Old dogs

Patrick is 48 and single, renting. His brother Les is 41, two kids, house and mortgage. Mom lives in a little condo, no financing, no savings. Dad has dementia. He’s in the hospital and not coming home. This family’s in crisis.

P reads the blog, contacted me for help and let me know his folks have owned a rental house in DT Toronto for more than half a century. It brings in about forty grand a year – which supports the parents – and is worth $2 million, even in its deferred-maintenance state. Dad’s minimum care in a dodgy public facility will cost a little under $3,000 a month. Alzheimer’s is an expensive affliction, in addition to being a personal hell. More respectful and attentive care in a private facility in the GTA costs about eight grand a month.

The sons have no money, or are unwilling to spend it on a failing father. Nor does she. So, I said, stating the obvious, the rental real estate has to go. Sell it, invest the proceeds and you’ll have enough to care for the guy with dignity, and still support mom.

And then, the second crisis. Tax.

Although Mom agreed the real estate should be sold, Les (he has POA) is apoplectic at seeing a chunk of his inheritance disappear in tax, then the capital eroded by nursing home bills. Despite the absolute windfall gain on this house, and the fact it’s been generating GIC-level, fully-taxable gains, the guy is balking at a sale.

So what is the liability?

It’s the sale price ($2 million) less the adjusted cost base (ACB), divided by half and taxed at his parents’ marginal rate. The ACB is not only what it cost fifty years ago (maybe $200,000) but also the addition of improvements made along the way which were not claimed against rental income, plus the sale commission. So, let’s say the capital gain ends up being $1.7 million. Half of that is free, and half added to income – thus $850,000 is the taxable amount.

If that were added to mom’s income in 2019 she’d end up in the 54% tax bracket and have to hand over about four hundred thou of the sale price, keeping $1.6 million, or 80%. Not so bad. If she and her husband bought the property jointly in the 1970s with money they both contributed, the gain could be split between them. But, thanks to our ‘tax-the-rich’ system, the bill would not be reduced.

The after-tax proceeds of more than a million and a half, if invested conservatively, could kick out about six grand a month. That’s enough to handle the long-term care facility bills now, then move dad into better surroundings when the 24/7 care need kicks in, with a minor erosion in capital. Mom can stay where she is. Her husband gets the best possible attention. Almost all of the capital is preserved for her eventual needs and possibly her estate.

But guess what? Les says no. Too much tax.

“The question is simple,” I told Pat. “How are you going to finance your father’s care? Your brother’s attitude disgusts me if he’s more worried about taxes on a windfall gain he had nothing to do with rather than the care of your parents. You can tell him that.”

And I guess he did. The real estate sale was halted. The trail went cold.

There are about 750,000 people in Canada now with Alzheimer’s or dementia. That compares with 81,000 deaths a year from cancer. But cancer cases are diminishing. Dementia is an epidemic. In a decade the number afflicted will be close to a million, with an increase of 66% in new cases. This is a function of demographics (9.6 million Boomers) and longevity.

There’s no treatment and no cure. Nobody gets over Alzheimer’s. Nobody gets better. The decline can take a decade or more, and early-onset patients may be afflicted in their forties or fifties. Cognitive ability degrades and in the end nobody functions on their own. Often caregivers – usually elderly spouses – suffer immensely as they struggle to look after someone whose path leads to absolute dependence. The best care possible is not at home. It’s in a facility staffed with people who aren’t figuring things out for the first time. And that costs money. Big money. Every family should be aware of this, and prepare.

Ensure you have power of attorney for yourself, and that your parents have done the same. Make sure there’s a will. Don’t have a relative as the executor – unless she is a probate and estate lawyer. As you age, simplify your life. Shed assets. Raise cash. Become less encumbered and more liquid. Sell the cottage. Ditch the boat. Spell out the beneficiaries of your RRSPs and the successor holders of your TFSAs. If you have business interests or other assets consider having a secondary or even tertiary will. Get some insurance to cover probate costs or outstanding mortgage balances.

Tell your partner if this stuff happens to you, to skip the heroics. Alzheimer’s patients belong in a care facility, not wandering off from the front door into traffic. But financing the long goodbye is daunting. It takes advance thought, and action.

As Patrick found, it cannot wait for a crisis – when human nature never fails to disappoint.

120 comments ↓

#1 Shawn Allen on 09.29.19 at 4:21 pm

Scary…

In this case Les, who has power of attorney also stands to inherit. That seems like a big conflict of interest. How feasible is it for non-family to be have the POA?

Counting on an inheritance seems like a fail to me. Better to count on your parents living well past 80 and therefore look after yourself financially. Maybe your kids can get an inheritance.

An inheritance should be the residual after the parents financial needs are fully looked after. It’s their money, not their children’s.

Each spouse should probably will 100% to each other to keep the kid’s grubby hands off anything until both parents are gone.

Minismising tax is NOT the goal. Maximising the parents’ quality of life is more the goal.

#2 Rargary on 09.29.19 at 4:26 pm

A Dr told me recently how much dementia (maybe not Alzheimers) is avoidable. Many, maybe most people, cannot properly manage stress. It starts there. Can’t mom change the POA? That brother, and all those like him, is pathetic and lacks integrity and esteem. I’m so glad you put him in his place, through Patrick. Wtg Gartg!

#3 Shawn Allen on 09.29.19 at 4:26 pm

Another Accounting Fail

Les’s attitude toward the value of the rental property illustrates the usual failure to deduct expected taxes when valuing any asset.

An audited corporation MUST deduct taxes expected to be paid on investment assets (but not on assets even land and building used to operate the business, perhaps on the basis that there is no expectation those will ever be sold).

Most personal net worth statements you will ever see will fail to deduct the expected tax due on investments and other assets.

Les, thought that house was all the family’s. Forgot about the taxman. He’s poorer than he thought.

#4 Shaggy on 09.29.19 at 4:31 pm

A little clarification if you will Garth, how will she owe “about” $450k on $850k? I get that her top tax bracket will be 54%, but that only applies on income above $200k, right? She’s still going to owe a whack of cash, but not $450k.

Also, why would that be split between the husband? I assume that he still is co-owner of the property or does the dementia mean that he hasn’t been claiming / can’t derive income?

Appreciate the answers…

#5 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.29.19 at 4:32 pm

Form T1105, Supplementary Schedule for Dispositions of Capital Property Acquired Before 1972.

#6 Drill Baby Drill on 09.29.19 at 4:32 pm

You want your proof of global warming. Just look at southern Alta today. 40 cm of snow and counting plus it is going to -10 Monday night with highs of +2C Tuesday. But hey we need to cut way back on our fossil fuel consumption.

#7 Shaggy on 09.29.19 at 4:33 pm

“Also, why would that be split between the husband?”

Sorry, obviously should be “wouldn’t”.

#8 Lost...but not leased on 09.29.19 at 4:34 pm

Wow…thanks Garth..one of THE best posts amongst many.

I’ve lived several years of sheer hell re: how my one sibling made our Mother’s last few years 100% HELL.

Unless it has happened to you..one has no idea the evil people can unleash on vulnerable seniors…and when one compares notes with others in the same boat.

Forget “The Law”..there are few if any checks and balances

More Later….

#9 HH on 09.29.19 at 4:41 pm

Change the POA.

#10 Paddy on 09.29.19 at 4:45 pm

My brother and I were both named POA and Execs. in my late fathers will. I eventually signed over both titles to him as he was living closer(BC) as i was in Nova Scotia.
We must have been a one off because everyone we dealt with said that they’ve never seen so much cooperation and agreement on how the assets were dealt with. I guess there must be some shitty families out there trying to gouge each other.

Les, needs to get his shite together and stop being so selfish. Sell the house, invest the proceeds and get his dad the care he needs and deserves. Hopefully he reads the steerage section this evening.

#11 Eco Capitalist on 09.29.19 at 4:48 pm

What does Les hope to accomplish? Sell it now or sell it later, the taxman will still take his chunk. Best of luck Patrick; I hope your brother sees the light soon.

#12 Shawn Allen on 09.29.19 at 4:49 pm

Change the POA?

Well, presumably Dad can’t change it now that he has dementia.

