The disgrace

It’s a coincidence, but on the day the Bank of Canada head dude said he’s quitting came evidence the maple economy’s melting. Stephen Poloz is out in June. And we lost 71,000 jobs in a single month.

It’s hard to overstate how much this sucks. If we were Americans it would equate to erasing 700,000 positions last month. But guess what? They added 266,000. It was the best performance in 10 months in the US. The worst outcome in a decade for Canada. The contrast is stunning.

The grim beaver stats: it was the most dismal performance since the financial crisis. The jobless rate hasn’t jumped this month in a single month in ten years. Most losses were in the private sector, as opposed to government. Unemployment nationally is now 5.9% – but it spiked a lot more in places like Edmonton (7.7%). The dollar plopped almost three-quarters of a per cent on the news. We shed 27,500 factory jobs, 6,500 in resources and 44,000 in the service sector.

The news comes one day after the new Parliament opened, following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on a strong economy and jobs, jobs, jobs. Go figure.

The USA facts: The jobless rate fell to 3.5%, considered by most economists to be full employment. Over 266,000 more started working, and wages increased over 3%. All of the factory jobs (43,000) lost in October were recouped in November. GM workers went back after their strike and 60,000 more health care professionals found jobs. The surge in employment came despite a 17-month trade war with China and concern we’re now in the 11th year of economic expansion, which is virtually unprecedented.

So what does all this mean, you cry? Did you mess up when you voted?

The jobs number here may be rogue. Or not. But it sure puts more pressure on the central bank – where Poloz has resisted the allure of lower rates – to drop the hammer in the new year. Of course any reduction goes straight to the loins of a horny nation, stimulating more borrowing, spending and real estate inflation. Nobody wins.

Big job losses will mean reduced government tax revenues at a time when the Libs won office by promising to fatten their spending. The Throne Speech talked about that – lower overhead for the ‘middle class’ and increased support to families. Suck and blow. Two-faced. You know what this will entail. Bigger deficits. And higher taxes on the rich people who read this pathetic blog. Deadbeats like small business operators, docs, entrepreneurs, vets and the self-employed. Can the top tax rate pass 53%? Just wait.

In the States, it’s all puppies and cuddles. Stock markets erupted higher again. The recession headlines are gone. Expectation of a downturn in the next twelve months has plunged to one-in-five. It seems every month that passes now the odds of a Trump re-election rise, despite the impeachment drama in Washington. As one analyst said, nobody ever votes against the economy. More jobs has meant more family income, more confidence and spending. In a country where $12 trillion – or 76% of the GDP – comes from Mr & Mrs F-150, this is unbeatable.

Let’s not forget this advance has happened even in the midst of the trade war that has kneecapped US farmers, whacked manufacturers like Harley and seriously increased costs for the car and steel guys. So just imagine what the situation might be like in a year after Trump gets his China deal – and just as Americans are heading to the polls.

So stocks are up. Bonds and gold are down. With less than three weeks to go, 2019 has delivered gains on garden-variety US equity ETFs of well over 20%. Boring and pedantic balanced portfolios are ahead 12%, bringing the four-year advance to almost 30% – and that includes the bear market plop of 2018. More evidence that the time to invest is when you have the money. The only time to stop investing is when you need to spend it.

Let’s see if young Andrew Scheer (remember him?) has enough testo left in his battered bod to confront the minority government over jobs. More taxes won’t bring them back. Neither will social justice, indigenous rights nor gender equity – as important as they may be. But pipelines will. Encouraging, not punishing, business owners would help. And the last thing on the agenda should be goosing capital gains or dividend taxes and diverting capital away from the productive economy and into dead-end bank GICs.

Meanwhile, we won’t have Mr. Poloz to kick around any more. And we already know who comes next. Pity her.

140 comments ↓

#1 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.19 at 2:36 pm

The majority of job losses in the private sector….while the govt continues to feed more bureaucrats into the perpetual motion machine….. ugh.

Taxes and user fees goin uppa uppa uppa……

#2 Lost...but not leased on 12.06.19 at 2:36 pm

Phyrrzzttt !

Bad dog !!!

#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 2:40 pm

I’ve been saying this for awhile. Canada is doomed, Canada needs massive tax and regulations cuts to get risk takers back in the game.

Never happen while Butts calls the shots…

In Toronto now on Day Two, can’t believe how much more things cost than a few years ago when I decided to flee socialism.

Best move I’ve ever made.

I pray for you shmucks that are stuck here.

#4 Sail away on 12.06.19 at 2:58 pm

“The news comes one day after the new Parliament opened, following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on a strong economy and jobs, jobs, jobs.”

———————————–

Shouldn’t that read:

“…following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on false premises and lies, lies lies.”?

Same old story of politicians manipulating data and making things up. Trudeau’s probably making snide jokes about non-supportive Canadians right now.

#5 Linda on 12.06.19 at 3:09 pm

Dog pic of the day – is that a ‘chocolate’ lab?:) On to the economy. It used to be that jobs increased in the holiday season as bricks & mortar shops hired seasonal staff. I guess the online economy has made that a thing of the past. Plus, does anyone wonder how Canada posted robust job growth numbers in the month prior to the actual election given the less than stellar results post election?

2020 is shaping up to be a brutal year for the family budget. Increases to property taxes, utilities & the cost of groceries have already been announced even as more jobs are shed. So much for celebrating the New Year!

#6 paracho on 12.06.19 at 3:23 pm

Close to first . But no cigar !!!!
Seems like our government just needs to set some parameters and stick to them . This is not good in any way , shape or form .
Our government is overindebted . Most people I know are living a lifestyle pay cheque to pay cheque . Heavily indebted due to being house horny .
Most jobs in and around Woodbridge seem to revolve around real estate agents . Real estate commissions have become a big part of our GDP . This is scary !
Alberta is being hollowed out . We are headed in the opposite direction of the US .

#7 Leo on 12.06.19 at 3:27 pm

Being the anniversary of the massacre, T2 is talking about banning assault rifles. …Assault rifles are already banned in Canada, so I still don’t know what he is on about when he says this.

#8 NotLegalAdvice on 12.06.19 at 3:35 pm

Carolyn Wilkins is in for a big job come January!

#9 renter in Surrey on 12.06.19 at 3:39 pm

So interest rates will go down and RE up?

#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm

#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 2:40 pm

I’ve been saying this for awhile. Canada is doomed, Canada needs massive tax and regulations cuts to get risk takers back in the game.
Never happen while Butts calls the shots…
In Toronto now on Day Two, can’t believe how much more things cost than a few years ago when I decided to flee socialism.
Best move I’ve ever made.
I pray for you shmucks that are stuck here.
____________________________________________
My conjecture is that you are back here to benefit from our socialized health care Old Man. Lets face it that is the only reason you return here biannual. Why haven’t you purchased a health plan in SoCal? Have the rates startled you? We are not stuck here but reside here by choice. Ive lived right around the corner from your apartment in Bayport and its nothing to write home about. The homelessness there is beyond belief.
Enjoy the cold while your here and go strap on a pair of skates for Gods sake, try to be a real Canadian.

#11 James on 12.06.19 at 3:51 pm

#4 Sail away on 12.06.19 at 2:58 pm

“The news comes one day after the new Parliament opened, following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on a strong economy and jobs, jobs, jobs.”

———————————–

Shouldn’t that read:

“…following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on false premises and lies, lies lies.”?

Same old story of politicians manipulating data and making things up. Trudeau’s probably making snide jokes about non-supportive Canadians right now.
______________________________________
Semper Idem

#12 Leftover on 12.06.19 at 3:55 pm

The US numbers will give cover to the Fed, who will start raising rates in mid-2020.

Meanwhile, back in Canada, job losses and debt will compound the problem and could lead to a made-in-Canada recession while the USA carries on.

Remember, they don’t care a fig about us.

#13 marcus on 12.06.19 at 3:55 pm

This falls under the “Told you so” category. America is firing on all cylinders and Canada is roadkill. Alberta was just downgraded by Moody’s as well.

#14 FreeBird on 12.06.19 at 4:01 pm

Hopefully the US economy will continue to help millions below the poverty line. LA is/was reportedly the homeless capital of US…

https://youtu.be/JHDkALRz5Rk

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/10/759512938/u-s-census-bureau-reports-poverty-rate-down-but-millions-still-poor

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/15/extreme-poverty-america-un-special-monitor-report

#15 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:02 pm

#3 Smoking Man

Hey Smoking man where did you move to ?

#16 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:05 pm

#7 Leo

What do you classify as assault rifle ? It looks like you can easily purchase this gun for your collection

https://www.cabelas.ca/product/96077/soviet-sks-semi-automatic-rifle-w-tapco-stock

#17 marcus on 12.06.19 at 4:09 pm

Hopefully the US economy will continue to help millions below the poverty line. LA is/was reportedly the homeless capital of US…

When Trump wins in 2020 and the impeachment fiasco is in the rear view mirror Trump will be free to make an example of California. This leftist bastion has mismanaged EVERY aspect of their State. With the Republicans securing the House, Senate and Presidency California will be held to account. Let the chips fall where they may.

#18 Democracy Is Mob Rule on 12.06.19 at 4:12 pm

But it sure puts more pressure on the central bank – where Poloz has resisted the allure of lower rates – to drop the hammer in the new year. Of course any reduction goes straight to the loins of a horny nation, stimulating more borrowing, spending and real estate inflation.
—————–

Lower rates might stimulate more spending for young people (unless they’re heavily in debt), but it does the opposite for older, retired people.

https://wolfstreet.com/2019/11/20/fear-of-reversal-rates-sets-in-says-the-fed/

When interest rates come down, these people (retirees) have less money to spend, and they cut their spending. This includes the many retirees in the US. And it reduces demand. This has been happening in Japan for over 20 years. It’s happening in Europe. And it’s happening in the US.

When central banks, in this environment of already lacking demand, cut interest rates further, they will make the demand problem worse. In other words, these “distributive effects” no longer benefit the overall economy, but hurt it.

#19 Petty much anything goes here ... on 12.06.19 at 4:21 pm

#16 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:05 pm

#7 Leo

What do you classify as assault rifle ? It looks like you can easily purchase this gun for your collection

https://www.cabelas.ca/product/96077/soviet-sks-semi-automatic-rifle-w-tapco-stock

Except fully automatic weapons. Someone in the know once told me we can actually have more stuff than our southern neighbors. Wouldn’t doubt it from what I have seen. And as a nation we are very well armed per capita. Although now the gun registration is gone …

#20 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:35 pm

#19 Petty much anything goes here

Bumpfire stocks are available for the SKS which effectively turn it into an automatic rifle.

https://gun.deals/product/bumpfire-stock-sks-rifles-leftright-handed-models-available-9999

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/04/us/bump-stock-las-vegas-gun.html

And in case the standard SKS 5 round magazine is not enough, you can get a drum and turn the SKS into a 75 round rifle.

https://gunmagwarehouse.com/kci-sks-7-62x39mm-75-round-drum-magazine.html

#21 Mattl on 12.06.19 at 4:46 pm

#7 Leo on 12.06.19 at 3:27 pm
Being the anniversary of the massacre, T2 is talking about banning assault rifles. …Assault rifles are already banned in Canada, so I still don’t know what he is on about when he says this.

