The truism

When’s the best time to invest?

When you have the money.

This simple truism is one of the hardest for most people to grasp. Maybe they understand the logic of it. But they can’t get past the emotion. This is on full display daily on this blog as people moan about a coming apocalypse, the next recession or the great reset – which never comes. Face it, the worst thing that’s happened to anyone took place back in 2008-9. The stock market lost half its value in a once-in-a-generation global credit crisis. But people who stayed invested throughout it with a balanced portfolio lost nothing. The average return during 2008-10 was 5%. How’s that a bad outcome?

This year, 2019, should be a lesson to all the doubters, wailers, gnashers and worriers. Just relax. Invest the money. Stop trying to time the untimeable.

The brief and sharp correction in Q4 of 2018 – as described here at the time – was just noise. An inconsequential and largely Trump-induced plop that put equities on sale and made geniuses of those who had cash to invest. Since then, the recovery’s been remarkable. Those who stayed invested through the storm have seen ’18 paper losses wiped away and gains added. Those who sold made their losses real.

This week the Dow and S&P are achieving new record highs, as they did repeatedly in 2017 and 2018. The year-to-date advance of the Dow is 15%. For the S&P 500, the gain is 19%. For the tech-heavy Nasdaq, investors are ahead 23%. And on Bay Street – so unloved last year – the return is well over 15%. And what about people who held on through the Christmas massacre, not buying or selling? For them the one-year advance on US markets is 11%, and in Canada about 5%.

In fact a balanced and globally-diversified portfolio has delivered close to 7% on average over the past eight years. That rivals or exceeds real estate in Vancouver or Toronto – and without land transfer costs, lawyers, realtor commissions, condo fees, property tax, insurance, home inspectors, renos or utilities. Add in those burdens, and people opting to stay liquid, free, flexible plus fully-invested (and rent) are the winners.

Over this period of time markets have gone up and down. Interest rates rose. Trump emerged. Brexit happened. Trade wars broke out. The US debt ceiling crisis came and went. Commodities fluctuated. Throughout it all, consistently, guys like Gluskin Sheff strategist David Rosenberg predicted one recession after another, and the Chicken Littles lapped it up. They’d feel foolish now, if they weren’t expecting a recession soon. Rosy said so…

Most people, as you know, don’t invest. They save. They buy houses. This is why 80% of TFSA money sits in cash or GICs and there’s a 70% homeownership rate. It’s also no surprise a third of people between 45 and 54 have nothing saved for retirement. Zilch. Another 20% have put aside  less than $50,000. And the average amount in hand when people retire is just $184,000.

What are they thinking? Surely not that they can live on CPP and OAS – governmental crumbs – for 25 years after careers end. Sadly the majority of Canadians believe investing means ‘stocks’ and that’s gambling. So avoiding risk is their preoccupation when (as stated here so often)  the biggest risk is running out of money, not losing it.

Thus the highest hurdle to financial security is emotion, not markets. Not volatility nor loss. It’s you. And that’s exactly why a balanced portfolio – containing safe things as well as diversified growth assets – is a good answer. Putting all your eggs in one real estate basket is not. And saving in a low-yield world may condemn you to decades of KD and lonely nights of Netflix.

So, yes, markets just hit fresh highs. The world’s totally screwed up. It’s a great time to get started.

Well, this is it. For the past few days a portion of this blog has been turned over to the steerage section, giving those who wanted it a chance to pretend they are me – without the chiseled abs, fabulous, tight tosh and non-stop charisma, of course. It’s been interesting. Your comments on whether or not Vox Canabis should be repeated would be welcomed. Unlike Bill Morneau, I actually care what you think. No, really…

Our final contestants include James, who sends along a picture of his unnamed but hopeful dog, and wants you to know what sucks about life.

   There are so many things wrong in the world today and yesteryear that it could fill a book, but if I want to sum it up in one word it would be “blame”

I believe throughout history we blame everyone else for our problems. You can pick any time period and any issue, and someone is blaming someone else for the problems of the day.

I  bet even the Neanderthals blamed Homo Sapiens for getting the better of them, wall art?!

What are the issues? Pick one and someone is pointing the finger at everyone but themselves, suck it up buttercup, each of us must take responsibility and work together to find solutions.

Which Brings me to the other problem we have and that is we have become polarized with two sides? or many sides? to every issue.

I think our leaders and politicians need to work together or heaven forbid united together for the good of Canadians and Canadians need  to come together on local issues and have town halls on how we can solve the issue in our Communities which than can build into a vision and strategy for the country; and all levels of government must participate.

We need a 25 year and 50 year vision, not changing shirts in the next election. The dog is bringing you a message of hope

Finally, Blog Dog Brian Ripley, who often posts links here to his dense housing charts. “I was apprehensive about submitting my essay to you because of the unrestrained testosterone that often overflows on your blog especially when the Trump fanboys get unleashed,” he says. “But today with the Epstein story breaking bad, and the U.S. Women’s Soccer team at the forefront of the equal-pay movement, I thought perhaps my essay might be of interest to your readers. It strikes me that the U.S. 2020 election is indeed in the hands of women.” Actually if Brian got his way, women would dominate politics. Cuz, as he argues, you just can’t trust men.

There is still no real universality when it comes to voting. The biggest group left out with the most at risk are children. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census +/- 25% of the population in the U.S. are under 18 and therefore cannot vote, or effectively inform their government to make changes now that will benefit them or move the national interest more towards “the greatest portion of good”.

In Canada nearly 18% of the population is under 15 years of age (2007 Census Estimate). In Mexico 30% of the population is under 15 years of age (2007 Census Estimate).

These future citizens are barred from participation in shaping the world they will inherit.

How do we get this vote out? By proxy, held by the closest female caregiver. That’s right, a child’s vote should reside with their mother or the closest female caregiver or guardian.

Women bear the future, they should be entrusted with the vote of the largest ignored class of voters.

Imagine what could happen if we allowed our living inheritors a say in our affairs. In the United States for every 100 people, if 25% are children, and men and women share the remaining votes somewhat equally, then 37 women would have an additional 25 child votes to influence the other 38 male votes. That’s 62 female vs. 38 male votes. That ratio would lead to dramatic change.

In Canada, the results would be 59 female vs. 41 male votes, and in Mexico 65 female vs. 35 male votes. North America would become a model for the rest of the world.

The Grameen Bank is a case in point. It was first created as a university research project by Muhammad Yunus in 1976 in Bangladesh as an experiment in micro-banking (small loans to poor people). By 1983 it was made independent by government authority and as of 2007, women make up 97% of the clients who provide a 98% payback of the money borrowed.

Yunus discovered early on that men could not be trusted to repay the loans; women could. They used the money for creating businesses that provided income to insure the raising of standards for their families who in half the cases were previously living in desperate poverty but now have their children in schools, three meals a day, clean drinking water, sanitary toilets and rainproof houses.

It’s time to acknowledge our future. Let’s have Universal Suffrage, let’s count all the votes.

158 comments ↓

#1 dakkie on 07.11.19 at 3:49 pm

Would You Pay $1200 For A Bunk Bed In A Shared Living Space? Lights Out At 10pm. No Friends

https://www.investmentwatchblog.com/would-you-pay-1200-for-a-bunk-bed-in-a-shared-living-space-lights-out-at-10pm-no-friends/

#2 Smartalox on 07.11.19 at 3:54 pm

@ Brian Ripley:

My child cannot reliably choose his favourite breakfast cereal on a consistent basis.

Non-withstanding the Saudi-level of misogyny that comes with the image of young (male) children telling their female caregivers how to vote, restricting voting to the age of 18 is adequate for participation in elections – it doesn’t mean that children are forever disenfranchised, it just means that as children, they sit on the sidelines for their first three or four governments.

After that, it’s their responsibility to get out and vote.

#3 Caledon dave on 07.11.19 at 3:54 pm

Please keep publishing these essays on a monthly basis. Brian’s essay is indeed thought provoking as is James.

I feel lucky to be retired with my spouse. No kids because I knew 30 years the world was pooched….not in a canine way either.

Just starting to figure out how to fill each day.

Word to the wise… live within your means and try not to compare yourself to others. Oh yeah and don’t participate in any social media, otherwise we will all be dopamine addicts.

#4 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 07.11.19 at 3:55 pm

The next downturn will DWARF the 2008/9 recession. Gold Silver Food and lead: Be safe Can’t hurt.

#5 Investx on 07.11.19 at 4:04 pm

Giving the vote to children.

Wow. Just, wow.

#6 Anna on 07.11.19 at 4:07 pm

Totally agree with giving one vote per child, and allowing the primary caregiver to cast the vote on the child’s behalf. The youngest in society will benefit (or suffer) the most and longest from decisions made by our governments, so give them a say.

#7 PA on 07.11.19 at 4:13 pm

Oh Brian Ripley…

Women can get corrupted too and are subjected to the same human limitations as men.

#8 K on 07.11.19 at 4:13 pm

universal suffrage…Lmfao

#9 Adewade on 07.11.19 at 4:16 pm

I think there is a good argument to be made that lowering the voting age to, say, 16, would encourage lifelong voting tendencies (because voting could be addressed before the kids leave high school), but the system proposed by that blog dog… eeesh.

(and maybe at the same time, we could teach them how to file their taxes?)

#10 BobC on 07.11.19 at 4:25 pm

Only male landowners over 25 should be allowed to vote.

#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

Brian,

Lay off the soy lattes buddy. It’s betas like yourself that is causing the divide in people. Alphas and their testosterone become leaders (good and bad) or get themselves killed doing something stupid. So if you don’t have any children, your vote is worth less? And if you are 2 gay guys raising an adopted child, sucks to be them?

Advocating votes for children is silly but to top that off with giving it to their female caregiver purely assigned to women because they are women and tend to pay back loans?? We’re in bigger trouble than I thought.

