The envelope, please

1. Justin Trudeau is the prime minister after the Oct. 31 election. What percentage of the vote did he receive in order to form government? (a) 71.4% (b) 33.1% (c) 52.3%
You don’t need a majority of voters supporting you to form government in Canada. You don’t even need to get the most votes. Trudeau trailed Andrew Scheer in popular support. He’s PM and Scheer is soon to be unemployed. Go figure.

2. The composite benchmark house price in Toronto hit its highest-ever point during which month? (a) Nov 2019 (b) April 2016 (c) May 2017
The average detached house price crested two years ago, but the composite benchmark price hit a new all-time high just last month. It was $815,000, up almost 7% year/year. In 416 the benchmark was $903,700, according to real estate board stats. And realtors never lie.

3. When does an RRSP have to be cashed in and taxes paid, or converted to a RRIF (registered income fund)? (a) At age 65 (b) on your 71st birthday (c) by December of your 71st year.
When you turn into a crusty old wrinklie, RRSP contributions end and retirement savings must be cashed (tax is due), turned into an annuity (bad idea with low rates) or converted to a RRIF (retirement income fund). A small amount is then withdrawn yearly and added to your income. The conversion must take place by the last day of the year in which you turn 71. But if you have a younger spouse, contributions can still be made to his/her plan.

4. What’s the tax rate on capital gains? (a) 100% (b) 33.3% (c) 50%
When you buy something outside of a tax shelter and make bank – a stock, ETF, baseball card, ounce of gold or real property – it’s a capital gain. Half is tax-free. The other 50% is added to income for the year and taxed at your personal rate. Since the top marginal rate in Canada is around 53%, the maximum tax on a capital gain is 27%. For most people, it’s closer to a 15% hit. So this is a good way to make money, unless Justin messes it up in the next budget.

5. What’s the average detached house price in Canada’s second-biggest market, Montreal? (a) $789,540 (b) $1,123,560 (c) 259,000 (d) $350,000
Hard to believe the difference in price between Canada’s #1 and #2 markets, just five hours apart by car. What costs over $1 million in the GTA can be yours for $350,000 in Montreal, where prices are up 6% and sales have increased 11% over the past year. Montrealers are complaining about a property bubble, too. Sheesh.

6. What is the maximum contribution to an RESP in order to score the government’s 20% grant money? (a) $7,000 (b) $2,500 (c) $750
It’s free money, of course. The feds will top you up 20% of a contribution to an annual max of $2,500. There are also some provincial grants available, so check that out. Plus, you can go back a year at a time to claim missed grants. In total, subscribers can sock up to $50,000 into one of these plans, where it grows tax-free. Do it.

7. When did the TSX on Bay Street hit its highest-ever level? (a) Nov 3 2016 (b) Dec 23 2019 (c) July 17 2019
That would be now. Bay Street is on a roll, with the index at a record point, ahead 19.95% so far in 2019, for a 12-month gain of 28.69%. This is despite a collapse in weed stocks, and a lacklustre performance of late by the banks. The Canadian market was clearly under pressure and undervalued a year ago. Remember: never exit an asset class. Here’s an example why.

8. What’s Elon Musk worth? (a) $14 billion (b) Nothing. He owes more than he has (c) $23 billion
He’s the longest-serving CEO of a car company, but Musk is also the guy behind PayPal, SpaceX, a red Tesla convertible in orbit, the failing solar roof-tile enterprise (among other things) and is on the SEC’s hit list of troublesome people who enjoy giving regulators the finger. How can you not like him? And he’s worth $23 billion.

9. What’s B20? (a) Boeing product (b) Cannabis edible (c) stress test
It’s real name is the Residential Mortgage Underwriting Practices and Procedures Guideline, issued by the bank regulator (OSFI). Yes, it contains the mortgage stress test designed to protect the integrity of the banks’ mortgage portfolios. They were under assault from the Bank of Mom, with too many moisters being gifted down payments thereby avoiding mortgage insurance. No more. Now everybody must prove they could handle a rate increase. Good thing. One’s coming.

10. When bond yields rise what happens? (a) An inversion (b) Bond prices fall (c) Stocks rise
There’s an inverse relationship between bond yields and prices. So as yields go up bond prices fall. Normally higher interest rates depress equity values so by owning bonds an investor can achieve balance and less overall volatility. The best way for most people to own bonds is through an ETF.