—————————————————————

His usual pandering. The gun used was a Mini 14 with a 30 round clip. 5 rounds is max for a mag today.

So unless he is planning on banning all semi-autos….good luck with that.

And really how big a problem are mass shootings in Canada? Gun regs are working here – CORE/PAL, handgun regs, transportation regs, limits on magazines, restricted status. I actually think we have it right, and I bet he feels the same way. But he can never miss an opportunity to pander.

#22 n1tro on 12.06.19 at 4:47 pm

I don’t believe in coincidences. Buddy did nothing to help Canada’s economy while collecting bags of cash for “trying”. Thanks for your “service” Poloz….

#23 Mattl on 12.06.19 at 4:51 pm

#16 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:05 pm
#7 Leo

What do you classify as assault rifle ? It looks like you can easily purchase this gun for your collection

https://www.cabelas.ca/product/96077/soviet-sks-semi-automatic-rifle-w-tapco-stock

—————————————————————-
And? Does it scare you because it’s all black? That gun was built in the 50s and holds 5 rounds, the same as most hunting rifles. It’s semi auto not full auto. It’s not an assault rifle by any definition.

And there are probably 50-100K in Canada today and I’m not aware of any incidents with that gun.

But if it scares you, then by all means we should ban it.

#24 Rick on 12.06.19 at 4:54 pm

Guess “Orange Man Good” Love Trump!

#25 Sam on 12.06.19 at 5:02 pm

USA jobs report awesome

Canadian jobs report crap

Trudeau seen mocking Trump across the pond

Sure am glad our eldest works south of the border

#26 Jager on 12.06.19 at 5:03 pm

#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm

James,

Just how badly has your ego been bruised?

“go strap on a pair of skates for Gods sake, try to be a real Canadian.”

What part of Canada do you live in? At least half the people (now Canadian) I encounter on a daily basis could care less about skating, did not grow up with a (below 0c) winter season and have no interest in hockey etc.

P.S. For whom the bell tolls…It tolls for thee.

#27 Kitsilano Kid on 12.06.19 at 5:05 pm

If we could only find a political party that espouses tried and true Canadian values that built this country:

Free enterprise
Low taxes
Pro Immigration
Social Safety Net

Please would the Conservative Party find some proper leadership and get back to the middle where most Canadians live.

#28 ts on 12.06.19 at 5:06 pm

If 71,000 jobs were lost, won’t this dampen demand for housing as well as overall economy?

#29 Yukon Elvis on 12.06.19 at 5:13 pm

The gun ban is just a distraction. Get the people all fired up over a problem that doesn’t exist so that they don’t notice the employment numbers. Basic Politics 101.

#30 T on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm

#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm
#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 2:40 pm

I’ve been saying this for awhile. Canada is doomed, Canada needs massive tax and regulations cuts to get risk takers back in the game.
Never happen while Butts calls the shots…
In Toronto now on Day Two, can’t believe how much more things cost than a few years ago when I decided to flee socialism.
Best move I’ve ever made.
I pray for you shmucks that are stuck here.
____________________________________________
My conjecture is that you are back here to benefit from our socialized health care Old Man. Lets face it that is the only reason you return here biannual. Why haven’t you purchased a health plan in SoCal? Have the rates startled you? We are not stuck here but reside here by choice. Ive lived right around the corner from your apartment in Bayport and its nothing to write home about. The homelessness there is beyond belief.
Enjoy the cold while your here and go strap on a pair of skates for Gods sake, try to be a real Canadian.

——

Do you really believe the cost of a good health plan in the US is more expensive than the health care taxes in Canada for those who generate a decent income?

Do you really believe someone comes back to Canada to ‘benefit’ from socialized health care, only to have to wait months to see a specialist?

Do you really believe being Canadian means strapping on a pair of skates and enduring the cold weather, trying to make the best of it?

Smoking Man, while often off his rocker, has truly proven to ‘get it’ over the years. He’s smart, has predicted much of what has happened and is happening. Stop the jealous attacks.

This country, Canada, has seen tremendous change over the past several years – and not in a positive direction.

#31 leslie on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm

If they want to keep the game going they will need to reduce mortgage rates and create more spending. Mortgage creation creates a HUGE lift to all markets because this money came from no where and into someone’s pockets

#32 Paul on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm

#16 Mr. Nirp on 12.06.19 at 4:05 pm
#7 Leo

What do you classify as assault rifle ? It looks like you can easily purchase this gun for your collection

https://www.cabelas.ca/product/96077/soviet-sks-semi-automatic-rifle-w-tapco-stock
————————————————————————————————
That is 5 shot semi, auto 9.5 pound boat-anchor from the Cold War. No high power rifle can have magazine Capable holding 5 rounds.

From the R.C.M.P.
Magazines holding more than the prescribed limit are prohibited devices. Pistols are limited to a 10 round maximum capacity regardless of action type or caliber. Semi-auto centerfire rifles and shotguns are limited to a maximum of 5 rounds.

#33 AGuyInVancouver on 12.06.19 at 5:20 pm

#17 marcus on 12.06.19 at 4:09 pm
Hopefully the US economy will continue to help millions below the poverty line. LA is/was reportedly the homeless capital of US…

When Trump wins in 2020 and the impeachment fiasco is in the rear view mirror Trump will be free to make an example of California. This leftist bastion has mismanaged EVERY aspect of their State. With the Republicans securing the House, Senate and Presidency California will be held to account. Let the chips fall where they may.
_ _ _
Um yeah, sure, nice crazed rant. But Democratic California is on track for a multibillion dollar budget surplus, while Trump’s budget dficit is around $1 trillion.
“California is on track for a $7 billion budget surplus. Where will the money go?”
https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article237555229.html

#34 Keith on 12.06.19 at 5:21 pm

The U.S. deficit for 2019 is pushing a trillion.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-25/u-s-annual-budget-deficit-nears-1-trillion-with-26-increase

Economic growth this year is projected at 2.2 percent. Canada’s equivalent deficit would be 100 billion, and commenters are losing their minds at a fraction of that number. The cognitive dissonance is strong in Canada, across the political spectrum. Trump goosed growth to 4%, temporarily. The bill for that growth will fall to the grandchildren, long after economic growth resumes it’s normal modest pace.

In one of his recent shareholder letters, Warren Buffett pointed out there is nothing wrong with 2% growth in a mature economy. It quadruples in size over 72 years. He pointed out that the problem was that that quadrupling would not be fairly distributed, your pay will not go up 4x in real terms. Someone else will take that money.

#35 MF on 12.06.19 at 5:21 pm

#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at

Lol.

50% of the US population is radical socialist, and coming for your loot as well.

If not that, then the 22 trillion debt will eventually do you in.

Looks like it feels great to ignore all that from the huge glass house you moved into though.

MF

#36 The Wet One on 12.06.19 at 5:31 pm

While there were job losses, it’s noteworthy just how pesky those who look for work are to unemployment rates:

“In Quebec, 45,000 fewer people were employed in November, with the decline largely attributable to manufacturing as well as accommodation and food services. As more people searched for work, the unemployment rate in the province increased by 0.6 percentage points to 5.6%. Despite the monthly decline, total employment in Quebec was up by 45,000 (+1.0%) on a year-over-year basis.

Employment in Alberta fell by 18,000 in November, with declines occurring in a number of industries, led by wholesale and retail trade. On a year-over-year basis, total employment in the province was little changed. With more people seeking employment, the unemployment rate in Alberta rose by 0.5 percentage points to 7.2% in November, a rate observed as recently as August.

Employment in British Columbia also fell by 18,000 in November, with declines spread across several industries. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in the province was little changed. The unemployment rate rose to 5.0% in November from 4.7% in October.

While employment in Ontario held steady in November, the unemployment rate increased by 0.3 percentage points to 5.6% as a result of more people looking for work.

Employment in Saskatchewan was little changed, while the unemployment rate rose to 5.8% (+0.7 percentage points) as more people looked for work. There was also little employment change in Manitoba, and the unemployment rate edged up 0.3 percentage points to 5.6% in November.”

From https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/191206/dq191206a-eng.htm

Kinda makes you wonder don’t it?

Why are so many new people looking for work?

Any ideas?

#37 Midnights on 12.06.19 at 5:40 pm

Garth love your blog and your website. But your dancing around Trudeau being a total screwup. And this guy, Trudeau represents ALL of us on the world stage like it or not. And something I heard on Money Talk, is that Stephen Poloz was becoming outspoken about that was happening and would step down.

#38 Dutchy on 12.06.19 at 5:47 pm

Re: Employment numbers

Take a deep breath and wait for next month’s numbers.

#39 45north on 12.06.19 at 5:47 pm

Let’s see if young Andrew Scheer has enough testo to confront the minority government over jobs. More taxes won’t bring them back. Neither will social justice, indigenous rights nor gender equity – as important as they may be. But pipelines will. Encouraging, not punishing, business owners would help. And the last thing on the agenda should be goosing capital gains or dividend taxes and diverting capital away from the productive economy and into dead-end bank GICs.

he damn well better confront Justin Trudeau over jobs

more taxes won’t bring them back but pipelines will. As I said, the next move is a no-brainer. Build the pipeline to Ontario as well as the refineries to supply Ontario with a reliable source of fuel and petro-chemicals. Give Québec the option to buy in.

Mark Gordon talks about a change in regime. Right now oil is plentiful and cheap but that’s about to change:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhc6vyxVsDs

(link provided by SunDays)

The night of the election Loyd Roberston said “this is Justin Trudeau’s hour, he’s either going to make it or not.”

Well he’s not. If Andrew Scheer is going to make it, he’s going to have to be tougher than steel. He doesn’t look that tough.

#40 Stoph on 12.06.19 at 5:50 pm

I just wonder when the environmental movement is going to go after the auto manufacturing sector in Ontario and Bombardier in Quebec for manufacturing products that emit CO2.

I haven’t heard of any Canadian politicians opposing the auto or aerospace industries on the basis of the environmental destruction that results from the use their products. Seems hypocritical to me.