“Previous behavioral studies have found that women cooperate more when they’re being watched by other women; that men tend to cooperate better in large groups; and that while a pair of men might cooperate better than a pair of women, in a mixed-sex pair the woman tends to be more cooperative. ”

https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/06/brain-activity-during-cooperation-differs-by-sex.html

Here’s a thought. How about giving the children’s vote to say…their parents? You know, both the mom and the dad who through their combined efforts are doing everything they can to provide a good life for their children. Oh wait, that is already being done with traditional voting.

#12 michael on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

Garth wrote: “2008-9. The stock market lost half its value in a once-in-a-generation global credit crisis. But people who stayed invested throughout it with a balanced portfolio lost nothing.”

I can attest to that! I slept through it. A year later the value of my portfolio had regained it all. The graph showed a deep V shape in the curve. I have friends who sold on the dip and lost big.
The Moral?
LISTEN TO GARTH.
:)

#13 yvr_lurker on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

speculation tax in BC has provided good revenue

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/speculation-tax-generates-millions-1.5208584

Next step, is to do something useful with this…

#14 Sail away on 07.11.19 at 4:28 pm

Thanks Garth. Good post. It’s baffling that more people don’t invest that way, but… human nature..

For the blogdogs:

James: so to be clear, you’re blaming our leaders and politicians?

Brian: oh boy… so fecundity alone should be qualification for political influence? That sounds like a winning concept: have children, control the country! If women are savvy, they could start having kids early, say at 15 or 16, to increase their reproductive window, and it probably wouldn’t make sense for women to work anymore, since that could reduce their babymaking.

Way to end the guest posts with ridiculosity. A fine nail in the coffin.

#15 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.11.19 at 4:34 pm

#122 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 12:53 pm
#120 IHCTD9 on 07.11.19 at 12:28 pm

It’s never a waste of time to protest someone/some group that tries to rob you with the added insult that they are doing it on your own good.
————-
You should change your handle to Don Quixote.

#16 Farley on 07.11.19 at 4:35 pm

re: Brian –

Sorry friend that idea is out to lunch. Well reasoned, but a few primary foundations have missed the mark.

Might as well enfranchise peoples pets, too, because they are members of our families and our choices affect them. A vote for each pet, cast by a female because males cannot effectively care for either pets or children, right?

But then who will speak for the wild animals? It’s got to be a (female) biologist I guess since they care the most.

But wait – our government’s action clearly have an effect on the world (because a Carbon Tax is going to make or break it, right?) so what about the rest of the world. We better open up our democracy to let everyone in the world vote on which party is going to form our government.

And which riding’s will all of these extra people & animals vote in?? Could get confusing…

Never fear! Our present government was guaranteed to be the “Last Government to Be Elected in a First-Past-The-Post System”!

* * *

All joking and sarcasm aside, our children are represented by their parents. Every good parent will vote with the thoughts of what is best for their whole family in mind (including their pets, I might add). So children are already well represented.

When we make kids get jobs and pay taxes, then we can let them vote. A good argument for Victorian England when child labour was rampant, but it doesn’t stand up in today’s world.

#17 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.11.19 at 4:45 pm

#134 Is That All There Is on 07.11.19 at 3:39 pm
Remember that song? I haven’t been to our famous donut store in years. I called for a delivery of a dozen with 6 of them to be Apple Fritters that were huge in size. This oversized flat box arrived, and flipped the lid to see in horror small little donuts with pathetic Apple Fritters half the size. The price was up, and no more donuts from there. They can ripoff the Mills, but not me.
———
The delivery guy probably switched them.
Happens quite often, with the crummy wages they are making.
Next time get off your behind and walk to get them yourself

#18 Dave Ahem on 07.11.19 at 4:50 pm

I like the article Garth. I’m 38 and I make $16,000 a year in dividends and interest off of a portfolio of 25/25/25/25 ETF’s, a small bit of sector and some bank shares before I ever get out of bed. My goal at retirement is to generate enough income to make about $40,000 a year off my investments and then die and leave it all to my wife and kids. I never need the principal. It pays for my peace of mind, not for anything fancy. I have a DB Pension and will get CPP and OAS too.

My dream has always been financial independence and I have sacrificed a lot to hopefully get there someday. It is the one thing we should all strive for and it’s the one thing almost nobody ever achieves.

#19 Millennial on 07.11.19 at 4:53 pm

“How do we get this vote out? By proxy, held by the closest female caregiver.”
Yeah, right, those same females who voted Mr. Socks, because he had such a nice hair… gosh!

#20 Linda on 07.11.19 at 4:53 pm

James nailed it – the blame game seems to be the default setting most of the time. On those occasions when people do work together to fix something the results are truly remarkable. I’m not sure humans can work together all of the time, but if we practiced doing so more often I think the world would indeed be a better place.

Brian’s proposal is interesting, but I am doubtful that proxy votes would be the answer. Technically women have the balance of power when it comes to voting as it is, in that there are more females than males in the general population.

As to giving children the right to vote, it seems to me that doing so would cause more harm than good. We already have adults coercing children to be sex objects, laborers, soldiers as it is. Being forced to act as adults, but without the independence or resources to say no. How can you say no to someone who is legally responsible for you? Or is the proposal to truly do ‘universal suffrage’ & thus a child could run for & win political office? Will children be able to sue their parents for support & live independently from them (divorce)?

So I’d say no to giving children the right to vote. I might be amenable to lowering the voting age. If the laws of a country permit someone to legally engage in sex, get married or stop going to school at (for instance) age 16 then seems to me that the right to vote should be included in that package. I’ve always wondered why one adult activity should be legal while another is not.

#21 Leo Trollstoy on 07.11.19 at 4:56 pm

We need more positivity from the contributors

Enough remedial nonsensical stuff already

#22 Leo Trollstoy on 07.11.19 at 5:01 pm

I won’t suffer any meaningful consequences from climate change

Prove me wrong

That’s what I thought

#23 raisemyrent on 07.11.19 at 5:02 pm

If it’s up to a vote, I vote that the dawg voices stay. There will always be a Garth filter, of course, but this is his blog anyway. It doesn’t really matter what they say; I find it eye-opening to hear from real people living in this great country of ours, and it’s certainly a welcome change on the many, but cyclical topics Garth regularly covers. Together with the weekly expert colleague feature, I think it has elevated the blog. Thanks!

#24 NoName on 07.11.19 at 5:05 pm

O my God…

Hey brian tell us where do you get your make-up, shopers or shefora????

#25 BlorgDorg on 07.11.19 at 5:12 pm

“Markets just hit fresh highs. The world’s totally screwed up. It’s a great time to get started.”

Also known as “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”

On voting and electoral reform, I was really hoping T2 would make good on that promise (we got weed instead, not the same, sorry). Count me among the heartbroken.

Maybe if we abolished political parties and had everyone run as an independent candidate representing their riding, we’d see some constructive debate and productive compromise. Maybe even Garth would run again.

But probably not.

#26 Wayne Campbell on 07.11.19 at 5:19 pm

We shouldn’t let anybody vote. Instead we should establish a highly selective and rigorous series of obstacle courses and wrestling matches. The winner of these challenges will be selected to lead us into our bright new Canadian future.

Party on Garth!

#27 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.11.19 at 5:19 pm

#10 BobC on 07.11.19 at 4:25 pm
Only male landowners over 25 should be allowed to vote.
———–
Only white, male Anglo Saxon landowners should be allowed to vote and only the same group should be allowed to run for office.
Sounds absurd?
Just look at the Premier’s table and Trudeau’s cabinet.
and I should add, only Haper lookalikes should be allowed to run.
It’s funny how a country that prides itself on being diverse, is so top heavy with white male Anglo Saxons in charge.

#28 Billy on 07.11.19 at 5:20 pm

Truisms are true until they aren’t. We used to have reliable long-term models for severe weather, but lately 1 in 100 year storms are anything but. The 2008-9 recession was a generational economic event, but it’s full legacy is likely still unfolding in terms of the massive government & private debt level acceleration it fueled. Staying invested remains sound advice, but be prepared for a bumpy ride.

#29 SunShowers on 07.11.19 at 5:26 pm

Thanks again for publishing my guest post, Garth.

Has the bleeding stopped? – Garth

#30 BlogDog123 on 07.11.19 at 5:33 pm

Forget kids voting. They’d all vote for the Spongebob Squarepants party.

The US Supreme Court should nix all that state run gerrymandering in the USA that suppresses voting. Weird shaped districts that pool all the minority neighborhoods so they get slaughtered at the polls while all the old white guy neighborhoods with old white guys in the state legislature redistricting as needed to get their guy elected.

That’s the scandalous voting system in the good ol’ US of A.

#31 Not So New guy on 07.11.19 at 5:35 pm

#114 Shawn Allen on 07.11.19 at 11:17 am

But keep in mind that all kids are inheriting the installed publicly owned infrastructure of roads and bridges and government buildings and much more as well as the collective historical knowledge of humanity. It may not be a bad deal for anyone.

Anyone really think it is a bad time to be born today in North America?

====================================

The 1% own about 50% of the world’s assets. I assume a good majority of that is government debt. You are underestimating opportunity cost in the hundreds of billions in interest payments that have been taken out of Canadian’s pockets and channeled into the bank accounts of people who have no need to spend that money but just continue to accumulate it for their own personal greed and selfishness

Have you ever had a huge debt and then paid it off to become debt free? I have. There is a literal psychological burden that is lifted from you that truly gives you the feeling of freedom. Others have stated this too and it caused them to vow to never go back into debt. Why wouldn’t that same effect be felt by an entire country? Apart from the immorality of pushing your spending on to another generation, of course

#32 Ace Goodheart on 07.11.19 at 5:37 pm

Re Brian Ripley:

Negative sexual stereotypes? Really?
Shame on you!