Not clear if the POA has been sort of exercised by having two doctors attest to the dementia. Is that how it works. ?It’s only a potential power until that step is taken? Sorry, I need full refresher on that.

Even after the POA has Dad declared with dementia there are limitations on what he can do with the assets? Has to respect the will? Or can simply do anything he judges in Dad’s best interest?

#13 Yukon Elvis on 09.29.19 at 4:57 pm

Mister Bo Jangles….Again : dementia at a young age. How can we prevent it ?

https://www.zerohedge.com/political/yet-more-high-quality-video-trudeau-blackface-released

#14 RA on 09.29.19 at 5:02 pm

Garth

Great info especially for us older dudes.

#15 Sold Out on 09.29.19 at 5:09 pm

Never fails; when a parent dies or becomes cognitively impaired, the latent douchenozzle amongst our siblings comes out. Wouldn’t the taxes be payable even if title to the house goes to the ungrateful, dillhole son? He already has a primary residence, so no exemption for him. Time to see a lawyer about having the POA revoked on the grounds he’s not acting in the parents’ best interests. I also think Patrick needs to be clear about whether his brother has POA over the parents medical decisions or their legal interests; my understanding is that they are not one and the same and require two separate, legal documents.

#16 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.29.19 at 5:18 pm

“Change the POA.”

A POA is granted by someone who is mentally competent to do so. One can neither be granted nor revoked by someone who is non compos mentis. Options are:
– Go to court, try to get it revoked and to appoint somebody else. $$$
– Find a dodgy lawyer, and try to meet the grantor on a “good day.” $-$$
– Flat-out forge another POA, save the legal fees, risk jail, and don’t get a lawn sign or an MLS listing in case the “evil” son is watching. 0-$$$$

NONE of these are recommended, but people writing “change the POA” who think it can legally/easily be done ought to be disabused of that notion. This applies to wills, too. And contracts of any kind.

“Each spouse should probably will 100% to each other to keep the kid’s grubby hands off anything until both parents are gone.”

I’ve read SO many stories where one spouse (usually the husband) died, the other one remarried and rewrote [usually her] will, new husband (and eventually stepchildren) get everything at the expense of the children of the first marriage.

There are NO great answers. Love and avarice are both super-powerful emotions, many (most?) people don’t even manage to rise to the level of moderate financial competency in their peak cognitive years, and creating foolproof trusts managed by trustworthy, arms-length professionals is expensive.

#17 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.29.19 at 5:23 pm

Oh, and POA laws are different from one province to another. And many have changed recently (last decade or two). Law changes and somebody isn’t competent to sign a new POA or will? Too bad, so sad.

#18 Yukon Elvis on 09.29.19 at 5:26 pm

Meanwhile, back in the UK:

Labour has a very anti-business platform in which companies would be required to give 10% of the company to workers.
In a very radical plan, Labour proposes companies exceeding a headcount of 250 would be required to give shares to workers.
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/22/labour-conference-industry-policy-nationalisation-cbi

Pssst…..Don’t tell the Libs . They might steal the idea for the upcoming election freebie giveaway.

#19 Sold Out on 09.29.19 at 5:29 pm

#6 Drillhole

40 cm of snow? That’s not global warming, that’s karma! Just kidding, but for the slow learners, once again climate =/= weather. I hope you can read that, cuz I can’t type any slower.

#20 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.29.19 at 5:31 pm

yep.
peoples sense of entitlement never ceases to amaze me.
Watched an elderly uncle die of cancer last year and the squabbling among the kids is unbelievable.
Estate is worth maybe 750k.
Even though his Will set everything out point by point.
The elderly wife is in poor health and may not last 2 years.
Not good enough.
Even though most of his kids have good jobs and lots invested.
They feel the 2nd wife (not their mother) who was married to their father twice as long as their mother shouldnt get any of his assets without a fight.
They have made her life Hell because she, rightfully, inherited his assets .
(A divorce from the first wife 25 years ago tends to do that……idiots)
She intends to follow her husband’s wishes and all the kids will receive an equal share upon her death.
The kids want their share now and leave her with nothing to live on.
I told her to change the Will and leave it all to the dog catcher.

#21 Toronto1 on 09.29.19 at 5:47 pm

Sell the house for $1 to someone in the family, no tax bill
Take out a heloc against the house equal to whatever the care costs, the family chips in the difference for care if any

Or reverse mortgage the house, $40000k to the govt can almost pay 10 years of care…..

#22 Raging Ranter on 09.29.19 at 5:48 pm

Gawd I hate Les right now. Absolutely despise him. Is that wrong?

The mother should threaten to remove Les from the will entirely if he does not comply with her wishes immediately. Nothing makes a money-grubbing ingrate beneficiary fall in line faster than the threat of being disowned.

#23 Tony on 09.29.19 at 5:59 pm

The idea is give most of the money to the people in the will before you die as Canada is one of the few places with zero gift tax. Sell the house while capital gains tax is 50 percent. Should Trump lose the 2020 election capital gains tax could easily go to 100 percent in Canada.

#24 Mf on 09.29.19 at 6:02 pm

#19 Sold Out.
That was hilarious! However, I’m sure Drill Hole still doesn’t understand.

#25 AB Boxster on 09.29.19 at 6:08 pm

In the long run it doesn’t really matter?
If the husband dies the property goes to his wife.
Whoops no more POA control Les.

She can then write Les out of her will and he gets nothing.
Best thing to do based on Les’ actions.

Or when she dies, the house becomes part of her estate and the gov’t still gets the tax.

The house will be sold and split between the beneficiaries.

To deny his father better care in order to preserve his inheritance is pathetic. I expect any judge will see what is happening and replace Les as POA over his dad’s affairs.

Either way I think Les is in for a world of hurt.

#26 Tony on 09.29.19 at 6:12 pm

Re: #20 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.29.19 at 5:31 pm

You’ve got to look out for those money grubbers changing the will on the person’s death bed. It happened to our family. My first cousin stole all my aunt’s money that was supposed to go to our family in my aunt’s will. This was 6 months after she already inherited about 20 million when her mother died. She rewrote the will on her death bed and my brother who was executor of my aunt’s will didn’t care and told her to keep it all.

#27 conan on 09.29.19 at 6:13 pm

Reminds of the potential client I had who would not divest from Bre-X. Two months of effort on my part went no where. He had 2 m plus in this one share.

One week after I realized I had no chance to manage his money the market crashed on the stock.

He was the same way. The taxes on the free, no effort, money scared him, and made him the “stupid horse.”

The brother in your blog today is also the stupid horse.

#28 Linda on 09.29.19 at 6:31 pm

Today’s case raises some questions. If Mom & Dad own the rental property, presumably the POA could be revoked by Mom since Dad is incapacitated. Or if ‘Les’ has POA for Dad & is balking at selling ‘Dad’s’ share, I’d hire a lawyer & challenge the POA on the grounds that self interest rather than the legal obligation to do the best for his father is behind the decision to not sell. Sorry, toots. Inheritance isn’t a right & should not be counted upon. Those who do so often find themselves disappointed, because expectations rarely match reality.

Of course Mom won’t want to have the face off with her son, but the fact remains that her husband needs help now & the fact they’ve got an asset means the government isn’t going to pick up the bill. Time for ‘Les’ to accept ‘less’ may be what he will eventually inherit. By legal means if need be, though one would hope it wouldn’t come to that.

#29 Dog Breath on 09.29.19 at 6:40 pm

#19 Sold Out
“…but for the slow learners, once again climate =/= weather. I hope you can read that, cuz I can’t type any slower.”
———————————————————————-
Remember that when it gets a bit colder than normal, that’s just weather. When it gets a bit warmer than normal that’s man made climate change!!

Changing climate changes weather. Do you have a hard time grasping that? – Garth

#30 Penny Henny on 09.29.19 at 6:54 pm

#4 Shaggy on 09.29.19 at 4:31 pm
A little clarification if you will Garth, how will she owe “about” $450k on $850k? I get that her top tax bracket will be 54%, but that only applies on income above $200k, right? She’s still going to owe a whack of cash, but not $450k.

Also, why would that be split between the husband? I assume that he still is co-owner of the property or does the dementia mean that he hasn’t been claiming / can’t derive income?

