25 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:49 pm
#21 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 1:19 pm
Settlers must take responsibility for what they have done, and failed to do, throughout “Canadian” history in dealing, so often unfairly, with our First Nations.

Treaties tell a different story about Canada from the self-serving narrative, largely promulgated by Boomers today who have done so well on the backs of everyone else.

Ok Boomers? Ok Settlers? The time to fix this is now.

Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.

———

You’re a naive fool. Let me simplify this for your shrunken snowflake brain. It’s very simple.

Throughout the history of “peoplekind”, there have been conquerors and the conquered as well as colonization. It is not an invention of white people. It has occurred on all continents and all ethnic and cultural groups even before we probably discovered fire. That’s what tribal warfare is all about. And it will continue to occur well after you and I are dust.

Even you support what I’m saying.

“Be part of the change.

Or be run over by it.“

Do you see it? You! Yes you! Want to be the conqueror! Who wouldn’t want to be in that position? Of course we all want to be in charge.

How easy it is to crush the silliness of what you write.

And what does any of this have to do with boomers? Fool!

I’m sorry. Do you need a safe space to cry yourself out?

———

You’re awfully quiet. Still crying yourself out?

#75 Slim on 02.17.20 at 4:26 pm

Shortly after Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was arrested by RCMP, Chrystia Freeland and Harjit Singh Sajjan were in Washington, DC at a news conference, harping about Canada being a rule of law country.

What a joke that’s become. It’s time we ended these blockades now, then we’ll talk.

#76 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 4:26 pm

Just reading comments in The National Post.
100% anti Trudeau and anti protesters.
One person had a great idea.

Use water bombers to hit the protest camps….illegal camp fires and all that.
Nothing like being soaking wet in -25 cel to send them packing.

#77 Dwight Botnen on 02.17.20 at 4:47 pm

Why do we have this expensive national police force if they won’t or don’t enforce the law. What other group could or would block our railway line? Would they be removed and put in jail? Only natives could possibly get away with this. Send in the RCMP and remove the blockade!!

#78 Mike on 02.17.20 at 4:55 pm

NO doubt in my mind that the eco terrorists (Tides Foundation et. al) are funding this nonsense. Remember Trudeau stating that the government doesn’t tell the RCMP what to do? Well apparently they told them not to force the injunction:

https://twitter.com/BasedPoland/status/1229130576377942016?s=20

#79 world traveller on 02.17.20 at 5:03 pm

Let’s not let Dougie Ford off the hook either, both the feds and province have been feckless. Let’s have someone brutal lead Canada, looks like some tough love is needed. Say what you will about Trump, no one would dare pull this stunt in the USA, haven’t heard about too many interruptions in the states and even the protests in cities have been large, they haven’t disrupted the economy. as others have mentioned the only plus is that this will implode the Liberals if it goes on for much longer, which we all know it will.

#80 JSS on 02.17.20 at 5:04 pm

Lots of tough guys on the blog today. Sitting behind their computers typing away. If so tough then go out and solve the problem on your own.
Not a good blog today, just inciting hate.
Great blog for financial stuff though

This is a financial issue. – Garth

#81 Decent Majority on 02.17.20 at 5:05 pm

I feel a great sadness for the country. It will take a long time to get things working again, if ever. This was my intuition upon the election of Justin Trudeau, that things would just fly apart, because he could never become a leader.

#82 Joe Schmoe on 02.17.20 at 5:05 pm

I hope JT is able to re-book his vacay in the Caribbean in short order.

Poor little fella won’t be able to survive without his monthly beach time.

#83 Yukon Elvis on 02.17.20 at 5:07 pm

It serves us right. We have brainwashed them for generations with our liberal policies into thinking that they own the land. It serves us right for who we elected to run this place. But the upside is that the Easterners that elected him can legally smoke pot while they starve an freeze in the dark. And who in his right mind would invest in a country like this? We have become a laughing stock internationally.

#84 CDC on 02.17.20 at 5:14 pm

Let this lack of leadership and good stewardship please instruct our voting going forward!

#85 Gary C on 02.17.20 at 5:20 pm

If I tried to block a rail crossing in Alberta the police would arrest me within a hour.
Does the law not apply to FN and the Mohawks, obviously not, with the Tides Foundation in control of our spineless
PM, even his father would not put up with this crap.

#86 Sail Away on 02.17.20 at 5:23 pm

In other news, Tesla solarglass roof installations ramp up, and 60 more low earth comms satellites are launched by SpaceX.

Go Elon!

#87 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm

Not sure what to say next….

The Settler hatred and bigotry coming out in the comments here this afternoon since I posted is breathtaking. Perhaps I should not have been surprised given the homogeneity of the demographics here, but it is still stunning. (*Exception – thank you akashic record for your thoughtful reminder of how destructive Settlers have been to this land and the planet)

First Nations were not “conquered”, folks. Look it up. Over hundreds of years, there were some battles. But in the end, it was negotiations and agreements that “ended” violent conflicts. (Look it up in your Grade 10 history book, see the dozens of legally binding agreements that were made.)

Treaties were signed, the provisions of many of which were denigrated or abrogated at will by British and then Canadian governments whenever they felt like it.

How would you Settlers feel if your agreements, with your banks or business companies or real estate transactions, were treated with the same sort of regular contempt and disregard that the agreements with First Nations have been accorded?

This Settler sense of entitlement and obliviousness to its own hypocrisy is incredible.

Is this really the “Canada” we like to believe in?

Some of you ignorant Settlers make it sound more like Alabama, circa 1850.

Accept what has happened, who you are and what your role and the role of others like you has been in all this.

Only then can there be meaningful discussion and resolution.

#88 joblo on 02.17.20 at 5:32 pm

How much $ do they want?

#89 Triplenet on 02.17.20 at 5:34 pm

Well Garth,
If the possession of real property in Canada under ‘condominium ownership” does not include land, then it would only follow that the wet’suwet’en do not have a claim to land either.
Unless of course I have a treaty with the government with regard to my real property holding(s), as condominium and treaty are intangible rights – just on paper.

#90 1255 on 02.17.20 at 5:35 pm

#67 Chimingin on 02.17.20 at 4:02 pm
Could we just get over the “invaded and stole their land” thing? Jeezus, it’s 2020. Pull them off the tracks by force or run them over. They are terrorists and should be treated accordingly.
———————————————-
No, we can’t !!!

How about stealing and molesting their children? Do you want them to get over that too???

#91 AlbertaGuy in AZ on 02.17.20 at 5:36 pm

Does Canada have an official policy or a preparedness plan in place for economic terrorism?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_terrorism

“… This could entail varied, coordinated and sophisticated or massive destabilizing actions in order to disrupt the economic and financial stability of a state, a group of states or a society … for ideological, monetary or religious motives…”

#92 BlogDog123 on 02.17.20 at 5:41 pm

It’s a world of double-standards…

Lots of sympathy on the Toronto Star for the unelected Hereditary Chiefs. Why no sympathy for the elected 20/20 band chiefs? Because it doesn’t fit with their green-Woke philosophy. Imagine if it was 20/20 Hereditary Chiefs saying ‘yes’ to the project, the Star would question if they were “competent”, “accountable to their people”, or “enlightened to the emergency planetary crisis”.

Have a look at thestar.com’s front page. You’ll see those clickbait headlines. Target audience: A social justice warrior, female, age 53, grew up in Leaside, thinks downtown Toronto could be a liberal paradise. Feels guilt and shame over her white privilege. If only those with more wealth than her would “do more” to right all their wrongs against brown people who are quite alright with T2 smearing makeup and saying sorry 3 times. Boo hoo.

#93 Who-slaw? on 02.17.20 at 5:41 pm

There is intransigence on both sides. “The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs provided alternative routes to Coastal GasLink that would have been acceptable to them as a pipeline corridor…Coastal GasLink decided that it did not want to take those acceptable options” –Cullen
“The route that has been selected reflects the best engineering, environmental, cultural and economically feasible criteria possible…would not be feasible under the timelines to which we have committed.” –Coastal GasLink said in an emailed statement to CBC.

#94 Dutchy on 02.17.20 at 5:44 pm

Looks like Dorothy was right.

#95 Grunt on 02.17.20 at 5:53 pm

There are about 4,300 Wet’suwet’en.

The country was forged by the railway. Exploited Chinese labourers died building it.

Toronto got its first railway in 1853. If you popped down to the autoshow this weekend. Went in through the North Convention building you were stood where it all began. Toronto’s very first locomotive came across the lake in a boat. There was no other way.

There is a price to progress past, present and future. But progress we must.

#96 the ryguy - In cabo on 02.17.20 at 5:54 pm

#89 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm

The Settler hatred and bigotry coming out in the comments here this afternoon since I posted is breathtaking
———————————–
Hatred and bigotry? It’s breathtaking hey, you literally cant breath? You can go ahead and tone down the virtue signalling pal, you aren’t going to be featured on Trevor Noahs show.

The comments are suggesting the law be followed and applied..simple as that. There’s no deleted comments, there hasn’t been the slightest whiff of anything racist, other than your comment about the blog demographics of course.

There is a proper way to handle grievances in a 1st world country. Blockading a railway is not one of them.

Sorry if that hurts your feelings, may I suggest using your sociology degree to wipe away the tears?

#97 Howard on 02.17.20 at 5:55 pm

You left out the fact that the protesters (none of whom seem to have jobs, interestingly) are funded mostly by American and Qatari oil interests. This is about foreign competitors slamming Canada to the mat. And Trudeau is there to hold Canada’s legs down to ensure a 3-count.

#98 the Jaguar on 02.17.20 at 5:57 pm

Dorothy as always is very sensible, but I confess I like it when Garth goes rogue and is unable to resist expressing his thoughts on issues such as this very important national crisis. While the right to protest peacefully is supported by all Canadians, in no way do the current blockades fall into this category. Rex Murphy wrote an excellent piece in the National Post this weekend. Like Garth, he is another national treasure. Interestingly, the CTV network also broadcast a ‘look back’ at the FLQ crisis this weekend. You can find the YouTube replay by googling ‘W5: Remembering the October Crisis and Canada’s Darkest Hours’. At 28:23 in the program Jean Chretien provides his thoughts on Pierre Trudeau enacting the War Measures Act. I was taken by how relevant his comments were in relation to the current crisis. While the crisis is very different, the position the Canadian government found itself in ( between a rock and a hard place) are eerily similar. But Trudeau senior had the gonads and the brains.
I’ve been trying to get in touch with my feelings about this current situation. Disgust, resignation, anger all register. It’s just been such a ‘pile on’ these past few years on all the other subjects Garth covers in his post today. Whether the subject is climate change, treaty rights, AirBnB, cancel culture, etc., there is no intelligent debate allowed because the alt left just shouts everyone else down. Meanwhile, naked hypocrisy is on full display daily. The climate change activists drive around in their SUV’s or pick up trucks, pissing on industries that employ many canadians, and haven’t got a clue about the reality of what drives and delivers their standard of living.
Maybe in the future there are going to be ‘sanctuary cities’, but not the type this term usually references. Maybe the people that live there will be the ones that just can’t stand to be around the crazy people anymore. Qualicum Beach is probably half way there. No big box stores allowed, etc. Just like minded people who still hold traditional values and want to maintain a higher quality of life. We’ll see how it plays out once the rabble rousers wake up and realize who has been paying their bills. Meanwhile, it’s not time to get complacent. Let’s not go quietly into the night just yet. Grab your pitchforks. Time to begin a siege on the capital and our government.