#33 Andrew on 07.11.19 at 5:37 pm

From today, Fed chair Powell comparing bitcoin to gold as a store of value:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBUlXryF2WI

Tick tock…

#34 Coopoiler on 07.11.19 at 5:41 pm

What! Assign children’s vote? How absurd. I can not even get past vote by popularity. Sure first past the post may not be perfect but at least I got to choice between the candidates in my riding. With the popular or percentage idea I am expected to vote for a party, let’s say I vote for the purple party and enough other people across the country vote for the purple party to give them one seat. Who gets that seat? Joe from Nova Scotia or Susan from B.C. (Note that both genders mentioned) or someone else! Who knows! They may not be the person I would every ever vote for. Just because you vote for or are involved with a particular party does not mean you like and or agree with all within said party. At least first past the post the person can be expected to represent the constituency that they won in and were I voted not from some other local.

#35 Kelowna Business Man on 07.11.19 at 5:49 pm

I think the responses to your two submissions today make it clear that you should drop the idea of submissions. Many of the people who are responding do not understand Brian’s proposal. They make statements that do not correspond to his concept. They refute facts. They imply he is suggesting children vote, where he does not make that statement.

Garth, I read this blog for your insightful and generally correct predictions on where the markets and economy are heading. Of course, you can’t predict everything. Some of the events of the past decade resulted in market reactions that stumped me.

Trump’s election was one of them. I doubt if you expected the markets to rise as much as they have since his election. He is an idiot and clearly the most incompetent US president in history. The British Ambassador’s comments were dead on.

But, with a big tax cut, the markets went up. Hindsight = 20/20.

Someday I will probably come to visit and hand over my portfolio, but with a simple, somewhat balanced, ETF based portfolio, I think I may be ahead by doing it myself. Thank you for your incredible patience and your immeasurable support of the average Canadian family.

#36 Freedom First on 07.11.19 at 5:51 pm

Brian Ripley

Ripley’s “Believe It or Not”

Freedom First.

#37 Catalyst on 07.11.19 at 6:10 pm

Some of the guest posts have been okay, as much as I’m mostly here for your daily thoughts on current events. But oh man, if today’s were the best of the lot then stop immediately. Completely insane ramblings, does T2 have a 12yr/o boy named Brian (Brianne on weekends)?

#38 MaryEn on 07.11.19 at 6:14 pm

Sometimes I think that only people who actually pay public services (tax payers) should be allowed to vote. On the end of the day, voting is a decision where will our tax dollars go.

#39 LP on 07.11.19 at 6:18 pm

#5 Investx on 07.11.19 at 4:04 pm
Giving the vote to children.

Wow. Just, wow.

*********************************

I don’t think that’s what he said at all. He proposes that female caregivers of children would get to vote with the best interests of children in mind. Children wouldn’t be stepping up to the ballot box.

But with that thought in mind, maybe it’s time all those with children took them along to the voting stations so that kids could see how the process works and the importance of everyone taking part.

#40 Ustabe on 07.11.19 at 6:25 pm

Anger and pessimism do more damage than the things that cause them.

Assume good will and practice kindness. Otherwise you end up like Smoking Man.

When making potato salad toss the cut up potatoes with all your dry seasonings before you add the wet. This distributes the seasoning throughout the bowl.

One exception to this is to sprinkle apple cider vinegar over the potatoes when they are dry but still warm. Just a couple of tablespoons.

#41 Yvr2yyz on 07.11.19 at 6:25 pm

Seriously Brian, stop it with the women nonsense. Why not the father? Your idea is so flawed. Next you will be saying that Garth shouldn’t have a vote because he won’t be here in the future and so shouldn’t have a say about it.

Utter nonsense!

#42 Lead Paint on 07.11.19 at 6:32 pm

I’ve enjoyed some of the guest postings but some have gone pretty far afield, like Brian’s odd musings today. I’d be curious to hear about people’s business or job experiences completely foreign to mine.

How does a dentist run their business? A plumber? A stoned and drunk Forex trader? Ideally a climate scientist, but sadly there are none on this blog…

I’d like to walk in someone else’s shoes for 500 words a day.

#43 45north on 07.11.19 at 6:39 pm

There is still no real universality when it comes to voting. The biggest group left out with the most at risk are children. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census +/- 25% of the population in the U.S. are under 18 and therefore cannot vote, or effectively inform their government to make changes now that will benefit them or move the national interest more towards “the greatest portion of good”.

baloney

I’m thinking in particular, of two of my grandchildren, ages 3 and 5. It’s true they cannot vote but there are many who have their interest in mind – me, my wife, their mother, their father, their aunts and uncles. We can vote. Who’s to say that one vote is better than all the rest put together? Well Brian Ripley apparently, but his interest is social engineering – grand changes that purport “the greatest portion of good”.

baloney

#44 But ... on 07.11.19 at 6:40 pm

#40 Ustabe on 07.11.19 at 6:25 pm
When making potato salad toss the cut up potatoes with all your dry seasonings before you add the wet. This distributes the seasoning throughout the bowl.
One exception to this is to sprinkle apple cider vinegar over the potatoes when they are dry but still warm. Just a couple of tablespoons.

what should I add to my moose muffle?

#45 Sideshow Rob on 07.11.19 at 6:42 pm

Brian Ripley…You may just be the dumbest idiot in the history of the internet. Good grief! It’s amazing you function without getting hit by a car on a daily basis.

#46 Yanniel on 07.11.19 at 6:46 pm

I have learned that there is no such a thing as “common sense”.

#47 Shawn Allen on 07.11.19 at 6:50 pm

Democracy versus capitalism

#38 MaryEn on 07.11.19 at 6:14 pm said:

Sometimes I think that only people who actually pay public services (tax payers) should be allowed to vote. On the end of the day, voting is a decision where will our tax dollars go.

********************************
And those who pay the most taxes should get the most votes?

No.

Democracy = One vote per (adult) person

Capitalism = One vote per dollar.

Both systems have their strengths and weaknesses. Both have served most of the population well.

#48 Basil Fawlty on 07.11.19 at 6:58 pm

Leo Trollstoy

“I won’t suffer any meaningful consequences from climate change.”

Sure, when food prices spike due to loss of habitat, like no corn planted in Illinois this year, you can just quit eating.

#49 Chris on 07.11.19 at 7:06 pm

No more Vox Canabis please Garth, I can tune in to other blogs or comments section here or elsewhere to read their opinions. Most of it was incomprehensible or meaningless, unlike your contributions. Pass the mantle to trusted others if you must, but no more contributions from the plebs please!

#50 Tyberius on 07.11.19 at 7:10 pm

When’s the best time to invest?

When you have the money.

Obviously, one cannot invest if s/he has no money, so we’re really talking about HOW to invest – as in what to buy vs sell, at any given point in time.

Most buy-and-hold investors have nothing to show for in the last 2 decades. When adjusted for inflation, most indeces have not surpassed the 2000-1 highs.
Not that I have an answer.

Patently wrong. – Garth

#51 Dog Breath on 07.11.19 at 7:16 pm

DELETED

#52 Tyberius on 07.11.19 at 7:17 pm

“In Canada, the results would be 59 female vs. 41 male votes, and in Mexico 65 female vs. 35 male votes. North America would become a model for the rest of the world.”

I’d say it’s a measure of naivete!

Men have understood how meaningful their vote is (and thus become cynical), whereas women still think their vote matters?

That’s my vote on this – but I’m a confirmed cynic.

#53 and the budget will balance itself on 07.11.19 at 7:18 pm

what about the animals…. who is gonna vote for them?

#54 Bytor the Snow Dog on 07.11.19 at 7:26 pm

Finally we know who “Brian Ripley” is. A feminist kook job.

Why masquerade as a man “Brian”?

#55 Lost...but not leased on 07.11.19 at 7:34 pm

Garth:

Any comments re: Deutsche banks and 18,000 layoffs ?

Can’t happen here ?

#56 Hello Fellow Miscreants on 07.11.19 at 7:34 pm

Best free investment advice I can give is to buy as many GTA RE/houses as possible and rent them out. You will be RICHLY rewarded in the years to com.

#57 akashic record on 07.11.19 at 7:36 pm

#6 Anna on 07.11.19 at 4:07 pm

Totally agree with giving one vote per child, and allowing the primary caregiver to cast the vote on the child’s behalf. The youngest in society will benefit (or suffer) the most and longest from decisions made by our governments, so give them a say.

Maybe, if government child subsidies are limited to 2-3 children per family and having children does not become the main source of income for the caregiver.

On the other hand children are increasingly exploited for political indoctrination, primarely by the left, which is pushing to lower the voting age. The extra votes are used to support political agendas which are beyond the voting competence of children or teenagers.

So thanks for the suggestion, but no.

#58 FreeBird on 07.11.19 at 7:38 pm

Brian it takes a lot of courage to submit such a post for this blog. For that alone I give huge props and respect.

My father who was self employed 40+ years with much help from mom who also raised five kids taught me to never trust arrogance or the words trust me and always read before you sign. My mom to be open and take a risk. Both that all REAL men are gentlemen. My dad was and I suspect Brian you are too.

#59 Bytor the Snow Dog on 07.11.19 at 7:39 pm

I’m still in shock over what I just read Brian. Wow.

#60 akashic record on 07.11.19 at 7:43 pm

#47 Shawn Allen on 07.11.19 at 6:50 pm

And those who pay the most taxes should get the most votes?

No.

Democracy = One vote per (adult) person

Capitalism = One vote per dollar.

Both systems have their strengths and weaknesses. Both have served most of the population well.

In reality that’s happening already, billionaires using foundations to finance political infrastructure that promote specific political, social agendas or simply by lobbying the outcome of legislation.

#61 BC Renovator on 07.11.19 at 7:44 pm

#27 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.11.19 at 5:19 pm
#10 BobC on 07.11.19 at 4:25 pm
Only male landowners over 25 should be allowed to vote.
———–
Only white, male Anglo Saxon landowners should be allowed to vote and only the same group should be allowed to run for office.
Sounds absurd?
Just look at the Premier’s table and Trudeau’s cabinet.
and I should add, only Haper lookalikes should be allowed to run.
It’s funny how a country that prides itself on being diverse, is so top heavy with white male Anglo Saxons in charge.