Appreciate the answers…

///////////

Dementia

#31 Penny Henny on 09.29.19 at 6:56 pm

#6 Drill Baby Drill on 09.29.19 at 4:32 pm
You want your proof of global warming. Just look at southern Alta today. 40 cm of snow and counting plus it is going to -10 Monday night with highs of +2C Tuesday. But hey we need to cut way back on our fossil fuel consumption.
/////////////////

God is punishing you Albertans

#32 WUL on 09.29.19 at 6:59 pm

I’m wondering and will look into whether or not a person can direct physician assisted death (death with dignity), while competent, covering off the awful or complete lack of quality of life that many afflictions bring. In other words, the ultimate decision would be placed in the hands of someone trustworthy and sensible (if one can be found) in conjunction with a couple of physicians.

Probably not available is what my gut tells me.

Why occupy a bed for a couple of decades and why saddle your loved ones with year after year after year after year of miserable deterioration in your hopeless condition that is nowhere near a life.

#33 Dog Breath on 09.29.19 at 7:01 pm

Changing climate changes weather. Do you have a hard time grasping that? – Garth
—————————————————————————–
That must be why it’s snowing in southern B.C, Alberta and Saskatchewan at the start of fall! We’re headed for a new mini ice age!!

#34 Lisa on 09.29.19 at 7:03 pm

It is sad how greed messes up judgement. This sort of scenario is also one example of why assistance in dying is a bit scary. It is not too hard to imagine someone feeling that they ought to die rather than burden their family (or use up their future inheritance on care). Our most vulnerable need protection.

#35 Lost...but not leased on 09.29.19 at 7:17 pm

People who believe in “Global Warming”(..err fine- tuned @ss -cover repackaged “Climate Change)…..show irrefutable evidence of dementia and should be dealt .with accordingly.

An incredibly insensitive and ignorant comment. You are not welcome here. – Garth

#36 Tony on 09.29.19 at 7:19 pm

The brothers seem to be confused about whose money the property is. It’s not theirs, it’s mom and dad’s. If mom sells the place, pays her taxes, she has plenty of money.

She could use it to hire a top end Montreal hit-man to kill the dad, and smoke the two dolts with extreme prejudice.

Not likely, but she sure could go on some nice trips, buy a Maserati and a bunch of other things.

She owes the goofs nothing, and they should realize that if the get anything they are clearly getting more than they deserve.

#37 FreeBird on 09.29.19 at 7:27 pm

My MIL survived cancer only to be taken offside by Alzheimer. Nosy as hell (room overlooked parking lot) with a smile right to the end. How someone so small could be so tough is amazing. She had all preplanned. Alzheimer’s is one example of could force a home owner may (will prob) need to sell their home/condo sooner then planned (for assisted care and or by the widow). Hopefully the process would be as easy as possible.

#38 Albertistan on 09.29.19 at 7:31 pm

Re: “God is punishing you Albertans”

Equalization payments are punishing Albertans, God would not be so unjust or ungrateful.

#39 TurnerNation on 09.29.19 at 7:42 pm

This example highlights why the level of taxation is theft – the old man needs money for urgent care; the government does not.
But you will exclaim I like my roads and healthcare!
This weekend saw a massive Sick Kids hospital fund raiser outdoors.
Every hospital in each city and town holds yearly fund raisers; the names on the side of wings are all private money. Just for basic care. Stretched at that.

A total scam, you are paying for healthcare by way of your charity receipts – using AFTER tax income as it is.
$100 given to charity is $140 of your gross, say.

As I beleive our elite rulers really hate our way of life a seek to make us suffer. Prove me wrong I’ll gladly change my mind.

But muh taxes, they pay for health care…

“Your donation directly supports SickKids Foundation to speedily deploy funds in the areas of most need, such as research, clinical advances and compassionate care. Donations help to enhance the care patients receive, provide outstanding learning opportunities for staff and future generations of health-care professionals, and fund groundbreaking research that will lead to new discoveries, treatments, and cures.’

#40 IHCTD9 on 09.29.19 at 7:52 pm

#32 WUL on 09.29.19 at 6:59 pm
I’m wondering and will look into whether or not a person can direct physician assisted death (death with dignity), while competent, covering off the awful or complete lack of quality of life that many afflictions bring. In other words, the ultimate decision would be placed in the hands of someone trustworthy and sensible (if one can be found) in conjunction with a couple of physicians.

Probably not available is what my gut tells me.

Why occupy a bed for a couple of decades and why saddle your loved ones with year after year after year after year of miserable deterioration in your hopeless condition that is nowhere near a life
———

I don’t believe you can give advance directive for MAID in Canada. Nor can you give the directive yourself if you are not of competent mind. No one else can give said directive on your behalf in any case.

#41 FreeBird on 09.29.19 at 7:54 pm

FYI when making a living will be careful when stating your desire for DNR (do not resuscitate). Even if made clear, in writing, through a lawyer, witnessed and a copy given to any/all attending MDs (and maybe CCAC care coordinator) there’s been cases of family fighting it (as my dad said if you still have a few eye lashes moving). Make your intentions clear to ALL involved if possible while still able to deal with any conflict. I can’t stress this enough. It’s NOT something to let a spouse or primary care person deal with in real time or others who others be side swiped by. Ditto with organ donation. It’s a tough talk to have but the right one. My father did but mom didn’t and it fell on me to do it at her bedside and spread the news to my other siblings. Trust me you don’t want this to happen. Good luck.

#42 Nonplused on 09.29.19 at 8:06 pm

#1 Shawn Allen

If you have a personal lawyer, you know the guy that handles your real-estate transactions, incorporated you company, and wrote you will, chances are he will also do POA. Of course there will be fees, but he/she has to explain them in advance of you signing the contract.

Now of course there have been cases of Lawyers stealing their client’s money, but these are rare because they usually end up in jail. When your brother or sister steals money from your parents chances are there is nothing to be done.

This story rings a bell for me, maybe even triggers me, because I also have acrimonious relations with my siblings. My sisters free-load off my mom, and when I brought it up my brother came to their defense, so I don’t talk with any of them anymore. How can I? Some of the free-loading is for non-discretionary spending, so I sort of understand it except that I have kids who have non-discretionary expenses and they have to take student loans. But a lot of it was completely discretionary and a complete waste of money mom will need when she goes to a home, but now it’s gone. So who is going to foot the bill? Well, there is some money left, but once that’s gone I’ll be the only one who can, regardless of who is willing.

Siblings are your worst enemy. That’s why you fought with them so much as a child. You knew damn well down in the part of your brain that doesn’t talk that they were trying to throw you out of the nest and take all the food for themselves. And, in all likelihood, you were doing the same. People are not nice. Ever wonder why there is so much crime? The part of our brain that can talk says “theft is not right, so let’s make it illegal”. The part of our brain that cannot talk says “I better take this bike before someone else does”.

I’ll add to that by saying the only thing you need to know about human nature is this: bike locks. If people were anywhere near as moral as we consider ourselves, who would need a bike lock? Or any lock for that matter. But we have locks on everything, not just bikes. Why? Because if it isn’t nailed down it’s going to go missing. And even if it is nailed down it will go missing if it is worth something. We are not by nature a law abiding and fair creature. We evolved stealing each-other’s food and wives. That’s what we are, perpetual thieves.

*Disclaimer – I have never stolen anything, I’ve never had to because I was smart enough to get a good job. But I have spent a lot of money on security because I and my neighbors have had lots of things go missing. It has led me to conclude that my fellow humans cannot be trusted, and also wonder what I might do had I not been so fortunate. We all suck.

#43 Blackdog on 09.29.19 at 8:47 pm

re: #35 Lost…but not leased.

That was just sad. Thanks for calling it out Garth, and for not deleting it.

I’m biased (like everyone else), but it seems to me that the most ignorant, hateful messages come from the ‘man-made climate change’ deniers as opposed to those they direct their vitriol towards.

#44 SunShowers on 09.29.19 at 8:49 pm

Seems to me like this is a fantastic argument for bringing End of Life care such as those required for people with dementia under the “health care” umbrella and treating them the same way we treat hospitals.