#41 JSS on 12.06.19 at 5:56 pm

“Unemployment nationally is now 5.9% – but it spiked a lot more in places like Edmonton (7.7%)”

I can easily see 10% unemployment in Edmonton within a year’s time, as Edmonton has a fairly large provincial public sector workforce.

#42 Sirloin Steak at 60 cents a pound on 12.06.19 at 6:04 pm

$1700 for a one bedroom in Toronto’s suburbs. Explain how people can afford that price?

#43 oh bouy on 12.06.19 at 6:15 pm

ha, the negativity is extra thick on here today.
curmudgeons unite!

#44 marcus on 12.06.19 at 6:29 pm

Moody’s downgraded Alberta’s credit once again. This is the 7th downgrade. The main reason for the downgrade is Alberta’s reliance on oil AND their inability to transport said oil due to insufficient number of pipelines. If this is not shooting yourself in the foot Canada I don’t know what is. Trudope is killing Alberta. No wonder they want out.

#45 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.06.19 at 6:50 pm

No wonder job numbers are down. The 20% carbon tax on natural gas to heat your home is taking a bite out of everyone. And for the next three years it’s going up to its planned price of $50 per tonne which oddly enough works out to close to 50%.

#46 Entrepreneur on 12.06.19 at 6:51 pm

BC probably has the highest homeless number in Canada, popping up everywhere. Are more affordable homes the answer?

Or is there a bigger problem? Where are the jobs? Where is the spirit, the Canadian one? Where are leaders and are they ignoring the real problem?

BC has 5000 Port Alice mill workers laid off just recently. Not much news on this outside of here. Is BC being ignored again? Another problem not addressed.

At least Scheer is addressing the people of the western provinces, taxpaying workers. He came out of Parliament Hill to talk to the Truck Convoy from the West.

But isn’t T1 the PM, addressing issues “for all Canadians.” And wasn’t that the perfect time to explain how to “transition” to renewable energy? Not a word.

BC being ignored, homeless camps increasing, mills shutting down, but logs shipped outside of BC, no manufacturing here, ferries built in other countries and what else are our great leaders sending out, ignoring us.

Maybe start thinking of the people who live within borders to control this mess. We are not building we are destroying and out of control.

Climate change will not correct until we start addressing issues and how to solve them correctly.

#47 Sail Away on 12.06.19 at 6:51 pm

In good news: Elon Musk exonerated of defamation.

Now he can concentrate on Tesla continued superiority.

#48 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.06.19 at 6:52 pm

And that doesn’t include the increased cost of driving to work or the increased cost of everything else shipped with fossil fuels…which is everything.

#49 MF on 12.06.19 at 6:57 pm

#30 T on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm

Nope.

I’m sorry T but that sounds more like an emotional outburst than anything evidence based.

Canada does have superior health care than the US. Every international ranking acknowledges this fact.

Also, “wait times” is a pretty complex factor. Not all procedures take the same amount of time. It also varies according to province. 2015 stats:

http://www.waittimealliance.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/EN-FINAL-2015-WTA-Report-Card_REV.pdf

Also, James is right. While these ex pats like Smoking Man may wait longer for some procedures, they do come back for cheaper pharmacare. An example is insulin, which even Trump spoke about a few months ago:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/insulin-prices-united-states-canada-caravan-1.5195399

Your assertion that “Canada has changed for the worse in the last few years” is based on what exactly?

Political climate? The US is deeply divided politically, and it routinely bubbles over into violence.

Debt levels? This is a western world wide problem. 22 trillion and counting in the US.

Radical leftism? The Dems down south are drifting further and further left. Witness the debates a while back for evidence.

I go on a few US forums. Same complaining about what the country has become, or where it is headed. Same finger pointing. Same poop.

MF

#50 Yukon Elvis on 12.06.19 at 6:59 pm

#43 Sirloin Steak at 60 cents a pound on 12.06.19 at 6:04 pm
$1700 for a one bedroom in Toronto’s suburbs. Explain how people can afford that price?
……………….

Roommates.

#51 TurnerNation on 12.06.19 at 7:00 pm

Good Cop; Bad Cop coming?
Blog Dog Poloz the happy hockey-haired housing inflator. Timing, as B of C plans a digital currency launch. Was he on board or not?
Did the UN demand a globalist instead?
Remember, nothing is left to chance on the global tax farm.

#52 Dave on 12.06.19 at 7:02 pm

Pipelines won’t bring substantial number of jobs. Oil is in secular decline. Saudi Aramco intended to sell 5% of their market cap and they only sold 1.5%. What does that tell you? We can build pipelines, but who will buy the oil? Russia has built one to China….We need to diversify the economy and get more value added companies…and what does that Charlatan Jason Kenny do? He cuts funding for the innovation fund, which was used to stimulate small business, so he can give his buddies at Husky another tax break, despite them making a profit, they lay off hundreds of staff. Pipelines will not transform the Canadian economy.

#53 Phylis on 12.06.19 at 7:03 pm

#40 Stoph on 12.06.19 at 5:50 pm don’t worry, GM has seen the writing on the wall and is shutting down as we speak. No more coal heating, no more gas ovens no more jobs. Problem solved. Well at least for ontario, it’s mexicos problem now. I wonder when the remaining closure will hit the job numbers. If there are 1000 people still there and there is a 10 times supplier effect, the next report for Ontario might not be too rosey.

#54 Ustabe on 12.06.19 at 7:04 pm

Except fully automatic weapons. Someone in the know once told me we can actually have more stuff than our southern neighbors. Wouldn’t doubt it from what I have seen. And as a nation we are very well armed per capita. Although now the gun registration is gone …

I think we have more long guns per capita than the US but don’t think the same metric holds for pistols and revolvers.

Fun story time:
I have a semi (approved for sale in Canada under Harper’s rule) out of Israel. Scary enough to store in the local RCMP’s armory.

Each time they get a new CO I have to go and update why a civilian keeps a semi-auto there instead of at home.

Load it and hand it over to the new guy while the range master frets in the background, lol. Doesn’t take long for them to say to me, “I see why you would chose to have us keep this one secure.”

Mine is what they call the civilian model, semi as opposed to full auto.
Tavor bullpup assault rifle, Google images is fun.

Legally imported into Canada, legally owned, only reason I got it is some tuff guy (from Alberta, lol) told me I couldn’t.

Showed him, eh?

#55 Felix on 12.06.19 at 7:09 pm

Finally, a photo that shows the truth about what dogs are made of.

#56 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.19 at 7:10 pm

Scheer had his chance.
His Winnie the Poo personal just dont cut it.
If he couldnt beat “two face” the first time with the scandals and embarrassments …..
He doesnt deserve another chance.
For the good of the Party and the Country…. he should move on…
Maybe let Lisa Rait run in a safe seat so she can step up as Leader of the cons.
New face, new ideas, a gal from hard scrabble Sidney Nova Scotia locking horns with Gerald Butts “two face” lackey….
Be fun to watch.

#57 Glengarry Girl on 12.06.19 at 7:30 pm

The grass is NOT greener on the other side of the fence, trust me. I travel and live all over the USA and it is in decline. I could add the data charts and stats to back my claim, but I don’t have the need to convince anyone. Infrastructure, life expectancy, labor participation rate, quality of life, on and on. The health care billing and delivery of service is predatory as is post secondary education. Pension deficits and trillions in stimulus, fake numbers and Trump and his banking cartel propping up the stock market, it’s a house of cards. Canada has it’s problems, but is a positive home base for my future plans. At least we have social nets and not every other man woman and child armed and angry.

#58 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.19 at 7:30 pm

@#63 Sixty Scents Sir Loin
“$1700 for a one bedroom in Toronto’s suburbs. Explain how people can afford that price?’
++++

Well, where there’s a will, there’s a way…

https://business.financialpost.com/real-estate/whistler-now-tops-vancouver-as-canadas-craziest-housing-market

Or a Dodge Caravan with no heat……

#59 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.19 at 7:33 pm

Vancouvers working homeless…

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/homeless-asking-city-to-let-them-live-in-their-vehicles

You’ve been towed.
Merry Christmas…..

#60 Gravy Train on 12.06.19 at 7:40 pm

#46 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.06.19 at 6:50 pm
“No wonder job numbers are down. The 20% carbon tax on natural gas to heat your home is taking a bite out of everyone.” In other words, it’s a perfect time to put solar panels on your roof. :)

“And for the next three years it’s going up to its planned price of $50 per tonne which oddly enough works out to close to 50%.” Look into net metering and any carbon tax rebates on solar panels. :)

#61 BillyBob on 12.06.19 at 7:46 pm

#26 Jager on 12.06.19 at 5:03 pm
#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm

James,

Just how badly has your ego been bruised?

“go strap on a pair of skates for Gods sake, try to be a real Canadian.”

What part of Canada do you live in? At least half the people (now Canadian) I encounter on a daily basis could care less about skating, did not grow up with a (below 0c) winter season and have no interest in hockey etc.

P.S. For whom the bell tolls…It tolls for thee.

====================================================

Yep. Nailed it. Anyone who uses the term “real Canadian” has already lost. There IS nothing that defines Canada anymore. If there is, it’s Justin Trudeau captured on video gossiping like a schoolgirl. That IS Canada, in a nutshell. The insecure wannabe, always trying to be one of the cool kids.

The whole willy-measuring contest misses the point entirely. Be flexible, be ready to adapt, be ready to go where the opportunities are. Either literally, or with your dollars.

Or, be like MF and try and endlessly defend mediocrity.

Think what you want of SM, but he didn’t sit around waiting for things to circle the bowl.

#62 Greg Sanjuin on 12.06.19 at 7:50 pm

I hope you guys like a 52 to 57 cents Canadian dollar to U.S. dollar because this is where we are going. Every time the useless Liberals, slower form of Socialists but Trudeau, Morneau is changing that for the worse get in we all become poorer day by day. Get ready to pay for 1.75 to 1.96 Canadian dollar to buy a U.S. dollar.

The last time 1.63 for a U.S. dollar under Chretien, Martin Liberals. Remember the brain drain. They are all going to the U.S. because it is cheaper, lower taxes, fees, less regulation etc.

Most Canadians are such real financial losers and will stay that way as they are delusional and in fantasyland.

#63 BillyBob on 12.06.19 at 8:01 pm

Incidentally, both Canada’s and the US healthcare don’t rank particularly high on any list of healthcare quality in the world (23 and 30 respectively mid-2019). Trying to brag that Canada is better than our southern neighbours is a bit like being proud of being the leper with the most fingers. Um…yay?

Y’all need to get out more.

@Ustabe

The Tavor X95 with the 40mm grenade launcher slung underneath has to be seen to be believed.

The Israelis make some crazy-good armaments.