___________

We are the majority, don’t like it? Run for office, Jagmeet did and look where he is. You are an example of James’ essay “Blame’

#62 ImGonnaBeSick on 07.11.19 at 7:50 pm

#27 Ponzius Pilatus on 07.11.19 at 5:19 pm

Give it a rest…

Canadian Demographics; if things were truly proportional, then this would be how our government would be represented – in the most simplest of terms.

Ethnic groups (2016)[2]
List of ethnicities
74.3% European
14.5% Asian
5.1% Indigenous
3.4% Caribbean and Latin American
2.9% African
0.2% Oceanian

Religion (2011)[3]
List of religions
67.2% Christianity
23.9% Irreligious
3.2% Islam
1.5% Hinduism
1.4% Sikhism
1.1% Buddhism
1.0% Judaism
0.6% Other

#63 Long-Time Lurker on 07.11.19 at 7:52 pm

Some guest posts were interesting. Some were loopy. (You know who you are.) You can post up any interesting guest posts you find, Garth, if you want to increase your blog workload even more. Letters to Garth the Editor.

I liked Matsebula and Nitro standing up for real science in yesterday’s comments.

>This was a good article. Thanks for sharing it, Chris. The (IMF) rumour is that negative interest rates are on the horizon for a recession.

#111 Chris on 07.11.19 at 10:32 am
Traditional logic regarding interest rate fluctuation holds little value in a post QE world. Central banks created an environment for debt levels to skyrocket – without knowing how to effectively unwind. Last December’s gyrations illustrated how dependent world economies have become on perpetually low interest rates – and precious few politicians will have the stomach to try to stop the merry-go-round.

https://www.cassandracapital.net/post/quantitative-easing-has-prevented-a-debt-crisis-but-we-re-reaching-the-physical-limits-of-qe

#64 David on 07.11.19 at 7:53 pm

If the majority of Canadians don’t save for retirment then is it not reasonable to assume that tax rates will rise, guaranteed income will rise and any political party who takes this policy position will reign supreme? If enough people were stupid, then they can make up for it as long as there are enough of them. This includes all the crooked self employed who will live the high life, make a ton of money yet pay no tax and strangely have no cop to speak of. Wait til they all cry poverty and demand relief.

#65 ImGonnaBeSick on 07.11.19 at 8:04 pm

#45 Sideshow Rob on 07.11.19 at 6:42 pm

This made me laugh out loud.

Brian’s post reminded me of the first time I gave my girls nerf guns; they were a bit unsure, I removed the packaging for them, helped them load it, fitted the face mask to them, gave them a quick lesson on how to use them safely, a quick lesson on does and donts, and once I handed it to them – they immediately shot me. To their great enjoyment.

#66 Sunshine ànd Lollipops on 07.11.19 at 8:23 pm

A good initiative, quality varies wildly, but better than the comment section! Thanks for all you do, Garth.

#67 Yukon Elvis on 07.11.19 at 8:24 pm

I like the Vox Canibus. Just goes to show you how scary it can be out there.

#68 Tyberius on 07.11.19 at 8:26 pm

#6 Anna on 07.11.19 at 4:07 pm

Totally agree with giving one vote per child, and allowing the primary caregiver to cast the vote on the child’s behalf. The youngest in society will benefit (or suffer) the most and longest from decisions made by our governments, so give them a say.

What did I say about naivete and women? Not to be sexist, as I do in fact know several very accomplished women (who would be embarrassed by Anna’s statement), but seriously? I remember being 17-19 and having NO CLUE about politics and most around me were even more clueless!
Let’s all have more babies now so as to have a bigger impact on election day! Geeshh!!!

#69 Karlhungus on 07.11.19 at 8:26 pm

Garth you should check out the website “honest door”. Sold stats for the Edmonton market. I have no affiliation with the site but figure its right up with what youve been discussing with regards to housing sold stats.

#70 akashic record on 07.11.19 at 8:29 pm

After Western ideology finally managed to put in laws that every human is equal, Western Marxists rediscovered that gender, race, skin colour, etc. somehow has some kind of inherited value, that overrides human equality.

#71 Hello Fellow Micreants on 07.11.19 at 8:31 pm

“And saving in a low-yield world may condemn you to decades of KD and lonely nights of Netflix.” – Garth

——————————————-

Yeah, in other words, a world where the central bankers are purposely creating massive debt and devaluing money. It’s collusion and it’s real. Don’t save! Instead buy GTA RE. Lot’s of it. Can’t go wrong in the long term.

#72 joblo on 07.11.19 at 8:41 pm

Let the kids vote, heck let em run for office.

#73 DON on 07.11.19 at 8:51 pm

Love the picture of the puppy. I have the full grown version…best dog ever…and smart (cunning). Just like having another child.

#74 Freddie on 07.11.19 at 9:03 pm

I totally agree, do not try to time the markets and stay invested. I started making maximum yearly RRSP contributions as soon as I started working in the early eighties (no TFSAs back then). Even with for most of these years the money being invested in mutual funds sold to me by the NLATB, my nest egg has grown to an impressive figure. I stopped making RRSP contributions five years ago when I realized I would be paying too much tax when I turn 71 (a dozen years from now). I have kept detail records of the value of my nest egg over time. When graphed over time, the 2008-9 downturn is only a minor bump in the road.

#75 Indiegirl on 07.11.19 at 9:09 pm

Vox canibus – Repeat it. While I haven’t agreed with everything, reading the different viewpoints has been interesting and even entertaining.

#76 Robert Ash on 07.11.19 at 9:12 pm

Is going to Cash a really unwise decision, at this point of the Business cycle. My assessment of the Market Conditions, are that Equities, in the form of Common Stock are overpriced. This is a result of Share Buy backs, and often a combination of Share Value improvement, and the emergency low interest rates…Corporate Debt. If the Trade War is not concluded ( I believe an agreement will be reached), why not wait, and see… Patience is a virture in terms of Investing. The Earnings reports many of which roll out these next few weeks, I feel will also demonstrate that the Market is possibly in a Bubble territory… It is like the Housing Bubble, mere Mortals, have had to survive with investing in Assets, they had not considered in the past… Many have distorted values, and then the confusion of the Bond Market which definitely seems, to be at odds with the Stock Market… Purchase Bond Proxies, Defensive posture… Economists, that can’t even predict the next Labour market with any kind of accuracy… Stats Canada, using Labour market models, based on 2012 data… Lying and Deceptive politicians… Enviro Warriors, that want to Keep Rail Cars full, but challenge pipelines… Stagflation, … Policies, that have been implemented for the past Decade just don’t add up….Policies that focus on Inflation, when the Fiscal posture is 12T of Negative Investments, in EU Fixed asset market… These are my reasons, for being pessimistic… and I don’t like it… I could go on.. Hey there’s Brexit, Give us your money and we will give you back less in 5 years.. but Capitalism is based on Profit, the Entire Economy is based on Credit, and Income.. but one side of the Equation, is artificial… Currency Manipulation, is the choice of CB’s… Maybe time to re read Brians comments..

#77 Yukon Elvis on 07.11.19 at 9:12 pm

#72 joblo on 07.11.19 at 8:41 pm
Let the kids vote, heck let em run for office.
………………
Yes! We could all get ponies !

#78 Brian Hartley on 07.11.19 at 9:17 pm

You guys can keep typing out those essays like you learned to do in school… or you can start investing. Sitting on a pile of cash, no matter how small is nice and all… but sitting on a pile of monthly cashflow that you know will never cease, likely grow is power.

#79 Ace Goodheart on 07.11.19 at 9:19 pm

Best investment strategy is tax avoidance.

Governments work on fear.

Make people afraid of something, and you can tax them. They will accept the tax as long as they feel it is saving them from something.

Canada’s first income taxes were supposed to be a temporary measure. They were introduced to combat the fear of “foreigners”. They were war taxes. Pay them, or we will be taken over by foreign folks who are just icky.

BC has successfully taxed real estate using fear. If they don’t tax it, foreigners will take over.

T2 is hoping to win an election by promising to “save us” from imaginary “climate change” by taxing our basic needs including groceries, gasoline and heat for our houses.

T2 is promising to make it unaffordable to drive your car or heat your house. And in exchange he will save the world.

Tax based on fear. If we don’t pay, “climate change ” will come and we’ll all die.

The idea is to piggy back on taxes while avoiding their effects.

Figure this out and you can do quite well.

Or get crushed by it….

#80 Re-Cowtown on 07.11.19 at 9:20 pm

This research paper clearly shows that the CO2-Climate Change premise is false. I’ve been following this line of research for the past several years and the research done is experimentally supported and verified, unlike the Government of Canada views which rely only on computer models, not actual measurements from the real world.

Not to put too fine a point on it, but computer models are only cartoon drawings of an idea. Sometimes they’re valid and sometimes not, but when they ignore key inputs they are guaranteed to be wrong.

Experimental results, as this paper demonstrates are the only scientifically valid form of evidence. Everything else is just conjecture.

The interesting thing is that if the computer models incorporated the findings of this paper, they would be more valid, but the “Climate Emergency” issue would evaporate.

Why is this important? Because the Trudeau government is driving the Canadian economy off of a cliff based on computer models that are demonstrably false. It is a guarantee that every dime spent on CO2 reduction will be a wasted dime. Every. Single. Dime.

https://notrickszone.com/2019/07/11/physicists-clouds-practically-control-climate-whereas-human-warming-amounts-to-0-01c-per-100-years/

#81 CEW9 on 07.11.19 at 9:24 pm

(i) #38 MaryEn on 07.11.19 at 6:14 pm

Sometimes I think that only people who actually pay public services (tax payers) should be allowed to vote. On the end of the day, voting is a decision where will our tax dollars go.
(/i)

This is not a terrible idea. One of the greatest dangers to democracy is politicians buying votes and people voting themselves free stuff (at other’s expense).

If one group or demographic went so far as to vote themselves absolutely no taxes, or oodles of benefits that outweigh their taxes, then perhaps they give up their right to vote along with it. Then when the new group votes to take the first group’s stuff, they get the vote back.