11. What’s the maximum TFSA contribution for 2020? (a) 5,000 (b) 6,000 (c) $6,500
It stays at six grand for 2020, due to our relatively low inflation rate. When the Trudeau government chopped the annual contribution from $10,000 it also indexed the limit, so there may be a small increase in 2021. If you wish to feel inadequate, compare our TFSA to the British equivalent, the ISA. The current annual ceiling there is the Canadian dollar equivalent of over $34,000.

12. Who did Bill Morneau marry? (a) Mrs. Morneau (b) Jane Philpot (c) Nancy McCain
Nancy McCain is heir to the privately-held family fortune (McCain Foods) which is currently estimated to be $4.51 billion. Bill owns about two million shares in his family’s company, Morneau Shepell, worth about $40 million, and declaring $140,000 a month in dividends. Power couple. But he feels for you.

13. Since pot was legalized in October of 2017, how much have investors lost on cannabis stocks expressed as an average negative return? (a) 14% (b) 57% (c) 38%
It was a classic bubble. Some people who got in early and cashed out fast, made a bundle. Most others have seen the average weed issue fall by 57%. Now there are health concerns about vaping, while edibles are hitting the market even without regulatory testing. Weed sales have been way below expectations and as long as Trump’s around, the US won’t be joining the party any time soon.

14. When does Stephen Poloz quit as head of the bank of Canada? (a) January (b) June (c) 2021
He’s gone at the end of a seven-year term this summer. Less flashy than Mark Carney, who went on to lead the Bank of England and will soon be working with the UN to prepare the global financial sector for climate change, Poloz has been workmanlike, low-key and successful at keeping Canada growing. The cost has been an asset bubble puffed up by cheap money.

15. What’s the difference between a TFSA beneficiary and successor holder? (a) Children cannot be a SH (b) Beneficiaries get paid faster (c) A SH inherits the account
A beneficiary to a TFSA gets the money or assets contained in that account when the holder croaks. But the account is deemed to have been cashed at the moment of death, so tax could accrue on growth before the bene receives it. A successor holder in effect takes control of the tax-free account at the time of the owner’s death and assumes ownership. No tax. To pull this off, you need a spouse.

16. Why are preferred shares preferred? (a) Dividends are paid first (b) The dividend tax credit (c) Issued by regulated, blue chip companies
Preferreds are a hybrid of stocks and bonds. Technically they’re equities, but the dividends are fixed and they’re more stable than common stocks. They are preferred because dividends must be paid out to owners before a single cent is paid to those who hold the company’s common stock. These days prefs deliver close to 5%, plus offer the dividend tax credit.

17. What’s a basis point? (a) Part of credit scores (b) One 100th of 1% (c) A bond measurement
One percentage point is made up of 100 basis points. If you have a credit score of 100 you probably like the Trailer Park Boys.

18. Capital gains on houses are tax-free if: (a) You have owned it for at least a year (b) only if the PR Exemption is claimed (c) It has never been a rental
There is no set time limit on ownership of residential real estate to qualify for tax-free profits. It’s what the CRA thinks it should be, on a case-by-case basis. That’s how they catch flippers, speckers and renobombers. As for renting out a place, that may not affect the PR exemption unless it alters the basic use of the property or involves renovations. In any case, no exemption will be allowed unless you apply for it through your annual tax return. This has been the case since 2016, when the recording of all transactions became mandatory. Guess why.

19. The limit on bank deposit insurance is: (a) $100,000 (b) unlimited (c) Up to $700,000 per institution
CDIC will cover an account at a single institution for up to $100,000. But this is only for cash or cash-equivalent assets like HISAs or GICs. No stocks, mutual funds, ETFs, bonds or other negotiable assets are included. However you can have accounts at several banks, all insured. And CDIC will actually cover seven different kinds of accounts to the maximum at any one bank.

20. How long, in dog years, is the average stock bear market? (a) 13.2 (b) 2.3 (c) 8.1
Since WW2 the average bear market (a drop of 20% or more) has lasted 14 months, while corrections (a decline of 10% to 20%) have taken an average of five months to recover. If we assume one year equals 7 dog years, the average bear lasts a little over eight DYs. But your canine doesn’t care. And neither should you.

 

47 comments ↓

#1 Jimmy on 12.26.19 at 1:35 pm

100% thanks to The Greater Fool.

#2 Lost...but not leased on 12.26.19 at 1:43 pm

Phyyrrzzttt again…

Happy Boxing Day!

