The wave

“Hello Garth,” Lady Jane writes.  “I have been reading your website for a few years now and can’t recall seeing a scenario similar to mine. So I’m writing for myself and all the other single ladies over 70.”

Of which, by the way, there are many. Guys are great but they wear out faster, even the ones (ahem) with chiseled abs, furry pates and tight buns. Now as the Boomers move into the Thirsty Underwear Years, the number of wrinklie babes is about to pop as never before. It’s a big deal. Especially since women tend to be more risk-averse (savers, not investors) and therefore unready for a long, long life. How will all these people cope?

Look at the stats, ladies: the oldest Boomers hit 65 eight years ago. In a dozen years there’ll be 5.1 million senior women. By 2061, when today’s Mills are in their 70s with hideously sagging tats, almost 7 million women will be 65+, but fewer than 5 million men will make it.

In short, the population’s aging as never before, with females will be leading the wave. Why?

StatsCan says this:

“Since 1972, Canada has had sustained below replacement level fertility, which from a demographic perspective, means that not enough babies are entering the age structure to replace their parents, leaving the population to grow older. In addition, overall lower mortality rates throughout the life course over the past century has resulted in higher life expectancy for both females and males, meaning that more people are not only surviving to age 65, but are spending many years as a senior.”

In fact there are now more senior chicks (17.5%) than 14-year-old girls (15.5%). The first time that line was crossed was in 2011. It’s an astonishing trend. Look at this chart, and ponder where we’re headed as a society:

Girls aged 14 and under, women aged 65+ and women aged 80+ as a % of the female population, Canada, 1921 to 2061

Forty years ago the old-lady quotient stood at just 9% while the girls clocked in at 29%. But with guys, it’s the opposite (we’re apparently croaking in droves) – 15% are seniors while boys make up about 17%. In the past 30 years the median age of Canadians has exploded by 10 years – to 42. That’s almost four years older than in the US, where dudes die younger (probably Trump’s fault).

Anyway, here’s the problem: a country in which seniors outnumber kids, where women outnumber men, where fertility rates are falling and where the national savings rate is less than 1% is asking for trouble. Without immigration or boxcars of Viagra, plus more financial literacy, we may be headed for a state of poochedness – especially when today’s moisters are tomorrow’s prunes.

Well, back to Lady Jane:

“My financial picture is this, a non-indexed pension of $1,146 per month, plus OAS and CPP which total $2,318 monthly, annual income of $27,816 before tax dollars. I have TFSA’s totaling $41,400, no RRSPs, no savings to speak of. I don’t seem to have any extra to set aside due to increases in strata Fees and levies, property taxes and bank interest, with income tax to pay every year. I am 72 years old.

“I presently live in a North Van condo where the assessed value has gone from $274,300 in 2016 to $480,900 in 2019. It is a 1 bedroom, 600 sq.ft. space, wood construction with an outdoor patio. Rents start at $1,700+ for a 1bedroom unit. A 600 sq.ft. unit is presently listed for $465,000.

“Ideally, I think it might be time to find a rental in a concrete building that would meet my needs until I check out, or switch off, whatever old farts do when they croak. My opinion on diversity has evolved to hating the odour of pot smoke and the screeching banshee boinking noises at 2am. I’m also done writing letters to the strata.

“How bad is my situation? Is there a strategy that would give me shelter for 20+ years and be able to manage financially? I would appreciate your comments. Thanks and cheers, LJ.”

Face it, Your Grace, trying to get by on twenty-seven grand a year in YVR is no picnic. So a first question might be, why not move? Are you in North Van because of family? If not, there are plenty of cheaper places to be, within or outside Canada. Without change, yes, your situation is bad. Escalating strata fees alone will eat into your fixed income. A special assessment could be financially mortal, while making your unit unsaleable. You have lousy back-up finances.

The answer, clearly, is to sell, invest and rent. If you clear $450,000 after realtor commission and invest that for an average annual return of (say) 6%, your income doubles. Even after paying rent to live in the same place you’d be $600 dollars a month ahead of where you are now, and still have $450,000 liquid to support you in case of an emergency (as opposed to almost nothing now). Strata fees, homeowner insurance premiums, maintenance costs, property taxes and the threat of an assessment – all poof.