#99 Stone on 02.17.20 at 6:00 pm

#89 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm
Not sure what to say next….

———

Actually, you said a lot…of nothing.

#100 crossbordershopper on 02.17.20 at 6:01 pm

DELETED

#101 not 1st on 02.17.20 at 6:01 pm

#89 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm

I have got news for you, my family and hundreds of thousand others weren’t settlers. They were pioneers. That’s what you call someone sent into the middle of fricken nowhere to carve an existence out of the rocks and cacti and cut off from all civilization and a 2 day wagon ride from the nearest major town. There was nothing to settle into when they came. Did your ancestors live in a sod hut? Burn dung for heat? Lose half their family to disease and lack of medical care?

Ive got more news for you. The govt of Canada has broken covenants on all its citizens and some more than others. Was your grain taken to feed the British army or bail out a Russian and Chinese famine? Nobody shed a tear when govt policy decimated my home town and its way of life.

Don’t you dare use that racially charged language.

#102 oh bouy on 02.17.20 at 6:02 pm

@#82 JSS on 02.17.20 at 5:04 pm
Lots of tough guys on the blog today. Sitting behind their computers typing away. If so tough then go out and solve the problem on your own.
________________________________________

nah, just the same 5-6 curmudgeons that are on here all day everyday lol. sadly the blog has become a bit of an echo chamber.

#103 Theyoungreek on 02.17.20 at 6:04 pm

This is getting a little heated, so I will quickly solve this dilemma.

“Blockade participants, please protest elsewhere so we can carry on going to work and continue paying your welfare cheque’s”

Done, problem solved

#104 Figmund Sreud on 02.17.20 at 6:04 pm

In order to somewhat dull unrestrained commentaries by a cheapest section of the peanut gallery, … just perhaps some perspective can be found in following piece:

Wet’suwet’en Crisis: Whose Rule of Law?

Explained: The complex clash of legal authority, and histories, behind today’s standoffs.

“The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that in order for resource projects to go ahead on Indigenous lands, the government must engage in consultation with Indigenous communities in order to receive their “free, prior and informed consent” for the project.”

https://thetyee.ca/News/2020/02/14/Wetsuweten-Crisis-Whose-Rule-Law/

Best,

F.S. – Calgary, Alberta.

#105 Howard on 02.17.20 at 6:05 pm

#11 1255 on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm
They’re supposed to care about jobs when thousands died when the Europeans came over and stole their land?

—————————————————-

The British and French were supposed to understand germ theory hundreds of years before it was discovered?

#106 Bytor the Snow Dog on 02.17.20 at 6:08 pm

The situation is a prime example that capitulation to the Grievance Groups only gets you more trouble. Give an inch they take a mile. There will never to enough to satisfy any of these people.

Trudeau created these Social Justice monsters.

Trudeau, it’s time to just say no.

#107 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 6:11 pm

#78 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 4:26 pm

Use water bombers to hit the protest camps….illegal camp fires and all that.
Nothing like being soaking wet in -25 cel to send them packing.

Macron used that tactics. What else do you want from his crowd-control repertoire? Shooting eyes with rubber bullets?

#108 Stone on 02.17.20 at 6:16 pm

#89 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm
Not sure what to say next….

The Settler hatred and bigotry coming out in the comments here this afternoon since I posted is breathtaking. Perhaps I should not have been surprised given the homogeneity of the demographics here, but it is still stunning. (*Exception – thank you akashic record for your thoughtful reminder of how destructive Settlers have been to this land and the planet)

First Nations were not “conquered”, folks. Look it up. Over hundreds of years, there were some battles. But in the end, it was negotiations and agreements that “ended” violent conflicts. (Look it up in your Grade 10 history book, see the dozens of legally binding agreements that were made.)

———

You mean the Grade 10 history book written by…drumroll please…settlers?

Wouldn’t that be a tad bit biased?

You just make it soooo easy to ridicule you.

#109 eduardo de la conche on 02.17.20 at 6:30 pm

#92 1255 I fully agree that was despicable, and Trudeau’s gvt trying to escape paying compensation is unacceptable.

I also think that sanitation and services should be on all Indian land as a REAL priority.

Both cons and libs should be ashamed it hasn’t been done
yet and it should be a priority instead of going to Africa.

#110 Nonplused on 02.17.20 at 6:40 pm

Seems pretty straight forward to me. These protesters are trespassing and should be removed by force. They are also interfering with commerce which is also a crime.

Also it should be noted that the line coming from CBC and other news sources recently gifted money by Trudeau that the indigenous community is unified behind these protests is a lie, a damned lie. Many, probably most natives understand the virtue in making a buck in commerce. For example when the City of Calgary offer the Tsuu T’ina nation $1 billion plus replacement lands to run the ring road over their land the vote was very close to 50/50. The offer amounted to close to $1,000,000 for every man, woman and child in the nation with the main complaint by the folks who voted against being that it wasn’t as much as the city could pay given the costs of going around, and that it bisected too much of the reserve, not that they opposed the road or getting money. Eventually the road was realigned and a deal was struck.

So while I would say that indigenous folks tend to be sensitive to environmental concerns, the idea that you can’t negotiate with any of them is just plain false. You just have to satisfy their concerns and offer a reasonable buck.

#111 Not a mill on 02.17.20 at 6:44 pm

#89 Millennial Realist

Treaties were signed to stop the war. They signed because they lost. And politicians along the way lied did some horrible things. Isn’t that what politicians do now? When the majority of the population vote for T2, are the few who didn’t not robbed of their money to pay for the majority?

If you want to solve all this, I say we find a new piece of land on this earth and move there, because we will always be harming the natives. ALWAYS!

#92 1255

Yes, get over it! We apologized and meant it. We(nation) have probably committed some other terrible stuff after that apology and guess what, we will probably continue to do it. It’s hard to do anything right these days

#112 Yukon Elvis on 02.17.20 at 6:51 pm

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Sunday cancelled a trip to the Caribbean to focus on the blockades and Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said that Ottawa doesn’t believe police intervention is the solution to anti-pipeline protests that have shut down much of the country’s rail system. Some premiers and the federal Conservative opposition had called on the government in recent days to take a hard line, enforce injunctions and remove protesters.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ottawa-rejects-police-intervention-to-put-an-end-to-blockades/

#113 Blair on 02.17.20 at 6:52 pm

This is very bad. The rule of law has collapsed. It is an example that emboldens others to act up without fear of consequence, and shows that we can’t protect our economy.

#114 Thedood on 02.17.20 at 6:53 pm

DELETED

#115 James on 02.17.20 at 6:57 pm

I think there was a post about give aboriginals money then tax it back, for your information aboriginals do not pay tax.
100 million a week?
How much would it cost to move the tracks? Solve lots of issues. Create lots of jobs.
Oh speaking of money is that not what the seaway was built for to transport containers by ship?
I bet it would be easy to float it all down river and by pass the blockade.

The Indians are lucky the Spanish did not conquer North America.

The British where far fairer and now we gave kindness and now we receive hatred.

And finally there is Indian law
If an Indian band defeats another band in war you loose your land to the winning side. You were defeated years ago live with it.

I would make all Indians assimilate into Canada or allow bands to be self government. And guess how many billions that would save, yep no more deficit. Just a note many departments pay for aboriginal costs from health care to post office.

I always like to say this if it were white Canadians doing this blockade you can bet your bottom dollar they would be removed.
So anyone up to the challenge of blockading the reserve and all the illegal activities on that reserve. They would buckle in a week.
It’s all about money.
Cheers
I have long been a supporter of aboriginal issues but that has long past as a result of nonsense like this.

#116 Less is More on 02.17.20 at 6:58 pm

#2 DFO

Bitumen does not flow through a pipe, it is way too viscous. Bitumen is either upgraded to Syncrude, which is a light sweet oil, or mixed with diluent to form something refereed to “dilbit”, or must be shipped by rail in heated cars. There will be no straight bitumen flowing through Tran-Mountain because it is just plain impossible to do.

The existing Trans-Mountain pipeline ships mostly products (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, the like), not crude oil. That pipeline was built in the 50’s, so it is due for replacement at some point. That is partly what TM2 is about, but the idea was to ship products for export until that day comes making the project more economic. If the day comes when TM1 must be retired and TM2 is not in service, Vancouver will become one of the greenest cities in the world overnight. But life will suck. TM2 must be built.

And if you are wondering why Keystone sold the project to the Canadian government, the answer is pretty obvious. Keystone was going to sue the government for the total amount of money they had invested in the project and some more because the delays were mostly regulatory (project approved, spend a bunch of money, project delayed indefinitely). The lawyers politely explained to Trudeau using crayons and safe space conversations that Keystone would win, no other buyers would touch it with a ten foot pole, and so the government could either buy it or pay for it anyway and not own it. Whether Trudeau intended to complete it or not I don’t know. Still don’t.

#117 Mr Canada on 02.17.20 at 6:58 pm

Let’s see, The 2nd largest land mass in the world, and we cannot build or bury a 48″ piece of pipe in the ground. Its natural gas too – the cleanest form of “fossil” fuel, with the plan to create jobs to some of the poorest dependent people in Canada, export to markets that will reduce reliance on higher levels of C02 (less Coal plants in China), 20 of the councils agree, and 8 out of 12 heredity chiefs approve too – meanwhile T2 is spineless and everyone can go and protest block highways, borders, knowing nothing will happen. What is next ?? Can you imagine if we were every invaded ? You are seeing the outcome now — Welcome to sunny ways…

#118 Asterix1 on 02.17.20 at 7:01 pm

The RCMP or/and OPP need to get creative. Most of these protesters are not even indigenous! The solution…

Crack down hard on all of the Mohawks “traditional” illegal activities. From cigarettes production and distributions, weapons smuggling coming from the USA and people smuggling.

That should get some elders thinking twice about letting some professional protesters and a few of their own Mohawk disrupt their business.

#119 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 7:03 pm

1255, you say it well, in far fewer words than it takes me.

#120 AR on 02.17.20 at 7:03 pm

‘Canadian law when it comes to Indigenous communities has been a slippery, oppressive thing throughout the country’s history. Treaties are the law, but they are routinely violated. Laws were invented to erase Indigenous culture. It took until last year for the federal government to finally remove the legislated gender discrimination from the Indian Act.’

From this article:
https://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/february-2020/the-breathtaking-hypocrisy-of-the-howls-for-rule-of-law/

#121 kommykim on 02.17.20 at 7:07 pm

#17 Jeroma on 02.17.20 at 1:12 pm
Can the railway sue the Indians?