#3 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.26.19 at 1:43 pm

Arrrgh!
12 out of 20
So close on so many answers.
McCains French Fries…..arrrrrggggh.
TFSA max contributions…..arrgggh. Too high.
Cost of Montreal Housing? arrgggh. Too low.
The “dog years” answer…..arrrrrrggggrrrrrh.

Thats why I have a financial advisor……

#4 westcoaster on 12.26.19 at 1:46 pm

Big drama in the house over this quiz and who would do better. Husband (12/20) Wife (14/20). Happy house now since wife won.

TSFA and SH question – can it be changed easily to SH if set as beneficiary?

Yes. – Garth

#5 Paul on 12.26.19 at 1:49 pm

I am still trying to figure out the answer to number 1.

#6 tccontrarian on 12.26.19 at 1:49 pm

“Bill owns about two million shares in his family’s company, Morneau Shepell, worth about $40 million, and declaring $140,000 a month in dividends. Power couple.

…But he feels for you.”

Of course he does! Good one Garth, LOL

tcc

#7 NoOneOfConsequence on 12.26.19 at 1:49 pm

Aced It!

The curriculum of this course is excellent Garth! Keep up the great work!

#8 Dogman01 on 12.26.19 at 1:59 pm

Wow, the BC edits out Trump from a stupid Christmas movie…..

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/cbc-deletes-trump-from-home-alone-2-broadcast/

It is bizarre how left wing nuts can’t perceive they are left wing nuts. It is so bad the state of media bias, it further pushes people whom don’t like being manipulated away from the MSM.

You can practically smell the giddiyness when these professional reporters are “reporting” on impeachment. None are commenting on how it taking attention away from things that might actually matter and the result is pretty much a forgone conclusion.

It is like entertainment or sports reporting.

#9 westcoaster on 12.26.19 at 2:10 pm

2019 Tax question please!!

Can I sell some securities (at a loss) tomorrow – Dec 27 – to offset some capital gains I have for 2019? I use TD.

Thanks!!!

Yes. Tomorrow is the last day. – Garth

#10 some other guy in Vancouver on 12.26.19 at 2:53 pm

Re question #4 “… unless Justin messes it up in the next budget.”
If there’s a risk our own government plans to screw us over by increasing the inclusion rate of capital gains from 50%, is it not optimal to sell at least a fraction of assets that have had big gains now rather than risk the bigger theft later?

#11 Suburban Bob on 12.26.19 at 3:10 pm

I think people have been scamming #18 for a long time, never living at all in houses or apartments bought to rent out, but claiming the PR when they sell what have been their business rentals.

Is the CRA planning to crack down on this or do they only care since 2016? They could make a boatload of taxes if they could go back to the 1990s or the 2000s to enforce this. Can they go back that far to audit all those amateur landlords? That would help the deficit and lower taxes for the rest of us for sure.

#12 Paul on 12.26.19 at 3:28 pm

#11 Suburban Bob on 12.26.19 at 3:10 pm
I think people have been scamming #18 for a long time, never living at all in houses or apartments bought to rent out, but claiming the PR when they sell what have been their business rentals.

Is the CRA planning to crack down on this or do they only care since 2016? They could make a boatload of taxes if they could go back to the 1990s or the 2000s to enforce this. Can they go back that far to audit all those amateur landlords? That would help the deficit and lower taxes for the rest of us for sure.
———————————————————————————————
Says the guy that never invested to put a roof over anyone’s head .

#13 Coastal Zapper on 12.26.19 at 3:50 pm

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR

17 of 20, not bad for a pulp mill worker who’s only been reading the blog for a year

Your answer to #4 has me all screwed up. Wouldn’t “tax rate” be between 15%-27% for most people, which is what the question asked?

The ‘tax rate’ referred to the inclusion rate, not your personal one. Too much variance. – Garth

#14 conan on 12.26.19 at 3:59 pm

“He’s PM and Scheer is soon to be unemployed.” -Garth

With a “cooked-up” charge of financial impropriety. He will be lucky to get a job at Burger King.
Proof positive that this current incarnation of Conservatism, eats their young.

This Party is broken beyond repair, and it is probably easier to split it into two .

1) The Big oil Sky Daddy Party from the West.

2 )The Progressive Conservative Party.
Now 100 % Harper free in ROC!

But wait, there is more!

