Perspectives

Being a minor celeb, but less than the Trivago guy, I get emails. Tons. Read them all, sometimes sharing a few with you. Naturally everyone has to include a MSU to get through the filter and make me feel worthy. Dog pictures help, too.

This week’s been poignant, for reasons unknown. Here are some words worth reading, and a few of my thoughts.

Hi Garth: I read your blog every day.  As a mom of two small wonderful humans, my most favourite thing is hugs and snuggles from my 6 and 7 year olds.  After they are tucked away for the night,  my other favourite thing is reading your blog.

I sold my home a few years ago.  My Dad had a stroke and then another and then another.  He didn’t recognize me, didn’t recognize himself.  It was heartbreaking. I had to put him in a long term care home.  Dad was always self employed, no insurance, no benefits. He never saved anything.  I doubt he believed he would ever get ‘old’.

My Dad slowly got better,  It was miraculous, really.  Today he is half the person he used to be but 20 times the person he was in the hospital. I sold my home to take care of my Dad.  Assisted living costs about $5,000 a month.  I couldn’t afford it, Dad had no income except $1400 from the Canada pension.  In case you are curious, my Dad cannot live with me, although it would be much better for me financially.  He has very intense anger/confusion issues and it’s really not healthy for my kids.

I cashed in my house to take care of my Dad and have spent more than $200,000 for Dad’s housing the last few years.  I am 40 now. I will take a second job if it means keeping Dad in a good environment.  Maybe I really screwed things up for me and the children.  Where do I draw the line?  I just wanted to tell you why I rent a house now… It’s because I have to, because I chose to, because sometimes you have to choose between brick and mortar or love.  Love should always win.

Yes, always. As lives grow longer, lingering good-byes and dementia become more and more common. People have to plan for that. Budget for it. You’ve done what you had to, dividing your love and obligation between your father and your children. What a wrenching choice. Let your words be a lesson. There are insurance vehicles to help with this situation. There are equity lines of credit that can be used as a less drastic alternative to selling. And, of course, every human alive has the moral responsibility to arrange for their own care until death do us part.

And now, for comic, relief, is a dude who wants me to adopt him.

Hi Garth: [Insert super suck up comment here about how I’ve been reading your blog daily for a long time – hoping this would somehow catch your attention].

What would it take for you to mentor me?

To help you consider this wonderful opportunity and experience, let me list out the potential pros and cons here for you:

PROS
* You’ll LEARN.  About a Canadian born to Pakistani parents and what impacts financial decisions (keeping up with the Ahmads vs keeping up with the Joneses)
* It allows you to share knowledge/expertise, and see the impact over time
* Gain insight for online learning in case you ever wanted build a course for adult financial literacy (I’m a Learning Engineer – there’s the standard way of teaching someone and then there’s a more efficient/effective way to learn – more on this if/when we chat!)
* There’s really too many pros to list!

CONS
* I don’t have a dog

Your Blog U post yesterday inspired me to ask: what do you wish to learn today? Kindly let me know your thoughts and feel free to reach out via cell. Thank you, Shak.

That’s sweet, Shak, but a little creepy. I sure hope you don’t start hanging around the car or show up at my pet bank. Just keep reading this pathetic blog for the basics, even including the comments. Not all of them are from deplorables, climate change-deniers, gold nuts, doomers, house-humpers, Dipper fanatics, Trumpians or morose moisters.

Like Peter – who has a few life lessons to impart.

First off, thank you for all of your past, present and future contributions to our beloved country.

I purchased my first paper (Telegram) route in from my older brother  at the savvy age ten.  Purchased the neighboring route and consolidated.  Sold.  Did the same with the The Star (Saturday bag weighed more than I did ). Finally The Globe. Lessons learned: Beware of Dogs and people that don’t pay.

Started The Gardener lawn care Company with my best friend in high school and university.  Now franchised. Lessons learned:  Beware of dogs and their ‘business ‘ in back yards and clients that don’t pay.

Lived on the left coast.  Started Peter and Co.  Successful coffee and muffin cafes (Starbucks wanted me to be their baked goods supplier when they only had a few units in Seattle and Vancouver). Lessons learned: Love what you do and get a dog to pick up chicks at Kits Beach.

Finally got to build a national network: Weed Man lawn care franchise North America.  700 franchises and growing like dandelions.  Lessons learned:  Beware Dobermans in back yards and NEVER trespass on an American’s property .

I hated dogs all my life, scared, chased , bitten.  Disgusting, pooping animals. Then I had a daughter.  She wanted a dog.  What is a decent man to do?  Mr. Turner, it took me forty years to appreciate the bonding that occurs between humans and dogs.  Our Havanese Onyx just celebrated ten years with us.  What an arc of evolution for this simple Paperboy.  I’m already missing him if passes before me.

Now the real estate gratitudes.  Bought our first home/ house in Markham 2000.  Sold moved up.  Lived the suburban dream. Bought home in Naples Florida at the very bottom and dollar at over par .  ( remember I was doing business in the USA) Renovations Markham 2012. Started reading YOUR book / blogs 2013.  My sense was that things didn’t feel right

Wife gets promoted big time to Manhattan, NY in 2015.  Purchase tired, dream retirement/ legacy property Muskoka. Real estate Craziness in Markham like I had just witnessed in USA.  We sell Markham peak, early 2016 thanks to reassurance from YOUR blog. Sell Naples property last month in run up in prices and drop in currency delta; in part due to YOUR blog.

I guess, I just felt compelled after all these years to say thank you for making me appreciate enjoying a dog’s life.  You have had an impact on this entrepreneur’s life. In my travels the most heartfelt compliment I give someone, no matter the local:  You’re a good Canadian .  They always understand. The Honourable Garth Turner, you are a good Canadian. – Peter

And, finally, Jeremiah. A moister working on (yet another) academic degree who was inspired when that Chilliwack teacher wanted help designing a financial literacy course.

I’m a 27 year old millennial and wrapping up my third degree, so I (of course) have to chime in. If there’s ever a post to respond to, it’s this one. In my humble opinion, teaching prudent financial management is only half the battle. People have to actually want to save first.

Learning about maxing out TFSAs, making regular contributions to RRSPs, stuffing money in RESPs, knowing what investments work best in non-registered accounts, etc. is the easy part. An hour of reading through your blog posts should cure anyone of basic financial illiteracy if they didn’t already know to avoid mutual funds like the plague. But is this even what people want? Do people even want to save?

The real enemy is our entire culture – the current mass-consumption zeitgeist of my generation, and perhaps society writ large. The pervasive need to consume at all costs has people filling whatever void they feel in their lives with houses, cars, vacations, expensive meals, or whatever gimmick catches their eye on a given day. I’m not sure that I even blame the average Joe or Jill. Any corporation with even a basic understanding of behavioural psychology can push their (sugar-filled/diabetic causing/wallet-depleting/cheaply-made) crap in the market. People don’t even have a chance. But in the absence of (unlikely/undesirable) government intervention, people really do need to take personal responsibility for their spending. I know you talk about this in the context of housing and bigger purchases, but it’s the little things that count. I’m not sure that people realize that it is their daily spending habits, and not necessarily their monthly bills, that keep them trapped in debt.