=======================================

Yes, and the government (You and me via taxes) will pay up.

#122 Nonplused on 02.17.20 at 7:08 pm

#12 Dr V

What is this talk of “hereditary chiefs” of which you speak? First of all most tribes are so inter-related that pretty much anyone could take that title if they go far enough back in the family tree. Second most tribes elect their chiefs today. They have a form of self-government, but it is not a monarchy.

#123 Wait, what??? on 02.17.20 at 7:16 pm

#9 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 12:51 pm

“Natives have thousands of years of proven, unprecedented, responsible, respectful relationship with Mother Earth, that defines their whole identity.

Noone with any decent knowledge about them can deny this from them anymore.

Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.”

The natives around here ride quads all over the reserve and elsewhere, drive trucks to town, by processed foods, heat their houses, charge their iPhones, and play video games on large screen TV’s.

Most of them around here have oil and gas wells, gravel pits, animal grazing, and forestry right on their own land. They also like hockey and many reserves have their own energy sucking hockey rinks. But what you don’t often see on a reserve is a wind farm.

They aren’t so much different than you or me.

#124 A good thing on 02.17.20 at 7:22 pm

It may be in Alberta’s best interest that much of rural Quebec is about to get very cold due to lack of propane. It will enlighten a bunch of ignorant people as to the importance of oil and gas. And consider; the reserves will be hit just as hard.

#125 S.Bby on 02.17.20 at 7:22 pm

This extortion by the natives needs to stop (or be stopped immediately) it has already gone on for two weeks too long. If we let them get their way on this we will be held for ransom over and over; it will never end. We cannot negotiate with terrorists and this is an act of war.

#126 Sold Out on 02.17.20 at 7:26 pm

#117 James on 02.17.20 at 6:57 pm
I think there was a post about give aboriginals money then tax it back, for your information aboriginals do not pay tax.
100 million a week?

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Common misconception. You are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts.

https://turbotax.intuit.ca/tax-resources/tax-compliance/do-natives-pay-tax-in-canada.jsp

Common misconception.

#127 Peter Kook on 02.17.20 at 7:30 pm

I am not sure that T2 is any better than hereditary chiefs.

Ultimately, Queen of the United Kingdom is also hereditary chief.

Democracy has degenerated.

#128 Paul on 02.17.20 at 7:37 pm

Finally Justin is back and arrest are being make at the pipeline protest!
http://globalnews.ca/news/6533542/vancouver-island-anti-pipeline-blockade-arrest/

#129 Mel on 02.17.20 at 7:53 pm

This was posted to facebook today by a native from Alberta, a Mr. Wen Feather.

February 15 at 2:24 PMWun Feather
This post is gonna hurt some feelings.
I am good with that.
I am totally tired of people who say stupid things like “Give us back our land”.
Like seriously.
I like to look them in the eyes and say:
“Ok. If you had your land back, what would you do with it?”
I will wait for the answer.
Have you ever taken the time to use google maps and look at the huge tracts of Federal land that are not being used for any purpose at all?
No one is trapping any beavers on the land.
No one is hunting wolves or coyotes, or any other fur bearing animal on that land.
Very rarely do you ever see anyone hunting anymore.
If we compare that land to the land owned by the Hutterite Colonies, you would shit yourself if you saw what they are doing on their land.
They have hay and oats and barley and grain, and they run large herds of livestock and flocks of domestic geese and chickens.
Well, ever since I was 18, I have owned my own home.
Seriously!
I bought my first mobile home in Fraser Lake BC and darn it all, it was mine.
Nobody gave it to me.
I never held my hand out for it like a pet monkey in a zoo.
I earned it.
And I have never, ever, EVER been without at least one house on land ever since that day.
I guess you could say that I am the kind of Indian who just goes to work every day, and buys my own piece of land with the money I earn at my job.
I have every single right that anyone else in Canada has.
Oh.
But because I am a status Indian, (I am non Treaty.) That means even though I am Status, I am not bound by any treaty agreements or obligations.
I have WAY more rights than most Canadians.
Firstly, I have the right to be free.
I have the right to become educated if I want to.
I have the right to freedom of speech, and I have the right to every single privilege that any other Canadian has.
But that is not where it ends!
I can hunt and fish and trap and do significantly more than all my non Indigenous friends do.
No one has ever stopped me from trapping animals for subsistence on crown land.
No one has ever stopped me from hunting for subsistence on crown land.
No one has ever stopped me from gathering medicines, plants, fungi, berries or roots for traditional or ceremonial purposes.
So if I can do all those things like my ancestors did before me, why would I want to have that land back??
Isn’t it actually already mine to use anyway??
Only, unlike the land that I have bought for myself over the years, I do not have the burden of paying property taxes on the land where I harvest my moose.
I just drive out there, walk a few miles along a river amongst the red willows, and when I see a bull moose, (I don’t take cows because they make baby moose), I decide if it is the right one for the freezer.
Here I am with a couple of wolves in this photo.
I can use the meat, skin and tan the hide, and I can use the fur to make a nice blanket or for the top of my moccasins.
Yep. I still have those too!
You will never hear me say that you owe me any land.
As Canadians you have already given me the most important things.
And that is the freedom to carry on my Indigenous culture and traditions on Crown Land.
I don’t want my land back.
I already have purchased my own, and I have the rest of the Canadian Boreal forest to do anything else I want to do.
Thank you Canada.
That is more than enough for me.
Oh. Just one more thing.
Thanks for not standing in my way when I go to work each day.
That would really suck if you did that.
And I promise not to stand in your way either.
That’s what us real Indians call “A GOOD TRADE”

#130 Diharv on 02.17.20 at 7:58 pm

Our so called”leader” is gutless and spineless trying to talk out of both sides of his mouth. The FN can hold the entire country hostage because they know he doesn’t have the balls to even enforce the law. This country is getting more and more pathetic.

#131 T-Rev on 02.17.20 at 8:06 pm

Remember the Social Contract that everyone learned about in high school? You’re about to see it tested in Canada in ways that we probably would have scoffed at just five years ago. For those that are scrambling for their old textbooks or the google machine, the social contract is what gives the government the right to set and enforce laws….essentially, if enough of use believe in the laws of the land, then they exist and are enforceable. In more practical terms, as long as enough people believe that living under the current set of rules and regulations is better than cost of changing them, our laws and institutions will remain stable.

However, should the majority of people decide that the regime of the day must fall because of, say, the preferential treatment of a criminal subgroup (no matter what facade they cloak themselves in) that is impeding prosperity for the masses while the government sits on its hands and virtue signals, then the laws that everyone thought apply can very suddenly cease to apply. Democracy is a surprisingly stable style of governance precisely because it has historically provided a means of non-violent regime change, and a result lends itself to constant rejuvenation & thereby typically avoiding a situation where the laws of the land are terribly out of step with the will of the people. But, don’t for one second get comfortable in the belief that liberal democracies like Canada’s can’t suddenly capitulate due to long-ignored perturbations that suddenly align in resonance, throwing the system into chaos. I have no doubt that the outcome will be resolved democratically; but there could well be some very ugly conflicts that spin out of control in the meantime, and what the new laws and rules that will govern, and who will govern, our democracy post-outcome could be quite a bit different than what a few self-styled rebels blockading railroads conceive possible. Those seeking revolution may want to be careful what they wish for.

#132 Bob the builder on 02.17.20 at 8:09 pm

#128 Sold Out

Your information is correct. Many years ago I was working on a bridge project that ran from a regular crown road over to a reserve. We had many good workers from the reserve, they all came running to get jobs when we arrived (it was a multi-million dollar project). But they preferred work on “their side of the bridge”. The reason was they paid income tax on hours worked off the reserve but on the reserve they did not pay tax. They would work off the reserve if that was the only work, but where possible they wanted to build their end of the bridge because the tax rates were different. But off the reserve the tax burden was the same.

#133 Habitt on 02.17.20 at 8:13 pm

21 millennial realist. The only person you’re gonna run over is an old person in a wheelchair. Make sure you have fresh crying towels and don’t loose your bib. Maroon

#134 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 8:17 pm

The UN Security Council seat……so coveted by ‘Little Potato” as describe by a UN council member

Former UN Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick.
and I quote,

“Washington views it as “semi legal, semi juridical, semi political body which nations sometimes accept and sometimes don’t”…..

But hey!
Trudeau looks good in a suit sitting at a table with all the smart people……doesn’t he?

#135 T-Rev on 02.17.20 at 8:17 pm

Remove the murderers from the tracks and pathways. Murderers, you ask? If we’re losing $100M a week in lost GDP, that’s enough to fund better healthcare, access to medicine, life saving treatment, etc, for people all over this country. I’m a math major. I see the world in numbers. For every dollar of value these criminals prevent this country from generating, that’s less nurses, doctors, imaging equipment, and medicine that we can afford. Money isn’t green stuff in your wallet or a fancy house, it’s capacity to provide quality of life for people. Money = Capacity. Less money, less capacity to heal, to protect, to educate, to reduce suffering, to help. If the government of Canada isn’t prepared to stand up and fight for its own people, then the people will eventually have to do it for them, and at that point we might as well start over with a new government at the same time.

Maybe this will be the straw that breaks the special interests’ back and makes regular Canadians of all backgrounds wake up and take their country back.

#136 TurnerNation on 02.17.20 at 8:20 pm

Meanwhile in a real country…Apple warns hard tonight. Shut this market down boys and hold on.

https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2020/02/investor-update-on-quarterly-guidance/

PRESS RELEASE
February 17, 2020
The first is that worldwide iPhone supply will be temporarily constrained. While our iPhone manufacturing partner sites are located outside the Hubei province — and while all of these facilities have reopened — they are ramping up more slowly than we had anticipated. The health and well-being of every person who helps make these products possible is our paramount priority, and we are working in close consultation with our suppliers and public health experts as this ramp continues. These iPhone supply shortages will temporarily affect revenues worldwide.
The second is that demand for our products within China has been affected. All of our stores in China and many of our partner stores have been closed. Additionally, stores that are open have been operating at reduced hours and with very low customer traffic. We are gradually reopening our retail stores and will continue to do so as steadily and safely as we can. Our corporate offices and contact centers in China are open, and our online stores have remained open throughout.

#137 Dave on 02.17.20 at 8:21 pm

Easy….build a time machine. Go back 200 years. Settlers come to Canada. Indians say go away white man. White man is a politically correct snowflake and goes and:
A) Goes away
B) Grabs his rifle and protects his right to his land
C) Grabs the sketch of his parents and cries
D) Moves to the USA because he knows the Americans won’t take any crap from anyone, especially some forefathers of some domestic terrorists

#138 Damifino on 02.17.20 at 8:22 pm

I’ve heard it said on this blog many times…

“Man, we are so screwed!”

…but I always thought it was in reference to the sorry state of personal finances in Canada. I never thought the screwed-ness would manifest in this way. T2 made his bed and we get to lay in it.