I see a schism in the Conservative Party’s near future.
I do not see any other way.

#15 Dogman01 on 12.26.19 at 4:38 pm

Ok…CBC says they cut Trump out five years ago….

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/cbc-trump-scene-home-alone-2-1.5408809?cmp=rss

It is so much more satisfying to be triggered.

But does make another point about the media and the speed vs research time conflict they are under.

#16 Flop... on 12.26.19 at 4:49 pm

It’s official.

Garth is bored.

He emailed me…

M45TX.

#17 Lost...but not leased on 12.26.19 at 5:00 pm

#11 Suburban Bob on 12.26.19 at 3:10 pm
I think people have been scamming #18 for a long time, never living at all in houses or apartments bought to rent out, but claiming the PR when they sell what have been their business rentals.
===================

I agree with #12 Paul reply..

Are that many people still into class warfare ?

My middle class parents invested in RE….and yes did very well after providing shelter for renters for over 30 + years….and paid a sh*tload of taxes…which of course we know gov’ts spend wisely and prudently.

#18 SW on 12.26.19 at 5:46 pm

“Bill…declaring $140,000 a month in dividends. Power couple. But he feels for you.”
Lol…hmm…c’mon be nice!
You’re also rich beyond the dreams of avarice Mr. T – your lovely wife is as much of a catch as that nice Nancy…lucky dogs all!

#19 Reximus on 12.26.19 at 6:22 pm

#8 cbc didnt edit out Trump. the distribution co. did that in 2014. I don’t care either way

happy holidays

#20 Spock on 12.26.19 at 6:52 pm

The Vulcan logic rules. To get anything wrong would be illogical.

I wait for the promised rewards. Logical.

#21 Camille on 12.26.19 at 7:08 pm

No one can explain properly, no one should try, why preferreds showed higher coefficients of variance than stocks not so long ago. About a quarter less variable normally, but a big loser past two years. Orthodox money managers are playing them up now, like a great strategic move.

#22 Ustabe on 12.26.19 at 7:15 pm

Regarding the beneficiary/successor holder aspect of a TFSA.

Beneficiary means you get the money, full stop.

Successor holder means you get to have two TFSA’s.

#23 akashic record on 12.26.19 at 7:34 pm

“It’s what the CRA thinks it should be, on a case-by-case basis.”

This method is the hotbed of corruption according to world-wide historical experience.

#24 LP on 12.26.19 at 8:15 pm

#22 Ustabe on 12.26.19 at 7:15 pm

******************

I don’t think so. I believe one is rolled over into the other. At least, that’s what happened in my case.

F72ON

#25 BillyBob on 12.26.19 at 8:33 pm

Tax evasion is not investing nor noble. Disliking those who evade taxes illegally is not “class warfare”.

Sounds like a couple of self-justifying a-holes.

#26 Jmr on 12.26.19 at 8:49 pm

#17
I don’t understand how you think it is ok for your middle class parents to claim real estate gains that were not for their primary residence as if they were for a primary residence. Isnt this illegal and tax evasion? But thats ok why – because they are middle class?

#27 TurnerNation on 12.26.19 at 8:50 pm

27th? Hmm Futures in Gold, Black Gold, and Nasduck melting upwards past few days. Which one of these does not be-long……

#28 Calgary retiree on 12.26.19 at 9:00 pm

“Trudeau trailed Andrew Scheer in popular support. He’s PM and Scheer is soon to be unemployed. Go figure.”
———————————————————
Bart, you must mistake Canada for having a proportional representation system. There is a tone of faux outrage in your post.
Of course you know we’ve inherited some crazy election system from the Brits. It’s called first round he post…

Here are the numbers that count:

Number of seats: Liberals 157. Conservatives 121.

Also, a combined 59 seats were won by the remaining parties – who are generally not inclined to support the Con’s: NDP, BQ and Greens.

But you knew that already…

#29 Treasure Island CEO - 64,059,543.88 Offshore on 12.26.19 at 9:12 pm

The CRA does not catch flippers, speckers and/or renobombers because everybody who files exemptions are lying about what they did and the CRA does not have the resources to follow-up on this.

This is why the most utilized loop-hole in housing (tax avoidance as a huge financial incentive) needs to be closed. Otherwise, housing stays more lucrative that stock investing and balanced portfolios and you get to live in it.

All real estate (being a commodity now that is traded rather than lived in) needs to be regulated like financial markets and the principal residence exemption needs to end.