It would act as a check on the “Tyranny of the Majority” common in democracies.

Not that I have really thought it all the way through, it’s just an interesting thought experiment.

#82 Jeff on 07.11.19 at 9:25 pm

You’d be hard pressed to argue that we wouldn’t have a better run government if women didn’t get the right to vote.
In every country that enfranchised women, the politics in that country veered far left within one or two election cycles. The focus of government moved from adequately providing basic public goods and necessities to a mass free-for-all of various socialistic schemes.
Women evaluate governments the same way they evaluate husbands…who’s a good provider?

If only men voted would we be stuck with Trudeau? No. If only men voted the United States would have had Republican presidents since Carter.

We’d all be better off if women couldn’t vote…including women themselves.

Tell us that was sarcasm. – Garth

#83 millmech on 07.11.19 at 9:26 pm

#48 Basil Fawlty
Do not forget about Saskatchewan that is still receiving snow this week, damn that global warming!

Climate change appears to alter weather patterns, not just make the world hotter. Weather is not climate. – Garth

#84 Kelly on 07.11.19 at 9:30 pm

Brian Ripley

Such gibberish

Not worthy of even being the dog blog comment section.

#85 Tee Esex on 07.11.19 at 9:31 pm

Garth, I really appreciate the financial advise and education you freely dispense regularly and freely but time and again you equate stocks with gambling (and shower endless praises on ETFS).

To be fair the so called “blue chip/dividend aristocrats stocks” are not gambling. I do not have the stats but I think they held and rebounced as good as any ETF in the 2008 plunge. overall I like them because they are pure play investment as opposed to cloak and dagger derivative investing which include ETF and Mutual Funds.

Retail investors have no way of really knowing what goes on behind the scenes and of the so called “regulators” the less said the better – they have failed the average Joe time and again without any consequences and might do again.

I know Stocks are are not ideals as auditors can go to bed with the Board & Management anytime but still I think they are better than ETF’s because we are at least not paying someone to put the fruits in the basket !!

Keep up the good work. God Bless you.

It took stocks seven years to recover from 2008. It took a balanced ETF portfolio one year. – Garth

#86 Pfft on 07.11.19 at 10:23 pm

@#45 Sideshow Rob on 07.11.19 at 6:42 pm
Brian Ripley…You may just be the dumbest idiot in the history of the internet. Good grief! It’s amazing you function without getting hit by a car on a daily basis.
_____________________

pot meet kettle

#87 Sail Away on 07.11.19 at 10:23 pm

When you rearrange “Brian Ripley”, it spells ” Megan Rapinoe”

#88 Amber Alerts Ruined My Sleep! on 07.11.19 at 10:23 pm

Not again. This is crazy. Finished my shift after midnight, then woken up by amber alerts early this morning about something happening that the cops were already dealing with, could have been handled just by inter-police communications.

Nuts. Thanks for nothing all you SJW Commies and libtards who created this system.

Send a letter to the Premier, everyone. Dougie will stop this nonsense.

Leave policing to the cops, I say, not the general public.

I wonder how many heart attacks and car crashes will happen in the next 24 hours because of thousands of people getting woken up repeatedly by amber alerts, now fatigued and distracted or suffering high blood pressure?

Does not make sense at all.

#89 oh bouy on 07.11.19 at 10:24 pm

don’t agree with children getting a vote but…

maybe there should be a cut off where you don’t get a vote?

say 65?

#90 NoName on 07.11.19 at 10:30 pm

Dog guest post should stay.

It would be interesting to do single topic or issue that concerns more or less everyone, and chose from two dogs with very different view points and solution for issue at hand, and publish them on same day.

That would be interesting, me thinks.

#91 Trojan House on 07.11.19 at 10:34 pm

“…and someone is pointing the finger at everyone but themselves…” Like the Democrats and most of the MSM still blaming Russian collusion with Trump for the reason they lost the election.

We may not be able to trust men but at least they’re logical. Women tend to base their decisions on emotion which usually leads to higher taxes for all the social programs they dream up.

#92 Shawn Allen on 07.11.19 at 10:37 pm

Buy and Hold Results?

Tyberious at 50 claimed:

Obviously, one cannot invest if s/he has no money, so we’re really talking about HOW to invest – as in what to buy vs sell, at any given point in time.

Most buy-and-hold investors have nothing to show for in the last 2 decades. When adjusted for inflation, most indexes have not surpassed the 2000-1 highs.
Not that I have an answer.

Patently wrong. – Garth

********************************
Even if the claim about the index were true (it’s not) approximately zero people invested invested all their money at once at or near the peak in 2000 and then never invested another dime.

Anyone who invested regularly in the indexes is WAY ahead even after inflation since the year 2000.

But people believe what they want and they calculate things to confirm. In Tyberius’s case he could use the stock index without dividends (rather than the proper total return index) and compare that to inflation. Even then, I seriously doubt that claim though it might be true for Toronto. certainly not for the S&P 500.

From about 2008 through 2012 we constantly heard how “no one has made any money since the year 2000”. Those claims were silenced as markets roared ahead. Have not heard that claim in years.

#93 Buford Wilson on 07.11.19 at 10:40 pm

Please don’t repeat Vox Canabis.

Tedious and boring.

#94 cmj on 07.11.19 at 10:41 pm

Garth, you wanted our input on how to balance the blog with your daily direction of political and financial news and personal cases of those making sense of the times we live in
I like seeing personal situations occasionally to remind me this is what many people are dealing with. In some cases, I can relate to their dilemma to find the financial balance. They acknowledge years of reading the blog and try to express how they are making decisions with what they are reading here and the need to either buy a home or define what to invest in in the future.
I come to this blog to gain your perspective on the current political climate and how it impacts investing. Your humor and input along with Ryan and Doug stretch my perspective.
Lately, we have been reading daily bloggers personal struggles. I hope you now rebalance the blog to gives us the needed current events to make better financial decisions. Continue to call us on our BS with how we blame others for our personal outcomes. We need to support the generations and not attack them. We also need to evaluate our political representatives and decide if they are short sighted in looking to get reelected in the next election instead of long range planning for what is best for all Canadians

#95 SoggyShorts on 07.11.19 at 10:45 pm

#25 BlorgDorg on 07.11.19 at 5:12 pm

On voting and electoral reform, I was really hoping T2 would make good on that promise (we got weed instead, not the same, sorry). Count me among the heartbroken.

Maybe if we abolished political parties and had everyone run as an independent candidate representing their riding, we’d see some constructive debate and productive compromise. Maybe even Garth would run again.

But probably not.

***********************************
This is what makes me question whether I will even vote again. If there is no penalty for going back on campaign promises, what’s the point? Is my vote againstyou 4 years later the only penalty? So I’m to join the never-ending cycle of voting against instead of voting for?
That being said…. @Brian Ripley I think it would be grossly unfair if some single mother of 6 kids was able to outvote me 7 to 1. Setting aside which of us seems to be the better decision maker, it sounds like an ever-increasing amount of my money would go towards their kids.
————————————-
As for the Vox Canibus in general, I like it in small doses. I think most posters were loons, but I suppose it’s a good thing to know they exist and I believe echo chambers are a bad thing so keep em, just not too often.
Also, for those of us who got the message on Rent vs Buy a long time ago(Thank you GT!) it’s more entertaining than going over that subject too much.

#96 Remembrancer on 07.11.19 at 10:51 pm

#85 Tee Esex on 07.11.19 at 9:31 pm
To be fair the so called “blue chip/dividend aristocrats stocks” are not gambling. I do not have the stats but I think they held and rebounced as good as any ETF in the 2008 plunge. overall I like them because they are pure play investment as opposed to cloak and dagger derivative investing which include ETF and Mutual Funds.
————————————
The Narrator: 1) Garth’s firm specializes in selling ETFs not stocks, its how he pays for Milk-Bones 2) unlike you, he has the stats…

Correction: I sell nothing. ETFs are simply a far superior asset class for 99% of investors. – Garth

#97 Sask to AB on 07.11.19 at 10:57 pm

re #69 Karlhungus on 07.11.19 at 8:26 pm

Thanks for this!
very informative……

F56AB

#98 Pete from St. Cesaire on 07.11.19 at 11:12 pm

To vote is to: A) Accept responsibility for the decisions and policies implemented by the regime that wins the election (especially if you voted for that party). B) Use the force of the state to impose your will upon your neighbours. C) Have the false belief that people can legitimately, as a group, delegate to others rights and powers that they themselves don’t possess.

#99 Nonplused on 07.11.19 at 11:20 pm

Wait, whaaat???? Brian wants children to vote? What could possibly go wrong with that? Maybe we should let them decide what’s for dinner, when bedtime is, and whether or not they are going to school tomorrow too? And whether there should be a new 60 inch TV and Play Station?

Mom and dad already vote and have the responsibility for looking after their children (including voting in their interest). Also, children are too easily manipulated, uninformed, and uneducated. Well I suppose that could be said about their parents too.

Anyway I doubt very many parents are intentionally voting to wreck the world. It’s just kind of how things worked out. And I doubt children have any practical solutions that adults haven’t already thought of.

Hope that isn’t too much testosterone Brian, I love your site and visit at least once a month to see your updates. But on this point I think you are being a little impractical. There is a reason parents have as much say-so over their children until they are at least 16. The kids aren’t ready to make decisions of serious consequences until at least then. That’s why they aren’t allowed to drive, purchase alcohol, and yes, vote, among other things.

#100 Dave on 07.11.19 at 11:39 pm

Everybody is now a little bit dumber for reading that guys idea of allowing Moms to vote for their kids.

#101 fishman on 07.12.19 at 12:17 am

Its time to acknowledge Vox Canubis is swarmy & boring. I think. Rarely got passed the first couple of paragraphs. I vote we go back to the red meat & gore. More ha ha’s in the comments. I’m starting to buzz over the blog & comments like a fly checking out a plethora of dog turds. Can’t settle down & get on it.