Many fiscal conservatives will balk at the notion of subsidizing “old folks homes” with taxpayer dough, but these are undoubtedly healthcare facilities.

My grandfather went to an “old folks home”. He had what was in essence a small condo to himself, and it looked like any other apartment block, except with a large common dining hall and event rooms. There were daily outings to shopping malls, the racetrack, even the casino sometimes. Buses to church/synagogue every weekend, etc. There was ample socialization and independence. All the tenants had to do was sign out and they could drive off in their own cars. It cost about 5 grand a month, including meals.

My grandmother (from the other parent’s side) had dementia. She had to go to one of these facilities that Pat’s dad needs. You have a single room (plus a hole in the wall bathroom). You are in a secure ward with 2-3 other people, and you all share a single common area where an attending nurse will serve you your meals. These are the only 2 rooms and only people (outside of your) that your elderly relative will ever know for the rest of their lives. They cannot leave of their own volition, and they are monitored 24/7 for their own safety. This cost about the same as the old folks home.

I hope we can all appreciate the difference between an all-inclusive social club for mentally fit and independent seniors, and what is in essence a sanatorium. One is a luxury, and the other serves what should be considered a medically necessary purpose.

#45 Blackdog on 09.29.19 at 8:55 pm

What’s really disheartening is that I believe most people who are concerned about man-made climate change come from a place of love for humanity, wild life and the health of our planet. Since when is that a bad attribute for people to have? Why the hate-on? Sigh. More and more I lean towards thinking like Nonplused: “we all suck”.

#46 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.29.19 at 8:59 pm

Where the hell is Apocalypse2019?

Oct 1st baby!

Communist China’s 70 anniversary of communism taking control.

Lets see what happens to those “ungrateful” ( Two Party One State) citizens violently protesting in HK……

#47 Yukon Elvis on 09.29.19 at 9:01 pm

DELETED

Plagiarize again and you are out of here. – Garth

#48 Fake News? on 09.29.19 at 9:05 pm

Whoa, I think we have to be a bit less judgmental here. Maybe Les isn’t selling because he doesn’t think it’s in Dad’s best interest. Afterall, he saw the TO RE market soar, and now he’s watching it decline. Perhaps he thinks if he sold it now he would lock in an unnecessary loss for his parents – and Dad and Mom will need all the money he can realize for them from the house.

Remember the inheritance theory came from brother Patrick. The one who wants to sell in a down market. Also, taxes are owed whenever the house is sold – now or upon death. Maybe Patrick doesn’t realize that, and maybe Les does. Garth, perhaps you should give a Les a call and let us know his side of the story!

How can you ‘lock in a loss’ on a house owned for 50 years and worth ten times its purchase price? – Garth

#49 JM on 09.29.19 at 9:10 pm

Gingivitis proteins and DNA is being found in the brains of alzheimer and dementia victims.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191842-gum-disease-may-be-the-cause-of-alzheimers-heres-how-to-avoid-it/

There are also studies showing 3 different bacterial in probiotic supplements reduce gingivitis better than mouthwash.

https://www.cda-adc.ca › jcdaPDF
Probiotics for Oral Health: Myth or Reality? – Canadian Dental Association

I’ve been trying the probiotic mouth wash, still early, but teeth feel nice and clean.

We will see how the next hygienist visit goes.

#50 Cristian VASILACHE on 09.29.19 at 9:14 pm

Just refinance the damn property and get market rent on the apartments!! It a cash cow .. .refinance every 5 years and get the cash back .. you have a money making machine forever .. “perpetuum mobile”

The ‘money machine’ has a yield of 2.2% fully taxable, and it comes with heavy overhead. Wholly inappropriate for people facing challenging end-of-life situations, and in need of capital. – Garth

#51 kappa on 09.29.19 at 9:37 pm

For people that don’t believe in climate change (global warming) … even Russia (one of the top oil/gas exporters/producers) signed last week the 2015 Paris climate accord. Why ? Because the permafrost is melting and that affects both the people that live in those areas and most importantly (I would think) … the oil/gas infrastructure. What ?… Exactly!

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/09/23/russia-ratifies-paris-climate-accord-targets-critically-insufficient/

#52 SoggyShorts on 09.29.19 at 9:40 pm

#6 Drill Baby Drill on 09.29.19 at 4:32 pm
You want your proof of global warming. Just look at southern Alta today. 40 cm of snow and counting plus it is going to -10 Monday night with highs of +2C Tuesday. But hey we need to cut way back on our fossil fuel consumption.
#33 Dog Breath on 09.29.19 at 7:01 pm
Changing climate changes weather. Do you have a hard time grasping that? – Garth
—————————————————————————–
That must be why it’s snowing in southern B.C, Alberta and Saskatchewan at the start of fall! We’re headed for a new mini ice age!!

**********************
How hard is it to understand that an overall rise in the global average temperature (aka”global warming”) means messed up and extreme weather of all kinds (aka “climate change”)

Here’s a quick 2-minute read: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/01/climate-change-colder-winters-global-warming-polar-vortex/

There’s room for debate on how much impact we Canadians are having vs the rest of the world or how we can make changes with continued economic expansion, but not about how climate works.

#53 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.29.19 at 9:42 pm

#32 WUL — “In other words, the ultimate decision would be placed in the hands of someone trustworthy and sensible …”

That’s the trick, isn’t it.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=FZ10CwAAQBAJ&pg=PT97&lpg=PT97&dq=living+will+jablokov

#54 reynolds531 on 09.29.19 at 9:49 pm

I think Les obviously knows the tax is payable now or later. It’s spending the money on Dad’s care not taxes as the issue. Let’s be real clear about what his priorities are here. Guy is a real piece of work.

#55 conan on 09.29.19 at 9:51 pm

To think the Cons would have had a chance to win this election if they had chosen wisely on the climate change issue.

Every single blog and news site that allows commenting is filled with hate soaked anti climate moo rons, and they are all Conservatives….

They look like idiots.

#56 ImGonnaBeSick on 09.29.19 at 9:53 pm

#45 Blackdog on 09.29.19 at 8:55 pm

Thomas Hobbes vs John Locke… We’re innately evil vs we’re innately good. Two sides of the same coin.. flip it to see what type of day it’ll be.

All I know is that I was taught to never tempt an honest man… If your bike gets stolen because you left it unlocked, it’s partly your fault, since it likely would not have been stolen if it were.

Same goes for climate change. I personally don’t know anyone that is against taking care of our environment, but whenever something gets politicized, that’s when people get cynical… Being constantly bombarded that you’ll never do enough, makes people throw their collective hands in the air and say “f” it… Especially when you live in Canada, with our immense forests, small population, and the best environmental policies in the world already.

Assisted death is disgusting.. a lot can happen in a decade, and I’d rather have a parent with dementia be taken care of with dignity and hope of a cure, then to be put down so as to clear a bed… Obviously WUL has never had a loved one in assisted care, and being able to visit them and walk with them, even if they don’t always recognize you, is a beautiful thing to be able to share in the final days. We should be so lucky as to be able to say goodbye and a enjoy a few more moments. The mere suggestion makes me sick to my stomach and someone would be getting some free dental work if they suggested that for one of my family members.

#57 Sold Out on 09.29.19 at 9:54 pm

#47 Yukon Elvis

DELETED

Plagiarize again and you are out of here. – Garth

_________________________________________________________________________

Hahahaha, sadly proving Nonplused’s rant that if it ain’t locked down, some low-life will steal it.

#58 Jeff on 09.29.19 at 9:56 pm

DELETED

#59 Yukon Elvis on 09.29.19 at 10:03 pm

#47 Yukon Elvis on 09.29.19 at 9:01 pm
DELETED

Plagiarize again and you are out of here. – Garth
…………………………..

Didn’t consider it plagiarizing, just passing it on as suggested at the bottom of the piece. I thought it was interesting.

What else would you call copy-and-paste without attribution? Have more respect. – Garth

#60 tccontrarian on 09.29.19 at 10:06 pm

Les…

I assisted in selling a rental property (owned for about 35 years) for one of my relatives back in 2017. It sold north of $1.8M in the Vancouver area. Other relatives were advising not to for similar reasons – the capital gains tax.
Well, this property now would not sell for more than $1.4M, judging from most recent sale history in the area. So, the ‘tax’ was, in reality, paid by the buyer – at near the peak of a bubble who has thus earned the ‘greater fool’ badge, with (dis)honour.