#64 Election fraud? on 12.06.19 at 8:02 pm

In early October, Stats Canada published massive jobs increase numbers that blew past analysts expectations. On CBC, Suhana Meharchand presented these numbers, while saying something closely along the lines of “Keep these fantastic numbers in mind when you go to vote next week”. So, here we are, post elections: two subsequent months of Stats Canada jobs numbers that are terrible and worse than terrible. What to make of the October anomaly, is this just a fluke or a case of an inadvertent Stats Canada error, or is something more nefarious at work? At the same time, where is the long-promised RCMP investigation into Trudeau regarding SNC-Lavalin? When I watch the US impeachment hearings, I cannot help but think that despite the soap drama in US politics, at least their system is functioning; when here in Canada, one gets the impression that there are too few opposing powerful interests behind the scenes.

#65 True D'oh on 12.06.19 at 8:07 pm

#30 T on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm
#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm
#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 2:40 pm

Smoking Man, while often off his rocker, has truly proven to ‘get it’ over the years. He’s smart, has predicted much of what has happened and is happening. Stop the jealous attacks.

——————-
Easy to bad mouth canada on a bad 30 days but do you ever see him predict a good month? Only comes here for the no risk Canadian money.

#66 Debtslavecreator on 12.06.19 at 8:14 pm

No surprise here
The economy is and has been nothing more than a financialization fraud as the crown corps BofC and CMHC along with local and provincial govts subsidize credit and apply crazy taxes
While most buyers and homeDEBTRENTERs get fooled by the artificially inflated home prices, what’s happening to most is their disposable income is being taxed away through credit inflation
The Canadian economy is a massive Bezzle
One month is not a trend but the economy has been fundamentally weak and driven mainly by junk debt induced housing inflation and related spending
It’s has shocked me
The duration and height of this debt bubble made possible only because of the never ending hordes of borrowers in free will to enslave themselves
Whether it’s this year or 3-4 years the longer this debt fuelled housing and consumption binge goes on the more likely we experience a historic and rapid economic collapse that will be stagflationary in nature

The signs of decay and precollapse have been obvious for several years and recent data points such as growth in bankruptcy and consumer proposals confirm late debt bubble stage behaviours
I really hate seeing it this way
I really am a positive person and we might be able to muddle through with some nasty bruises if the US and rest of the world economies grow at a decent clip
I hope we get a second lucky break via a strong external economy like we did for most of the 90s which allowed us to escape the worst case

But this economy is one sick puppy and it’s quite possibly we go into a powerful and rapid stagflationary collapse over the next 24 months or so

#67 Robert Ash on 12.06.19 at 8:15 pm

I would suspect, that JT, will take the higher tax route. This is a guy, that is dangerous, because he has just enough information to be dangerous, and he believes the Tea Leaves, he must be reading. There is a sad, melancholy rant to this guy… He actually believes, he is making progress on social issues, his just society, like his Father expounded, but the times are not supportive. Today in our Modern World, we have to compete more, and that means, efficiencies, but focusing and adopting these social improvements, is really JT’s mandate. He is not a Business savy guy, or Technical Savy, he is well, probably a nice guy, who believes, in his strategy, but it is not focused, on the Economy that is for sure… No one mentions, the Pot Stock debacle, but some 16 Billion of investment money went to Wall Street/ Bay Street…. What a waste of Productivity. What do international Investors think about Canada, when they look at BNN for example and the Images, they see, are Pot Plants, and a Dialogue, about Edibles, or Candy for Kids, that gets them High… Helpful, for our Serious Business interests.. Well you all have your opinions, but for me, it is and was a non issue, that simply needed Decriminalization….. One and done.. but that is what folks, voted, for… The end result, is we have elected a group of “Posers”, who have limited ability, to actually Govern, Limited Ideas, and the saddest part, is our Democracy, is not working in my Opinion, when unelected folks, form the Policies, and Direction, and there is seemingly little input from our MPs, … Only one Group is in charge, and for many Canadians, not the people they think represent them.

#68 MF on 12.06.19 at 8:16 pm

3 BillyBob on 12.06.19 at

It’s not defending mediocrity, it’s calling out stupidity.

Do you know the difference? Probably not.

What’s the UK’s identity today?

If I were to use your analogy, the UK is the former jock who got by on “athletics” and never studied. Eventually he got kicked out of school and had to work odd jobs here and there while he bores people with his high school football stories from the 60’s.

“I was the greatest quarterback ever”

“I know you were Jim. I know”

MF

#69 Ustabe on 12.06.19 at 8:18 pm

@#59 Glengarry Girl

Thank you for so clearly enunciating your thoughts. Thoughts that I share.

Nice to know there are others who frequent this blog who are not doomer/gloomers.

#70 conan on 12.06.19 at 8:38 pm

Never happen while Butts calls the shots… -Smoking Man

Like a dictator? Pretty sure the Liberals rule by Cabinet.

#71 Rargary on 12.06.19 at 8:46 pm

#28 ts on 12.06.19 at 5:06 pm

If 71,000 jobs were lost, won’t this dampen demand for housing as well as overall economy?….
………
Noooo! They sell, mom and dad shell out rescue money for millennials to buy their distressed home!

#72 Leo on 12.06.19 at 9:02 pm

#16 Mr. Nirp
#32 Paul

I classify an assault rifle as a selective fire rife with detachable magazine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assault_rifle

Magazine capacity is a another thing. For example, rifles are restrict to 5 round capacity. But some have found a loop holes, such as using a 10 round LAR15 pistol magazine in their .223 rifle which is legal because there isn’t anything illegal with using a pistol magazine in your rifle if it fits without modification.

#73 oh bouy on 12.06.19 at 9:03 pm

@#63 BillyBob on 12.06.19 at 7:46 pm
#26 Jager on 12.06.19 at 5:03 pm
#10 James on 12.06.19 at 3:48 pm

James,

Just how badly has your ego been bruised?

“go strap on a pair of skates for Gods sake, try to be a real Canadian.”

What part of Canada do you live in? At least half the people (now Canadian) I encounter on a daily basis could care less about skating, did not grow up with a (below 0c) winter season and have no interest in hockey etc.

P.S. For whom the bell tolls…It tolls for thee.

====================================================

Yep. Nailed it. Anyone who uses the term “real Canadian” has already lost. There IS nothing that defines Canada anymore. If there is, it’s Justin Trudeau captured on video gossiping like a schoolgirl. That IS Canada, in a nutshell. The insecure wannabe, always trying to be one of the cool kids.

The whole willy-measuring contest misses the point entirely. Be flexible, be ready to adapt, be ready to go where the opportunities are. Either literally, or with your dollars.

Or, be like MF and try and endlessly defend mediocrity.

Think what you want of SM, but he didn’t sit around waiting for things to circle the bowl.
__________________________________________

lol, you folks are lost.

#74 islander on 12.06.19 at 9:21 pm

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-suvs-are-killing-the-planet-and-pedestrians-why-do-canadians/

…looking to cut back ….try ditching that SUV

#75 Nonplused on 12.06.19 at 9:22 pm

And of course Trudeau is marching right along with his ill-advised increase in the HST (which he calls a “carbon tax”, it is anything but). Any tax cuts received by the lower and middle classes will be more than offset by the coming increase in the cost of living due to this tax.

The problem with the HST and the carbon tax is that the poor cannot avoid it. It will be baked into every step of the way of getting their Doritos and Slurpees to the 7-11. Prices will go up. They have to. The money has to come from somewhere.

When Alberta had its ill-fated carbon tax, I estimated I was paying $2000/y+ just on gasoline and running the house. But I am sure the total amount including embedding was much more than that. Even the school board had to raise busing fees because of the increased fuel costs. Carbon taxes are really just a “tax on everything”. Nothing gets done without carbon, including getting the kids to school. Will the carbon tax actually reduce emissions? Probably. But it will do so by reducing the lifestyle of the very voters who put Trudeau in office. You can’t just put a $2000+ or probably $4000 pole tax on people making minimum wage and expect them to magically come up with the money. They will be buying a lot less Slurpees.

And all over what? CO2 emissions from Canada are not rising and haven’t for years. Cars keep getting more efficient, I think all new appliances are “high efficiency”, I just put in a new furnace and the only choices I had were all high efficiency, people have been replacing their windows, stuffing their attics with extra insulation, getting those fancy thermostats, using LED lights, all kinds of stuff as technology improves, money is available, and necessity dictates. All without a carbon tax.

The carbon tax is just a money grab, and it is primarily directed at the average person. The rich fuel their jets and yachts in US, and have for years. I learned this years ago when I flew in a corporate jet from Calgary to San Francisco. We stopped in Montana for fuel. They weren’t going to fill up in Calgary if they could avoid it. I’m pretty sure they also topped up in San Francisco for the return flight but I was in a black SUV at that point. Flying private is so cool, you park right at the hanger for free, and at the other end the black SUV’s meet you right at the plane. None of this terminal stuff. No lines, no body scans, no luggage searches, no pat downs, no removing your shoes and belt and jacket. You just park, have a (free) coffee and a doughnut, and get on the plane. No wonder Leonardo DiCaprio won’t give it up even when he’s protesting the oil sands. But based on what our corporate charge out rate was for that airplane, I would say a private jet uses 4 times as much fuel per person as commercial and that is if every seat is full. Way to go Lenny. But I’d still accept an invite to hang on the yacht with the babes.

Remember folks, the carbon tax applies to everybody but the rich. If they be producing, they pass the cost along to the end user. If they be sailing the 7 seas or flying to the Caymans so they can check on their tax shelters, they don’t fuel up in Calgary when they can coast to Montana. That is how the rich do. They don’t have borders. The carbon tax is for you, not them. All taxes are.

#76 Politico on 12.06.19 at 9:34 pm

There will be no new pipelines built from Alberta that go east or west. When the time comes for the pipelines to be built, they will go south. The economic capture of Alberta by US moneyed interests is complete. Why would the US moneyed interests want to put an LNG export facility in Prince Rupert when it can just as easily be placed in Oregon and they can capture the margin? All it costs is a small amount to get Canadians to protest against each other and shut everything down. That is how business is done in the US.

Alberta will get its new pipelines. But not until the US is ready for them and the pipelines will run south when they do get built, as most of the existing ones do.

To bad for BC. Lots of jobs they will never have. But don’t think for a minute that a US politician wouldn’t rather have the jobs in his own district. Where would you put the votes, tax revenue, and economic activity if you were a US politician? Canada? Screw that. The valuable workers can immigrate to the US and pay US taxes, thank you very much. This is how it has always been done.

#77 Spectacle on 12.06.19 at 9:44 pm

“And the last thing on the agenda ……..”

It’s 1992 All Over Again: Agenda 2030 Threatens Our Way of Life

It’s never over with Agenda 2030 !