I learned this lesson the hard way, even though I had parents who taught me better. This is where I take umbrage with your (admitted) generalization of teachers. My folks, newly retired from careers as public school teachers, have significant liquid assets sitting in flush TFSAs and RRSPs. They paid off their house in a nice neighbourhood, and even have a rental condo to boot. They did this all with the knowledge that they had generous pensions coming their way. They simply prioritized their spending, and didn’t throw it away on Starbucks or spin classes.

I should note, it wasn’t a penny-pinching lifestyle either. Yes, clothes were bought at Costco, but they still sent my sister and I to private schools, paid for our post-secondary education with fat RESPs, and put us in more summer camps than you could possibly count (to get us out of the house while they were enjoying two months off every summer). Full disclosure, we’re from Winnipeg. As you’ve noted recently, it’s a lot easier to get ahead in mid-sized markets where housing costs aren’t totally out of control. Who knows, maybe it even helped that it was too cold to leave the house and spend.

Regardless, my parents set the best example a kid could ask for, with lessons learned from their working-class parents. Even still, it took me far too long to realize just how much eating out and a pay-it-off later mentality affects your long-term net worth. I’ve eventually learned that it’s the little things that count. If you watch your cash-flow, minimize expenses, and focus on the day to day…well, the big picture often works itself out.

The current debt crisis is more about values than anything else. Frugality used to be held in high-esteem. Now, cash is king and it’s about whatever looks good on an Instagram page. People live to spend, and are obsessed with going out and flashing their cash (or more likely, their fancy credit cards). Rather than looking forward to home-cooked meals with family and good friends, people enjoy fast company and want to be seen out on the town.

This is a culture war, Garth. While everyone has a role to play in this comedy of errors, it’s not just about banks and the federal government. It’s about how people derive value from their lives, and what they think will make them happy. Yes, housing costs in Vancouver and Toronto are nutty, but it seems like people have lost their sense of proportion in every aspect of their spending. They just can’t seem to say no. Maybe I’m the one overgeneralizing now, but from what I see, it’s endemic. Saying “no” to spending seems to be the exception, not the rule.

What came first, the chicken or the egg? Maybe financial literacy leads to self-reflection and a shift in values. Maybe if every kid learned about the time-value of money, they wouldn’t be so quick to finance consumption with debt. So I applaud what you do Garth, but my fear is that it’s not enough. That it only stems the tide. The real question, as you’ve previously noted, is what happens when it becomes truly unsustainable? What happens when people can’t finance what they think they deserve? It’s a very scary thought. Sincerely, Jeremiah

Remember, J, that people like to think they live in the worst of times, on the cusp of profound change, facing forces they cannot alter or avoid. But almost nobody does. Compared to decades past, we are the chosen ones. In this society our lives are cushioned from real adversity, while we moan about the cost of houses and gas. It’s comical how perspective has been lost.

Is a reset coming? Of course. There’s always a reset. This one has started. I think you’ll get through it. But I’m worried about Shak.

96 comments ↓

#1 Paul on 05.24.19 at 4:02 pm

He’s back the Old Garth we knew and loved.

#2 CJ on 05.24.19 at 4:16 pm

J’s letter reminds me of a topic that I’m hoping Garth will tackle. And that is the normalization of both parents working full time when raising kids.

My wife and I decided to have one parent at home, take a hit in our day to day finances, but do this so we could raise our kids and not have them in daycare.

We talk to people all the time who can’t believe we’re doing this and want to know how. Sacrifices are made for sure. We don’t go to Mexico. The kids also aren’t in expensive day camps in the summer, which seem to have become the norm.

Life is short. Raising kids is a stage that you can’t repeat. Why do so many people outsource the role of raising kids?

#3 Sask to AB on 05.24.19 at 4:25 pm

Garth, you are a great Canadian. Thank you so much for your blog and educating us. We are very grateful.

#4 Peter McLean on 05.24.19 at 4:40 pm

Garth Turner for Prez!

#5 Jimmy on 05.24.19 at 4:42 pm

That was a bit too much to read for a Friday.

#6 wendi1 on 05.24.19 at 4:46 pm

I think people had Mother’s Day, then a long weekend. Then you asked for lessons learned to help teach children, which makes people look back, sometimes nostalgically.

And spring.

#7 Dolce Vita on 05.24.19 at 4:50 pm

Youth. Middle Years. Retirement Years.

Time changes all, it tempers youth, it glimpses childhood and mortality at the same time and in the end, provides peace.

Gail Sheehy’s:

“Passages: Predictable Crises of Adult Life”

describes the decades of life, their characteristic tensions, revolution and then evolution onto the next decade…until there are no more.

A good read, it puts life into perspective no matter what age you are. You will learn you are not so different from your fellow human beings after all.

3 great stories today about 3 of life’s decades (and 1 story about how I got there, dog bites/reconciliation, and all).

#8 Canadian Moose on 05.24.19 at 5:11 pm

Garth’s wisdom is pure educational entertainment. A great read with a glass of red wine and potato chips! hahaha. thanks Garth & company!

#9 Blog Bunny on 05.24.19 at 5:15 pm

Garth,

I am reading your old posts. My parents are 50% house and 50% liquid. They should sell according to your rule of 90, but that is not going to happen anytime soon.

Does taking out a Heloc to invest for diversification against a paid off house still make sense at today’s rates of 4.5% and rising?

Not really. – Garth

#10 Re-Cowtown on 05.24.19 at 5:18 pm

B.C. spanked by court today. No pipeline veto by provincial bureaucrats for you.

Next stop? Forcing environmental lobbyists to disclose where their pathways come from. SPOILER ALERT: IT AIN’T FROM CANADIANS!

Go Kenney! Shine a bright light on these bastards who are selling out Canadians and colluding with foreigners to purchase our elections!

#11 Re-Cowtown on 05.24.19 at 5:21 pm

Paycheques come from. Damn autocorrect. Just another way that social media inserts itself into our business and forces their thoughts into our conversations.

#12 Al on 05.24.19 at 5:23 pm

“Why do so many people outsource the role of raising kids?” Beacuse they flat out don’t want to do it or realize that they are psychologically/emotionally unfit to do so on full-time basis, lack of family/friends/paid support , prefer to consume more goods and services or combination thereof. Prolly many more reasons I missed. No backsies once they come out.

#13 The Wet One on 05.24.19 at 5:35 pm

That first post was very solid. It made me misty.

Jeez, as my mother grows older, I hope that things were squared away well enough not to have to go to such lengths for her (or for my wife’s mother for that matter).

Dang.

But, you gotta do what you gotta do. That writer did the right thing and can hold her (his?) head high.

#14 YULYYZ on 05.24.19 at 5:50 pm

I have noticed that assisted living is very expensive in Toronto, which is worrisome for the future.
There are however many affordable locations in Montreal, in particular there are full care facilities in Laval that are about 10-15 years old. I don’t understand why there is such a discrepancy. I think that some of the CHSLDs, full care facilities which are not private, may be partially subsidized but I am not sure.
For folks and families that can move, it is worthwhile to compare costs in other provinces. I know it’s not always an option but there may be significant monthly savings.

#15 Sovavia on 05.24.19 at 5:53 pm

(1) Some of the best lessons from financial literacy are about failure: learning from mistakes (others and one self).