So, don’t be another ‘fool’ – sell promptly – or you risk losing more by waiting. A portfolio of $1.5M could easily yield enough for father’s care costs. Not to mention the liquidity gained going from RE to B+D portfolio.
tcc

#61 45north on 09.29.19 at 10:17 pm

Hamer Bay exists in cascades — of income and reality. It’s part Hamptons of the North, part old cottage country, and home to the working-class Hamer family

https://nationalpost.com/news/on-hamer-bay-boat-tragedy-involving-kevin-oleary-illuminates-clash-of-different-worlds

For years we drove north on Highway 11 to see family in Burks Falls and Sundridge. They were working class. Still are. The story reminds me of the two little towns.

Hamers built the first generation of cabins on the bay. Like the Hamers, my grandfather built the the first generation of cabins on Lake Bernard or at least on the south end.

The old crowd, he said, were respectful. They’d pop into his store, just off the highway, and pick up supplies. Now they all stock up in the city and buzz right by. “It was just a different type of people to deal with,” he said. Highway 11 used to go right through Burks Falls and right by Sundridge. Now it completely by-passes both little towns, by miles. Local business is suffering. The old crowd worked in the city, and drove up in the summer. They’d stay for a couple of weeks. The cabins were simple – wood frames with boards on the outside – a couple of electric lights – no indoor plumbing.

Lake Bernard isn’t the Hamptons of the North but it’s moving up. $200,000 for a lot, $200,000 for a first class building. Which you have to heat and for which you have to pay taxes, electricity and insurance. If you’re middle class, it’s out of reach.

#62 Mean Gene on 09.29.19 at 10:27 pm

Elder abuse sounds like a good reason to change the old man’s power of attorney.

#63 Yuus bin Haad on 09.29.19 at 10:41 pm

filthy lucre

#64 yvr_lurker on 09.29.19 at 10:54 pm

I don’t know if this is an option, but what about kicking the tenants out in the house and then having the mother move back in for a year with perhaps a little family support. Rent out the condo. Then, can’t one claim the house as the “principal residence” after a year and thereby avoid all of the 400K in tax?

Not a chance. – Garth

#65 Dr V on 09.29.19 at 11:26 pm

64 lurker – this would be deemed a sale of the rental
and cap gain tax applied at that time.

#66 Binder Dundat on 09.29.19 at 11:31 pm

@Tannhäuser Gatekeeper

That was a very thought-provoking story, thank you so much for passing it along.

#67 Fortune500 on 09.30.19 at 12:15 am

Wow! The urban/rural divide is stark here. I think it is the untold story of our current times. My parents worked in a small city of 25,000 and bought a house that they paid off quickly back in the 80s. Today, had they not divorced, they would be looking at 200,000 in appreciation.

People who did not happen to work in Toronto area, or Vancouver, are living in totally different worlds to these people. Worrying how to divide up 2 million that came from sitting on a house. Nuts. If we are worrying about people like these the rest of us are doomed.

#68 Loonie Coder on 09.30.19 at 12:45 am

Not sure there is anything worse than watching a loved one slowly deteriorate to a fraction of their former self from Alzheimer’s. I went through this for years and do not wish this on anybody (Les included). Come to your senses and do the right thing for the folks that brought you here.

#69 Paul on 09.30.19 at 12:48 am

#42 Nonplused on 09.29.19 at 8:06 pm

I’m sorry to read about your personal story with your siblings. There are good people out there who won’t steal your bike and I’m going to vouch for my siblings here – but you are right to lock it up all the same.

I wear Grandmother’s ring
On my finger
On my finger
She had a tooth of gold
And just before she died
She said son
You can have my tooth
But do I
Really have to go

Look around
And you will see
This world is full of creeps like me
You look surpised
You shouldn’t be
This world is full of creeps like me
– Lyle Lovett

Best,

Paul

#70 Wait on 09.30.19 at 2:37 am

What happens if this scenario presented itself without a 2 million dollar house to sell?

Oh wait, that will be the situation for all millennials who basically rent.

#71 Ustabe on 09.30.19 at 2:54 am

We are all done with the parental end of life stuff (except for us!) but I have younger friends and acquaintances who are going through variations on this scenario.

We are there for them in whatever capacity they may need.

My financial team tells me they have clients both wealthy and still building who do not have wills, POA’s, insurance where indicated, etc. Why is all I can say.

All you do is leave an expensive and time suck of a mess for your loved ones.

And your sons or daughters should not be executors, hold the poa, etc. That is why we have trust companies or trust departments.

Trust me on that, been there done that and you do not want to be there doing it.

#72 Kevin on 09.30.19 at 2:59 am

It’s a sad day when your kid tries to screw you over because of greed.

I hope they take him to court, and take him out of the will. This is just awful behavior.

#73 Glory Hound on 09.30.19 at 3:12 am

If I get Alzheimer’s I want to be set free on a South Pacific island. That way I can ilny walk in circles. My executor will be instructed to pre-pay drinks and coconuts at the various bars I have to stumble across. Way better than a moldy dump overlooking the 401. May alternative will be self supporting from the dividends I receive from owning shares in Extendicare, EXE – TSX today paying 5.4%. The two million should cover that easy.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/china-markets-to-test-the-risk-of-most-extreme-u-s-threat-yet-1.1323292

Trump is kicking ass. Yah!

#74 under the radar on 09.30.19 at 5:16 am

A cautionary tale for sure, one which i see a lot. If the home is owned jointy as you alluded to, then mother can bring an application under the partition and sale act to have the home sold. The Application would be a slam dunk given these facts.

#75 Tater on 09.30.19 at 7:50 am

#4 Shaggy on 09.29.19 at 4:31 pm
A little clarification if you will Garth, how will she owe “about” $450k on $850k? I get that her top tax bracket will be 54%, but that only applies on income above $200k, right? She’s still going to owe a whack of cash, but not $450k.

Also, why would that be split between the husband? I assume that he still is co-owner of the property or does the dementia mean that he hasn’t been claiming / can’t derive income?

Appreciate the answers…

————————-

I see 420k as the tax owing in Ontario. Average rate of 49%.

And Les is despicable. It’s simply not your money and as a POA you need to act in the best interest of your parents, not any inheritors.

#76 Tater on 09.30.19 at 7:58 am

#21 Toronto1 on 09.29.19 at 5:47 pm
Sell the house for $1 to someone in the family, no tax bill
Take out a heloc against the house equal to whatever the care costs, the family chips in the difference for care if any

Or reverse mortgage the house, $40000k to the govt can almost pay 10 years of care…..

———————-

Only 21 comments in and I can’t imagine I’ll see one dumber than this. I’m not sure this family needs to add tax evasion to their problems.

#77 Not So New guy on 09.30.19 at 8:26 am

#71 Ustabe on 09.30.19 at 2:54 am

My financial team tells me they have clients both wealthy and still building who do not have wills, POA’s, insurance where indicated, etc. Why is all I can say.

============================

I think it is because many people are afraid to deal with their mortality and all those things are loud, flashing signs pointing right at it

#78 IM in C on 09.30.19 at 8:32 am

Trouble is, I can also see Les/s side of this. Don’t get too pious until you’ve been there.

#79 Justin S on 09.30.19 at 8:33 am

Les is a POS. Plain and simple.

#80 Axehead on 09.30.19 at 8:35 am

I love it when this blog forces me to reference a dictionary.
I hate it when greed displays its vile colors, especially towards family.

#81 Polozified on 09.30.19 at 8:47 am

There are a lot more Les-es out there than you realize, and there’s a high chance there’s one in your family. Plan accordingly.

#82 David Hawke on 09.30.19 at 8:59 am

Garth writes “Alzheimer’s patients belong in a care facility, not wandering off from the front door into traffic. But financing the long goodbye is daunting. It takes advance thought, and action.”

I vehemently disagree with the first part of this statement as placing a loved one in a facility where care is performed by uncaring union dudes/dudettes merely there for a paycheck is not quality care.