#78 Mark Taylor on 12.06.19 at 9:47 pm

I feel like when reading the job losses I am reading Pravda. Extremely high job creation pre-election & then this! These numbers are all B.S. & manipulated& am now watching HGTV instead of the news.

#79 Nice math guys on 12.06.19 at 9:56 pm

#51 Yukon Elvis on 12.06.19 at 6:59 pm
#43 Sirloin Steak at 60 cents a pound on 12.06.19 at 6:04 pm
$1700 for a one bedroom in Toronto’s suburbs. Explain how people can afford that price?
……………….

It’s called having a job. Single person making min wage $14 * 40hrs = $2200/month. They can squeeze by. And if they make anything additional, they’re laughing.

#80 Phylis on 12.06.19 at 9:57 pm

#78 Nonplused on 12.06.19 at 9:22 pm And customs comes to you. sweet indeed.

#81 Sail Away on 12.06.19 at 9:57 pm

#66 Election fraud? on 12.06.19 at 8:02 pm

In early October, Stats Canada published massive jobs increase numbers that blew past analysts expectations.

On CBC, Suhana Meharchand presented these numbers, while saying something closely along the lines of “Keep these fantastic numbers in mind when you go to vote next week”.

—————————

Of course it was fake.

And.. with this front and centre, how do you feel about the climate emergency?

Oh- that’s real? Uh huh.

#82 T on 12.06.19 at 9:58 pm

#50 MF on 12.06.19 at 6:57 pm
#30 T on 12.06.19 at 5:15 pm

Nope.

I’m sorry T but that sounds more like an emotional outburst than anything evidence based.

———

Health care is far superior in almost every aspect in the US except for costs, and if you carry a quality health care plan this is not a concern. The difference in cost of a quality plan in the US vs the cost to individual Canadian taxpayers who actually pay for the health care system is substantial. Also, US health care is more focused on treating causes while Canada is all about treating symtoms which is a result of accountability US doctors face with insurance plans and the lack of accountability in Canada. An insurance provider will not continue to payout to poor performing doctors, this is not true in Canada where you are lucky to find a family doctor or wait less than 20 weeks to see a specialist.

Yes, politically there is division. This is not a point I was challenging. However this is a fact of life everywhere these days, there’s no getting away from it.

I have life experience on both sides of the border, have family in both countries, pay taxes to both. Anecdotal, yes, though I’m sure I could find many articles online to support everything above. But really, you can find articles online to support any point of view. What matters is personal experience. Don’t misrepresent what you read on message boards as such experience. You might want to consider living in the US and obtaining the experience. Find a quality job to help with your VISA. You won’t regret it, especially if you go to the west coast.

Lastly, I do get emotional about someone telling someone else how to be Canadian unless it’s guidance around being intelligent, thoughtful, and courteous.

#83 Nice math guys on 12.06.19 at 10:00 pm

Oh, and if you get an apartment, not a condo, you can pay $1000-$1200 for a place. Not $1700. Entitled millenials thinking that prices should be low enough to afford a condo rental at part-time min wage? Please. 20 years ago we were forced to live in apartments coming out of school and the same should apply now. Don’t expect to live the life of luxury just because you got a B.A. it BSc. Earn it and live larger when you build some savings. Don’t blow it all on avacado toast or you’ll be whining on pathetic blogs your whole life about how the boomers had it so easy but you poor snowflakes suffer so terribly. Boomers didn’t rent luxury condos when they started working either. Earn it, crybabies.

#84 Yukon Elvis on 12.06.19 at 10:07 pm

#57 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.06.19 at 7:10 pm
Scheer had his chance.
His Winnie the Poo personal just dont cut it.
If he couldnt beat “two face” the first time with the scandals and embarrassments …..
He doesnt deserve another chance.
For the good of the Party and the Country…. he should move on…
………………………

I don’t blame Scheer personally. The Conservative Party simply did not offer as much free stuff as the Libs and the Dips. Simple as that. Whoever offers the most free stuff wins. Fiscal conservatism is dead.

#85 fishman on 12.06.19 at 10:09 pm

You can add one more to the unemployment ranks from B.C.. I’ve gotten to know fellows who give me a call when they come to town. I’ll give them work , make a few bucks before they drift back to their village up the coast. I’m checking on how things are going this morning & notice something wrong. This native guy working with one hand; broken knuckles on his right hand. OK,Thanks for showing up on time but looks like holidays start early for you.
One time we were all prepped for a big 20 day opening.
The night before leaving the whole crew is in the bar, at my expense of course. My main guy was irreplaceable. I paid him more than I paid me. Besides him I had to take his brother in law, a Cape Bretoner with no teeth. Soon, sure enough the Cape Bretoner was in a fight & I’ll always remember my main guy yelling at him across the bar: the hands, the hands, don’t hurt the hands.
Now you blogdogs know why say “all hands on deck.”

#86 T on 12.06.19 at 10:17 pm

#59 Glengarry Girl on 12.06.19 at 7:30 pm
The grass is NOT greener on the other side of the fence, trust me. I travel and live all over the USA and it is in decline. I could add the data charts and stats to back my claim, but I don’t have the need to convince anyone. Infrastructure, life expectancy, labor participation rate, quality of life, on and on. The health care billing and delivery of service is predatory as is post secondary education. Pension deficits and trillions in stimulus, fake numbers and Trump and his banking cartel propping up the stock market, it’s a house of cards. Canada has it’s problems, but is a positive home base for my future plans. At least we have social nets and not every other man woman and child armed and angry.

———

Sounds like you live on CNN. Words of advice; change the channel.

#87 BS on 12.06.19 at 10:22 pm

More taxes won’t bring them back. Neither will social justice, indigenous rights nor gender equity – as important as they may be.

A rising tide lifts all boats. It doesn’t matter what your gender, race or social status. A good economy and jobs is good for every group. Trumps plan makes the economy great for everyone which helps every race, gender or identity and increases tax revenue even with lower taxes.

Mr. Socks plan is to increase taxes, punish businesses and invoke identity politics into everything. What we get is less jobs for everyone, less tax revenue and less to help those in need and more people left behind.

Another lesson in the failure of the progressives. It doesn’t work. Never has, never will.

#88 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 10:27 pm

I could not afford to be an alcoholic in Canada. These phychos abosest with behavior modeling would drive me insane. Bozze is the happy pill.

I hate Libtards…

#89 Irwin on 12.06.19 at 10:40 pm

Almost makes one think there’s a Higher Power in charge; one that loves Land of Trump (LoT) and hates Canadians. Maybe we’re the next “chosen” people.

Whom the Higher Power loves, it chastens. As in “chased by a dog” – get it?

#90 DON on 12.06.19 at 10:42 pm

@#68 Debtslavecreator 12.06.19 at 8:14 pm

Thanks for the insight!

@#Entrepreneur

Not Port Alice most recently, the village only has 800 people if that (pulp mill has been closed for a while). But the loggers and some medium sized mills are out on the picket lines up and down the island. There have been mill curtailments and shutdowns all over the interior due to lack of quality logs (they get shipped to the US and Asia). We can’t lower our stumpage fees without having the US come down hard on our industry. And given our Prime Minister’s most recent Trump blunder I think Trump would focus in on this one(?). Did you see the look on his face?

#91 Steven Rowlandson on 12.06.19 at 10:50 pm

Speaking of disgraces.
https://www.debtclock.ca/

#92 Doug in London on 12.06.19 at 10:52 pm

@Keith, post #32:
About 2 months ago I heard Bruce Heyman, former U.S. Ambassador to Canada speaking at Western University. Among other things, he mentioned that all other things equal the total debt for the United States should be about 10 times what it is for Canada. The actual figure, according to him, is more like 50 times. Oh sure, that’s boosting the economy now but it’s not sustainable and one day the bill will come due. When that day comes the Government of Canada with its smaller debt will look like sober minded geniuses.

@Bytor the Snow Dog, post #26:
Yes, the carbon tax. To date I’ve used 465 litres of gas. Multiply that by 12/11 and, at my present rate of use that equals 507.3 l for the year. Multiply that by 4.4 cents per litre and it equals $22.32. Meanwhile I got a rebate, on line 449 of my income tax of $154. That leaves a net gain of $131.68. Wow, what a ripoff!

@Greg Sanjuin, post #64:
Well then pack up and leave. We won’t miss you.

#93 Doug in London on 12.06.19 at 10:57 pm

@Glengarry Girl, post #59:
What you said is also consistent with my observations.

#94 SunDays on 12.06.19 at 11:01 pm

#68 Debtslavecreator on 12.06.19 at 8:14 pm
———————
100% agree. Financial services used to be facilitators of the economy. Today in Canada they are THE economy. Almost 40% of TSX composite index is Financials sector. Even Switzerland, which is well known for their Banking Industry, has Health Care and Consumer Staples sectors preceding Financials.

Regarding your Stagflation prediction. Real GDP per capita growth is already an issue. No wonder Canada ranks between Panama and Bolivia on the Misery Index, and people are feeling the pinch.

Hanke’s Annual Misery Index
https://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/hankes-annual-misery-index-2018-worlds-saddest-happiest-countries

The Most Miserable Countries in the World
https://www.visualcapitalist.com/the-most-miserable-countries-in-the-world/

#95 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 11:05 pm

DELETED

#96 GRG on 12.06.19 at 11:11 pm

“…The grim beaver stats: it was the most dismal performance since the financial crisis. The jobless rate hasn’t jumped this month in a single month in ten years. Most losses were in the private sector, as opposed to government. Unemployment nationally is now 5.9% – but it spiked a lot more in places like Edmonton (7.7%). The dollar plopped almost three-quarters of a per cent on the news. We shed 27,500 factory jobs, 6,500 in resources and 44,000 in the service sector.

The news comes one day after the new Parliament opened, following an election in which the Trudeau Libs ran on a strong economy and jobs, jobs, jobs. Go figure…

…And higher taxes on the rich people who read this pathetic blog. Deadbeats like small business operators, docs, entrepreneurs, vets and the self-employed. Can the top tax rate pass 53%? Just wait…”

After years of chasing capital investment away from Canada, and the assault on entrepreneurs and self-employed professionals, is it any wonder the private sector is taking the jobs hit? And the resource dependent Provinces are taking the biggest hits of all? Ya right, go figure.

I’m sure more carbon taxes, the focus on climate change in the Throne Speech and the new Minister of Middle Class Prosperity will save us…with all those “high paying green economy jobs”.

The voters in the GVRD and the GTA must be about the only ones left that still believe we don’t need no stinkin’ rocks, trees or decomposed dinosaurs for this economy to prosper.