(2) Kids in school should be told of the stories of famous people going bankrupt.

(3) Adults should figure out how to survive a balance sheet recession.

#16 Rakesh Goshadi on 05.24.19 at 6:06 pm

I borrowed a whole lot of money $1.5 million so far from my rental properties. I took that money and invested it in Indian rupee bank fixed rate deposits. I pay 3.6% for a 10 year fixed rate mortgage but am getting 8.0% compounded annually on my deposits. Th exchange rate differential is small or around 1% per year so I made 100% interest in 10 years or 10% per year, $150,000 per year, $1,500,000 in 10 years total.

#17 Barb on 05.24.19 at 6:16 pm

Great blog post, Mr. T.
Lump in my throat when I read the first letter. My hat goes off to the woman. Few would do the same, I’m afraid.

Congrats to Peter who, from a young age, obviously had his goals well set.

Jeremiah’s letter is bang on!
It always amazes me that public school teachers put their kids in private school!
People should keep track for 3 months of what they spend daily. They’d be stunned to see the total. That’s part of the cure…being frugal in your life is the secret.

And Shak?
Wayyyyyyyy too creepy.

#18 Lead Paint on 05.24.19 at 6:19 pm

Jeremiah is very wise for a bullfrog.

Things are swinging the other way. Google Michael Singer, Eckhart Tolle or Sadhguru. They are blowing up. More and more people are realizing the futility of empty endless consumption and the sanctity of life beyond ‘form’. Good luck and keep your spirits high!

#19 Lead Paint on 05.24.19 at 6:23 pm

#15 Sovavia on 05.24.19 at 5:53 pm

How does one survive a balance sheet recession, other than having secure income and liquid savings?

#20 LP on 05.24.19 at 6:31 pm

Re #2 CJ

Would those “parents” be the same ones who expect teachers to teach the little darlings everything from soup to nuts while still having time to teach the 3Rs? All while dodging flying objects, maneuvering through the ever changing circula, and absorbing almost constant second -guessing and criticism from experts, many of whom visit this blog.

#21 Trump lover on 05.24.19 at 6:32 pm

Trump for prime minister and garth his deputy minister!!

#22 MF on 05.24.19 at 6:39 pm

#117 Headhunter on 05.24.19 at 8:30 am

“Quick lesson if you have ears to hear. When you resort to name calling you have lost the battle.

The reason Teachers are judged harshly in the real world at least in Canada is they act like they were hand picked by GOD and are above reproach. Rank hypocrisy on full display.

“For the children” take a pay cut.”

-Why don’t you take a pay cut?

I get it. At first you try to take some moral high ground, and then you proceed to belittle the teaching profession in the very next sentence.

Smooth.

You are the one complaining about employment when the unemployment levels are at historic, generational, lows.

With that said, I’ll reiterate. I said that the only people who complain about teachers are workers who “come up short” in the private sector and are looking to blame others for their perceived lack of success. The successful don’t have to complain and moan so they don’t.

MF

Smooth.

#23 MF on 05.24.19 at 6:41 pm

“Is a reset coming? Of course. There’s always a reset. This one has started. I think you’ll get through it. But I’m worried about Shak.”

-I hope we are only talking about a real estate reset?

MF

#24 yorkville renter on 05.24.19 at 6:50 pm

Just keep reading this pathetic blog for the basics, even including the comments. Not all of them are from deplorables, climate change-deniers, gold nuts, doomers, house-humpers, Dipper fanatics, Trumpians or morose moisters

Thanks GT, I’ll take that as a compliment

#25 T on 05.24.19 at 6:51 pm

#22 MF on 05.24.19 at 6:39 pm

I say it often and I will say it again.

You are a moron.

#26 Slam on 05.24.19 at 6:54 pm

All the words I needed: “you are a good Canadian”

#27 Ace Goodheart on 05.24.19 at 6:58 pm

RE: “climate change-deniers”

This sounds suspiciously like an introduction to a topic that a person is not allowed to disagree with. If a person says “I am going to research “climate change” and come up with my own opinion as to whether or not it is happening, they are called a “denier”.

Climate change in Canada:

People’s houses got flooded. These houses were located directly on flood plains, near large rivers that can become quite a bit larger, during spring melt season. These houses were all built within the last 100 years or so, during a period of time when there have been less severe spring melt seasons.

We have recently had a number of rather large spring melts. Resulting in these houses being flooded.

The Canadian solution? To proclaim that the entire planet’s climate is changing, the cause is carbon dioxide emissions, and the solution is to impose taxes on all carbon dioxide producing activities.

Like, what? That has to be the dumbest solution to a problem I have ever heard of.

In Africa, the Nile Delta experienced flooding. Houses were washed away. Did Egypt declare that the entire world’s climate was f*cked and we all had to tax ourselves to death?

No, they did not. They moved the settlements to higher ground, and banned building in the flood plains of the Nile delta.

In BC and Alberta, we have changed the micro climates by:

(a) logging, and

(b) oil sands extraction.

The result is a whole lot more forest fires.

The Canadian solution?

Control logging?

Control oil sands extraction?

Put in place fire barriers and don’t allow people to build houses and towns directly next to forests?

Hell no.

Declare that the world’s climate is changing, and institute a tax on carbon.

We have to be the dumbest people alive…..

#28 -=jwk=- on 05.24.19 at 7:04 pm


The current debt crisis is more about values than anything else. Frugality used to be held in high-esteem. Now, cash is king and it’s about whatever looks good on an Instagram page. People live to spend, and are obsessed with going out and flashing their cash (or more likely, their fancy credit cards). Rather than looking forward to home-cooked meals with family and good friends, people enjoy fast company and want to be seen out on the town.

This is completely false, and quite frankly insulting. People in the Victorian era used to wear bustles, and ment wore top hats and lovely pants. Nothing has changed in our society.

It’s also a super convenient red herring to the real issue of soaring cost of living vs the past particularly when it comes to housing and education. When a house costs 10x your salary and a years tuition it 1x your graduating salary it doesn’t matter whether you post on Instagram or not, you are screwed.

#29 In Public we trust(?) on 05.24.19 at 7:04 pm

J, both parents were public school teachers and they sent both kids to private school.

#30 Lost...but not leased on 05.24.19 at 7:06 pm

I’m calling 9/11…

Overdose of MSU….code red

#31 Stahom on 05.24.19 at 7:15 pm

Ditto #2 CJ, a path we took. Frankly, I don’t give a rip about everyone else’s choices, but it won’t be us. Our kids as teenagers know TFSA, ETFs, how to prepare home cooked meals from basic ingredients, the value of family time, community service. Their future will be theirs to steer, not mimicking the wannabes that surround them.

My dirty curiosity is watching the chaos of the lives of those chasing riches and what they think is a good life, and missing their kids growing up and abdicating shepherding them to become productive adults.

#32 Diggge on 05.24.19 at 7:19 pm

Hard to believe in first story. All care facilities payment based on income. If her dad is had nothing than he can stay there for free. Only high end facilities does not have subsidy with luxury units hotel like, and cost from 20k a month. All others are subsidized.