#102 Smoking Man on 07.12.19 at 1:09 am

Did I ever fk up as a father. I blame his teachers.

Nothing would have made me happier than a phone call. “Hey asshole, happy Birthday shit head” but no, I get this. Woman will eat him and steal from him his entire life. To soft. This is why I hate teachers.

His text. I regret not slapped him around as kid.

Here it is. Pathetic.
…….

Dear dad on your birthday, you travlled the world you wrote a book changed careers did what it took , you are my hero the only person I ever looked
Up too flew planes, dealt with crisis, new businesses family stuff, you always seemed so calm I am going through the worst times in my life and I always had my dad , I just wanted to say I love you and thank you and I’m not going to let you down. Your my hero, you always have been I didnt miss a moment in my life because you made it possible, You are everything I want to be like and I know I have big shoes to fill, but you gave me all the tools to be more , and better and stronger, Dad when I think about you being 60 it’s so weird I still see you like this 40 year old guy, anyways I love you so much and want to thank you for making me the person I’m going to be, you made me a man I am happy to be , you are the biggest influence of my life , the smartest person I could ever speak to and the most compassionate and caring I only hope to fill your shoes because in 33 years I hope I can be what you are to all the people you touch, caring sacrifice and love, you are the most incredible person I ever met, happy b day day I love you. I only hope when papoo saw billancourt with the biggest smile on his face I get to do that for you one day, you will always be my hero and I know one day your going to see something great, love you dad happy birthday

#103 Smoking Man on 07.12.19 at 1:22 am

O to 20 was a slow ride to hope.
20 to 40. Went fast hockey rinks and all that bull shit socializing.
40 to 60 went by in a heart beat. Did not even lookout the window. I was busy.

Not looking forward to the next 20. No more surfing for you old man.

#104 Dolce Vita on 07.12.19 at 1:36 am

#67 Yukon Elvis

THAT was good.

I would append rebuttal Comments to what you say.

—————————————

As to the polarization of viewpoints in Canada:

Stop the listening and watching of American news thinking that is Canada, it is not.

For example, we do not have Antifa clubbing people with opposing views nor the far Right driving into crowds to mow down legitimate protesters – we just have a single male Toronto crack pot that drop kicks a woman in the street.

Canadian MSM has a definite Left to near Progressive slant indeed, yet, there are counterbalances (e.g., National Post).

Rather, it is an issue of informing ones self with differing and opposing viewpoints rather than from “birds of a feather”.

#105 MaryEn on 07.12.19 at 2:16 am

#47 Shawn Allen on 07.11.19 at 6:50 pm
Democracy versus capitalism

#38 MaryEn on 07.11.19 at 6:14 pm said:

Sometimes I think that only people who actually pay public services (tax payers) should be allowed to vote. On the end of the day, voting is a decision where will our tax dollars go.

********************************
And those who pay the most taxes should get the most votes?

No.

Democracy = One vote per (adult) person

Capitalism = One vote per dollar.

Both systems have their strengths and weaknesses. Both have served most of the population well.

*********************************************

A vote per taxpayer, not per tax $. So, anyone who pays taxes can vote (once). Anyway, it was more an answer to Brian’s opinion, an idea for thinking-not the proposal.

#106 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.12.19 at 6:37 am

To hell with voting!
Nominate 2 of the nicest volunteers from each province in a mortal combat Deadliest Race.

Cudgels and protective padding (to prolong the entertainment :).
And to interest the younger crowd, have the people go on a cross Canada chase through all the Provinces and Territories to find clues to the location of the next combat weapon.
Imagine.
Everyone who arrives first gets to pick the best protective padding.
The last people get no padding.
That show would have everything, nice people learning the ins and out of politics, political infighting, blood, tears and ultimately…….our new leader.

Who’s in?

#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 7:50 am

The stock market lost half its value in a once-in-a-generation global credit crisis. But people who stayed invested throughout it with a balanced portfolio lost nothing. The average return during 2008-10 was 5%. How’s that a bad outcome?
—————————————————————-
It’s a bit disingenuous to compare the peak to trough draw-down of the market to the worst calendar year performance of the B+H portfolio. What was the draw down for the B+H?

Completely factual. In the credit crisis the equity market lost over half its value and took seven years to recover. A balanced portfolio dipped 20% and was restored in 12 months. It works. – Garth

#108 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am

#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm
Brian,

Lay off the soy lattes buddy. It’s betas like yourself that is causing the divide in people. Alphas and their testosterone become leaders (good and bad) or get themselves killed doing something stupid.
—————————————————————

No better way to find the loser than to find the guy who talks about alphas and betas.

#109 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:17 am

#105 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.12.19 at 6:37 am
To hell with voting!
Nominate 2 of the nicest volunteers from each province in a mortal combat Deadliest Race.

Cudgels and protective padding (to prolong the entertainment :).
And to interest the younger crowd, have the people go on a cross Canada chase through all the Provinces and Territories to find clues to the location of the next combat weapon.
Imagine.
Everyone who arrives first gets to pick the best protective padding.
The last people get no padding.
That show would have everything, nice people learning the ins and out of politics, political infighting, blood, tears and ultimately…….our new leader.

Who’s in?
————
I’m in for the mortal kombat for entertainment value. However, a fight between beta males or a beta male and a female, how entertaining would that be? One pimp slap at the first station to the beta male and he going running and crying. Contest would be short lived me thinks.

#110 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:21 am

#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am
#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

No better way to find the loser than to find the guy who talks about alphas and betas.
————
The joke is obviously too low level for the intellectual genius as yourself. I’m thinking of a word starting with the letter B to describe you. Care to guess what it is?

#111 dharma bum on 07.12.19 at 8:35 am

Just spent a few minutes catching up on the last 3 days of posts. Took a little time out to rough it in a rented shack up in the Muskokas this week with visiting family. It was practically a camping trip. I’m getting too old for that stuff. Also, too much booze (if there is such thing). The fog is clearing.

Anyway, re: Vox Canabis – my opinion is that these diatribes should continue to be relegated to the comments (steerage) section.
They are fun to read – the blog wouldn’t be the same without them – however, they detract from the meaningful and insightful substance of what you have to write about. They kind of taint the stellar prime content.
For those of us so inclined to hear what the street folk have to say, it’s easy enough to scroll down and have our fill of swill.

Best to leave these opinions in their containment vault. Like nuclear waste.

I absolutely love the comments section.
It provides a microcosm of the moronic state of our pathetic society. The ignorance. The hopelessness. The misguidedness.
The losers.
The winners.
The liars.
The haters.
The wannabes.
The holier than thous.
The tree huggers.
The lefties.
The Nazis.
The misogynists.
The wise.
The philosophers.
The naive.
The ignorant.
The narcissists.
The anarchists.
The trolls.
The sociopaths.
The psychos.
The whack jobs.
MF
The Toronto hating realists.
Millennials.
Boomers.
Smug rich bastards.
Braggers.
Know it alls.
Crowdedelevatorfartz
Expats.
Douchebags.
Adversaries.
Lefties.
The debt ridden.
The misfits.
The smug.
The humorous.
The humourless.
The racists.
Meanies.
Nice folks.

I am pleased as punch to be able to be a part of this eclectic gang of idiots and impart my stupidity from time to time.

#112 maxx on 07.12.19 at 9:01 am

@ #7

Absolutely, 100% agree.

All human need requires attention, from vets living on the streets to children who fall through societal cracks to brilliant young minds with no money/resources/connections with which to launch their smarts.

Women are no more or less responsible/capable than men. The concept of “feminism” imho, is divisive and prevents the ideal of equality.

I would not be comfortable, AT ALL, with women having the right to cast an “extra” vote because they happen to have children.

Equality. Equality. Equality.

#113 Penny Henny on 07.12.19 at 9:13 am

Ripley’s Believe it or Not!
************

To Brian Ripley, I think I know who wears the pants in your household.

#114 Tater on 07.12.19 at 9:29 am

#109 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:21 am
#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am
#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

No better way to find the loser than to find the guy who talks about alphas and betas.
————
The joke is obviously too low level for the intellectual genius as yourself. I’m thinking of a word starting with the letter B to describe you. Care to guess what it is?
—————————————————————
Boss.

Anything else you’d lack the testicular fortitude to call me to my face. And you’re not just an internet tough guy, are you?

Easy, boys. – Garth

#115 SunShowers on 07.12.19 at 9:36 am

“Has the bleeding stopped? – Garth”

—————–

I thought things went pretty well. Lots of white noise and bleating of canards was to be expected. Many people seemed to at least understand the message, and those who put forward actual critiques got some quick lessons in history or economics.

Unless you’re referring to my heart, that is. As you know, that thing bleeds 24/7.

#116 LH on 07.12.19 at 9:36 am

Be very careful in treating children like adults. There is a reason we traditionally recognize they are not mature enough to make certain decisions. Voting, driving, drinking, etc.

Pretending otherwise leads to some very dark places.

#117 Damifino on 07.12.19 at 9:45 am

#100 Dave

Everybody is now a little bit dumber for reading that guys idea of allowing Moms to vote for their kids.
—————————————

No, everyone is now better informed about the frightening extent of left flakiness.

#118 oh bouy on 07.12.19 at 9:45 am

@#112 Tater on 07.12.19 at 9:29 am
#109 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:21 am
#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am
#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

No better way to find the loser than to find the guy who talks about alphas and betas.
————
The joke is obviously too low level for the intellectual genius as yourself. I’m thinking of a word starting with the letter B to describe you. Care to guess what it is?
—————————————————————
Boss.

Anything else you’d lack the testicular fortitude to call me to my face. And you’re not just an internet tough guy, are you?

Easy, boys. – Garth
____________________________

how old are you two?
i’d guess not a day past 14.

#119 Tater on 07.12.19 at 9:46 am

#106 Tater on 07.12.19 at 7:50 am
The stock market lost half its value in a once-in-a-generation global credit crisis. But people who stayed invested throughout it with a balanced portfolio lost nothing. The average return during 2008-10 was 5%. How’s that a bad outcome?
—————————————————————-
It’s a bit disingenuous to compare the peak to trough draw-down of the market to the worst calendar year performance of the B+H portfolio. What was the draw down for the B+H?