Pipelines are a pipe dream. Nobody with a functioning brain cell is going to waste time and money trying to get one of those projects off the ground in this gawdforsaken land.

Owe Canada.

#97 dr talc on 12.06.19 at 11:12 pm

T2’s war on non existent guns is all about police budgets,
that’s it.

#98 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.06.19 at 11:25 pm

44k of the job losses, more than 50% were in the service industry.
Minimum wage paying jobs, who pay no taxes.
I think this is good news.

#99 Sandy Shalin on 12.06.19 at 11:30 pm

I am glad my $1.2 million is in many financial institutions this year 3.5% to 3.75% 5, 7 year brain-dead GIC’s. TFSA, RRSP, RRIF, non-registered money 14.7% overall income tax rate with my personal amount, pension income amount, disability tax credit, TFSA tax free interest. This is a pretty low overall income tax rate, 85.30% left net after income, health taxes.

My total income, interest, RRIF,+C.P.P., OAS is $64,200 and I paid $9,437 in 2018 tax year. I have no debts, no mortgage etc. and after all my living expenses from property taxes to utilities to insurance, food, gas, etc. everything I saved last year in my brain dead GIC’s, savings accounts, TFSA’s total $36,000. It is roughly $3,000 a month. An annual 56.07% overall savings rate is pretty high.

One thing I will say, I may look into some REIT’s at most $1,000 to $1,200 a month dollar cost averaging as those 4.2% to 4.6% yields look like it maybe worth it. It looks like 4 to 5 split between them. These are at least 15 to 20 year holds to pan out.

#100 GRG on 12.06.19 at 11:39 pm

Every time I see the words “Minister of Middle Class Prosperity” I think we are living in a Monty Python skit.

#101 Ponzius Pilatus on 12.06.19 at 11:53 pm

Just read the following article:
The average cost of an F-150 in US dollars is 40k.
Ford’s profit is about 25% a pop.
The average profit on a car like the Honda Civic is about 5%.
So, assuming a new F-150 loses about 20% once its driven off the lot, the proud new owner has just bought a brand new Asset that’s only worth 24k for 40k.
No wonder, Alberta is in trouble.

#102 Loving_Mises_to_Pieces on 12.07.19 at 12:01 am

Well…

Don’t gripe or look over the fence at the green grass. Instead, consider giving the Seasteading option some mindshare and generosity (a tax deduction for any American readers) — https://www.seasteading.org/ .

More economic/political options **should** allow anyone’s pet-utopia to be tried in the scales of practicality and tangible effectiveness. I’d personally prefer extreme /laissez faire/ that also follows the tax model outlined here: http://gunsanddopeparty.net/spooner.html — treating people like adults and getting away from the paternal-state [fascist, patriotic, tribal, conman/leader-following, isolationism] or maternal-state stuff [socialism or “we’ll figure out how to pay for it later”]. Moreover, I’m no fan of central banks and the boom-bust cycle spurred on by fractional-reserve banking (described exhaustively with examples here: https://www.scribd.com/document/59166705/Money-Bank-Credit-and-Economic-Cycles-Jesus-Huerta-de-Soto ).

*** Experimentation before refutation *** … put your big-boy/big-girl pants on and help humanity get out of the tangible ruts or lame, myopic, and unmotivated gravity-wells (in the long run we should be a more than one-planet species, BTW… the future should be this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Expanse_(TV_series) ).

Don’t settle; push yourself to evolve, think, and grow. Don’t succumb to the inertia of our present unwieldy federated states (most of which can’t even get a ranked-voting system in place and have their roots and history and ideology following the programming and viewpoints of people from the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries).

#103 Stan Brooks on 12.07.19 at 1:44 am

#58 Figure it Out on 12.06.19 at 7:13 pm

That was very, very delusional.

1. You can make easily 200 k USD family income in SF/the tech capital of the world, making 260 k CAD in GTA is a pipe dream, the average family income is 75 k CAD before taxes.

2. Comparing comprehensive health care in US with an excellent health insurance in US, which BTW is covered in its majority by you employer, so you won’t pay 3 k but rather 1-1.5 k USD for coverage where you can see ANY provider/specialist with no waiting times…

to the practically non-existent and non usable ‘free’ health care in Ontario where you can not see a specialist even if you like to pay without you primary care provider approval (and they won’t give it to you unless ‘urgent’), visiting a doctor for ‘one complaint at a time’, if you are lucky to have a family doctor, horrendous waiting times at the emergency..

You got to be kidding.

When in Toronto I was regularly visiting doctors in US (and paying for it) due to our ‘wonderful free health care’ and that started over 12 years ago.

I would recommend treating your delusions/a severe case of brain freezing/ south of the border.

———————————-

#3 Smoking Man on 12.06.19 at 2:40 pm

Of course, but the sheeple ‘believes’/is told that it has an excellent quality of life and there is no inflation.

BTW the BOC boss stepping down/running quickly away from his good salary and benefits is quite indicative of what is coming. It will be a horrific stagflation (I agree on this one), with further rise of an already significant inflation, further tax increases, larger deficits and very quickly deteriorating quality of life and the economy nose diving and hitting the wall.

Those stories about ‘high standards’ and ‘a developed/G7 country’ have long been part of the past, urban myths, but the sheeple likes to think that it so superior to others.

It will be a very nasty hangover.

Cheers,

#104 palebird on 12.07.19 at 2:05 am

#26 Jager

Who cares?

#105 crazyfox on 12.07.19 at 2:28 am

It’s interesting. I made predictions of when the next recessions would be in Canada and the U.S. roughly a year ago for kicks, thought it would be fun. (at the time anyway) What’d I say, Q4 kicks off a Canadian recession (won’t know it til’ Q1, Q2), and the U.S. kicks off the start of a recession in Q2 of 2020 from Trump trade wars.

Of course, there is such a thing as a mild recession which I think these will be so its not the end of the world (Canada could be hit worse than mild) but markets will contract, no doubt… if I’m at all right. Time will tell.

Meanwhile, politically, hypocrisy and stupidity is alive and well in federal and provincial politics. Scheer and Kenney, the King and Prince of Wexit, is now blaming Trudeau for a national unity crisis:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/andrew-scheer-national-unity-western-canada-1.5386866

Our King and Prince of Wexit is pushing hard for an oil pipeline to Kitimat, not only not feasible for environmental reasons, but not realistic due to Trans Mountain already being built. So, blame Trudeau for not getting a pipeline built while later taking credit for a pipeline being built. Suck and blow apparently is their plan. Now… someone please tell me why they deserved to be elected into power? Because I’m missing it. The queen of Wexit quips as an example, “If it were commodity prices, why is the U.S. doing so well with its industry?” – Michell Rempell

Whatever you do Canada, do not give this woman a real job. She’s dumb as a fence post, clearly not knowing how to read. This is supposed to be “the oil and gas party”? Get worried Canada if this is the best the opposition can muster. All you need to read is right here:

https://pgjonline.com/news/2019/08-aug/us-natural-gas-prices-continue-to-drop-as-demand-soars

And of course, its about prices as the 10 year chart fleshes out:

https://pgjonline.com/news/2019/08-aug/us-natural-gas-prices-continue-to-drop-as-demand-soars

Since most Canadian corps outside of the tar sands are weighted 70/30 gas to oil, gas prices are killing the Canadian O & G industry with no end in sight because, if readers are smarter than Michell Rempel the Wexit queen and read the link, you will know that oil production in the U.S. has been on a tear:

https://www.macrotrends.net/2562/us-crude-oil-production-historical-chart

The U.S. has gone from 6 million barrels of oil per day to 13 mil in 8 years or basically a million BOE per year new production every year except 1 (early 2016 commodity crash). To put this into perspective, The tar sands, oil sands, whatever you call it, produces 2.9 million barrels of extra heavy crude per day. The U.S. matched this in new production in the last 3 years alone mostly coming from Texas and Oklahoma, with a major biproduct of natural gas that is flooding the North American market. Since its a biproduct of new oil production that is still profitable, a good deal more gas is coming on stream that will continue to flood the market no matter how cheap it goes.

What does this mean for gas prices? Doom:

https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/commodities/ng%3Anmx

Roughly 80% of the natural gas plays to develop in Canada have a $2.40 or higher cost of production. Some 20% can be produced for maybe around $2 bucks but much of it is land locked. This doesn’t include financing which runs another 10%. At these prices, its not feasible. It’s December with gas nearing peak demand and the price is still below the cost of production for most gas companies in Canada. This problem is not going away any time soon. All one has to do is read the links to see why that is. One thing is for sure though. The leaders of the so called O & G party or Conservatives or so they call themselves or the King, prince and queen of Wexit or whatever they fashion themselves as.

They don’t read.

If Scheer or Kenney or dumb as a rock Rempel took the time to read, they would see that its low commodity prices, that the problem behind it is structural, we are competing against superior assets in the U.S. that are being rapidly developed, a big problem because the U.S. was our #1 customer of O & G, its not fixable by government other than finding new international markets through an LNG proposal both West (Trans Mountain) which will take time as an oil pipeline is being built on the same right of way, or East through the Saint Lawrence Seaway and one has to remember what Canadians are up against with LNG as we have competition from the U.S. now, from Iran/Qatar (nearly half of the world’s gas reserves are there) and Russia. It will not be easy. Encana knows it and pulled out. The Libs likely know it (Trudeau bought TM after all). The readers here at Greater fool know it. But the all hat no cattle cowboy Conservative leaders and dumb as a rock Rempel’s of the world sure don’t know it by what comes out of their mouths and there’s a big message in that.

Meanwhile, Kenny has decided to lay off civil servants in a bid to help pay for a lower corp tax rate from 12 to 8% over 4 years:

https://www.alberta.ca/corporate-income-tax.aspx

So, Kenny pleases his corp bum buddies with a big tax cut and cuts services by throwing a bunch of civil workers out of work to offset and somehow it will end well. Kenny’s openly talking about doing away with universal health care in favor for pay as you go now. Are we witnessing Alberta at the beginning of crashing and burning with a mass exodus of Albertans soon to follow? Because that’s what happens when government services go to hell and there’s no jobs to support because of structural fundamentals that can’t be fixed. And all the while, while Alberta O & G goes down in flames (save oil in time for a while) because our #1 customer doesn’t need us anymore and EV’s hit the road and climate change becomes an expensive catastrophe never mind undeniable, shitty talking head Conservative governments marked by low information and talent show it off with unrealistic proposals while scapegoating everyone else but themselves in a desperate bid to retain power they are unfit to hold. Their only hope is low information supporters who like to revictimize themselves through the support of politicians woefully unfit for office and it looks like the Scheer, Kenney and Rempel’s of the world get their wish at least, for now but it doesn’t make it easy to watch because the only thing Con leaders know is how to blame anyone else but themselves for everything they don’t know but should. Scheer should have resigned and shows how unfit he is to lead with each new day. Kenney is the school of hard knocks for Alberta chalk filled with ugly lessons Alberta voters need to learn unfortunately, call it karma and the Rempel’s of the world live up to a stereotype unfortunately because there are smart blonds in the world. Just not her and how can one forget why when all you have to do is… read.