#33 Flop... on 05.24.19 at 7:23 pm

Being a minor celeb, but less than the Trivago guy, I get emails.- Garth

///////////////////

Not entirely sure if I am in front of the Sham Wow guy yet…

M44BC

#34 crowdedelevatorfartz on 05.24.19 at 7:39 pm

@#109 MF
“The losers of the private sector will blame the public sector for all their failures. Basic psychology.”
+++++

Well.
I’m not sure I’m blaming anyone for my “failures”.
What ever they are…..

I’m merely pointing out the fact that , as a taxpayer that pays exorbitant taxes i have a bit of an issue when I see full time, unionized public servants that are bullet proof as far as job security goes.
Be they lousy, lazy, insolent teachers, nurses, garbage collectors, bus drivers, postal workers, whatever…..
It ….doesnt…..matter.
They wont be fired and they know it.
The garanteed and taxpayer subsidized pensions are just the icing on the employment cake.

Take a job in the private sector for a month and experience the real world .
It might actually improve your outlook as a govt employee serving the general public…. but I doubt it.

The peer pressure from the other insolent lazy sloths ( aka co workers)that may feel threatened by you will soon put a stop to your new found “customer service” attitude.

I just wonder when the taxpayers of this country will reach the “tipping point” and all you retire govt “workers” start having your pensions clawed back by a new govt elected by unpension Millennials .

I give it 10 years max.

But I dont care.
My RRSP’s, TFSA, LIRA, and other investments are all privately owned by ….me.
Doing VERY well I might add so that even in retirement I’ll still be in the top 5% of Canadians as far as income goes.
This Loser in the Private sector a Failure?
If you say so……. :)

#35 K on 05.24.19 at 7:44 pm

(#2 cj) thank you for that. I want to be 85 on my rocking chair, and thinking OMG, I actually raised my kids, and not someone else. Wake up people!!!!

#36 dakkie on 05.24.19 at 7:45 pm

Vancouver to Investigate Real Estate Buyers for Money Laundering
https://www.investmentwatchblog.com/vancouver-to-investigate-real-estate-buyers-for-money-laundering/

#37 tccontrarian on 05.24.19 at 7:47 pm

#27 Ace Goodheart on 05.24.19 at 6:58 pm

RE: “climate change-deniers”

This sounds suspiciously like an introduction to a topic that a person is not allowed to disagree with. If a person says “I am going to research “climate change” and come up with my own opinion as to whether or not it is happening, they are called a “denier”.

Climate change in Canada:

People’s houses got flooded. These houses were located directly on flood plains, near large rivers that can become quite a bit larger, during spring melt season. These houses were all built within the last 100 years or so, during a period of time when there have been less severe spring melt seasons.

We have recently had a number of rather large spring melts. Resulting in these houses being flooded.

The Canadian solution? To proclaim that the entire planet’s climate is changing, the cause is carbon dioxide emissions, and the solution is to impose taxes on all carbon dioxide producing activities.

/ / / / / /

Many moons ago, while in university and headed towards a teaching career (which didn’t happen), I majored in Geography and mathematics, among other things…

Anyway, when you study geomorphology (the branch of geography that looks at the forces/processes which create the various landforms we see everywhere), you understand that flood-plains are formed by rivers spillin over their banks, repeatedly over thousands/millions of years.
The intelligent species that we are, during the past few centuries we started building our homes there … and now that some flooding is occuring (again), ‘they’ blame Climate Change and the evil CO2.

Funny!

TCC

#38 Basil Fawlty on 05.24.19 at 7:48 pm

So, if gold nuts are truly “nuts”, as our trusty narrator indicates on a regular basis, why is Russia purchasing by the tonne? They purchased one million ounces in February alone.

Can anyone provide some insight on this perplexing reality?

#39 Flop... on 05.24.19 at 8:23 pm

One of the most prominent real estate companies in Australia is named LJ Hooker.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/LJ_Hooker

A while back a husband and wife team got in trouble for stealing 6.5 million dollars of clients funds.

Hubs got 5 years, apparently blew a heap of cash on jewelry and drugs.

Wifey is apparently about to plead guilty after apparently originally denying knowing anything about what was going on.

Why would anyone be shocked the a company named LJ Hooker would franchise out to people that would do anything for a buck.

No false advertising, it’s right there in the name of the company.

O.k ,now for the catchy jingle from when I was a kid.

LJ Hooker, you’re the best..

M44BC

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-15/lj-hooker-real-estate-agent-spent-clients-money-on-jewellery/9550594

#40 Casey on 05.24.19 at 8:43 pm

#34 crowdedelevatorfartz on 05.24.19 at 7:39 pm
I just wonder when the taxpayers of this country will reach the “tipping point” and all you retire govt “workers” start having your pensions clawed back by a new govt elected by unpension Millennials .
____
Garth never mentions his pension?

$29k annually, which I donate. – Garth

#41 Nonplused on 05.24.19 at 8:44 pm

I have in the past been asked for financial advice. Not because I have anything to offer compared to Garth, I am the student not the teacher, but because I had some financial success.

Unfortunately what I did was tell them the secret to my success, as modest as it has been. Go to school but in the STEM fields or law or medicine or accounting or teaching, or even a trade, something that has a job prospect. Be flexible and creative at work. Get as many stock options as you can and do not sell them until close to expiry (markets tend to go up and this is free leverage). Or if you are in the trades consider opening your own business. Don’t spend all your money (save). Live below your means. Don’t buy fancy stuff. Invest. Don’t buy penny stocks because they all go to zero.

Unfortunately all such advice was viewed with contempt and the recipients actually felt I was holding out on them. And they asked me! I don’t give financial or any other advice unless asked except on forums like this, anonymously. They wanted a “get rich quick” secret that they thought I must have but wouldn’t tell them. It actually resulted in the destruction of a few relationships when it was discovered that I wouldn’t reveal a way to get rich quick (I did not have one but they assumed I did). If I had one, I would be far richer than I am.

My most fabulous trade, the “trade of the century”, was that I was long puts on Nortel (so short the stock) pretty much shortly after the top to almost the bottom. I never made a penny. I didn’t lose anything either but the transaction fees (which were much higher then than they are now on options) plus the careful calculations of the option writers meant that each option series settled at about what I needed to pay transaction costs, never a penny for me. It was then that I realized that the folks who write options control the rate at which the market moves (but not the direction) and you cannot beat them. You can be 100% right, and your reward is that you come out even.

I liken it to a casino. Yes, you can on a given night come out with much more money than you brought in. But if you keep going back, they will fix that. They have pros that know the odds and just need time. You can, in theory, win any given play. But the house will win a slight majority of many plays. Otherwise they would all be bankrupt. So if you want to gamble successfully, buy shares in a casino, don’t gamble in it.

As N.N. Taleb pointed out, if you want a low risk way to become rich, become something like a dentist and understand it takes a lot of time and effort. Everyone else is just playing in the casino.

#42 West Van Conspiracy Theorist on 05.24.19 at 8:45 pm

This house in West Van, sold for $5.5 million in April, down from $11.2M in 2016.