#139 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 8:22 pm

@#109 akashic contrarian

I’m surprised that you can still type through all the tears…..over the injustice of it all.
I know.
Lets raise everyone’s taxes, give more money in “reparations” and deal with this again in 10 years…..20 years…..30 years…..forever….money seems to placate everything.

#140 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 8:32 pm

@#130 Paul
” finally arrests are being made…”
+++++

Old news.
That happened last week on Vancouver Island.
Not since Trudeau scurried back to Canada to bunker down to have more meetings .

And the person the RCMP arrested was a private citizen who removed tires, pallets and plywood from the blocked highway.
The “yellow legged” gendarmes arrested him for “violence” …. for clearing off an illegal blockade of a public highway….
Politically correct pablum for the tv cameras

#141 Drinking on 02.17.20 at 8:35 pm

I am actually hoping that it gets much, much worse, tens of thousands people laid off (including me); no produce, products or energy to where it is needed, total calamity, and then maybe then Canadians become angry enough to throw out this useless government and put a stop to special interest groups that have caused such so much damage.

Yes Indigenous people “WHEN FIRST SETTLERS APPEARED ON THE CONTINENT” did great disservice to them. But how is it any different that any other ancestral people on this planet went through in there past?? I have native friends, get along very well with them but also know what all this is exactly about. They migrated to this continent like our ancestors did. Enough already!

Either we are one country; all citizens or not!

Canadians need to make a serious decision; this needs to stop! No other country would put up with this.

#142 Randy on 02.17.20 at 8:37 pm

I need more popcorn….

#143 Raging Ranter on 02.17.20 at 8:38 pm

@#130 Paul, they arrested a resident trying to pull down the protesters’ barricades. They didn’t arrest any protesters. Apparently removing an illegal blockade is arrest-worthy, but setting up an illegal blockade can be done under police guard. This is starting to look like the same disgusting police bias we saw in Caledonia in 2007, where one side (often wearing gang insignia masquerading as traditional indigenous symbolism) was allowed to get away with everything while the other side wasn’t allowed to even show up without ending up in cuffs.

#144 Doug t on 02.17.20 at 8:38 pm

Let’s give the whole country back lol

#145 VICTORIA TEA PARTY on 02.17.20 at 8:41 pm

O, SAY CAN YOU SEE…BY DAWN’S EARLY LIGHT……

For an exercise in WTF check out the December 2019 major US corporate “invasion” into BC’s Coastal GasLink calamity.

Canada’s TC Energy sold its 65 per cent stake in the project in December to KKR: Kohlberg Kravis Roberts. In return TC will be paid $600-million to pay down debts etc.

KKR is a half-trillion US-dollar New York City-based money-spinning global wealth management behemoth that also has influence…apparently.

Big Time influential is my feeling that governs its “arrival” in northern BC.

Seems a most unlikely move it getting deep into all that BC bush don’t you think?

Why? Acquiring trapped assets.

With a side-office in Calgary, to oversee its recent and various corporate natural gas acquisitions in Alberta and BC (mid-stream assets in the Western Sedimentary Basin), it has moved further into the coastal province in buying a major part of this largest of midstream assets, Coastal Gaslink.

In further research into KKR I also found it also makes money disposing of distressed assets (spanning many industries) by bundling them together for sale to new customers, at healthy profits.

But just how can KKR make money if the Indigenous
just keep tying up the project even more in another round of litigation?

The answer is unclear to me right now, but stick with this:

China’s obvious decline could be a clue. That empire is faltering and Steve Bannon, on FOX Sunday, said China is imploding. I’d believe that.

If that be the case where will the US get the resources it will need to become the “new” China?

Oh, I know. Canada!

Meanwhile KKR, perhaps anticipating sea-state changes geopolitically, because it knows more than we do, is shoveling together our trapped natural gas assets for use in the US and its many industries that will employ many millions of American workers whose jobs will be coming back from China in a whole new and different way. Just as Trump promised, right?

So, while Canada implodes because of our angst and unwillingness to hire politicians to do their damn jobs competently, the Trumpsters march up and switch on the lights on a brand-new shining city on the hill.

BTW, another website, the koboiproject one from Malaysia, says that a recent recruit to KKR is retired US Army four-star general David Petraeus, a battle-hardened fighter of the Afghan and Iraq campaigns, head of Centcom and director of the CIA.

Apparently, says the ‘site, he’ll be busy there. Of course he will.

#146 Ken from BC on 02.17.20 at 8:44 pm

I have no problem with working within the treaties that our forefathers made with the peoples that were here when Europeans arrived. My issue is determining who I deal with in terms of mining or oil extraction.

If the FN is the legitimate landholder, then let me deal with them in terms of what regulations and taxes that I must comply with and pay.

If T2 and the Provinces are the landholders and set the terms, I will comply with their terms and taxes and expect them to uphold the rule of law and distribute what my company pays responsibly.

The issue is that we have 2 recognized nations (which is a crazy plan) within a single nation. An unmanageable situation.

No one wants to acknowledge the unworkability of this “form of government” and as a result, nothing will be resolved.

Good luck Canada, packing my bags and getting out of the country before they steal all my cash. Good Luck

#147 SunShowers on 02.17.20 at 8:49 pm

#25 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:49 pm
Throughout the history of “peoplekind”, there have been conquerors and the conquered as well as colonization. It is not an invention of white people. It has occurred on all continents and all ethnic and cultural groups even before we probably discovered fire. That’s what tribal warfare is all about. And it will continue to occur well after you and I are dust.
——–

Be that as it may, we start running in to problems when the colonizers start pretending they’re too good to be colonizers. The fundamental principle of colonization is that the colonizers are within their rights to conquer and subjugate the native inhabitants of the land, but any attempts for the native population to try to take their land back are illegitimate.

Why is it that European settlers could justifiably colonize North America by force, but when the First Nations try to resist, even nonviolently like this, everyone clutches their pearls and says “We’re a nation of laws and ethics!”

So which is it? If we truly are a nation of laws and ethics, we should be acknowledging the illegal and unethical actions of our past, and making good faith attempts to accommodate the people whose land we stole.

But if we really are a nation of might makes right because “everyone wants to be the conqueror” as you say, why shouldn’t I be allowed to roll up to your domicile in an M1 Abrams tank and conquer it for myself?

I would also be very careful about staking your claim on the latter choice when you share a border with the world’s largest military superpower.

#148 eduardo de la conche on 02.17.20 at 8:58 pm

To all those saying Quebec will be in the cold.
Nope, it’s all hydro heating there.

Side word:

teachers on strike, social unrest, protests, economy going down Canada has a decidedly European feel to it nowadays.

#149 Doug t on 02.17.20 at 9:10 pm

I guess eventually they stopped apologizing for the Christian crusades right

#150 Person on 02.17.20 at 9:13 pm

If Canada is a country of law, why not enforce those laws (regardless of race or religion) and end these illegal protests? These individuals should be made to pay the damages they have caused to so many families and businesses.

#151 WhatsThePoint on 02.17.20 at 9:18 pm

I don’t give a darn toot about Quebec or the natives or even the queen. I just want to join the great American republic.

We’ve obviously given up on even asserting our national sovereignty so why not just hurry up with the inevitable?

#152 Bruce Allen on 02.17.20 at 9:27 pm

I keep saying Garth that a series of converging events are all going to come together at once and cause the perfect storm for Canada and the global economy in general.

Could this be ‘it’? I have no idea. All I know is, I can emphatically say that in all my 70yrs kicking around on this planet, I have never seen things so politically and economically unstable as they are now… From east to west, the country appears to be fracturing. My wife commented at the dinner table tonight that it would seem as there’s trouble in all four corners of the globe. Governments seem inept or incapable of solving the problems they themselves helped create, while at the same time, we’re living in a period of unprecedented debt and housing costs. When does this lunacy end?

I have no stake in outcome, good or bad. At this age, I figure I have about a good 5-10yrs left before my number is up. I do somewhat fear for the generation being born today. What kind of future do they have to look forward to?

Good luck, everyone…

#153 Franklin Mormo on 02.17.20 at 9:28 pm

#9 AR, what nonsense. Natives fought endless raiding raping murderous wars of theft and slavery. They exploited areas dry iof all life and moved on in endless circles of misery. The fairy tale of natives floating like fairy spirits from flower to flower is just garbage. Take a class.

#154 Yukon Elvis on 02.17.20 at 9:37 pm

#145 Raging Ranter on 02.17.20 at 8:38 pm
@#130 Paul, they arrested a resident trying to pull down the protesters’ barricades. They didn’t arrest any protesters. Apparently removing an illegal blockade is arrest-worthy, but setting up an illegal blockade can be done under police guard. This is starting to look like the same disgusting police bias we saw in Caledonia in 2007, where one side (often wearing gang insignia masquerading as traditional indigenous symbolism) was allowed to get away with everything while the other side wasn’t allowed to even show up without ending up in cuffs.
………………………..

Give this man a cigar. You nailed it exactly.

#155 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 9:42 pm

#141 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 8:22 pm

@#109 akashic contrarian

I’m surprised that you can still type through all the tears…..over the injustice of it all.
I know.
Lets raise everyone’s taxes, give more money in “reparations” and deal with this again in 10 years…..20 years…..30 years…..forever….money seems to placate everything.

If the price is too high for you, you can always chose to leave.

#156 Yuus bin Haad on 02.17.20 at 9:52 pm

DAMN! Just as we were getting a fix on controlling the global climate.

#157 Realist on 02.17.20 at 9:56 pm

Maybe it’s time for law abiding Canadians that believe in our economy to start protesting and blocking casinos?

#158 MF on 02.17.20 at 10:11 pm

Wow this comment section is pretty rough.

What a bunch of weirdos lol

Yeah this is the first time there has been political protest.

Rrrrright.

Meh I guess politics always gets people riled up.

148 Ken from BC on 02.17.20 at 8:44 pm

Like this guy^^^

Yeah “Ken”, if you don’t like protest, and think it will be different elsewhere, I’ve got news for you….

That’s it. I’m out.

MF

#159 Silent the people on 02.17.20 at 10:18 pm

Native, First Nation, Aboriginal, Indigenous
People just have to make a decision. That is
what creates the problem! They can blockade
but that won’t solve anything… Let’s get
to the bargaining table and end this….

#160 Tulips on 02.17.20 at 10:26 pm

“She’s right. So I’ll keep this post short. Maybe she won’t notice…”

Rolling on the floor, splitting my gut in laughter here. Thanks again Garth, and equal thanks to Dorothy for obvious support that makes this knowledge wealth of wealth knowledge possible.

#161 Doug in London on 02.17.20 at 10:28 pm

@Gary C, post #87:
My thoughts exactly. If I blocked a rail line here in Ontario the same would happen. What’s needed is the OPP or RCMP to go in, arrest anyone taking part in the blockade, and issue steep fines. If they won’t do it, then bring in the army.