But, I hear you say, what of the risk?

Without a doubt, portfolios fluctuate month-to-month. Yet with a balanced and diversified approach those changes tend to be minor. Meanwhile the income you take monthly need never change since the advisor’s job is to ensure constant liquidity and a tax-efficient cash flow. Understand that by sinking the money into a GIC or a high-yield account you’ll have to dip constantly into the capital to get by. So the greatest risk is running out of money – which  outweighs the lesser risk of losing some.

Life is long, my dear Lady Jane. It’s expensive. It’s stressful. But better than the alternative. The last thing to do with your precious time is fret over money. Many men would trade theirs for one more morning.

123 comments ↓

#1 Semi Retired Conservative on 02.25.19 at 4:44 pm

Why do men die before their wives ?

Because they want to.

#2 I’m stupid on 02.25.19 at 4:46 pm

We’re definitely heading for a recession. I don’t care what the job numbers said in Jan.

Canary in the cole mine:

Car sales have been trending lower.
Home sales trending lower

Now I hear restaurants are beginning to be hit. I spoke to a chef today, he works for a company that ownes a bunch of high end restaurants around the gta plus a few banquet halls and he said that the banquet halls don’t have anything booked until April. Brunch at the restaurant usually was 200 people now it’s at fewer than 50. The ones that are going to the restaurants are not ordering the same volume of deserts. So money is definitely starting to get tight. The entire group I’m speaking of does more than $100million in sales in the food industry around the gta. So if this is happening across the board we’re going to be in negative growth very soon.

Obviously no one can predict when exactly we’ll go negative but I think a lot of steam is being removed from the economy.

#3 David Olson on 02.25.19 at 4:48 pm

Hi Garth, longtime reader, second comment. Love your blog and I am a daily reader. Will I ever be able to put part of my small investment accounts into a Turner Balanced ETF to share what your larger clients have access to ? It sure would be nice to invest in an ETF that was managed by you and your team.
Keep up the great humour in your blog Garth.

#4 The Greater Cauliflower on 02.25.19 at 4:53 pm

So, when I retire, I need to find myself some wealthy senior lady whose husband has kicked the bucket and left her a pile of cash and a lonely heart.

#5 The Greater Cauliflower on 02.25.19 at 5:04 pm

“screeching banshee boinking noises at 2am”

Note: This is how future taxpayers are created which pay for the GIS & OAS enjoyed by the wrinklies.
I respectfully submit that Lady Jane ought to buy earplugs.

#6 the Jaguar on 02.25.19 at 5:16 pm

Sell now, Lady Jane, before the market drops 30% in the GVA. Rent and live it up a little. Life actually isn’t as long as some people believe it will be. 75-80 for most, and even if you are an outlier, +80 ain’t no picnic.

#7 Wallflower on 02.25.19 at 5:16 pm

boomer/1960 here

1976: grade 11 geography class – “here are the demographics, here is what is going on, here is what will happen”
I watched/listened. Did nobody else?
This was pretty obvious stuff for, what, 5 decades?

#8 expat on 02.25.19 at 5:19 pm

In my opinion this is why interest rates will rise quicker than people think

OMERS
OMERS posts 2.3 per cent return in 2018 as investments offset tough market

CPPIP
FIVE-YEAR ANNUALIZED RATE OF RETURN – 11.0%
That’s 2.20% annual return……

After all the private investing these entities have done they have returned nothing…..

As our population retires – as per Garth’s comments – How the F is this sustainable?

Without interest rate increases these funds are screwed and ultimately will cause govts to raise taxes to pay into these plans which go into contribution deficit….

Or raise the drawdown for you to 70 instead of 60.

It is rather easy to specualte that something has to give…..

Interest rates will be the give in my opinion..

The underwater world of of the million buck mortgage on a 500K house is coming…..