It won’t.

The play book for Canada is to increase wealthy international immigration to offset housing stagnation and keep housing as the number one industry going forever, with house prices continuing to climb and builders continuing to build. Jobs for all.

Anyone who does not get this will continue to complain about the cost of living and how absurd house prices are in Canada. Sorry, domestic younger folk – unless you amass a ton of wealth or you find some magical way to make it in a rural part of Canada and enjoy living rural, you will forever be forking most of your hard earned money over in rent and never afford yourself a decent living in Canada. Any left over money not going to your landlord will be spend on food.

This isn’t even debatable anymore among younger people in Canada. It has happened for the past 10 years and it is never going to change. This change by gov started in 2008 in response to the financial crisis. The strategy is to inflate out of debt with young people as collateral damage.

This is why I recommend all younger people move away from Canada.

#30 MF on 12.26.19 at 9:46 pm

#29 Treasure Island CEO – 64,059,543.88 Offshore on 12.26.19 at 9:12 pm

-You are half right. What you describe is the failed policy of central bankers worldwide. ALL young people are being sacrificed, in all countries. Here it shows up in house prices most visibly (in the US it’s the trillion dollar/year debt).

That’s where you are wrong. All “countries” are crap. Canada is much less crap than all the rest. Hence why people willingly take on all the debt to buy RE.

MF

#31 Ustabe on 12.26.19 at 10:34 pm

#24 LP on 12.26.19 at 8:15 pm

#22 Ustabe on 12.26.19 at 7:15 pm

******************

I don’t think so. I believe one is rolled over into the other. At least, that’s what happened in my case.

F72ON

Well I suppose there might be numerous ways to facilitate it but the question remains, one way you will pay tax on gains going forward, one way you will not. Which way do you want?

I won’t pretend to know every twitch and moan on this matter from CRA or otherwise. I rely on the compliance department of the firm that houses my financial team.

#32 TurnerNation on 12.26.19 at 10:45 pm

Gross. Barf! Attention Debt Slaves. A nice bank has a new method by which to pickle yourself on a card.

Remember Store Credit and Layaway plans? I don’t. Anyway everything old is new again.

https://www.cibc.com/en/personal-banking/credit-cards/manage/installment-plans.html

“Installment Plan options
6 monthly payments at 5.99%
12 monthly payments at 6.99%
24 monthly payments at 7.99%
One Time Installment Fee
1.50% of purchase amount”

,,,
…Hey GoEasy/Easyhome (GSY.TO) these guys are on to you.

#33 T on 12.26.19 at 11:28 pm

#30 MF on 12.26.19 at 9:46 pm
#29 Treasure Island CEO – 64,059,543.88 Offshore on 12.26.19 at 9:12 pm

-You are half right. What you describe is the failed policy of central bankers worldwide. ALL young people are being sacrificed, in all countries. Here it shows up in house prices most visibly (in the US it’s the trillion dollar/year debt).

That’s where you are wrong. All “countries” are crap. Canada is much less crap than all the rest. Hence why people willingly take on all the debt to buy RE.

MF

—–

Wrong. Canada is crap compared to a lot of countries because of the extreme debt to income required to buy RE.

Life is short, blowing your best years paying off monstrous debt is not what most would call life well spent.

#34 P Sydney on 12.27.19 at 12:31 am

16/20. 5, 12, 14 & 20 wrong. One was a tabloid question and I’m a cat owner, so not too bad. Good fun, thanks Garth!

#35 april on 12.27.19 at 12:43 am

#29- As if the same thing isn’t going on in other countries as well, and some of these countries got whacked when their bubble burst… and which is now happening in Canada.

#36 Al on 12.27.19 at 1:58 am

Dogman01, yous got played by the fake news, aka clickbait. At least you are perceptive enough to notice what happened. One could go on about right wing bias bla bla trying to see left bias where there is none, but this story was just a built in consequence of the incentives in the system to get us all to click..left, right it dont matter.

#37 Sail Away on 12.27.19 at 2:05 am

Tesla’s returns have been a true Christmas gift for believers.

#38 NoName on 12.27.19 at 2:12 am

Maybe museum will be flop I can already see that curator is not experienced enough, but drunkopoly looks promising.

https://nypost.com/2019/12/26/museum-of-hangovers-opens-in-croatia/

#39 Steve French on 12.27.19 at 4:39 am

A Quiz!