Yes, many indigenous people in BC support the oil and gas industry with its superior-paying jobs. I wonder why they aren’t also out protesting about what’s been going on. As for these hereditary chiefs, my guess is they’ve never worked a day in their lives and don’t understand the abstract concept of good high paying jobs.

#162 Duffy on 02.17.20 at 10:31 pm

Canada is wanting to hear just two words . . . . . post trudeau . . . . . . . just those two words.

#163 Nonplused on 02.17.20 at 10:40 pm

Look folks, natives drive trucks, quads, snowmobiles, boats, live in heated houses, buy Doritos at the store, have access to free health care, and internet access. In addition they maintain hunting and fishing rights on crown land (and of course the reserve) that the rest of us do not. They also like to play baseball and hockey.
They are a lot more like us than one would think. Do they have a different culture? Yes they do. Do they have different values? Yes they do. Would they rather go back to living in tepees? I guess that no, no they would not.

#164 Tax the 1% on 02.17.20 at 10:43 pm

Out of this topic, but in line with the topic from few days ago. Check out this article from Washington Post titled “U.N. warns that runaway inequality is destabilizing the world’s democracies”.
This article confirms my previous comment: there needs to be a tax on wealth and a tax on inheritance (more than 10 mil inherited). You can see the possible consequences if this income inequality to keep growing: “Runaway inequality is eroding trust in democratic societies and paving the way for authoritarian and nativist regimes to take root” If this happens it’s already too late: we are not a democracy anymore but an authoritarian regime. The inequality growing can’t continue without increased risk to dire consequences.

#165 Sail away on 02.17.20 at 10:46 pm

One area I bird hunt is on Crown land with grazing leases, bordering a reserve. Leaseholders are allowed by law to erect fences and restrict access if they choose.

The ranch owners had never chosen to do this… until the Douglas Lake Ranch, of BC access restriction infamy, purchased the ranch and took over the grazing leases. Signs went up on every access gate and roving security started.

Then one night, a cow was shot and the signs removed. Two days later, the signs were back up. Two cows were shot that night and the signs were gone again. A week later, the signs were back up and many roving security patrols were on. This time, the signs stayed up, but the fences bordering the reserve were cut and 7 cows that happened to wander onto reserve land were shot.

The signs and access restrictions are now a thing of the past.

#166 Lorne on 02.17.20 at 10:47 pm

What we need is an Independent negotiator to help settle this dispute. Hey, how about Jody Wilson-Raybould?

#167 Less is More on 02.17.20 at 10:50 pm

#150 eduardo de la conche on 02.17.20 at 8:58 pm

“To all those saying Quebec will be in the cold.
Nope, it’s all hydro heating there.”

If this is so why is everyone so worried about propane shortages?

I have been to Montreal and what isn’t heated with natural gas is heated with oil. Yup, people have a big old oil tank in the back yard and a forced-air oil fueled furnace and hot water heater. Granted there is a lot of hydro heating as well as in BC, but not in the hinterland or the suburbs. Even in Alberta, where there are natural gas pipes running everywhere, there is still propane heating. Just look for the big cylindrical tank. It all comes down to whether it is worth it to run a big ol’ power line (or gas line) for that many miles for a small load. It often isn’t so there are many areas where it has to be done with propane (or oil from Saudi Arabia or Norway).

And besides the Quebec government doesn’t like selling power to the Quebecois. The money is much better in New York. Those hydro units are for export.

#168 Paul on 02.17.20 at 10:59 pm

#142 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.17.20 at 8:32 pm
@#130 Paul
” finally arrests are being made…”
+++++

Old news.
That happened last week on Vancouver Island.
Not since Trudeau scurried back to Canada to bunker down to have more meetings .

And the person the RCMP arrested was a private citizen who removed tires, pallets and plywood from the blocked highway.
The “yellow legged” gendarmes arrested him for “violence” …. for clearing off an illegal blockade of a public highway….
Politically correct pablum for the tv cameras
————————————————————————————————
Yes old news ‘sarcasm ‘ But it shows who has the power!

#169 Politically Incorrect on 02.17.20 at 11:02 pm

Folks, as Thomas Sowell (a black economist, pretty famous and well respected actually) argued, despite the grave atrocities of slavery in the US, the folks who survived through to emancipation were the lucky Africans. You don’t see black Americans migrating back to their ancestral lands. In fact they are still coming to America as fast as they can. Yes, there were horrors and there are still problems but progress is being made.

It is likewise with the indigenous people who survived the horrors of colonization. But colonization is over now, and I didn’t do it. My grand-parents didn’t even do it. Sue the Queen.

#170 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.17.20 at 11:14 pm

Garth,
Time to run for office, again.
Obviously, you’ve got the solution

#171 Tip from Gen-X on 02.17.20 at 11:21 pm

I have been having many conversations with my friends about approaching retirement. Now, I run in a crowd where the RRSP’s are mostly topped up, but the years are winding down, and much conversation is about what to do in a zero yield world.

I can tell you that the long term rate (for 20-30 year) bond will not go above 6%, because all these folks have done the calcs and 5-6% works so if it ever gets there they are locking in. Seriously folks, everyone I know who has a 60/40 is looking to go long term at 5-6%. It won’t go higher. At 6% all RRSP money or at least 60% of it is going to come a running. Mine probably too. Why have 40% risky to get 7% if 6% government bonds rears its head? Nope, lock in the 6%, fire the investment adviser, and clip coupons.

Therefore there is a limit on how high interest rates can go. It is higher than where they are, but they won’t go to the moon. There are a ton of 55 year old folks out there just waiting to hit 6% with all of their money.

#172 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.17.20 at 11:23 pm

#26 G on 02.17.20 at 1:55 pm
FYI: If you really want to know what most of the world is being told about this COVID19!

How North Korea is reporting on coronavirus (English subtitles) Channel 4 News Feb 17 8min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI_MG3ZnDak

So when will this be on CBC? I’m guessing not since it mentions some people take 24 days to show symptoms!
And Canada is only doing 14 day quarantines!
————-
Garth,
Time to ban this fear monger.

#173 Paul on 02.17.20 at 11:26 pm

In order to somewhat dull unrestrained commentaries by a cheapest section of the peanut gallery, … just perhaps some perspective can be found in following piece:

Wet’suwet’en Crisis: Whose Rule of Law?

Explained: The complex clash of legal authority, and histories, behind today’s standoffs.

“The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that in order for resource projects to go ahead on Indigenous lands, the government must engage in consultation with Indigenous communities in order to receive their “free, prior and informed consent” for the project.”

https://thetyee.ca/News/2020/02/14/Wetsuweten-Crisis-Whose-Rule-Law/

Best,

F.S. – Calgary, Alberta.

___________________________

This is Aboriginal title that is claimed but not yet proven. This is also traditional territory that is also claimed by the Carrier Sekani so it is complicated. At any rate, the Suprme Court has not indicated that “free, prior and informed consent” is required in such instances although a duty to consult (and to accommodate where appropriate) is.

The company has consulted meaningfully, has detailed the many reasonable reasons for not moving the pipeline along the Heridatary Chiefs preferred route and have offered compromises for an alternative route. No response was ever received from the Hereditary Chiefs. Meaningful consultation goes both ways. Apparently, their next court challenge is that the project contravenes Canada’s international climate commitments. Good luck with that.

The Superme Court has been clear that the duty to consult does not give Indigenous groups a veto over final Crown decisions. You can’t just pick and choose the Supreme Court decisions that go your way.

https://lop.parl.ca/sites/PublicWebsite/default/en_CA/ResearchPublications/201917E

That was a particularly biased and mis-informed article.

#174 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.17.20 at 11:37 pm

#36 Yukon Elvis on 02.17.20 at 2:20 pm
#11 1255 on 02.17.20 at 12:57 pm
They’re supposed to care about jobs when thousands died when the Europeans came over and stole their land?
…………………

They are immigrants too. They came from Asia. They don’t own the land any more than I do.
—————
All of Canada is Crown land,
God save the Queen and Harry and Merkle.

#175 crazyfox on 02.17.20 at 11:41 pm

I read near countless comments that base a flawed opinion on a flawed assumption, which is that the federal government can enforce the law within the provinces. That’s not the case!

https://www.canada.ca/en/intergovernmental-affairs/services/federation/distribution-legislative-powers.html

The exclusive powers of the provincial legislatures includes the administration of civil/criminal justice! It is provincial court injunctions that have ruled that these protests stop in BC and Ontario. It’s up to the provincial, not federal government to enforce the law. It’s in our constitution.

The only way the federal government can enforce civil and criminal law enforcement within the provinces of Canada is if the province(s) invite the federal government to send in the military or RCMP to do so:

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis

Are most of ye commenters ignorant of the the laws of the land? Are the majority of the commenters ignorant of history and facts? If we want these protests to stop, ask John Horgan’s NDP government of BC and Doug Ford’s Conservatives why they aren’t enforcing the law!

If people want these protests to stop through the enforcement of the law through Federal law, get the premiers of BC and Ontario to ask for Federal help! It’s not like the provincial courts haven’t ruled and spoken and its not like the members of the opposition in the parliaments of BC and Ontario aren’t asking for the provinces to enforce the law, never mind the feds.

Why do I still feel the need to speak more plain… the Canadian people, it seems, are an ignorant people when it comes to the laws of the land and short on memory when it comes to history (Oka). Must Canadians in general have to have our noses rubbed in it before we see the truth? Well, do we? Are we really so stupid that this is what it takes? (by all means, answer that)

Once again… the only way T2 can end these protests in timely fashion is if the leaders of the provinces involved, invite him to. It’s either that or amend the constitution (not gonna happen) or provinces volunteer to secede provincial powers to the feds through the courts which is likely a cold day in hell. Andrew Scheer’s argument that the RCMP Act gives mandate for the federal government to enforce provincial laws also holds no water as the RCMP enforces the law under the authority of the provinces through the laws of the constitution proving once again, he is out of his depth.

If folks are really looking for someone to blame, they should start thinking provincial. A quick look at federal/provincial jurisdiction of law (constitution) and enforcement cuts to the chase if there was a few among us that gave a mere 10 minutes beyond mindless assumptions to see why.

#176 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.17.20 at 11:48 pm

DELETED

#177 Dr V on 02.17.20 at 11:55 pm

124 Nonplused – The self-government you speak of is
what is bestowed by the federal Indian Act. An
“Indian Band” is an administrative unit created pursuant to the legislation. A Tribe(s) or Nation can be
comprised of multiple Bands.

There was a question raised as to whether we could create this third level of government under our constitution which apparently only recognized federal and provincial jurisdiction. Local government being
created by provincial legislation.

Please remember BC is lacking in the native treaties that so much of the rest of Canada was required to make under the 1763 royal proclamation. You have a native population herded onto reserves and given the
white man’s law. Sounds more like they had freedoms
taken away as opposed to being given rights.

So how should our native people approve such projects? Others here have suggested referendums which sounds very reasonable.

You just have to broaden your focus and not think strictly in terms of our historical forms of law.