Foreshadowing flash back … this money laundering ponzi unwind is accelerating

There are 7 mortgages and 8 claims of builders liens

#43 Drill Baby Drill on 05.24.19 at 8:47 pm

Climate change happens. Dumb asses that build on flood plains happens. Forest fires happen. Smog and water polution, plastic pollution in TO, Van and Montreal happens. Sitting in your car at the Tim Hortons, Mac Donalds, A&W etc happens. Hipocrites on hydrocarbon use happens. Blaming the oil producing provinces for the worlds problems “priceless”. Alberta envy will get you nowhere.

#44 Ace Goodheart on 05.24.19 at 8:52 pm

RE: “#37 tccontrarian on 05.24.19 at 7:47 pm”

“The intelligent species that we are, during the past few centuries we started building our homes there … and now that some flooding is occuring (again), ‘they’ blame Climate Change and the evil CO2.”

When the “waterfront” craze got going back in the 1990s, and everyone started building “dream homes” next to large rivers, and gushing and tearing up about how wonderful it was to live “on the water” I thought that things could go south pretty quickly.

Living on a hill, next to a lake, is one thing. Provided you are a few metres above the level of the lake, and there is no danger of erosion, you are probably OK.

Living directly on a floodplain, on a river bed, a couple of feet elevated from the level of the river at low ebb, is just completely nuts. I watched them build all the “river front” palaces in Muskoka, directly on the Muskoka river, one of the most flood-prone rivers in Canada.

Now that these water front palaces have been deluged in spring melt season, they want to tell us all that this is caused by “climate change”.

No, it is not. It is caused by stupidity.

Don’t build your house on a frickin’ flood plain.

It gets better than this, though.

A “Bay” that terminates at the ocean, is actually a drowned river basin.

Yup, that’s right. If you live around, say, Chesapeake Bay for example, you are living at the edge of what used to be a long hill going down to the edge of a river.

That river got drowned by the Ocean in an event known as climate change.

It was caused by the planet warming up following an ice age.

The ocean level actually was raised so much, that an entire river basin was drowned and became a brackish, inland bay.

Yes, the climate changes.

No, people do not cause the changes.

If you want to avoid flooding, don’t live on a flood plain.

If you want to avoid earthquakes, don’t live near a fault line.

If you want to avoid hurricanes, don’t live in areas where they are known to occur.

#45 The first Joel on 05.24.19 at 8:57 pm

Very inspiring Garth, these contributors make me feel a little better about our world, thank you for sharing. Shak isn’t weird, it is just a friendly culture (I work with a few of his country people and nicer folk you will not find).
The ladies story demonstrates the genuine goodness in people, bless her, I wish her strength.
With young people like Jeremiah around I feel more confident about the future. I hope he successfully inspires others.

#46 DON on 05.24.19 at 9:00 pm

The mother with the “two wonderful kids” is safely a wonderful person herself.

She is only 40 and still has time. Putting your non-work time into your kids can save you money and time in the long run. She is imparting a strong set of values in her children. It must be tough, but she sounds very capable and adaptable.

This mom is real deal. Cheers, to her.

To the comment that suggested affordable care spaces were/are available for the Dad. In theory yes, but the demand surpasses the supply. A year on the wait list seems to be the norm depending on the misfortunes of others.

#47 Leftymarc on 05.24.19 at 9:02 pm

https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/20540137/1-bedroom-condo-310-245-brookes-street-new-westminster

Garth, do you think you could photoshop better thrn this Realtor tm.?

#48 Nonplused on 05.24.19 at 9:23 pm

#127 Alistair McLaughlin (yesterday)

Cats have always killed birds, it’s how it works. You can’t blame cats for the decline. Birds kill each other too. But your other points are valid. There is something wrong with the ecosystem and it can’t be blamed on a 0.8 degree rise in temperature.

Where did the ‘.8’ come from? – Garth

#49 DON on 05.24.19 at 9:24 pm

@MF

Not only a reset in real estate but one in expectations.

We have yet to see a significant downturn. A whole generation yet to experience such an event in their working lives. Lots of boomers I know who make good money as still in debt (hundreds of thousands left on the mortgage) and have to hang on to pay it off. Bought bigger houses, annual vacations far away etc.

Perspectives will change / reset.

#50 Barb on 05.24.19 at 9:47 pm

“Garth never mentions his pension?

$29k annually, which I donate. – Garth”
———————————–

You shouldn’t feel obligated to answer that, Mr. T.
None of his goddamned business.

#51 IHCTD9 on 05.24.19 at 11:02 pm

#45 The first Joel on 05.24.19 at 8:57 pm

Shak isn’t weird, it is just a friendly culture (I work with a few of his country people and nicer folk you will not find.

———

I work with a few Canadians too, they really are a friendly bunch! :)

#52 Tom from Mississauga on 05.24.19 at 11:05 pm

“Today he is half the person he used to be but 20 times the person he was in hospital” sure experienced that one.

#53 Blake on 05.24.19 at 11:20 pm

Russia can buy my gold!
I have an ailing father with his entire life savings in gold and silver bullion and coins, an absolute nightmare trying to exchange it for cash money.
Everyone adds on their percent of the take, fees for this, shipping here, insurance there, the list goes on… trying to get someone to pull out close to $2k CAD for a bit of metal and having multiple bits of metal to sell is a nightmare!
This is just a heads up, every gold bug raves about gold but none have tried to sell apparently.
All the legitimate places will sell it to you with free shipping but try and sell it back…..

#54 45north on 05.24.19 at 11:23 pm

The Real Mark: I would hate for them to pay capital gains on this beautiful house in the Bramptons for simply providing me a separate entrance for the basement

“the Bramptons”

pretty funny

#55 Teknohippie on 05.24.19 at 11:33 pm

Have you ever noticed how the climate change denier crowd has such wonderfully simplistic world views? I particularly like their insistance that humans can’t affect the climate. What rot.

When I was a wee lad, nigh 60 years ago, I had the privilege of doing a fair bit of international travel. One thing I remember with vivid recall is how clear the skies always were. The horizons were just shades of white and blue. In my 20s I had another spurt of travel, and one again in my 40s. What appalled me in my later travels was the dark smudge that had developed in the skies. Europe was the worst place I saw, but a heavy brown haze in our skies has developed and been getting markedly thicker within my lifetime. That, my friends, is clear evidence of us impacting our very small planet. We humans have been making huge changes to our atmosphere, and that atmosphere is our climate. You can continue to deny our culpability all you want, but you’d be quite wrong.

#56 Calgary Cowboy on 05.24.19 at 11:36 pm

As is the norm, great read Garth. Thank you.

#57 DON on 05.24.19 at 11:37 pm

#39 Flop… on 05.24.19 at 8:23 pm

One of the most prominent real estate companies in Australia is named LJ Hooker

***************

How about the cop show ‘T. J. Hooker’ staring William Shatner?

#58 VicPaul on 05.24.19 at 11:50 pm

#2 CJ
Life is short. Raising kids is a stage that you can’t repeat. Why do so many people outsource the role of raising kids?
*******
…cause it’s challenging, everyday.
We chose to stay at home (mostly Mom, but me for one year) for the first five years – family time.
I’d do it over in a heartbeat, if I could be twenty-seven again.

#59 Vampire studies (doctoral thesis) on 05.24.19 at 11:52 pm

So, Jeremiah, the private-school, parents-paid-post-sec-
tuition, also-summer-camps, is lecturing on scrimping
and saving. Is there an irony here? And 3 degrees? To
what purpose?