The last sentence, however, is spot on.

Should the child responsible for making the decision is retired the sensible option is moving to a developing country (preferably in the tropics) where quality 24/7 in-home care can be arranged for a quarter of the cost of Canuckistanian institutional ‘care’.

Impractical for most families. Clearly you have not lived through the progression of an Alzheimer’s patient. At-home care is dangerous and likely provides a worse quality of life for the patient unless there’s a full-time caregiver, preferably with medical training. Park your own guilt and emotion.- Garth

#83 dharma bum on 09.30.19 at 9:15 am

Today’s post is highly significant, as it describes a situation that will affect the majority of the population in some way shape or form, but is also largely ignored by most.

I don’t blame them. It’s a daunting circumstance to think about, yet it’s practically inevitable. Chances are it’s going to happen to you sooner or later. Definitely something to dread.

I went through it recently. I feared the onset of my parents’ demise (mental and physical) for several years. Circumstances were not promising given the combined problem of ridiculously stubborn parents and a practically estranged hostile sibling.

Fortunately (if that is even an appropriate word to use), things fell into place timing wise on a number of fronts. Dad passed. I took the initiative to patch things up with my sibling in order to civilly wade through the legal quagmire of red tape involved in sorting out the health and financial issues of our Alzheimer’s afflicted mother.

Everything Garth wrote today is spot-on accurate. Divest the parents’ hard assets pronto. Invest it in liquid income producing instruments. Use the proceeds to pay for their professional care.

By the way, $8000 a month for one person in high quality private dementia care is pretty much exactly right. I know. I write the cheques. Luckily, the income from their invested assets covers the nut.

Ain’t life fun?

#84 dharma bum on 09.30.19 at 9:34 am

371 Ustabe

Trust me on that, been there done that and you do not want to be there doing it.
——————————————————————-

You are preaching to the choir here, brother!
So very true.

People need to grab the bull by the horns and make darn sure that properly executed POAs and wills are in place, and that there is a plan ready for when the wheels fall off.

The family that Garth describes above sound like a bunch of real “winners”. At least the parents had the foresight to hang on to some real estate from way back, but now Freddy the freeloader is holding out on papa for his own erroneously perceived financial benefit while dad rots in a public facility.

Nice guy. What? Is he from the Ozarks or something?

Also, how the heck did Les get POA if mom is still alive and has her faculties?
That’s weird.
Usually, couple’s POAs are for each other with a provision that unless one or the other is mentally incapacitated and unable to adequately handle the financial or health affairs for whomever they have POA for. Only then does control default to the alternate POA named in the document.

Patrick should contact the public trustee to file a complaint that his brother is mismanaging the power that he has been entrusted with and that it will lead to potential harm to his father.

Patrick – see this:

https://www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/english/family/pgt/contact.php

#85 Bytor the Snow Dog on 09.30.19 at 9:50 am

Here is your average climate scientist’s view right here. Her answer to question 2 is particularly enlightening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-wAxnAG54U

#86 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.30.19 at 10:01 am

“[…] a POS. Plain and simple.”

It’s pretty neat that people can read a five paragraph, double-unreliable-narrator story (a.k.a game of Telephone), and get so judge-mental, so quickly.

If I were to point out that the POA was granted to the younger, propertied brother who sired heirs and not to the older renting singleton — whose secondhand version we hear here — would it make anyone rethink the paterfamilias’s judgement, feelings and motivations?

We can’t draw conclusions, but we can imagine. Not every family is a Jonathan Franzen novel, but we must examine all the clues we are given.

Also, I think some of you need to differentiate between the POA “doing what’s felt best” for the grantor, and the POA doing what the grantor would’ve done himself, had he the capability, within reason. If the old man was a crochety bugger who avoided tax early and often, and wished to see family wealth preserved at the price of some discomfort for himself, quickly forgotten, it’s perfectly possible that the POA is acting in accordance with his mandate.

#87 Whoooaaaaaaa on 09.30.19 at 10:05 am

Just a little advise Patrick, don’t drink anything Les pours, or go hunting with him!!!

#88 Dog Breath on 09.30.19 at 10:08 am

#52 SoggyShorts
How hard is it to understand that an overall rise in the global average temperature (aka”global warming”) means messed up and extreme weather
—————————————————————————-
Those pushing this climate hysteria always preach that it’s “settled science” that the earth is warming. But is it? Real scientists are not all in agreement about this, never mind that it’s caused by human activity. (I know St. Greta disagrees)
https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/nature/nasa-finally-admit-its-going-to-get-colder/

#89 Remembrancer on 09.30.19 at 10:09 am

#78 IM in C on 09.30.19 at 8:32 am
Trouble is, I can also see Les/s side of this. Don’t get too pious until you’ve been there.

Although Mom agreed the real estate should be sold, Les (he has POA) is apoplectic at seeing a chunk of his inheritance disappear in tax, then the capital eroded by nursing home bills. Despite the absolute windfall gain on this house, and the fact it’s been generating GIC-level, fully-taxable gains, the guy is balking at a sale.
—————————————————
See his side? What side would that be? ITS NOT HIS MONEY. Explain why Les is not an A-hole in this little morality play, please. How is putting mom and dad on short rations so he can gorge meeting his POA fiduciary responsibilities?

#90 Dog Breath on 09.30.19 at 10:17 am

Here’s Dr. Patrick Michaels discussing what’s wrong with climate hysteria:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fA5sGtj7QKQ&app=desktop

Fox News. Really? – Garth

#91 Remembrancer on 09.30.19 at 10:28 am

#61 45north on 09.29.19 at 10:17 pm
Hamer Bay exists in cascades — of income and reality. It’s part Hamptons of the North, part old cottage country, and home to the working-class Hamer family
———————————————————-
This is pretty much the story of any seasonal vacation/resort area, particularly playgrounds of the rich (though the city-its on a weeks rental vacation can be bad enough, the entitlement of seasonals, particularly their teenage to 20-something kids, fuels the townies and tourists meme endlessly… On the flip side, the locals complain, but they like the money coming in…

The highway rerouting traffic just adds to the background story of general decline – a cottage country gothic that reads like Norman Rockwell and Stephen King came up from the States for a weekend with Tom Thomson…

Oh, and Mr. Hamer deserves no sympathy for his complaint about not being able to feed the bears out behind his store anymore, dumb ass, best case he’s signing their death warrants. Besides, that’s what the dump parking area is for…

#92 Lee on 09.30.19 at 10:29 am

Alzheimer’s sufferers need to be in a care facility once they show any sign of serious confusion in their daily living, are constantly falling, or cannot attend to their daily hygiene. At least government run facilities are affordable, and some are decently run. Proper home care will run you at least $50,000 a year with very little in the way of government help and tax relief. The patient will be better off in the care facility. The big hurdle is wives who worry about being accused of abandoning their husbands if they send them away. Very big concern among older European women.

#93 Shawn Allen on 09.30.19 at 10:40 am

The United States of Hypocrisy

I am no defender of Trump.

But the notion that foreign interference in the elections should be illegal is sheer hypocrisy.

The United States actively engages in that as a matter of policy – to the point of achieving “Regime Change” on more than one occasion. Trump apparently recently mentioned that he is not bothered by the 2016 foreign interference since the USA does that all the time. The first honest response I have seen on this matter.

Why should a free and open country be afraid of the view of foreigners or foreign governments? Why would misinformation from foreigners be anymore dangerous or illegal than the same information from Americans?

If there is indeed actual “dirt” on Joe Biden, why should Trump not get it from Ukraine? If abuse of power is the issue, fine, but why care that he abused his power abroad as opposed to in the U.S.?

It seems to me that trump could be impeached for many things including his frequent attacks on (and firings of) opponents in the U.S. and attacks on the press and his blatant and frequent abuse of power in the U.S. on a daily basis.

But forget this hypocrisy that it is outrageous to have foreign interference. A free and open and confident U.S. should welcome debate on who should be President from anyone in the world.

If the Russians want to convince Canadians that Trudeau should continue to be Prime Minister, or not, I’d say, have at it.

If there are rules on election spending it would be ideal to impose those on domestic as well as foreign actors equally. Or maybe just admit that such rules are unenforceable.