#178 WUL on 02.17.20 at 11:58 pm

#113 Not a mill on 02.17.20 at 6:44 pm
#89 Millennial Realist

Treaties were signed to stop the war. They signed because they lost.

bullshit…Chief Sitting Bull…bullshit

You should read:

“Crowfoot: Chief of the Blackfeet” by Hugh Dempsey.

The great Chief Crowfoot signed Treaty 7 at Blackfoot Crossing.

You might learn something about the whiskey traders from Fort Benton, Montana killing our Blackfoot neighbours, now the proud and successful people of the Siksika Nation.

He had no choice. The buffalo were nearly wiped out and he knew that meant the end of his people if he did not affix his “X” to the contract that none of his people understood.

WUL

#179 Dr V on 02.18.20 at 12:14 am

9 akashic record

These claims should be considered within the historical context. The native population of Canada at the time of
European settlement is generally estimated at several hundred thousand. Given this relatively scarce number,
the bounty of game, fish, berries etc was truly sustainable – they couldn’t make a dent in it.
If by chance there was a scourge the simplest solution was to move and have nature replenish over time.

125 Wait, what? covers the reality of many of the
current conditions.

#180 TRON on 02.18.20 at 12:15 am

There are two very important reasons why Canadians are happy and friendly to all. First, we have a rich land full of resources that have allowed us to produce little but profit greatly. Second, to the south we have the most powerful country in the world that would never allow us to be invaded or occupied knowing we have a military too small to stop invading forces.

Let’s remember this the next time we trash our resource industry or gleefully speak of how much better Canadians are when compared to Americans.

Our PM is a child with many issues. He gets elected by idealistic fools who would argue that we somehow are special and different but we’re not. By not removing the illegal blockades we are proving that Libs believe laws apply only to those individuals or groups that disagree with them.

#181 Dr V on 02.18.20 at 12:28 am

Garth – thank you for posting on such a contentious topic. And thank you to all bloggers who have posted thoughtfully and respectfully. I bet our host hit the delete button more than indicated….

#182 Not So New guy on 02.18.20 at 1:54 am

The last time I passed by train tracks I distinctly remember seeing a sign saying:

Private property. No trespassing.

That’s pretty clear to me. I don’t even see why an injunction is needed

For those who said the land was all peace and unicorns before mean Europeans arrived, you might want to read (or in this case, listen) to the autobiography of Geronimo.

It’s quite an eye-opener. I got from that the natives of North America were very much like gangstas fighting over each other’s turf and goods. There is more but it wasn’t the best world for them:

http://www.loyalbooks.com/book/Geronimos-Story-of-His-Life

#183 just snootin' on 02.18.20 at 1:58 am

I am working on a solution that will anger protesters, upset Tribal chiefs, make the government look like fools, alarm the police, frustrate the industry, mutually tick off Alberta and BC, and drive commenters on this blog over the top. When I get it formulated, I will post it here first.

#184 The Totally Unbiased, Highly Intelligent, Rational Observer on 02.18.20 at 2:24 am

You need to understand and remember that the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, to reuse his own infamous words from the past, “does not represent all Canadians.” He represents only those who might have been put in jail in the past for their bad behaviour.

#185 Where's My Money Guidos? on 02.18.20 at 2:32 am

Re: #147 VICTORIA TEA PARTY on 02.17.20 at 8:41 pm
O, SAY CAN YOU SEE…BY DAWN’S EARLY LIGHT……

For an exercise in WTF check out the December 2019 major US corporate “invasion” into BC’s Coastal GasLink calamity.

Canada’s TC Energy sold its 65 per cent stake in the project in December to KKR: Kohlberg Kravis Roberts. In return TC will be paid $600-million to pay down debts etc.
++++++++++++++++++++++++
Had a friend work for a 100+ year old construction company in San Francisco in the 80’s. KKR came in and stripped the company bare. The next day suppliers that were dealing with that company for over 100 years wouldn’t let them into their stores because KKR canceled all payments of their bills.
They are the ultimate corporate raider!!!!! Count on them raping and pillaging like you have never seen in Canada.
I think there were a couple films about them called “Wall Street”.

#186 Chelsea Luang on 02.18.20 at 3:24 am

US Government confirms today through international media that Corona Wuhan Virus originated at Wuhan Institute of Virology.

China Media has gone ballistic, “ US stock market will collapse if US continues to denigrate China with ‘unfriendly acts”.

It seems that China is not liking the spotlight. Communists and Vampires have something in common.

Also in the Asia headlines is Trudeaus petulant answers to serious questions about his radical cabinet ministers doling out money to anti-development activists.

Word is, Trudeau has ordered a Greta Thunberg costume for the Caribbean Carnival.

#187 tradetillyadrop on 02.18.20 at 4:18 am

Garth,

Any portfolio advice on how to trade this event. Buy USD/CAD mayhaps?

#188 Abolitionist on 02.18.20 at 4:23 am

Abolish the Indian Act. There should only be one class of citizen with every individual treated equally regardless of ethnicity. Abolish two tiered citizenship in Canada; one rule of law for all.

Apartheid was wrong in South Africa.

It is wrong in Canada too.

People shouldn’t pay different tax rates or receive different government benefits based on their ethnicity. Canadian apartheid is appalling and must be abolished.

#189 SoggyShorts on 02.18.20 at 5:02 am

#92 1255 on 02.17.20 at 5:35 pm
#67 Chimingin on 02.17.20 at 4:02 pm
Could we just get over the “invaded and stole their land” thing? Jeezus, it’s 2020. Pull them off the tracks by force or run them over. They are terrorists and should be treated accordingly.
———————————————-
No, we can’t !!!

How about stealing and molesting their children? Do you want them to get over that too???
*****
Well…yes. I didnt do those things, did you? So why are we being punished?

My ancestors fled Yugoslavia because of nazis, but if I went back to try and claim grandma’s farm I’m pretty sure I’d be told to get bent.

There’s a time limit on claims. I’m not sure where to draw the line, but if everyone directly involved is dead, I think that’s it.

#190 SoggyShorts on 02.18.20 at 5:10 am

#149 SunShowers on 02.17.20 at 8:49 pm
#25 Stone on 02.17.20 at 1:49 pm

Dont be stupid sunshowers. You are comparing settlement over a hundred years ago to an unlawful blockade happening right now.

What happened to natives in the 1800s was bad, but it’s done, everyone involved is dead, move on. We are all Canadians, no special treatment.

#191 Midnights on 02.18.20 at 6:55 am

Unreal…
https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/john-osullivan-mark-carney-fiduciary-responsibility-charity-and-other-peoples-money

#192 akashic record on 02.18.20 at 7:09 am

Reading the voices of gratitude for being able to live in this land gives a profound insight how this gratitude might have been even just decades ago.

#193 Steven Rowlandson on 02.18.20 at 7:46 am

“Those who disagree with the consensus view, whether on climate, taxes or treaty rights, are paleo. Reactionary.”

They are also absolutely correct if they see things my way. As a general rule the majority are always wrong and so are their leaders. Proof of this is government debt, extreme real estate prices and rents plus social engineering contrary to the word of God.
What counts most of all is truth and the majority and their leaders find it intolerable. Why? Because it shines the light on what they do and stand for hence the usage of the term conspiracy theory or theorist and the policy of censorship especially on the internet. The truth hurts and increases the revolt risk. Something deemed to be unacceptable. One other thing, if you go to the top of the charter of rights and freedoms it clearly states that Canada is based on the supremacy of God and the rule of Law. Canada does not measure up to that. So does Canada really exist or is it a myth?

#194 David on 02.18.20 at 8:02 am

Yesterday I had to listen to a number of people speaking on the indigenous protests against pipelines. My suggestion was that they read the writings of the Mahatma and Harvard liberal philosopher John Rawls on the matter of civil disobedience to put context on the issue. Needless to say my suggestion was not did not provide much consolation to angered folks.
Regardless of peoples political persuasions. With the changing energy landscape these pipelines may well not prove to be terribly good investments. Energy industry giants like Exxon and BP have pulled out of the stories Canadian oil and gas sector. Last week the world’s largest investment find Blackrock eliminated its’ exposure to the Canadian energy sector.Goldman Sachs put in a sell recommendation on Exxon and investment show host Jim Cramer proclaimed “I’m done with fossil fuels”. Chevron announced a joint venture with the besieged Venezuelan oil industry which now means that Alberta will now how to compete for the low end high carbon market or whatever remains of it in the future.
There isn’t very much governments can do about what is happening and even less policy room to change things.

#195 Randy Hurley on 02.18.20 at 8:03 am

Garth, how do we save our portfolios from this? Do we need to act now before we regret complacency?

#196 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.18.20 at 8:28 am

@#157 akashic delirium
“you can always chose to leave…..”
+++

Nah, my tax bill allows me a front row seat to the unfolding disatster that is Liberal policy.

I choose to stay and watch Trudeau’s entire house of politically correct double speak come crashing down around him in the the real world of greed, stupidity and anger.
I cant wait to see the polls after all this and then his “touchy feely” debt “budget” next month.
“Free daycare! Free bus passes! Free prescriptions! Free internet! Free Pink T-shirts! Free wedding for Binary Couples! Free food for anyone under 30!”
Hurray!
Venezuela without the Latin music Comrade.
Fidel Castro’s son by any other name.

#197 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.18.20 at 8:31 am

@#194 Akashic homegrown
“Reading the voices of gratitude for being able to live in this land gives a profound insight how this gratitude might have been even just decades ago.”
++++

Delirious with gratitude or just hitting the bong a little early today?

#198 eduardo de la conche on 02.18.20 at 8:57 am

#169

I’ve (unfortunately) lived in Montreal. All hydro, including greater montreal. Propane is used on farms etc. They don’t vote liberal, hence not important

#199 Dups on 02.18.20 at 9:09 am

“The minister responsible for indigenous issues travelled to the blockade, legitimizing the civil disobedience there.”

The minister should have demanded respect back the Canadian flag be put up beside the Mohak flag. Respect goes both ways. It seems to me that the Mohak’s are being rude by offending our flag. They ask for fair treatment and respect, on the other side they defame our flag by writing on it, leaving it on the ground, or hanging it backwards. How can you have a civil conversation with people that act like this? It is a two way street.

Since they are cutting the supply of goods to the country: natural gas, chlorine, etc. Should the Gov cut their welfare handouts, their electricity, their gas to heat the homes, the gas to fill the trucks, the chlorine to treat the water, etc…? It would only seem fair too one would think!!!

This has to stop now!

#200 heloguy on 02.18.20 at 9:13 am

DELETED

#201 IHCTD9 on 02.18.20 at 9:26 am

#9 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 12:51 pm
Natives have thousands of years of proven, unprecedented, responsible, respectful relationship with Mother Earth, that defines their whole identity.

Noone with any decent knowledge about them can deny this from them anymore.

Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.
__

Lord knows I love those FNR’s and the folks living there, but let’s get real:

Those dudes live in normal houses, and drive F350’s just like the rest of us, and there are more litres of gas for sale per head out there than probably anywhere else in Ontario.