And spin class? Sounds like a good idea in Winnipeg during the winter.

#60 Keith on 05.25.19 at 12:26 am

“Remember, J, that people like to think they live in the worst of times, on the cusp of profound change, facing forces they cannot alter or avoid. But almost nobody does. Compared to decades past, we are the chosen ones. In this society our lives are cushioned from real adversity, while we moan about the cost of houses and gas. It’s comical how perspective has been lost.”

Absolutely astonishing from a man who has lived at a time of much higher union density, when a single income had a job for life, a living wage for a family of five, affordable home ownership, benefits and a pension. Compare that to the gig employment economy of today and talk some more about this supposed golden era.

#61 DON on 05.25.19 at 12:49 am

#7 Dolce Vita on 05.24.19 at 4:50 pm

Youth. Middle Years. Retirement Years.

*********************

Nicely put!

A mindset for every decade of life that you can’t know until you experience it.

But…didn’t you know it’s different this time!

#62 Winterpeg on 05.25.19 at 12:51 am

Heartfelt empathy for the lady who caregives for her dad. To clarify for some of the above commenters, assisted living is private, and long term care is subsidized based on your income; at least in Manitoba. Probably in other provinces too. There might be some private nursing homes in other provinces too. One or two true privates I know of in Winnipeg, but they are part of an “age in place” model for assisted living facilities and they are pricey. Assisted living can accommodate a person needs up to a point, but beyond that, personal care homes are pretty much the necessity if you can’t look after your loved one. Care homes vary in quality, but almost all have a staffing level that only provides the basics, which is why it is crucial to be actively involved in care home life. Hopefully the lady looking after her dad can find a less expensive assisted living place. My Mum’s is about 3650/month. The place she is at can’t accommodate her much longer and she is short listed for a nursing home very close to me. Living close by is an important factor. For availability, sense of security and so that you can advocate for your loved one.

#63 Smoking Man on 05.25.19 at 12:56 am

I’ll admit it I’m a bit of a freak show.

This is why I love Vegas. No one knows.
They cant even spot tall white aliens here.

They’re every where.

You humans are lucky the Nictonites have your back.

#64 Varunas on 05.25.19 at 1:02 am

DoJ Launches Anti-Trust Probe Into Real Estate Brokerage Industry.

According to Bloomberg, anti-trust authorities are looking into allegations that members of the Realtors Association conspired with brokerage companies like Realogy Holdings Corp and Re/Max Holdings to stop home sellers from negotiating their commissions.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-05-23/doj-launches-anti-trust-probe-real-estate-brokerage-industry

#65 Jon B on 05.25.19 at 1:05 am

Some excellent letters to the editor. Thanks for sharing them.

#66 Smoking Man on 05.25.19 at 1:40 am

DELETED

#67 Longterm on 05.25.19 at 2:08 am

#44 Ace Goodheart on 05.24.19 at 8:52 pm

Go ahead an read the science. Here it is – the fifth Assessment Report. Funded by all member governments of the UN – including the Canadian government under Harper. 800 authors, over 9000 peer reviewed scientific papers in the climate science volume alone.

https://www.ipcc.ch/assessment-report/ar5/

#68 My Big Sister Told Me on 05.25.19 at 6:44 am

So my first born is graduating from high school this year. A great kid… but…one of my concerns is that he may not have acquired a proper appreciation for debt/credit and its role in our economy. I seem to have preached a bit too much and now he is not comfortable with the idea of debt/credit at all! Oooops…

#69 Oakville68 on 05.25.19 at 8:14 am

Am I the only one that finds it ironic that both of Jerimiahs parents were public school teachers yet they placed both Jeremiah and his sister in private school………

#70 dharma bum on 05.25.19 at 8:22 am

I love it when you share your fan mail.

It provides great perspective, reading about various situations that a representative cross section of regular folk are dealing with.

The daughter as parental caregiver – WOW. That is a nightmare. I don’t know how she copes. Amazing person. My dad passed away last year. Mom has dementia. We immediately had to find a facility for her, as she requires professional help and also has the anger and confusion issues. I couldn’t deal with it for 5 minutes. Seriously.
Fortunately, they had a house from the old days that I sold and can fund her dementia care (to the tune of $7 grand a month!). Just pure luck that they had a lifelong Toronto home.

Regarding the millennial who understands the sick nature of our consumeaholic debt addicted society, again, WOW!
For a millennial, she has way more knowledge that most real adults. Good for her. This insight will keep her financially grounded for the rest of her life, and she will no doubt be very successful with her solid mentality. It’s refreshing to hear that there still may be hope for some of that cohort yet.

Finally, the Weedman dude.
Brilliant. What a concept!
I was stupid enough for a couple of years to use that company’s service.
Some shlump shows up at the house for 2 minutes, makes a few spritzes on the lawn, and pockets $50 bucks.
And the weeds still come back.
Now THAT’s the way to make a ton of money!
No wonder he’s lounging in Muskoka while his customers are stuck in the city picking weeds.
I really gotta hand it to him.
Smart is smart.
Genius.

#71 Raging Ranter on 05.25.19 at 8:47 am

Jeramiah = SMARTEST MILLENNIAL EVER

I don’t think I’ve ever read a more articulate, more accurate diagnosis of current societal ills than that. If I had half his maturity and one tenth his awareness at age 27, I’d be light years ahead of where I am now.

#72 Raging Ranter on 05.25.19 at 8:59 am

And then we have #60 Keith. Yes, there are some major downsides and challenges to contemporary life, but people had their challenges back then too. Don’t take my word for it, and don’t rely on the memories of past generations either. Their memories – including my own – are skewed by their own experiences. Go through the Macleans online archives from the 70s, 80s and 90s (they’re free) and read up on the problems facing the workforce over much of those decades. It wasn’t all sunshine and roses, and it sure as hell wasn’t “one job for life” that could “support your family on one income”.

Know why many families lived on one income? Because they had to. And they didn’t enjoy half the lifestyle we do today. Not even close. The middle class in the 1980s didn’t have resort vacations, drive brand new vehicles, or live in 2500 square foot houses. Those perks were the exclusive domain of the upper middle class. Yes, much of today’s lifestyle is driven by debt and home equity, but that’s another issue entirely, and is also finite. That’s why that reset Garth mentions in his closing paragraphs is coming. And necessary.

Keith, these are the good times. It does not get any better than it is right now. There will come a time when you will wistfully look back to the 2014-2020 period as the good old days, and wish things could be this good again.

#73 Y. Knott on 05.25.19 at 9:34 am

#55 Teknohippie on 05.24.19 at 11:33 pm

Have you ever noticed how the climate change denier crowd has such wonderfully simplistic world views?

Have you ever noticed how the climate change alarmist crowd has such wonderfully simplistic world views?

“All we need to do is get rid of all that eeevil CO2, and then everything will just be sooooo wonderfulll…

There’s good evidence that CO2 FOLLOWS temperature increases, it doesn’t lead them – which invalidates your entire CAGW platform at the stroke of a pen. Or, what – do you just not believe that?

And once again, you are dipping-into the cardinal sin of ALL global warming alarmists. CO2 is a colourless, odorless gas; you can believe me on that, too. So what you’re seeing in your travels, by-definition is not CO2.