Completely factual. In the credit crisis the equity market lost over half its value and took seven years to recover. A balanced portfolio dipped 20% and was restored in 12 months. It works. – Garth
—————————————————————–
Don’t disagree with the numbers, just thought you should compare like for like.

#120 baloney Sandwitch on 07.12.19 at 9:52 am

Wow, what a great idea. Vote for kids casting by Mommy. Bring on the matriarchy. Have to go get my Estrogen injection.

#121 Leo Trollstoy on 07.12.19 at 9:58 am

#48 Basil Fawlty on 07.11.19 at 6:58 pm
Leo Trollstoy

“I won’t suffer any meaningful consequences from climate change.”

Sure, when food prices spike due to loss of habitat, like no corn planted in Illinois this year, you can just quit eating.

I’ll stop eating? That’s what you got? Lol! That will never happen

Try again

I won’t suffer any meaningful consequences from climate change

Fact

#122 Leo Trollstoy on 07.12.19 at 10:00 am

Ripley just destroyed his credibility

He clearly has dementia

Just goes to show you that data isn’t correlated with intelligence

Sad

#123 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 10:19 am

Ripley, you are totally ******* insane.

Nothing else really needs said.

#124 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 10:29 am

#112 Tater on 07.12.19 at 9:29 am
#109 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:21 am
#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am
#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

—————————————————————
Boss.

Anything else you’d lack the testicular fortitude to call me to my face. And you’re not just an internet tough guy, are you?
———————–
Wow…close. I was thinking of boss(y), a synonym of a know it all.
Just for reference to your original attack on my comments about being an alpha or beta male which obviously doesn’t apply in the real world because I’m a “loser”.

1. a male animal having the highest rank in a dominance hierarchy:
2. the most dominant, powerful, or assertive man in a particular group:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/alpha-male

Nope. I don’t see no alphas or betas here. I will say no more on the topic.

#125 NoName on 07.12.19 at 10:52 am

Something definitely to read, directly related to guest post.

https://thefederalist.com/2018/11/26/mom-dresses-six-year-old-son-girl-threatens-dad-losing-son-disagreeing/

#126 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 10:54 am

Ripley’s post is brain numbing, let’s let kids vote – oh, and their female caregivers need to put pencil to paper for them. I’ll bet that’s a pretty important requirement there right Brian?

How about letting their Dads pencil in the vote for them too?

No?

BR just hates right wingers, I get it. But this attempt is just stupid.

“It’s time to acknowledge our future. Let’s have Universal Suffrage, let’s count all the votes.”

Let’s also let the Dads vote twice too Brian, you ******* nimrod.

#127 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 11:07 am

#114 LH on 07.12.19 at 9:36 am
Be very careful in treating children like adults. There is a reason we traditionally recognize they are not mature enough to make certain decisions. Voting, driving, drinking, etc.

Pretending otherwise leads to some very dark places.
____

BR’s idea about letting female care givers vote for the under-aged is all about getting more left wing votes – he don’t give a rip about what the outcome might be for the country. He knows tons of Women would not vote on behalf of their dependent for a guy like Harper even if that’s what their kid wanted.

#128 Matthew on 07.12.19 at 11:08 am

Admittedly, I’m facing the exact same scenario you describe: paralyzingly risk aversion in regards to investing my savings & maxing out my TFSA/RRSP. Based on your reinforcement of the 60/40 principle and utilizing low-cost ETFs, would it be wise for a newbie to go with an all-in-one 60/40 ETF (like the ones offered by Vanguard and Blackrock etc.) via direct investing? I’ve already had a meeting with [email protected] and I’m weary….

#129 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 11:18 am

#89 oh bouy on 07.11.19 at 10:24 pm
don’t agree with children getting a vote but…

maybe there should be a cut off where you don’t get a vote?

say 65?
________

Way too young – many of these folks still work and pay taxes.

I’d say 85-90+ or so.

Brian R wouldn’t like this idea though because this age group is probably 90% Women.

#130 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.12.19 at 11:21 am

I’m assuming Tater and n1tro will be on opposing teams in the Political Cudgel race?

#131 Ryan the Thirtysomething on 07.12.19 at 11:25 am

I don’t comment here often, but wow, that post from Brian might be the dumbest thing I have ever read. And I sometimes read YouTube comments.

I enjoyed Vox Canabis but it might be a good time to end it as we’ve clearly hit rock bottom for material.

#132 Doug in Londinium on 07.12.19 at 11:27 am

A balanced portfolio dipped 20% and was restored in 12 months. It works.
———————————————————–
Wow, and just think what would have happened if when stocks and equity funds got real cheap in early 2009 you cashed in your fixed income investments and bought more of those dirt cheap equity investments!

#133 Terry Simms on 07.12.19 at 11:35 am

The only way to get rid of socialism and far left ideology from damaging the world is to make a voting system based on how much each voter contributes through the income tax system.

The more you pay, the more your vote counts. This way the ones who pay the bills have the real say because they are always paying for it. The way the system is set up now, it is broken and Canadian citizens who pay for everything are getting shafted.

#134 Hookskhot on 07.12.19 at 11:54 am

#106 Tater on 07.12.19 at 7:50 am
The stock market lost half its value in a once-in-a-generation global credit crisis. But people who stayed invested throughout it with a balanced portfolio lost nothing. The average return during 2008-10 was 5%. How’s that a bad outcome?
—————————————————————-
It’s a bit disingenuous to compare the peak to trough draw-down of the market to the worst calendar year performance of the B+H portfolio. What was the draw down for the B+H?

Completely factual. In the credit crisis the equity market lost over half its value and took seven years to recover. A balanced portfolio dipped 20% and was restored in 12 months. It works. – Garth
……
As you are, I believe, required to state: “Past performance is not and indicator of future returns”

I predicted none. – Garth

#135 Niko R. on 07.12.19 at 12:05 pm

Here is a counter proposal re voting rights: Only people older than 35 should have the voting rights, if they are able to pass the “Voter Test”, which would assure that voter is mentally competent and non-corrupt person.

#136 Ubul on 07.12.19 at 12:20 pm

#89 oh bouy on 07.11.19 at 10:24 pm

don’t agree with children getting a vote but…

maybe there should be a cut off where you don’t get a vote?

say 65?

Sure. Double the pension as a goodwill gesture to start up the conversation. Otherwise… you know what…

#137 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 12:33 pm

#54 Bytor the Snow Dog on 07.11.19 at 7:26 pm

Finally we know who “Brian Ripley” is. A feminist kook job.

Why masquerade as a man “Brian”?
____

He does not post often outside his “chart updates”, but when he does it’s usually a real H-bomb of extreme lefty/feminazi/dingbatism.

#138 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 12:45 pm

#128 crowdedelevatorfartz on 07.12.19 at 11:21 am
I’m assuming Tater and n1tro will be on opposing teams in the Political Cudgel race?
——————
Nah. Tater is a good poster. Despite me saying he is bossy, there is a compliment in there if you think about it. :D I didn’t say Tater’s posts are wrong or not valuable, I just wish the delivery could be less blunt force trauma.

#139 paul on 07.12.19 at 1:00 pm

#133 Niko R. on 07.12.19 at 12:05 pm

Here is a counter proposal re voting rights: Only people older than 35 should have the voting rights, if they are able to pass the “Voter Test”, which would assure that voter is mentally competent and non-corrupt person.
—————————————————————–So it would take 3 out of 5 to form the Government.lol

#140 Sail away on 07.12.19 at 1:01 pm

#130 Doug in Londinium on 07.12.19 at 11:27 am

A balanced portfolio dipped 20% and was restored in 12 months. It works.
———————————————————–
Wow, and just think what would have happened if when stocks and equity funds got real cheap in early 2009 you cashed in your fixed income investments and bought more of those dirt cheap equity investments!
—————————————–

Well, yes, that’s called rebalancing the portfolio when one sector gets overly weighted. Maybe Rule #2 or #3 of investing. Are you seriously proposing this as a groundbreaking idea?

I just rebalanced last week, taking some good equity gains and buying out-of-favour preferred shares. Experienced investors rebalance regularly.

#141 paul on 07.12.19 at 1:08 pm

#132 Hookskhot on 07.12.19 at 11:54 am

I predicted none. – Garth
——————————————————————–
I predicted, after that crack Garth shook his head and went out for a Scotch. the comment came in at 11:54 and its Friday. Easy peasy!

#142 paul on 07.12.19 at 1:22 pm

#112 Tater on 07.12.19 at 9:29 am

#109 n1tro on 07.12.19 at 8:21 am
#107 Tater on 07.12.19 at 8:00 am
#11 n1tro on 07.11.19 at 4:27 pm

No better way to find the loser than to find the guy who talks about alphas and betas.
————
The joke is obviously too low level for the intellectual genius as yourself. I’m thinking of a word starting with the letter B to describe you. Care to guess what it is?
—————————————————————
Boss.

Anything else you’d lack the testicular fortitude to call me to my face. And you’re not just an internet tough guy, are you?

Easy, boys. – Garth
—————————————————————–
Tell them Garth.

https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/a523388e-2568-41b8-9091-70405b889b1c

#143 Investx on 07.12.19 at 1:26 pm

Sure, let’s give kids the vote!

I would look forward to free everything, especially candy and toys!

Children know best. LOL.

#144 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 1:31 pm

#131 Terry Simms on 07.12.19 at 11:35 am
The only way to get rid of socialism and far left ideology from damaging the world is to make a voting system based on how much each voter contributes through the income tax system.

The more you pay, the more your vote counts. This way the ones who pay the bills have the real say because they are always paying for it. The way the system is set up now, it is broken and Canadian citizens who pay for everything are getting shafted.
____

I think the system we have works good for those who “work it”, and roll with the punches.