#202 Steve on 02.18.20 at 9:31 am

#164 Duffy on 02.17.20 at 10:31 pm
Canada is wanting to hear just two words . . . . . post trudeau . . . . . . . just those two words.

First, you don’t speak for Canada; however much you might like to. Trudeau is the PM because he is the least awful of our choices. No matter how much any individual one of us thinks, collectively, under the existing rules, the Liberals chose Trudeau, and Canada chose the Liberals. Almost none of us voted directly for Trudeau, and to be fair, it was pretty much even between the top parties nationwide.

Second, it is almost certain that some of every cabinet conversation is occupied with how to proceed without toppling the minority government. We may need to get used to a lot of “no action” given the potential consequences of action are unpalatable to Liberals on all fronts.

We need to be most concerned with the financial fallout of the apparent government paralysis that we are now in the midst of, rather than lamenting the outcome of an election that is long over.

Should be an interesting week, although that assumes that Canada gets itself untwisted from the axle in the next 4 days…

#203 SoggyShorts on 02.18.20 at 9:33 am

#9 akashic record on 02.17.20 at 12:51 pm
Natives have thousands of years of proven, unprecedented, responsible, respectful relationship with Mother Earth, that defines their whole identity.

Noone with any decent knowledge about them can deny this from them anymore.

Native’s relationship to Mother Earth is the utmost respectful co-existence, collaboration.
*********
First of all, every primitive civilization with low population in a large area did very well environmentally by default.

Secondly, have you been on a reservation or met natives in the past few decades? They’re just like the rest of us-modern.

And finally, while I empathize with the history, why should people with one set of ancestors have different laws than those with different ancestry?

#204 Dharma Bum on 02.18.20 at 9:35 am

If the Canadian government is too weak to deal with it, then bring in the Americans.

They’ve had plenty of experience and know how to clear up this kind of inconvenience.

Canada just sucks at some things.

#205 Sail Away on 02.18.20 at 9:40 am

Natural gas is a dumb idea anyway; there’s a huge worldwide surplus and it sells for pennies on the dollar. This is just a make-work project.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Natural-Gas/The-Worlds-Top-LNG-Producer-Is-In-Trouble.html

#206 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.18.20 at 9:43 am

@#197 Randy Hurling at Liberal Policy
“Garth, how do we save our portfolios from this?”..
++++

I hate to break it to you but our portfolio’s are fine.

Canadian political stupidity is irrelevant on world markets….amusing but irrelevant…..

Punitive Liberal taxes?
Thats another story and unless you plan on fleeing to the US with your portfolio….. good luck.

#207 Jimers on 02.18.20 at 9:49 am

Non-First Nations Native Clans have no obligation to obey the Crown, quite the contrary, on their land Canada must obey them. Many Canadians seem sorely due for a lesson in sovereign rights.

#208 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.18.20 at 9:55 am

@#206 Dharma
“They’ve had plenty of experience and know how to clear up this kind of inconvenience.”
++++

Yep.
They open casinos on Native land and get them hooked on the cash flow.
No roads blocked there….otherwise it would affect the precious cash flow…
AND
There are 50 million Trump voting rednecks with guns that wouldn’t stand idly by while their major rail lines and highways were blocked in the middle of winter.

Our spineless, politically correct, pablum eating, politicians are to blame for this mess….. not the natives taking advantage of it.

#209 G on 02.18.20 at 9:58 am

Hi #174 Ponzius Pilatus,
LOL
I thought of mentioning Plato’s cave but then thought why bother.

#210 Remembrancer on 02.18.20 at 10:01 am

#201 Dups on 02.18.20 at 9:09 am
the chlorine to treat the water, etc…? It would only seem fair too one would think!!!
——————————————-
Don’t agree with the blockades at all but might want to not lead with water quality as a reason there hoss….

#211 mike from mtl on 02.18.20 at 10:09 am

#169 Less is More on 02.17.20 at 10:50 pm
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

The heck are you talking about? Propane tanks are really only seen very far off island, think ex-farm houses and summer homes (Chalets).

On island and surrounding area is mostly electric heating in case of SFD, some still oil yes but those tanks are ALWAYS inside the structure. Nat gas heating for anything other than office towers, warehouses or MDU is very rare.

#212 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 10:30 am

#177 crazyfox on 02.17.20 at 11:41 pm
I read near countless comments that base a flawed opinion on a flawed assumption, which is that the federal government can enforce the law within the provinces. That’s not the case!
………………………

I seem to remember T1 invoking martial law back in the day……..

#213 Brett in Calgary on 02.18.20 at 10:55 am

“The Trudeau government indicated it does not support any aggressive action to have the blockades removed, and prefers an open-ended process of exhaustive talks”
============
That’s all T2 does is exhaustively talk, or rather make me exhausted with his talk.

#214 Sold Out on 02.18.20 at 11:07 am

#214 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 10:30 am
#177 crazyfox on 02.17.20 at 11:41 pm
I read near countless comments that base a flawed opinion on a flawed assumption, which is that the federal government can enforce the law within the provinces. That’s not the case!
………………………

I seem to remember T1 invoking martial law back in the day……..

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Um, kidnapping and murder would typically require a more forceful response than would protests and blockades. Are you suggesting that the appropriate response to lawful protest is military force? If so, you may be in the wrong country.

#215 Leo on 02.18.20 at 11:13 am

For my whole life the indigenous community and Quebec have been a black hole of money and good will… the nation pours in and gets nothing back.

#216 IHCTD9 on 02.18.20 at 11:31 am

#55 Kevin on 02.17.20 at 3:26 pm
It’s ridiculous to read some of these comments blaming T2. Like a NDP or Conservative government would be able to avoid first nation issues and pipelines and oil. Is T2 responsible for what TC Energy does?
What a bunch of non-sense. It’s hard to believe how stupid some of Garth’s readers are.
__

No one is expecting the PM to “avoid” anything as we understand he does not have a crystal ball, and some folks will do completely unpredictable things.

We do however, expect that T2 ALLOW THE PROPER AUTHORITIES TO WITH THE [email protected]#%&!* PROBLEM, once it has established itself as such.

This blockage is illegal, and causing many problems. Send in the OPP to round up the handful of dudes standing there, and cart them off – DONE. The local OPP would be only too happy to do so if they’ve got good memories.

The reason nothing is being done is because Trudeau’s own doctrines mean any use of force at all will throw the entire flaccid Liberal party into a political quagmire they’ll never climb out of.

Trudeau has utterly ****** himself as all “the groups” now understand the guy is a total ***** and you could kick him in the crotch with steel toes on and he wouldn’t feel it. They know he’s got the structural rigidity of a pancake, and can pretty much do whatever the hell they want just as long as they’re advocating for the right folks/issues. Every single issue like this will end up on T2’s desk because it’ll get passed on up the line by lower authorities until it can go no higher. No one wants to touch this stuff with a 10′ pole thanks to Trudeau’s never ending progressive SJW monologue.

In this country, thanks to T2, it has basically become the sole personal responsibility of the Prime Minister of Canada, to deal with the demands of protesters.

#217 whiplash on 02.18.20 at 11:41 am

The Harper government introduced legislation for complete financial transparency of aboriginal bands in Canada. Joe public could have gone on line and looked at “audited” financial statements for any band in Canada.

This isn’t coffee money, for example fiscal years 2017-23 this government will be spending $4.757 Billion on reconciliation. And it only impacts 4.9% of the population. I smell a rat!

#218 whiplash on 02.18.20 at 11:46 am

219 Whiplash
Trudeau cancelled this legislation after getting first elected. No more transparency!

#219 The Wet One on 02.18.20 at 11:55 am

I used to work with lawyers who dealt with these sorts of issues.

I asked them how these things will get resolved.

The response was, “negotiations and agreement or war.”

That still seems about accurate.

We should be care not to tip the country into war. As we see elsewhere in the world, committed small groups of individuals can cause a whole lot of damage to a society. Jaw jaw seems like a much more preferable course of action. If the Indigenous people of Canada decide to stand up and not back down, well, I’m not sure that blood in streets will get us anywhere good. There’s too many examples of how that can go really, really badly.

#220 IHCTD9 on 02.18.20 at 11:59 am

We touched on this the other day, highlighting the muffin-top sporting Federal Libs. Weak. Soft. Scared.

T2 will pay these protesters out one way or another to make it go away, and those few remaining taxpayers in Canada’s working 60% will have the bill piled on their shoulders along with everything else.

My prediction is that there is already a line up forming to initiate the next “injustice” It won’t be very long before there is another SJW protest that requires millions of dollars to make disappear.

All I can say, is that I’m glad I pay almost nothing in income tax.

#221 Yuus bin Haad on 02.18.20 at 12:01 pm

Apparently Twinkletoes was overheard rehearsing for his next scrum the other day. “Well, just watch me.” “Well, just watch ME.” “WELL, just watch me?” …

#222 YVR Expat on 02.18.20 at 12:06 pm

#43 Phylis on 02.17.20 at 2:57 pm

Will butts come back to save the day? Gerry, what to do, what to do?

************************

I’m pretty sure Gerald Butts is behind the protests. He has been in bed with foreign money and eco-terrorists since Day 1.

#223 doug t on 02.18.20 at 12:25 pm

#198 crowdedelevatorfartz

CLASSIC STUFF – and so true

#224 Settlerphobia on 02.18.20 at 12:27 pm

the amount of Settler Phobia in Canada is astonishing. It’s 2020.

If the early Settlers and founders of Canada were of color and not white, there would be more acceptance in sharing the land of Canada.

My relatives were a visible minority when they came to Canada in the 50’s. There was prejudice, but we still carved out a life and had families.

We work, we go to school, we pay taxes, we get along with all cultures. That’s Canada.

#225 doug t on 02.18.20 at 12:28 pm

#209 Jimers

sorry but to the victors go the spoils – its throughout history – like it or not

#226 JB on 02.18.20 at 12:31 pm

#91 Triplenet on 02.17.20 at 5:34 pm

Well Garth,
If the possession of real property in Canada under ‘condominium ownership” does not include land, then it would only follow that the wet’suwet’en do not have a claim to land either.
Unless of course I have a treaty with the government with regard to my real property holding(s), as condominium and treaty are intangible rights – just on paper.
……………………………………………………………
If you own a Condominium you own nothing! You only have the rights to occupy that space between concrete walls, floors and ceilings. So good luck leaving that to your heirs Moisters! At least land is something you can stand on, grow food and defend.

#227 doug t on 02.18.20 at 12:37 pm

#194 akashic record

are you sniffing glue?

#228 YVR Expat on 02.18.20 at 12:39 pm

#89 Millennial Realist on 02.17.20 at 5:27 pm
Not sure what to say next….