IT. IS. POLLUTION! And for the umpty-millionth time, they are NOT the same thing!!!

And you’ll find very few ‘deniers’, including me, who will not happily endorse efforts to curtail pollution – let’s DO IT! Only, all the money we need to go after polluters is currently being drawn out of the pot and wasted on chasing moonbeams and building useless wind turbines.

By global warming alarmists.

– Look in the mirror much?

#74 Gravy Train on 05.25.19 at 9:35 am

#67 Longterm on 05.25.19 at 2:08 am
“Go ahead [and] read the science.” Sorry, no, in today’s world, uninformed opinion trumps expertise, feelings trump facts, irrationality trumps reason, ignorance trumps knowledge (e.g., see Smokey’s comments), social media trumps academia, partisanship trumps common sense and common decency, and lies and misdirection trump truth and science. Hey, get with the program!

“The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the convinced Communist, but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction (i.e., the reality of experience) and the distinction between true and false (i.e., the standards of thought) no longer exist.”
― Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951)

#75 Raging Ranter on 05.25.19 at 9:48 am

#55 Technohippie, I’m not denying climate change, but at least in North America and Europe, the air is cleaner than it’s been in any of our lifetimes. Those beautiful vivid sunsets you used to enjoy in the 60s and 70s were caused by suspended particulate matter; the product of severe air pollution that has since been cleaned up. Natural air has no colour.

#76 Jager on 05.25.19 at 9:50 am

#67 Longterm on 05.25.19 at 2:08 am

Please…with the parroting.

Only a few are aware as to how the peer review process works. Fewer yet understand how political and financial constraints are placed on science and scientists. Over time human organization always corrupts to some degree regardless of any safeguards built into the framework.

Do you know that even Einstein was sidelined by the majority of his peers for his dissatisfaction with the Copenhagen interpretation of QM? Alternative views were highly disdained and political (real world) pressure applied to silence those with alternative theories.

Remember: Well intentioned (honest) scientists are often in error as much as they are correct. e.g. Anthropogenic global warming (unceremoniously ;) became anthropogenic “climate change” i.e extremes in both heat quantity and the lack thereof.

It is interesting to observe how the scientific community is (generally) viewed with rose colored glasses by society. i.e. It always operates under ideal conditions contrary to humanities inherent flaws…

#77 maxx on 05.25.19 at 10:07 am

“People have to actually want to save first.”

Bingo.

Makes me wonder if people have also lost the ability to imagine a future/retirement free of debt, with enough financial resources to fully live the life available to said chosen ones. This life lays things out at their feet that Royalty couldn’t even imagine in times gone by.

Brings back memories of Winterpeg….we spent 2 glorious years in the city of sunshine. Deep cold, but lots of sun. We owned a 1911 River Heights gem, in perfect, original condition and on Friday nights after a hard week’s work, we headed out to Steven and Andrews for vino, cheese and delicious ficelle from the bakery. Great friends and lots of art and culture.

Manitobans are generally a frugal lot, who know the value of a buck. Some say cheap. I say Bravo! Hopefully this valuable trait will survive the craziness of the debtor mindset.

#78 Cabbagetown Carly on 05.25.19 at 10:37 am

Garth, this picture is beneath you. It is a misogynistic trope, available already on a number of far right woman-hating websites.

The message may look cute or clever superficially, but is vile and retrograde.

#79 TurnerNation on 05.25.19 at 11:20 am

Teachers…after 15 years in grade school (JK to Gr 13) I can count on one hand the ones I’d like to remember.
Many others were sloppy drunks, violent drunks or simply out of control. True story.

#80 Grey Dog on 05.25.19 at 11:30 am

To Peter…Congratulations on all your success! As I was reading, I thought yes I have seen your pristine white pickup truck with green lettering wherever I go in Unionville. Now that Unionville belongs to offshore residents (2016) that now rent their homes to folks that let the lawn get mowed by the city of Markham a couple times during the grass growing season. It gets added to homeowner‘s taxes. I wish your The Gardener trucks got contracts from all offshore homeowners for once a week yard cutting! This place used to be an IBM Ghetto and lawns were attended to once a week, rain or shine.

#81 TurnerNation on 05.25.19 at 11:52 am

Climate Change is shaping up to be the new global religion. Climate high priests and scientists will divine the knowledge we need from the new scriptures and tracts produced from all those NWO think tanks and foundations. Our elites are right we are too stupid for free will. Let them do it.

No one will dare question the theology behind this movement. Our habits and lives will be run by Men of the Climate.

Questioning someone who identifies as female on their climate beliefs will be considered gendered harassment.
Raising kids contrary to Central Climate Authority teachings is abuse.

Together and with the correct sacrifices will find the way. Looking forward to the T2V holy book edition!
We will placate the mysterious and omnipresent climate spirits.

#82 Ponzius Pilatus on 05.25.19 at 12:03 pm

#65 Jon B on 05.25.19 at 1:05 am
Some excellent letters to the editor. Thanks for sharing them.

#66 Smoking Man on 05.25.19 at 1:40 am
DELETED

#83 Ace Goodheart on 05.25.19 at 12:24 pm

Re: #67 Longterm on 05.25.19 at 2:08 am
#44 Ace Goodheart on 05.24.19 at 8:52 pm

Go ahead an read the science. Here it is – the fifth Assessment Report. Funded by all member governments of the UN – including the Canadian government under Harper. 800 authors, over 9000 peer reviewed scientific papers in the climate science volume alone.

https://www.ipcc.ch/assessment-report/ar5/

I’ve read the science.

I understand the general argument that global warming folks are making.

The theory is, in the last 200 years or so, we have sent a lot of CO2 into the atmosphere, and if you look back historically, during times that the Earth’s atmosphere has had CO2 in it, the planet has been warmer.

However, they then move from that argument to the conclusion that, if the earth is warming up, it is because humans are causing this.

Have a look here:

https://skepticalscience.com/Hockey-sticks-unprecedented-warming-and-past-climate-change.html

Second graph down. 450,000 years of climate data.

What do you see?

I see that the planet has cooled down and warmed up, over and over again, for 450,000 years.

So the conclusion that you have to come to by looking at this, is that whether or not humans dump CO2 into the atmosphere, the planet is still going to warm up and cool down.

Also, during times when humans were nothing more than hairy monkeys chasing around game animals and living in caves, the planet had huge warming spikes, warming up much more than the average global temperatures of today.

So either a bunch of hairy cave dwellers who had not yet invented fire, somehow managed to cause massive amounts of global warming, or some other force is at work here.

Your guess is as good as mine….

#84 TurnerNation on 05.25.19 at 12:26 pm

Man what a clown culture we’re living. This material writes itself:.

When I feel like signaling (or refreshing) my virtue I simply remind my neighbors they purchased a home that sits on stolen ingenious lands.
Then I go in for the kill: that they themselves participate in culture genocide.

I weep. I WEEP.
Sufficiently puffed up I continue my day.

#85 Ace Goodheart on 05.25.19 at 12:33 pm

The interesting thing about “climate change” and human CO2 emissions is ice ages.

We are overdue for one.

The planet is on a cooling cycle.

We may actually be slightly slowing that cycle down (though it will happen anyway)

We may buy ourselves another thousand years of nice weather.