The whole outrage over foreign interference is just another example of nationalism (i.e. the new racism)

#94 Flop... on 09.30.19 at 11:05 am

It’s a long shot but I’ll just slide this into the old Greaterfool Suggestion Box.

What are the chances you can convince someone running for office to do a Greaterfool Town Hall style Q&A at some stage before now and the election?

Do you think it would be a total train wreck or just your average Canadian Tire car park low speed, low impact car crash…

M45BC

#95 miguel on 09.30.19 at 11:31 am

Anyone that has experienced having a parent with Alzheimer and the path it ultimately leads to which is living out their years in a care facility will tell you that they would never want that for themselves. I have been told many times, usually after a visit to the care home, “dont ever let that happen to me”. I have to agree that I would rather tap out than live through that and put my family through it.Preparing for financial situations is one thing and preparing for hard choices is another.

#96 PastThePeak on 09.30.19 at 11:38 am

#52 SoggyShorts on 09.29.19 at 9:40 pm

How hard is it to understand that an overall rise in the global average temperature (aka”global warming”) means messed up and extreme weather of all kinds (aka “climate change”)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

There is more to a scientific theory than saying “as things warm up, all manner of bad things could happen, and when something bad happens, that is proof”. In fact, that is not a theory at all.

Believe it or not, but a scientific theory, to be considered valid, needs to be able to accurately describe how an event comes to be, it needs empirical evidence to show it was X and not Y reason that such an event happened, it needs to be replicable (independently) by others – and (crucially) it must enable reliable predictions.

Claiming, after the polar vortex has happened, that events like a polar vortex are completely consistent with AGW, is absolutely useless.

And by the way – the statement that there should be no debate on “how climate works” is 100% proof that a person really knows nothing about science…

#97 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.30.19 at 11:54 am

“Also, how the heck did Les get POA if mom is still alive and has her faculties?”

Incisive!

Choose your own “all unhappy families are unique” adventure:

If you think the old man thought his wife bad with money and his eldest a wastrel, turn to page 37.

If you think the younger son enlisted a shady lawyer and tricked the old man into granting a disadvantageous POA, turn to page 49.

If you think the old man turned to the trusted but, alas, lazy family solicitor, who said “maybe the wife’ll be nuts by the time you need this, and contingent POAs are expensive and risky, just name one of your boys now” and that was a tragic, tragic mistake… Turn to page 81.

If you think the younger son was forthright and levelheaded when the POA was granted, but has since done a few too many trips on the complimentary Casino Rama coach, and is now in dire straits, turn to page 93.

#98 Alex on 09.30.19 at 12:03 pm

“Dad’s minimum care in a dodgy public facility will cost a little under $3,000 a month. Alzheimer’s is an expensive affliction, in addition to being a personal hell. More respectful and attentive care in a private facility in the GTA costs about eight grand a month”.
There’s been some things I strongly disagreed with Garth, in regard to this particular matter he’s absolutely right, including the “dodgy” attribute. Have been in that industry for far too log and saw exactly what he said

#99 Stan Brooks on 09.30.19 at 12:05 pm

Mental health, including at old age is linked to diet, quality of food and quality of life/stress avoidance/ as well as to the environment and to the active lifestyle.

The rat race in the big smoke, the ‘GMO glucose fructose’/growth hormones rich food, the pollution and the stress pretty much guarantee epidemics of mental illnesses.

BTW hard alcohol/whiskey in moderation helps with dementia as it maintain elasticity of the blood vessels that supply the brain with oxygen as well as with cleaning of the plague in it/badly needed as of the palm/saturated fat rich diet.

Bottom line: A bartender at the beach in South America might have much better and fulfilling life at old age than a corporate VP in the big smoke/not even considering the weather /for example the snow storm currently/ in September/ in Alberta/, it seems that T2’s carbon taxes are working after all and the battle against global warming is finally being won…

Cheers folks,

#100 joblo on 09.30.19 at 12:17 pm

Poor Patrick…. on a lighter note

https://youtu.be/s9BTAGm6rmc

#101 Tater on 09.30.19 at 12:29 pm

#99 Stan Brooks on 09.30.19 at 12:05 pm
Mental health, including at old age is linked to diet, quality of food and quality of life/stress avoidance/ as well as to the environment and to the active lifestyle.

The rat race in the big smoke, the ‘GMO glucose fructose’/growth hormones rich food, the pollution and the stress pretty much guarantee epidemics of mental illnesses.

BTW hard alcohol/whiskey in moderation helps with dementia as it maintain elasticity of the blood vessels that supply the brain with oxygen as well as with cleaning of the plague in it/badly needed as of the palm/saturated fat rich diet.

Bottom line: A bartender at the beach in South America might have much better and fulfilling life at old age than a corporate VP in the big smoke/not even considering the weather /for example the snow storm currently/ in September/ in Alberta/, it seems that T2’s carbon taxes are working after all and the battle against global warming is finally being won…

Cheers folks,

——————————————-

And if anyone here knows about failing mental health it’s Stan! He’s so delusional he thinks inflation has been running at 10% for a decade.

Hopefully they get his meds sorted out.

#102 Remembrancer on 09.30.19 at 12:32 pm

#97 Tannhäuser Gatekeeper on 09.30.19 at 11:54 am
Choose your own “all unhappy families are unique” adventure:
—————————-
That’s a BINGO!

#103 IHCTD9 on 09.30.19 at 1:18 pm

All this back and forth over Climate Change is a waste of time.

Let’s see a show of hands for whose willing to return to an early 1800’s agrarian society? I don’t see too many hands. That’s what it’s going to take to actually REVERSE C02 levels.

Cessation of all fossil fuel use would decimate world food production. Based on what non mechanized agriculture was able to produce prior to GMO’s and (petro based) chemicals like fertilizers and insecticides, we’d be able to feed about 1-2 billion people – that’s it.

The simple fact is, BILLIONS and BILLIONS of peoples’ lives depend on mass consumption of energy, if the energy disappeared, they would die of thirst, starvation, and disease – just like they regularly did not that long ago.

No Politician will have a hand in going back there – not even a little bit, so you can say hello to increased annual C02 levels – 100% guaranteed.

The only answer is a workable alternative to our current energy supply. Artificial photosynthesis, Nuclear fusion, 50%+ efficiency Solar, or something else that can put out the power needed to keep us all alive. You’d better believe it is as simple as that. Turn off the pumps, and unplug the grid = Billions dead.

Bottom line is we CAN’T stop burning fuels, and that should be obvious by now. Realistically achievable cut backs on C02 emissions will not have a measurable effect. I haven’t even talked about the developing world and how they’re not going to play ball either.

It’s pretty clear to me that we have one singular plausible hope of reducing C02 output – and that is a revolutionary new, mega dense, clean power source.

#104 Remember This on 09.30.19 at 1:37 pm

A new circus has come to town with a new normal, and nothing is normal anymore. The truth matters not, but its the perception of the truth that counts in today’s sordid world of confusion and lies.

#105 SoggyShorts on 09.30.19 at 1:39 pm

#88 Dog Breath on 09.30.19 at 10:08 am
#52 SoggyShorts

How hard is it to understand that an overall rise in the global average temperature (aka”global warming”) means messed up and extreme weather
—————————————————————————-
Those pushing this climate hysteria always preach that it’s “settled science” that the earth is warming. But is it? Real scientists are not all in agreement about this, never mind that it’s caused by human activity. (I know St. Greta disagrees)
https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/nature/nasa-finally-admit-its-going-to-get-colder/

**********************************
Try reading the original NASA article that your economics blog is refering to.

Nasa: “We are looking into the idea the sun cycle may cause temperatures to drop”
Your Blog: “NASA admits man made climate change is a hoax!”

#106 Shawn Allen on 09.30.19 at 1:45 pm

IHCTD( points on carbon reduction

Good points.

Can we invent and pay to operate a giant machine to remove carbon so that we can keep burning energy? (more forest plus mechanical or chemical means)

To the extent that carbon will be emitted but is harmful then it seems quite appropriate to tax carbon emissions.