The Settler hatred and bigotry coming out in the comments here this afternoon since I posted is breathtaking. Perhaps I should not have been surprised given the homogeneity of the demographics here, but it is still stunning. (*Exception – thank you akashic record for your thoughtful reminder of how destructive Settlers have been to this land and the planet)

First Nations were not “conquered”, folks. Look it up. Over hundreds of years, there were some battles. But in the end, it was negotiations and agreements that “ended” violent conflicts. (Look it up in your Grade 10 history book, see the dozens of legally binding agreements that were made.)

Treaties were signed, the provisions of many of which were denigrated or abrogated at will by British and then Canadian governments whenever they felt like it.

How would you Settlers feel if your agreements, with your banks or business companies or real estate transactions, were treated with the same sort of regular contempt and disregard that the agreements with First Nations have been accorded?

This Settler sense of entitlement and obliviousness to its own hypocrisy is incredible.

Is this really the “Canada” we like to believe in?

Some of you ignorant Settlers make it sound more like Alabama, circa 1850.

Accept what has happened, who you are and what your role and the role of others like you has been in all this.

Only then can there be meaningful discussion and resolution.

*************************

I can’t tell if this is a troll post…or if millennial’s are this brain-washed? Sigh. This country is truly lost.

#229 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 1:08 pm

#216 Sold Out on 02.18.20 at 11:07 am
#214 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 10:30 am
#177 crazyfox on 02.17.20 at 11:41 pm
I read near countless comments that base a flawed opinion on a flawed assumption, which is that the federal government can enforce the law within the provinces. That’s not the case!
………………………

I seem to remember T1 invoking martial law back in the day……..

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Um, kidnapping and murder would typically require a more forceful response than would protests and blockades. Are you suggesting that the appropriate response to lawful protest is military force? If so, you may be in the wrong country.
……………………………………

Crippling our economy is as serious as kidnapping and murder and it affects us on a national scale. Perhaps you are in the wrong universe.

#230 Piano_Man87 on 02.18.20 at 1:34 pm

There are two paths ahead for Western Democracies in the face of climate change:

1. Build green infrastructure. Subsidize EV’s immensely. Work towards a sustainable economy. More democracy.

2. Double down on fossil fuels. Promote economic growth at all costs. Break up protests. Ignore climate change. Stifle debate, and discussion. Tell the people that good jobs are more important than having a few more trees to look at.

Australia paints a picture of where we are all destined to go, as they are feeling the effects of climate change first.

The protest will be busted up. We just don’t know when. Anyone who thought industrial civilization could be made sustainable hasn’t thought that hard about the life cycle of all our goods.

#231 G on 02.18.20 at 1:42 pm

Coronavirus outbreak will likely get worse before it gets better, specialist says CNBC Television Feb18 5min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NetMJvhcHHo

Coronavirus Epidemic Update 19: Treatment and Medication Clinical Trials Feb 17 6min
MedCram – Medical Lectures Explained CLEARLY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HK9QEy1KJ8

CDC: Information for Healthcare Professionals
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/index.html

N. Korean official who sneaked into public bath during COVID-19 quarantine shot dead: Report Feb13 1min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdOXYFh_2ck

How North Korea is reporting on coronavirus (English subtitles) Feb 17 8min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI_MG3ZnDak&t=127s

Proper hand washing and other simple things you can do to stay safe,
Chinese Doctor on how to stay safe Feb 13 10min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4vCHM2c4X0

Chinese Coronavirus: What to Know & What to Do (2019-nCoV) KenDBerryMD Jan 24 16min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QA5AbqlCHuc&t=116s

Stay safe. I pray most infections end up being are mild?

#232 The way to solve conflicts on 02.18.20 at 1:51 pm

T2 is guilty of many sins and shortages, but I would not blame him for this particular issue. The way T2 acts in soving this conflict is a typical Canadian way of solving conflicts. I saw it many time in business setting here in Canada. You saw it in the CBC news covering the way Canada vote in the UN. 50-50 aprroach. Shortage of determination and decisiveness. Fear to assault feeling of others. Fear to make the flames hotter. Sometimes it make sense, in most times – is not. The specific way Canadians try to solve conflicts is apparent for the people of other cultures.

Here is how other cultures would approach this conflict:

Putin, the former KGB, would send riot police in large numbers to put the demonstrators “face-on asphalt”. In parallel the FSB (former KGB) officers would put small bag of drugs in the demonstrators pockets in stealthy way so that corrupted judge could put the demonstrator in jail for 10 years for drugs possession.

Chinese Comrad Xi, would charge them to death penalty and shortly before the execution would have their essential organs for transplantation, removed.

North Korean Comrad Yin would feed them to hungry dogs.

Syrian President Assad would have their eyes removed and have tanks move on them slowly while they are still alive. The key word is S-L-O-W-L-Y.

Palestinian Hamas in Gaza would put them against the masonry wall and would shot them for collaboration with the Zionists and without any due process.

Peres and Rabin would negotiate with them for 27 years and would pay them monthly stipend so that they could pretend that they want peace until Trump present his plan to solve the conflict.

As you can see the T2 approach is not so bad in comparison…

#233 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 2:03 pm

A number of pipeline protesters attempted what they called a “citizen’s arrest” of Premier John Horgan outside his Vancouver Island home Tuesday morning.

CTV News reports members of Extinction Rebellion Vancouver Island said they wanted to prevent Horgan from attending the provincial budget announcement at the legislature.

The premier wasn’t at home when protesters first arrived, but he came home shortly after, and was verbally accosted.

https://www.castanet.net/news/BC/277324/Protesters-attempted-citizen-s-arrest-of-John-Horgan-Tuesday#277324

#234 Bergeron on 02.18.20 at 2:11 pm

Easy Solution… Stop all payments to all indigenous people involve completely since Canada has no money to pay them!

#235 NoName on 02.18.20 at 2:19 pm

@ #233 Gee

youll like this, interesting read

https://www.barrons.com/articles/chinas-economic-data-have-always-raised-questions-its-coronavirus-numbers-do-too-51581622840?redirect=amp#click=https://t.co/FuHXFz8o7P

“I have never in my years seen an r-squared of 0.99,” Goodman says. “As a statistician, it makes me question the data.”

Real human data are never perfectly predictive when it comes to something like an epidemic, Goodman says, since there are countless ways that a person could come into contact with the virus.

For context, Goodman says a “really good” r-squared, in terms of public health data, would be a 0.7. “Anything like 0.99,” she said, “would make me think that someone is simulating data. It would mean you already know what is going to happen.”

#236 Arctic Gringo: Qalunaaq on 02.18.20 at 2:19 pm

I call it ‘dynamic.’

https://www.ratespy.com/dof-announces-new-benchmark-rate-for-canadas-insured-stress-test-021811865

#237 IHCTD9 on 02.18.20 at 2:28 pm

#235 Yukon Elvis on 02.18.20 at 2:03 pm

A number of pipeline protesters attempted what they called a “citizen’s arrest” of Premier John Horgan outside his Vancouver Island home Tuesday morning.

https://www.castanet.net/news/BC/277324/Protesters-attempted-citizen-s-arrest-of-John-Horgan-Tuesday#277324
____

“By 8:15 a.m., two people were lying across the driveway, while others were holding signs on the street.

At 8:20 a.m., police arrested protesters who were blocking the driveway.

Horgan left his home at 8:30 a.m.”

^Someone send this article to Trudeau. ^

#238 SimplyPut7 on 02.18.20 at 2:32 pm

I don’t think Trudeau’s new beard is helping to calm tensions between the provinces, federal government, hereditary chiefs and the elected band councils.

Trudeau is starting to appear like Obama circa 2016 when the fake smiles from the government were not working any more and underlying problems that were not resolved from the previous government started to explode to the surface.

#239 Phylis on 02.18.20 at 2:48 pm

NN, “simulating data“ interesting phrase. Well as long as they dont prod, jinx or evoke the data, i guess it is ok to massage it.
Next up, Here comes jodi

#240 G on 02.18.20 at 2:59 pm

I would like to know that this Dr. does gets a call back today/soon, with an answerer, and what it is he is told.

Coronavirus call to Governor Cuomo by Dr Paul Cottrell
Feb18 17min. (Lots of phone tag in this call.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWJBeP8KITo

#241 Dan on 02.18.20 at 3:03 pm

You should see the comment sections on The Globe and Mail. The people are seething – everybody is fed up with the double standard which makes these activist more equal than the rest of us.

Curiously there are not that many progressives to support the blockades and the FN activists behind them. Maybe they are smarter than they look and recognize when is just time to shut up and fade in the background for a while. :-D

#242 IHCTD9 on 02.18.20 at 3:18 pm

“JJ Ruest, the president and chief executive officer at CN, said in a statement last night that shutting down trains is the safest option since court orders in Ontario aren’t being enforced.”

https://huddle.today/cn-rail-shutdown-halts-propane-deliveries-to-maritimes/
______________________________________

I like JJ’s handling here. Hey it’s Canada – if some protester got mowed down by a freight train, somehow it’d be his fault, even though trains can’t steer, and don’t brake much.

Enforce the damn Law – call me when you have things looked after.

Maybe other big service and resource providers should do the same.

“Sorry, shutting down the pipeline is the safest option”

“Sorry, shutting down the refinery is the safest option”

“Sorry, shutting down the Airport is the safest option”

“Sorry, shutting down the power plant is the safest option”

#243 G on 02.18.20 at 3:25 pm

The Truth About the Coronavirus – ORIGINS?
Stefan Molyneux Feb 18 23min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE-tLNyYVPM

#244 EB on 02.18.20 at 3:31 pm

This is a perfectly logical step in the Balkanization of Canada. The government of Canada can’t have it both ways – if they’re autonomous then the government must negotiate with them as autonomous nations. They can’t have the appearance of (and internet applause for) treating them as independent sates without the actually of ceding power to these tiny, fragmented groups. The alternative is a long, hard slog back to a united country regardless of the fallout.

#245 majik on 02.18.20 at 10:41 pm

CN laid off 1000 workers just like that. I’d be more concerned about railroad workers rights than a few protestors. What kind of contracts were these folks on? What severance if any were they given? The fact that CN can dispense with these many workers so hastily says a lot about our economy and the supposed ‘full employment’ that we’re currently enjoying.

#246 SCD on 02.19.20 at 11:26 am

Step back and let the First Nations sort it out between themselves. It seems like the majority want the project and if so more pressure needs to come from within to support it. If not, so be it.

#247 1255 on 02.19.20 at 10:52 pm

#191
Well…yes. I didnt do those things, did you? So why are we being punished?

My ancestors fled Yugoslavia because of nazis, but if I went back to try and claim grandma’s farm I’m pretty sure I’d be told to get bent.

There’s a time limit on claims. I’m not sure where to draw the line, but if everyone directly involved is dead, I think that’s it.
—————————————————————————

That is a disgusting response but I don’t blame you because you are a product of your environment and don’t know any better. You were brought up to think that way.

I suggest you take some history classes as well as a few law courses. Maybe some courses on morality too. It will be a good learning experience and help you grow as a person.

Seems like a lot of people only care about themselves these days – as long as they are happy or aren’t affected by something who cares about anyone else?

Very sad – very sad indeed!