#106 crazyfox on 12.07.19 at 2:32 am

My bad, natural gas price chart (go 10 year):

https://www.nasdaq.com/market-activity/commodities/ng%3Anmx

#107 BillyBob on 12.07.19 at 5:50 am

#70 MF on 12.06.19 at 8:16 pm
3 BillyBob on 12.06.19 at

It’s not defending mediocrity, it’s calling out stupidity.

Do you know the difference? Probably not.

What’s the UK’s identity today?

If I were to use your analogy, the UK is the former jock who got by on “athletics” and never studied. Eventually he got kicked out of school and had to work odd jobs here and there while he bores people with his high school football stories from the 60’s.

“I was the greatest quarterback ever”

“I know you were Jim. I know”

MF

===================================================

Where do I mention one word about the UK? Talk about proving my point about insecurity lol!

That’s the difference between you and I, MF. I may be living in London, but it’s only because I have a great job here, it allows me to be with my European partner, and I enjoy paying very little tax (Google “non-domiciled”). I don’t feel the need to defend the country itself – God knows it has its problems – it’s a means to an end. If circumstances change, so will I. You, I’m afraid, will always be stuck.

Anyway, gonna take a break from the blog for awhile, off for the next three weeks to take the missus to visit family and friends in both Canada and the US. Take care and don’t work too hard chasing the Canadian Dream, whatever that is.

#108 brian1 on 12.07.19 at 5:56 am

I can always trust Garth for the statistics. Who will replace him when he is gone?
I myself have invested in Moy’s Tai Chi for decades. There is a Taoist Tai Chi in Garth’s area. I recommend the Canadian Tai Chi Academy although I personally don’t need either one any more. I have also dicovered a great doctor on Youtube, Dr. Berg who is great for diabetes and general health. I also recommend investing in U.S. stocks although GDNP.V (penny stock) seems interesting. Trump 2020. Go Trump.

#109 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.07.19 at 8:22 am

@#66 Election Fraud
” What to make of the October anomaly, is this just a fluke or a case of an inadvertent Stats Canada error, or is something more nefarious at work? At the same time, where is the long-promised RCMP investigation into Trudeau regarding SNC-Lavalin? ”
+++++

That statement deserves repeating.

The same thing happened a few elections ago in BC .
“We balanced the budget!”
Immediately after the election it was revealed they lied.
The next election ?
The voters remembered.

Trudeau?
Trying to cobble a minority coalition together as he heads into what may be a painful Canadian economic recession built on a hill of realtor/media bs?
I give “two face” 12 months or less .
Scheer still needs to step down.
He’s unelectable even as “at least I’m not Trudeau”.

#110 Dharma Bum on 12.07.19 at 8:47 am

#56 Felix

Finally, a photo that shows the truth about what dogs are made of.
——————————————————————–

Nah.

That dog’s just doing his best Trudeau imitation.

#111 Dharma Bum on 12.07.19 at 9:02 am

Suck and blow. Two-faced. – Garth
——————————————————————–

Two-faced Justin.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJma8pVAvH4

#112 Cabbagetown Carly on 12.07.19 at 9:06 am

Garth, I know there are women in your life that you care about.

But at this time, on the 30th anniversary of Ethe misogynist slaughter at Ecole Polytechnique. you just said:

“Let’s see if young Andrew Scheer (remember him?) has enough testo left in his battered bod to confront the minority government over jobs. More taxes won’t bring them back. Neither will social justice, indigenous rights nor gender equity – as important as they may be.”

“Testo” ? “nor gender equity” ?

Then you allowed at least a half dozen people here to post off topic comments about bump stock guns and assault rifles, presumably to “share relevant information” to viewers of your blog.

?????????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Care to reconsider….?

#113 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.07.19 at 9:12 am

#62 Gravy Train on 12.06.19 at 7:40 pm sez:

“#46 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.06.19 at 6:50 pm
“No wonder job numbers are down. The 20% carbon tax on natural gas to heat your home is taking a bite out of everyone.” In other words, it’s a perfect time to put solar panels on your roof. :)

“And for the next three years it’s going up to its planned price of $50 per tonne which oddly enough works out to close to 50%.” Look into net metering and any carbon tax rebates on solar panels. :)”
——————————————————————–
You continually ignore/gloss over that fact that without government subsidies and other ratepayers/taxpayers footing your bill that the ROR on your solar panels is not viable.

You also ignore that there is a power grid that must be maintained for when the wind don’t blow and the sun don’t shine.

I would tend to respect your argument more if you were totally off the grid and if you had paid the full cost of the solar conversion yourself. But we know that didn’t happen, don’t we?

You just keep doing transparent you.

#114 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.07.19 at 9:15 am

#69 Robert Ash on 12.06.19 at 8:15 pm sez:

“I would suspect, that JT, will take the higher tax route. This is a guy, that is dangerous, because he has just enough information to be dangerous, and he believes the Tea Leaves, he must be reading. There is a sad, melancholy rant to this guy… He actually believes, he is making progress on social issues, his just society, like his Father expounded, but the times are not supportive. Today in our Modern World, we have to compete more, and that means, efficiencies, but focusing and adopting these social improvements, is really JT’s mandate. He is not a Business savy guy, or Technical Savy, he is well, probably a nice guy, who believes, in his strategy, but it is not focused, on the Economy that is for sure… No one mentions, the Pot Stock debacle, but some 16 Billion of investment money went to Wall Street/ Bay Street…. What a waste of Productivity. What do international Investors think about Canada, when they look at BNN for example and the Images, they see, are Pot Plants, and a Dialogue, about Edibles, or Candy for Kids, that gets them High… Helpful, for our Serious Business interests.. Well you all have your opinions, but for me, it is and was a non issue, that simply needed Decriminalization….. One and done.. but that is what folks, voted, for… The end result, is we have elected a group of “Posers”, who have limited ability, to actually Govern, Limited Ideas, and the saddest part, is our Democracy, is not working in my Opinion, when unelected folks, form the Policies, and Direction, and there is seemingly little input from our MPs, … Only one Group is in charge, and for many Canadians, not the people they think represent them.”
————————————————————-

Holy Commas, Batman!

#115 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.07.19 at 9:44 am

@Doug In London-

So simple Doug. You don’t buy food? You don’t heat the place where you live? If you think the meager rebate will begin to cover the increased cost of everything due to the carbon tax for the average person/family you are a fool. But of course you’re probably part of the low income demographic that Trudeau was aiming for when he created this mess right?

Hey Doug I’ve got an idea! If carbon taxes will save the planet, why don’t you decline your tax deduction and save the world! It would only be right! Virtue signalling costs money Doug.

#116 Joe Schmoe on 12.07.19 at 10:03 am

Policy without enforcement is lip service.

The gun control talk above is a case in point.

All the modifications to the SKS/AR15s discussed are currently illegal. Bumpstocks and adding aftermarket magazine capacity are illegal in Canada.

How would more unenforced laws help?

That being said, modern hunting rifles with a 3 magazine capacity have the practical accuracy for someone to hit a volley ball 3 times at 800 yards in under 30 seconds. Yet “Getting sniped” is not a common occurrence in Canada. And most guns fit into this category.

Get rid of the criminals, and it is highly unlikely the guns will shoot themselves.

#117 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.07.19 at 10:11 am

@#87 Yukon
“Whoever offers the most free stuff wins. Fiscal conservatism is dead….”
++++

True enough.
The electorate dont want to hear that (god forbid) they have to tighten their belts along with govt cuts and interest rate hikes.

Nah, we indebted canucks will wander blithely to our fiscal reckoning with our eyes shut, our ears covered and our drooling mouths slack jawed open….”nobody warned us……”

#118 Built to Spec on 12.07.19 at 10:16 am

“In a country where $12 trillion – or 76% of the GDP – comes from Mr & Mrs F-150, this is unbeatable.”
– – – – – – – – – –

Garth – could you please explain this statement? I understand that the F-150 is the Ford pickup that’s the best selling vehicle in the U.S, and that you are broadly referring to the working class, but your numbers are specific – could you clarify what exactly you’re referring to? Thanks!

As stated. Consumer spending accounts for 76% of the US economy. – Garth

#119 T on 12.07.19 at 10:20 am

#58 Figure it Out on 12.06.19 at 7:13 pm
“Do you really believe the cost of a good health plan in the US is more expensive than the health care taxes in Canada for those who generate a decent income?”

I ran some numbers.

Let’s call $200k US in San Francisco or $266k Canadian in Toronto a “decent” income.

In California, you’d pay $68,154 in combined Federal and state tax. Source https://smartasset.com/taxes/california-tax-calculator

In Toronto, you’d pay $108,076, call it US$81,260. Source https://simpletax.ca/calculator.

That would leave you US$13,106 to buy health insurance in California for the tie. And for that price, you don’t get diddly.

I plugged a family of four (45, 45, 10 and 12) into https://blueshieldcaplans.com/ and they want $3,000 per MONTH for a gold plan and $4k for a platinum.

So now I know.

—–

You know not much at all, actually. This is the dangers with being an Internet warrior, you believe you have all the answers by looking at a few websites yet have no real knowledge.

That family of four would most likely have a health plan through their employer(s). If not, or if self employed, the family can write off medical expenses including health plans against their gross earnings.

https://www.investopedia.com/are-health-insurance-premiums-tax-deductible-4773286

The plan you quoted includes prescription drug, dental, and vision coverage. Much more than the basic coverage provided here in Canada. Also, please refer to the link above which describes the average family plan at $1168 per month, which is much more in line with my experience – and by looking at eHealthInsurance.com also includes drug, dental, and vision. Far superior.

#120 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.07.19 at 10:36 am

@#84 Sail Away
“Of course it was fake.
And.. with this front and centre, how do you feel about the climate emergency?
Oh- that’s real? Uh huh.
“””””””

Tell that to the 45 million people in Southern Africa living under a years long drought….

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/dec/07/victoria-falls-dries-to-a-trickle-after-worst-drought-in-a-century

Or the 3 million people of Sidney…..

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-bushfires/giant-fire-near-sydney-may-burn-for-weeks-as-people-struggle-to-breathe-idUSKBN1YB01D

Nothing to see here….move along people…..nothing to see….