I always said if my gasoline consumption causes harm then I am willing to pay the costs to deal with that. I should pay a price that fully compensates for my consumption? Same for heating energy. And the fact that it is arguably a necessity has no bearing on this in my opinion.

Seems to me that those who oppose carbon tax often simply mistrust governments in general (to use the money properly). THAT is a bigger issue when democracy is no longer trusted. Or they mistrust the media and scientists. That is also very problematic. We did not move from IHCDT’s mentioned agrarian rough life to today’s standards of living by mistrusting scientists and the media to any huge extent.

#107 Sail away on 09.30.19 at 1:48 pm

#103 IHCTD9 on 09.30.19 at 1:18 pm

It’s pretty clear to me that we have one singular plausible hope of reducing C02 output – and that is a revolutionary new, mega dense, clean power source.

———————————————–

No, no… we just need to parade with politically-effective people and vow to plant 2 billion trees. That’s only 60 trees for every Canadian resident. Get to it.

#108 Damifino on 09.30.19 at 1:50 pm

#96 PastThePeak

Excellent response. Prepare for a lambasting.

#109 Brian Ripley on 09.30.19 at 1:51 pm

#88 Dog Breath “Those pushing this climate hysteria always preach that it’s “settled science” that the earth is warming. But is it?”

Here is NASA’s chart on solar irradiance vs Temperature:
https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/14/is-the-sun-causing-global-warming/

The amount of solar energy received by the Earth has followed the Sun’s natural 11-year cycle of small ups and downs with no net increase since the 1950s. Over the same period, global temperature has risen markedly. It is therefore extremely unlikely that the Sun has caused the observed global temperature warming trend over the past half-century. NASA

If you want to educate yourself, the NASA site has pages of data, charts and facts.

Ice cores drawn from Greenland, Antarctica, and tropical mountain glaciers show that the Earth’s climate responds to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Ancient evidence can also be found in tree rings, ocean sediments, coral reefs, and layers of sedimentary rocks. This ancient, or paleoclimate, evidence reveals that current warming is occurring roughly ten times faster than the average rate of ice-age-recovery warming. NASA

#110 thebarold on 09.30.19 at 1:53 pm

This is the side Financial planners don’t tell you about. These parents need to be protected from this greedy son. Family court could be an avenue, but instead of the tax man getting the money, the lawyers will. If you care about those you are leaving behind, ensure you make your wishes clear.

#111 joblo on 09.30.19 at 2:05 pm

I don’t always read the CBC comment section, but when I do I prefer comments like this. ( almost forgot 1/2 of this list)

” 35 minutes ago

SNC, JWR, Philpott, Norman, Veterans, 5 ethics violations, Creston, used jets, 11000 fentanyl deaths, No Navy ships, 7.1 billion in tax loan write offs, 5.1 billion on pipelines to nowhere, brown face, failed trade with India, China, US, UK, AUS, selling arms to SA, 68000 illegals snuck in, 68 returned Syrian fighters, M103, tanker bans, plastic bans, paper water bottle box thingys, peoplekind, elbowgate, sandbagging, 600 million in media payoffs, Atwal, Boyle, Khadr, Jack, McClintick, Khan, black face, and the 75 other epic fails over the last 3.5 yrs

The Liberal Party of Canada
Part of our Proud, Canadian Heritage « less “

#112 SoggyShorts on 09.30.19 at 2:15 pm

#96 PastThePeak on 09.30.19 at 11:38 am
#52 SoggyShorts on 09.29.19 at 9:40 pm

And by the way – the statement that there should be no debate on “how climate works” is 100% proof that a person really knows nothing about science…

*************************
Completely (purposely?) misread the post.
I am NOT claiming that the science is settled or that we know exactly how each and every factor is involved in the changing climate.

I am however pretty sure that the basic definition of the words and concepts that should frame the discussion are settled:

Climate defines a range of weather conditions.
If the climate changes then the range of weather conditions changes too.
One hot(or cold) day does not have meaningful significance.

2 minutes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBdxDFpDp_k
Even if you don’t agree with the last 20 seconds (where he says CO2 is the biggest factor) the definition/explanation of climate and weather is really good.

How much of the change we are seeing is from inescapable naturally occurring phenomena and how much is from the unnatural changes man has made?

I’m not sure, but I find it to be a pretty brazen gamble to basically guess that it’s not us and stick to that no matter what.

#113 Kate on 09.30.19 at 2:22 pm

I always surprises me how greedy people are about someone else’s money. This is not your money, Les! These are your parents’ and should go to them and their life quality, not yours!

#114 Sail away on 09.30.19 at 3:14 pm

The house situation seems pretty clear; there’s a person with POA who was given that for a reason. He’ll do what he feels is best, end of story. Nobody will get hurt too bad.

No need to involve emotion. I’m a bit suspicious of the older brother, anyway, since all we’ve heard is his side of the story.

For those who’ve had many family members and pets live and die, there really isn’t too much needed in the last stages of life beyond food, shelter and bathroom/cleaning assistance.

It’s just the way it goes. No reason to spend a lot of money. Everybody dies.

#115 n1tro on 09.30.19 at 3:23 pm

#112 SoggyShorts on 09.30.19 at 2:15 pm
#96 PastThePeak on 09.30.19 at 11:38 am
#52 SoggyShorts on 09.29.19 at 9:40 pm

And by the way – the statement that there should be no debate on “how climate works” is 100% proof that a person really knows nothing about science…
*************************
Completely (purposely?) misread the post.
I am NOT claiming that the science is settled or that we know exactly how each and every factor is involved in the changing climate.

I am however pretty sure that the basic definition of the words and concepts that should frame the discussion are settled:

Climate defines a range of weather conditions.
If the climate changes then the range of weather conditions changes too.
One hot(or cold) day does not have meaningful significance.

2 minutes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBdxDFpDp_k
Even if you don’t agree with the last 20 seconds (where he says CO2 is the biggest factor) the definition/explanation of climate and weather is really good.

How much of the change we are seeing is from inescapable naturally occurring phenomena and how much is from the unnatural changes man has made?

I’m not sure, but I find it to be a pretty brazen gamble to basically guess that it’s not us and stick to that no matter what.
—————-
There is hope after all. Being unsure versus calling other people who are also unsure as climate/science “deniers” is quite a big step.

#116 Ace on 09.30.19 at 7:18 pm

Never rely on an inheritance to fund your retirement.
There are a whole slew of problems that come with waiting for the that somebody to die.. Your elderly relative could live to be 102 and you will be elderly yourself by then. Or maybe they could acquire a gambling addiction and poof all money gone. I’ve seen all people in diapers at casino rama gambling away their children’s money. Or maybe your relative will get ticked off with you right before they pass away and then write you out of the will.. Not to mention when money in involved, nearly everyone becomes a vulture.. People who haven’t even talked to the deceased in 20 years come out of the wood works with their hands out and ready to go to court for their share. I’ve seen it all.

#117 Greek on 09.30.19 at 8:44 pm

“Cancer cases are diminishing “ are you sure Garth? I believe the numbers going forward are 1 in 2 of us will get some form of cancer in our lives.
Regardless, people eat your vegetables(a lot of them), eat less meat(and better quality), exercise(cardio/weights) regularly, manage your stress. These things help with every chronic illness.

#118 David Hawke on 10.01.19 at 8:50 am

Impractical for most families. Clearly you have not lived through the progression of an Alzheimer’s patient. At-home care is dangerous and likely provides a worse quality of life for the patient unless there’s a full-time caregiver, preferably with medical training. Park your own guilt and emotion.- Garth

While you’re correct about the impracticability for ‘most’ + the danger without a care-giver without training, that’s as far as your response goes.

I most definitely Have lived through the progression with my mother who ended her days at my home being liiked after by Caring local people plus a Doctor who weaned her off 75% of the drugs prescribed by the ON doctor including the one he called a “horse tranquizer that Never should be given to humans.

NO guilt, however, strong emotion about the inadequacy of ‘health care’ in Canuckistan!

#119 Tom on 10.01.19 at 10:49 am

We have 3 well adjusted grown children. Who should be our executor?
We do have a small holding company and fairly substantial investment portfolio

#120 Deo on 10.01.19 at 3:42 pm

Just Truedebt