Our household paid like 5K in income taxes last year after all the cash benefits and deductions – hard not to like that. This event was made possible in part, by socialist left wing policy. It’s dumb as hell – but I’ll take it thanks.

Yes you are correct the same policies are going to bankrupt the country eventually, but you’ll have the bankroll to leave the country if you played your cards right. You’ll want to be out of the country, and the Loonie before things get too bad. Just look at Venezuela – lots of warning and time to bail.

#145 Steven Rowlandson on 07.12.19 at 1:43 pm

“Yunus discovered early on that men could not be trusted to repay the loans.”
Sounds like BS to me. I am a man and I always pay my debts. If you can’t or won’t pay it back don’t borrow it!

#146 IHCTD9 on 07.12.19 at 1:48 pm

#126 Matthew on 07.12.19 at 11:08 am

Admittedly, I’m facing the exact same scenario you describe: paralyzingly risk aversion in regards to investing my savings & maxing out my TFSA/RRSP. Based on your reinforcement of the 60/40 principle and utilizing low-cost ETFs, would it be wise for a newbie to go with an all-in-one 60/40 ETF (like the ones offered by Vanguard and Blackrock etc.) via direct investing? I’ve already had a meeting with [email protected] and I’m weary….
_____

Young? FWIW, the Mrs. and I paid like zero attention to our portfolio (set up by [email protected]) for near 20 years. We did boring balanced+aggressive growth mutual funds and paid stupid MER’s.

Things went up, things went down, we got richer.

We finally left the bank this year for an outfit with a good philosophy, and a much more accessible and hands on approach.

Things are still going up and going down, and we’re still getting richer.

It’s a slow boring process with a thrill ride tossed in here and there. It is the same deal no matter what you do, or who you sign up with.

If you are young – just get going on it, set up an auto withdrawal, and do your best to forget about it for most of a decade or two.

#147 Shawn Allen on 07.12.19 at 2:54 pm

Home Capital and Warren Buffett

Home Capital Group is above $22 having recovered greatly since it was heavily discussed by the rabble here (including me) in 2017.

Individual stocks are indeed risky.

Some may recall though that I said that after Buffett gave his seal of approval and investment in 2017 that meant Home Capital was totally out of the woods. Prior to that it looked to be circling the drain.

Many here continued to predict doom for Home Capital. so far, so wrong.

Buffett got out at a profit after share holders ungratefully rejected his proposal to about double his investment.

Rule Number 3: Never ever reject Warren Buffett.

#148 Appalled on 07.12.19 at 3:16 pm

This blog just jumped the shark with Brian’s inanity. Who do we hear from next, Flat Earthers?

#149 Ezzy on 07.12.19 at 3:26 pm

So, is Brian Ripley serious or just being facetious?

I don’t doubt the influence of women, in general, and that it’s becoming larger, which it should. However, anyone who dares to paint an entire group of people with the same set of characteristics is not worth listening to. This shows a lack of ability to consider said people as the individuals they are, which in itself is discriminatory.

That being said, which women are we talking about? Is this exclusive to CIS gendered females? Females with children? Or others?

To suggest “women bear the future” is more than a bit irresponsible as it doesn’t do much other than shift the burden of responsibility (for the whole world in Brian’s case) onto the shoulders of females. That’s hardly fair, and more than a little sexist. I’d suggest something else. Rather than asking females to be responsible for even more than they already are, how about asking males to assume more responsibility?

The case of the bank in Bangladesh is not relevant to our situation in North America. As it’s present by Brian it’s not taking into account cultural factors, most especially the fact that it’s highly probable house hold affairs in Bangladesh are mostly handled by women, as there is still a very clear division of labour and responsibilities between the sexes in most of the developing world.

As far as women voting for their children, how stupid and foolish would that be, not to mention it becoming both illegal and a human rights issue. How dare anyone think they can vote for someone else? A rubbish idea, at best.

Anyone who believes that females are inherently “better”, more ethical, or responsible really needs to consult with studied psychiatrists and psychologists. Any noted differences are mostly environmental or sociological, which means they can be experienced by either of the sexes. They should also be more careful with what they say as there are a lot of feminists that would tear Brian a “new one” for assuming he had the authority to broad-stroke apply such characteristics to “women”, either overtly or indirectly.

Or, maybe, try working with a few like I do, and you’ll see there’s largely no difference between the sexes. To be clear, I’ve had three female bosses at work, and the president of the company is female as well. Brian might be shocked to learn they behave in largely the same manner as their male counterparts do.

Maybe Brian could just drop the virtue signaling, white-knight thing because women are humans, just like the rest of us. As far as I can tell they don’t need to be told what they are, who they are, who they can be, what they can be, what they can do, and/or what they should be responsible for, or not. Among other things they deal with.

How about we just let them make their own choices?

Oh, and young people voting en masse is how we got Trudeau, and we can see how well that’s turned out.

#150 Tater on 07.12.19 at 4:02 pm

#145 Shawn Allen on 07.12.19 at 2:54 pm
Home Capital and Warren Buffett

Home Capital Group is above $22 having recovered greatly since it was heavily discussed by the rabble here (including me) in 2017.

Individual stocks are indeed risky.

Some may recall though that I said that after Buffett gave his seal of approval and investment in 2017 that meant Home Capital was totally out of the woods. Prior to that it looked to be circling the drain.

Many here continued to predict doom for Home Capital. so far, so wrong.

Buffett got out at a profit after share holders ungratefully rejected his proposal to about double his investment.

Rule Number 3: Never ever reject Warren Buffett.
—————————————————————-
Except, in this case, the shareholders were right to reject Buffett. Had they not, their shares would have been further diluted and given the recovery in the share price, the market seems to be saying that additional capital was not required.

#151 Guillaume on 07.12.19 at 4:10 pm

I find very interesting the post #42 from Lead Paint:
Maybe you should give a “frame” to the next submissions. Maybe ask for a “life testimony” (we had a few that were interesting), it would be more real, people could describe who they are, their challenge in life, where they come from and how they see their/our future as Canadians. That would be more interesting and probably less ideologically adversarial. As a nation we don’t need more division but to understand our own diversity and get united around it. BTW, thanks Garth for all your free advice !

#152 JustIn4orLess on 07.12.19 at 5:16 pm

Since we have a bunch a crazy ideas like child voting, why not allow only people that pay taxes to vote? Even better the more taxes you pay the more times you can vote:
$10K tax paid = 1 vote or if you dont work but you volunteer:
500 hrs = 1 vote

How about that for crazy ideas????

JustIn for 4 or less

#153 Dave on 07.12.19 at 5:41 pm

Please stop with the reader submissions

#154 JonBoy on 07.12.19 at 5:47 pm

Brian,

If you truly believe that mothers would vote in the best interests of their children, wouldn’t they be doing that with their own vote already, thus essentially pushing the country in their chosen direction?

Problem is, most parents are voting for their own interests, not those of their children, and they’d do the same with additional votes based on the number of children they have (mothers AND fathers).

The simple fact is, humanity is primarily selfish. Sure, we have brief moments of sacrifice but when push comes to shove, most people will do what’s best for themselves, not others. That’s why people vote for free daycare, taxes on others homes, etc – it suits their purpose, regardless of their contribution level in taxes.

It also begs the question, are those with the most children generally the most suited for such control over the future of the country? In giving them additional votes, that’s effectively what happens: they get the majority of the voting power.

How does the number of children in a family correlate to the parents’ education, intelligence, etc? Are those parents somehow better (or even equally) qualified to determine the future of our country?

Why not use some other metric to determine number of votes? How about the highest earners get more votes, as they contribute more to the wealth of the country? How about the best looking get more votes, so we have a better genetic pool? How about the higher-educated get more votes, since they are potentially better-informed? How about only the gainfully employed get votes, since they’re the most significant contributors to the wealth of the country?

If your premise is correct (mothers/parents will vote in the interests of their children), it’s already happening and needs no further enhancement.

#155 Blake on 07.12.19 at 7:02 pm

I like the idea of giving the mothers the votes.
I know five women at my school with 10 children each and all are on social assistance.
I guess they will use their 50 votes to lower taxes and reduce spending so I can keep more of my pay.
That’s 50 kids of the 640 in the school.
LOVE IT!

#156 Scott Briden on 07.12.19 at 7:39 pm

IHCDT9, they will not let you leave the country. This is why they are going to make sure that you will have to give all your belongings including phones at the border. You don’t get it. You either fix it here or it is over.

#157 Dana Halton on 07.12.19 at 7:58 pm

The problem is not GIC’s versus REIT’s or ETF’s, stocks, bonds etc. It is that most Canadians are lazy and don’t plan their finances.

They plan more about a vacation then their finances. We used to both smoke 2 packs a day but we quit 20 years ago and manged to saved $375,000 in our TFSA’s and RRSP’s.

We also cut back on drinking out at bars and eating out less and saved another $293,200 their in the last 15 years. we are both 58 years old now and have no mortgage, debt free finally for 2 years now with our house worth $655,000. We both worked for the mining industry through a union shop but got out last year and rolled over pension money into LIRA’s worth $814,200 there. Soon we will get our early C.P.P. of $1,700 a month and all our pension, passive income will be $85,000 a year interest, dividends, C.P.P. and will cover 70% of our gross income from our prior employment. This does not include our part-time employment income right now.

We are both semi-retired and work part-time helping managing our son’s restaurant and are glad we look at our finances with the window to win.

#158 Doug in Londinium on 07.12.19 at 10:46 pm

@Sail away, post #138:
I wouldn’t call it a ground breaking idea. I recall reading about it in the book Low Risk Investing by Gordon Pape in the early 1990s. I also do rebalancing periodically. Over the last 2 to 3 years I moved some money out of equities and into fixed income investments. Late last year, when Boxing Day sales came early for equities I reversed the flow, going out of fixed income and into equities. Now I’ve reversed the flow again, getting more exposure to fixed income investments. If some sector goes on sale I’ll buy into it, otherwise no major changes. I don’t know why everyone doesn’t do this periodic rebalancing.