This is totally going to trigger Smoking Man.

He has public school PTSD.

#40 Dharma Bum on 12.27.19 at 8:29 am

Post X-Mas & Boxing Day hangover.
Blechhhhhhhhhhh.
Party’s over.
Back to work, dawgs.
In the next few days, try to scrape together some loose change to find 6 Gs for January’s TFSA contribution.
Then wait patiently for another 363 days to pass before all the X-Mas excitement returns.
Yippy-Kai-Yay.

#41 IHCTD9 on 12.27.19 at 12:12 pm

#14 conan on 12.26.19 at 3:59 pm

This Party is broken beyond repair, and it is probably easier to split it into two .

1) The Big oil Sky Daddy Party from the West.

2 )The Progressive Conservative Party.
Now 100 % Harper free in ROC!

But wait, there is more!

I see a schism in the Conservative Party’s near future.
I do not see any other way.
——-

Win win either way for me (and many others).

If the cons make a come back, maybe they’ll return with enough southern brass to take on the problems the Libs won’t touch. That’d be great.

If the Libs keep winning, then I’ll keep paying less and less and less and even less taxes. That IS and continues to be great too!

One of my bros and I had a ball adding up our CCB and tax returns since Trudeau got in. Between us both, T2’s policies pushed the total to just shy of Two Hundred Thousand dollars.

LOL! I don’t know any other way to say it.

Yeah, Trudeau isn’t the smartest dude we’ve ever had for a PM, but I’ll take that cash he’s handing out while it lasts baby :).

I really don’t have much trouble dealing with the embarrassment of being a Canadian under Trudeau. I just mix a little Stoic philosophy together with regular trips to the GM and YAMAHA dealerships, and the Lib policies are forgotten quickly.

So, while the Cons are tweaking, and the Libs are running the show, I’m shopping for a new truck paid for by tax money that Trudeau let me keep, and a new SXS to pull behind it. With piles of cash left over to boot.

Thanks Libs! :)

#42 IHCTD9 on 12.27.19 at 1:05 pm

Speaking of Trudeau and the Federal Libs, I see GM is coming around with .99 and 0% financing on their newly revamped Silverado and Sierra. Incentives also starting to appear. I really like the new design, and the High Country and Denali trims are SWEET.

But, here’s the problem dogs, Ford is coming out with a new F150 late next year, and if it looks as good inside and out as the new GM’s do, I think I’d rather have the aluminum body and EcoBoost/10 speed combo (especially if they let you get the 450 hp H.O. 3.5 from the Raptor/Limited in a lower trim).

I’m thinking I’ll hold out till the new F150 comes out to see what’s up, if I still like the GM’s at that point, they’ll be that much cheaper by then. If the Ford is sweet, then I’ll be glad I waited.

Tax time coming soon! The bro is looking at new trucks too. We expect our combined Trudeau bucks at the end of 2020 to crest One Quarter of a Million dollars (Haaahaha!) since Oct 2015. I laugh, but I am not joking one bit, these are 100% real dollars, conservative ones even.

The budget is definitely balancing itself out here in the sticks. Trudeau is growing our bank accounts from the heart out :).

#43 THOMAS on 12.27.19 at 1:42 pm

What would be the best ETF for RESP using first $2500?

#44 n1tro on 12.27.19 at 2:44 pm

#43 THOMAS on 12.27.19 at 1:42 pm
What would be the best ETF for RESP using first $2500?
———-
ZUE.to tracks the S&P 500 with low fees. Pretty sure in the next 18 years, it will do just fine if left alone.

#45 Marco on 12.27.19 at 3:41 pm

Russia, China, Iran joint naval exercise for your Christmas
present.
Gentlemen, sold and hide. But where?
Soon.

#46 Ronaldo on 12.27.19 at 7:55 pm

#43 Thomas

You might want to check this one out.

https://web.tmxmoney.com/quote.php?qm_symbol=xtr

Steady as she goes and low volatility and pays over 5% dividend.

#47 Ronaldo on 12.27.19 at 8:23 pm

#43 Thomas

You might also want to check this one out as well. I have owned it for many many years and it has done very well for me. No load front or back. Mer .88. 1st quartile rating past 10 years. Low volatility. Average return over 7% since inception. Up 16.69% ytd net of fees. Buy it and fugettaboutit.

http://funds.rbcgam.com/pdf/fund-pages/monthly/rbf1350_e.pdf