But we have to keep burning fossil fuels.

Go out and drive your cars.

The sun tans and summer days of future generations depend on it…

#86 millmech on 05.25.19 at 12:47 pm

#60 Keith
I am starting to see more and more articles about people living on one income again so they can be stay at home parent(s).
They now live the same lifestyle as one income earner families have done for generations, ie home cooked meals every night, one vehicle per family, smaller house with yards with gardens, lots of freezing and canning, hand me down generic clothes, vacations that usually are local road trips/camping. Home repairs were done by the homeowner, they now actually offer a course for this and it is called “Adulting”.
As a Gen X this was normal living and when I grew up everyone was the same , very few mothers had a job because their fulltime job was to keep tabs on us and make sure we did not get into trouble. Our mothers also ensured we got all of our chores and school work done, meals prepped and sewed all of our clothes, which we all had to learn.
I hear a lot of moms now want this freedom now to raise their families this way, yet a few years ago this was degrading to women, unpaid work that they were unappreciated, which they are not. It is the hardest yet most rewarding job a person can have to raise your children with your values and see them become responsible contributing members of our society.
I saw the news about the group of kids that beat up that Mom and if we did that we would not be able to sit for weeks and would be grounded for months. We were taught to be proud of our family and the biggest affront would be to do what those kids did as it made the family look bad and especially our parents who had raised us.

#87 Ace Goodheart on 05.25.19 at 2:02 pm

Just picked up another pile of sale priced preferred shares on Friday. As the sale continues.

Whatever the central banks are saying about interest rate hikes and economic strength, the preferred share market is saying something different.

It is saying that interest rates are going sky high.

If you believe this, don’t buy rate reset preferreds.

Otherwise, the feast is on and the eating is cheap and good….

#88 joe on 05.25.19 at 2:04 pm

wow a long winded Millenial, i can say that tune in one sentence:

“live within your means” …..KISS

#89 TurnerNation on 05.25.19 at 5:21 pm

#55 Teknohippie why are you here wagging your finger at us? Go back over there and save them from their smoggy ways. Wait didn’t T2 give billions to overseas blackholes to “Fight climate change”?
Why don’t you go and track down our money. Your signalling is epic failure.

And Cabbagepatch Carla can’t stand seeing two strong women each defending their own opinion. The Left cant stand strength, values and free speech.

#90 Gravy Train on 05.25.19 at 7:21 pm

#76 Jager on 05.25.19 at 9:50 am
“Only a few are aware as to how peer review works. Fewer yet understand how political and financial constraints are placed on science and scientists. Over time human organization always corrupts to some degree regardless of any safeguards built into the framework.” Provide evidence of your insinuation of corruption in the scientific community.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholarly_peer_review
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_publishing

“Do you know that even Einstein was sidelined by the majority of his peers for his dissatisfaction with the Copenhagen interpretation of QM? Alternative views were highly disdained and political (real world) pressure applied to silence those with alternative theories.” Rubbish! Bohr and Einstein had public debates and attended conferences on the Copenhagen interpretation.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohr–Einstein_debates
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solvay_Conference#Fifth_Conference

Einstein decided not to publish his hidden-variable theory because he felt it was faulty, not because he was sidelined.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_interpretation

“Remember: Well intentioned (honest) scientists are often in error as much as they are correct. e.g. Anthropogenic global warming (unceremoniously ;) became anthropogenic ‘climate change’ i.e extremes in both heat quantity and the lack thereof.” “Global warming is a long-term rise in the average temperature of the Earth’s climate system, an aspect of climate change shown by temperature measurements and by multiple effects of the warming.” For greater clarity, the terms are not interchangeable.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming

“It is interesting to observe how the scientific community is (generally) viewed with rose-colored glasses by society. i.e. It always operates under ideal conditions contrary to humanities’ inherent flaws…” I’d argue that people become scientists because they want to study science, and because they have a need to know.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientist

#91 Triplenet on 05.25.19 at 8:16 pm

#39 Flop

Hooker Realty vs. divorce lawyers Ditcher, Quick and Hyde.
…… what’s in a name?

#92 Jager on 05.25.19 at 8:33 pm

#90 Gravy Train on 05.25.19 at 7:21 pm

How much time did you spend parsing my comment via Wiki? Lol!! You remind me of one who is forever learning but never coming to a knowledge of the truth ;)

If your only limited source of information is indeed Wikipedia (often in error, omission or obfuscation) we have no further discussion. Why not begin to educate yourself by actually reading as many books (you’ll want to purchase them) as you can on QM by the handful of Phd’s who have authored such? You may then paraphrase your given understanding and provide adequate refutation of my comment.

Much luck to you in your future fact finding endeavours.

P.S. Since you’re a Wiki master :) why not do a search on peer review fraud? Better yet how about some honest research on how scientific funding is often established to meet predetermined objectives?

#93 Blackdog on 05.25.19 at 8:47 pm

“Garth never mentions his pension?

$29k annually, which I donate. – Garth”

That is really cool Garth.

#94 Blackdog on 05.25.19 at 8:57 pm

@ #48 Nonplussed re: ” #127 Alistair McLaughlin (yesterday)

Cats have always killed birds, it’s how it works. You can’t blame cats for the decline. Birds kill each other too. ”

You can’t blame the cats but you CAN blame the cat owners! Why can’t people keep their cats indoors or on a leash in their backyard? Cats can be very happy indoors. Not to mention that it is dangerous for the cat to be roaming outside. Cars! Duh? And feline sex leading to more bird killing cats! Only unthinking cat owners who don’t care about birds or overpopulation of felines, let theirs outside to do whatever. Right Felix?!

#95 Gravy Train on 05.25.19 at 10:19 pm

#92 Jager on 05.25.19 at 8:33 pm
“How much time did you spend parsing my comment via Wiki? Lol!!” Just a few minutes. I included the Wikipedia references to let readers know you’re just a troll.

“You remind me of one who is forever learning but never coming to a knowledge of the truth ;)” I can’t argue with that statement. Are you saying that you’re omniscient?

“Why not begin to educate yourself […]? You may then paraphrase your given understanding and provide adequate refutation of my comment.” So did you not just say that your comment can indeed be refuted? :P

“Much luck to you in your future fact-finding endeavours.” Just shooting down an Internet troll.

P.S. […] why not do a search on peer review fraud? Better yet how about some honest research on how scientific funding is often established to meet predetermined objectives? Don’t you remember? I asked you to provide the evidence! :P

#96 Glengarry Girl on 05.26.19 at 6:58 am

This is the reason I come here, thanks for sharing your readers letters Garth. It’s so interesting how people choose to live financially. How their past and present forms their habits. I read because how Economic conditions, how they shape our Society and their behavior and views is really interesting to me. This post really gave us a taste of that. I would live to Deep dive into each one of their Stories and ask more and learn more. Each one could have made different choices that would have made a profound effect on their finances. Jeremiah is very articulate and observant, I wonder if he will find happiness in Minnimilism. It would be ironic after his Parents poured such resources his wayso they could have it all. Kind of the way it goes sometimes, kind of a generational thing. Could also be that despite all of those advantages, he will never have what they do. That’s the stuff I like to talk about and observe.