#121 Figmund Sreud on 12.07.19 at 10:55 am

If we were Americans it would equate to erasing 700,000 positions last month. But guess what? They added 266,000. It was the best performance in 10 months in the US. The worst outcome in a decade for Canada. The contrast is stunning.
_________________________________

Ah, yes, … contrast. I could create plenty of “jobs” too, if I ran a trillion dollar a year deficit!

Federal deficit increases 26% to $984 billion for fiscal 2019, highest in 7 years

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/25/federal-deficit-increases-26percent-to-984-billion-for-fiscal-2019.html

U.S. budget deficit to top $1 trillion in 2020, two years sooner than expected

https://www.latimes.com/politics/story/2019-08-21/us-budget-deficit-cbo-report

When does that “grow our way out of the deficit” part start over there?

Best,

F.S. – Calgary, Alberta.

#122 Shawn Allen on 12.07.19 at 10:55 am

Dolce Vita on the job loss

Where is Dolce to point out that before seasonal adjustments the actual job loss was (I will bet) far lower?

I await enlightenment

#123 Sail Away on 12.07.19 at 11:21 am

#111 brian1 on 12.07.19 at 5:56 am

I can always trust Garth for the statistics. Who will replace him when he is gone?

I myself have invested in Moy’s Tai Chi for decades. There is a Taoist Tai Chi in Garth’s area. I recommend the Canadian Tai Chi Academy although I personally don’t need either one any more. I have also dicovered a great doctor on Youtube, Dr. Berg who is great for diabetes and general health.

——————————–

You think Garth’s on his last legs and could gain a few years with tai chi and internet doctoring?

Nobody makes it out alive, pal.

#124 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 12.07.19 at 11:22 am

I would love to know who is paying to lay down the Trans Canada Pipeline. Is it taxpayers???

#125 Linda on 12.07.19 at 11:35 am

#28 ‘ts’ – dampen the demand for housing? Not likely. All those who lost jobs still have to find a way to pay for food & shelter. If they can’t afford the shelter they are in they have to find alternative shelter they can afford which increases the demand. Affordable housing of any kind, even in places where overall housing costs are low/sensible is always in short supply with lengthy waiting lists. Throw in the ever increasing cost of living & even those with jobs may suddenly be looking for less expensive accommodation, because their income isn’t sufficient any longer. So work another job? Lots of folks at the lower end of the economic scale already work 2 or more jobs. Most people need to eat & sleep to keep going & employers are unlikely to keep you on if you don’t wash yourself or your clothing on a regular basis.

Point being, job loss has a flow through effect that is not positive, not for housing affordability or the economy. Those high paying oil & gas jobs shed by Alberta led to job losses in the peripheral supporting industries too, which led to lower sales for goods & services which led to closing businesses & on it goes.

#126 Sail Away on 12.07.19 at 11:41 am

#124 crowdedelevatorfartz on 12.07.19 at 10:36 am
@#84 Sail Away

“Of course it was fake.

And.. with this front and centre, how do you feel about the climate emergency?

Oh- that’s real? Uh huh.

———————————
Tell that to the 45 million people in Southern Africa living under a years long drought….

Or the 3 million people of Sidney…..

———————————-

Why do you care about people? Aren’t they the cause of the problem? I thought you were moving to get away from people?

When introduced snakes reproduced uncontrollably in Indonesia, the solution was a program to reduce the snakes. Likewise rabbits in Australia are controlled by introduced disease.

We don’t feel sorry for the snakes or rabbits.

#127 Quintelian on 12.07.19 at 11:54 am

Building more pipelines will bring more jobs on a short-term basis. But we are likely to be in the late 8th , possibly early 9th inning, of the business cycle and oil is less than $60.

How will bringing more supply to a saturated market bring sustainable growth?

#128 Doug in London on 12.07.19 at 11:55 am

@Bytor the Snow Dog, post #119:
I have a better idea. In years to come the effects of climate change are going to cost me extra money in the form of higher taxes to upgrade or pay for damage to infrastructure from extreme weather events. It will also cost me more for insurance premiums, or damage to personal property not covered by insurance or to pay for the deductible if it is covered. Climate change will likely cause more health problems and cost more in taxes as tropical diseases find their way north. Years ago, ticks carrying Lyme Disease were unheard of in Ontario and now they’re becoming a serious risk.

So, as I save that money in my disaster relief fund, where do I invest it? In renewable energy companies like Northland Power (NPI) and Algonquin Power (AQN). I also have some invested in uranium with Cameco (CCO), Uranium Participation Corp. (U) on the TSX as well as Global x Uranium ETF, listed on the NYSE. Years ago Wayne Gretzky was asked about his secret to playing a good game of hockey. He said: Don’t skate to where the puck is now, but to where the puck will be shortly. Similarly, we appear to be at a tipping point of where a large part of the general public sees that climate change is a problem, and probably too late. I believe these investments will all do well going forward, as NPI and AQN have already done recently.

Last but not least, I will continue getting plenty of use from my bike and keep those savings coming, as well as getting my exercise to be healthy and have a fighting change against any coming assaults to my good health. Does that answer your question?

#129 Doug in London on 12.07.19 at 12:04 pm

But of course you’re probably part of the low income demographic that Trudeau was aiming for when he created this mess right?
——————————————————–
I’m low to medium income but manage to live quite comfortably. I can’t imagine why, there’s no way it could possibly be due to my sensible cost controls, like using a bike a lot, driving a fuel efficient car rather than a gas guzzling SUV when I do drive, consolidating as many errands in one car trip as possible, and going slower on the highway to cut energy loss due to air drag and increase fuel economy. I also do things like turn the heat down at night or when away. Nor do I take part in conspicuous consumption.

#130 joblo on 12.07.19 at 12:18 pm

Hello Calgary meet Detroit.

#131 T on 12.07.19 at 1:38 pm

#135 Figure it Out on 12.07.19 at 12:37 pm

You’ve completely lost any credibility in this debate when you fail to acknowledge I’ve provided evidence of average costs of complete healthcare plans, are trying to compare complete and comprehensive healthcare plans in the US to Canadian healthcare which is far from complete and comprehensive, fail to acknowledge costs of these plans are pre-tax when provided evidence, fail to understand most employers provide healthcare plans for their employees, take a single quote from a longer response and base your entire argument around it, and attack the fact I go by a single letter pseudonym.

BTW, ‘T’ happens to be what the majority of my friends and family call me. Do yours call you ‘Figure It Out’? Does your pseudonym somehow attribute you with more credibility?

Your entire argument is a baseless joke, especially when you diverge from the actual points of debate and devolve into what you have. Your style is akin to a child debating, attacking the poster and not the debate at hand.

You need to go ‘figure it out’. You are completely wrong on this. Perhaps you should actually look at the links to the real data I supplied instead of knee jerking a response and argument based around a few websites you visited and some calculations you’ve made which you’ve admitted errors in.

#132 Shawn Allen on 12.07.19 at 1:42 pm

Paragraphs!

#69 Robert Ash on 12.06.19 at 8:15 pm…

I would suspect, that JT, will take the higher tax route. This is a guy, that…

…followed by 27 lines of text with no white space, no paragraphs.

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I don’t mean to pick on Robert Ash in particular.

But, please everyone, if you want your material read, try to use a new paragraph every four to at most about 8 lines. Garth does and most of the comments above do.

Especially online, white space makes things a lot easier to read. I basically skip over anything with no or way too few paragraphs.

It’s a shame to write a valuable comment and then have half the people skip it simply because it is an imposing block of dense text.

#133 Tony on 12.07.19 at 1:55 pm

Made good money day trading Friday morning then bought TLT and gold bars in the afternoon. I’m betting heavy the bottom will fall out of the U.S. economy until May 2020.

#134 Shawn Allen on 12.07.19 at 1:55 pm

Consumer Spending Dominates the Economy

As stated. Consumer spending accounts for 76% of the US economy. – Garth

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No argument with that figure. Or that a strong economy will make Trump hard to beat.

It may be interesting to note that the other components of GDP are business investments in capital assets, government spending, government investment in capital assets, and net exports.

The “raison dete” of any economy is ultimately to create things the population wants to consume. So, a high percentage of the GDP accounted for by consumer spending is a good thing – I say this just in case anyone thinks it is a bad thing. (Better, for example, than government spending on the military.)

#135 Tony on 12.07.19 at 2:53 pm

December 15th deadline, holiday season don’t fall for the fake jobs number out of America. Anything to make China look bad and sucker the penniless in buying Christmas gifts on credit.

#136 Gravy Train on 12.07.19 at 3:43 pm

#116 Bytor the Snow Dog on 12.07.19 at 9:12 am
“You continually ignore/gloss over that fact that without government subsidies and other ratepayers/taxpayers footing your bill that the ROR on your solar panels is not viable.” Do you think the oil and gas industry doesn’t get government subsidies? Do you think I don’t know that my carbon tax credits and rebates are paid for by your carbon taxes? :)

“You also ignore that there is a power grid that must be maintained for when the wind don’t blow and the sun don’t shine.” I signed a net metering agreement with the very same power company that maintains that power grid. It’s all perfectly legal! :)

“I would tend to respect your argument more if you were totally off the grid and if you had paid the full cost of the solar conversion yourself. But we know that didn’t happen, don’t we?” If you want to avoid paying carbon taxes, you have to take action to get credits and rebates. It’s that simple! :)

“You just keep doing transparent you.” And you keep paying your carbon tax, but just stop complaining about it! :)

#137 Graeme on 12.07.19 at 4:52 pm

Contrast im not convinced. Its at least possible those US numbers are bogus. The ADP print was much less. They cant both be right.

#138 Gary C on 12.07.19 at 11:44 pm

As I retired small business owner I am scared to death of Trudeau going after my retained earnings, which is part of my retirement income, re ineligible dividends with a change to the dividend tax credit.
I get OAS. clawed back, a new Carbon Tax Jan 1, this guy
is destroying Canada.

#139 Westcdn on 12.08.19 at 6:27 am

What is Alberta’s reasonable share of the Federal Government debt? I dare say zero. https://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/columnists/gary-lamphier-how-much-money-has-flowed-out-of-alberta-to-ottawa-a-lot

The issue of Equalization is a red herring but useful to illustrate how much O&G resources have financed Canada. Only Albertans seem to get it. In this era of Globalization and finalization of economic activity (share buybacks, CLO’s, derivatives …), a small but productive population can do well as long as borders are not sealed.

I don’t have any real issue with Alberta adopting the US$ as its currency as that is where nearly all the revenue comes. Bank of America or RBC, makes no difference to me.

#140 Antisocial social club on 12.08.19 at 9:50 am

#79 politico

Look up kitimat.pipelines are already heading west. Camps are built and a massive camp under construction.two massive projects underway.