Then they raise taxes and push the 49% who are 200 bucks from bankruptcy into bankruptcy

which causes house auctions

which causes lower property taxes andn cities crap out.

Which cause tax increases as bureaucracies nad politicans crap their pants…..

Then we get a sovereign debt crisis as 30-40% of our taxes go to pays for 2 trillion in govt debt… at 7% interest.

The stress points in my opinion are real and plausible

Comment?

#9 Take your pick on 02.25.19 at 5:19 pm

#4 The Greater Cauliflower on 02.25.19 at 4:53 pm

So, when I retire, I need to find myself some wealthy senior lady whose husband has kicked the bucket and left her a pile of cash and a lonely heart.

I lived in a gated community here in the LM that was chock-a-block full of what you want. They all had lots of $$$ and had no one to spend it with. Kinda sad for them.

#10 Alberta Boy on 02.25.19 at 5:28 pm

I think that is a Labradoodle in the foreground. Nice coat on that one. Good work still including a dog in the picture.

#11 Damifino on 02.25.19 at 5:32 pm

#4 The Greater Cauliflower

So, when I retire, I need to find myself some wealthy senior lady whose husband has kicked the bucket and left her a pile of cash and a lonely heart.
——————————

My dad died years before my mom. He left her plenty to carry on. I couldn’t believe the losers and freeloaders coming out of the woodwork.

#12 Rico on 02.25.19 at 5:36 pm

#8 CPPIP FIVE-YEAR ANNUALIZED RATE OF RETURN – 11.0%

That means the equivalent of 11% per year. CPP has been doing really well for a long time.

#13 expat on 02.25.19 at 5:39 pm

BTW IMHO

the dead cat bounce in the markets looks like its out of gas..

Outside reversal today

#14 Sold Out on 02.25.19 at 5:40 pm

Older single women should consider a marriage of convenience (or romance, if so inclined) with a good friend who’s in the same boat. Favourable taxation, split living expenses, company for travel and other adventures. Better quality of life at a lower cost. Loneliness is epidemic amongst the elderly, and is bad for one’s health. If inheritance is an issue, draw up a prenup. Lots of breeder marriages are sexless; sex doesn’t make a marriage more valid, (just more fun).

#15 yorkville renter on 02.25.19 at 5:43 pm

hooray for Median Age!

#16 By-Elections today! on 02.25.19 at 5:46 pm

Celebrate Democracy today Canadians! Democracy is the most awesome thing since ever. Let’s make Canada Great and vote heavy and have our say!

#17 Cole Buchanon on 02.25.19 at 5:48 pm

The Past is Male then? and what a great past it has been! Why? Because the past has given us our present! Liberals especially love the past because they love first past the post.

#18 Pot Smoke on 02.25.19 at 5:55 pm

Vancouver is a world class city where all you breathe is pot smoke. Try not to step on the discarded needles laying around.

She wants a concrete building because of how bad the air quality is leaking throughout the building of a wood frame construction.

It doesn’t get any better with the 1970s single detached houses. Full of black mould, they all smell musty and still cost multiple millions of dollars. Not worth it. Working class can’t afford it anyways, but even if they could, why?

A decent build in the last 15 years, dry and healthy and habitable anywhere near Vancouver will cost you 3M+. Good luck is you are not an international money launderer / drug king pin.

The standard of living in Vancouver had plummeted. It is a joke now. Keep destroying the dollar and purchasing power and pretend that there is no inflation. Keep those rates low. Life has improved so much for Vancouverites over the past decade.

#19 not 1st on 02.25.19 at 6:07 pm

No amount of immigration or Viagra will save Canada.

The cost of living, taxes and raising kids is a huge barrier. Immigrants maybe have intentions of having higher than average number of kids until they see the cost to raise and educate them and then that dream dies, or if they already have a lot of kids, they are going to face huge barriers to upgrading skills and language and probably fall into lower income brackets permanently. Its a dead end. And now we have fossils to take care of for 20 yrs.

#20 Max the Tax on 02.25.19 at 6:13 pm

So exciting Garth:
Citizenship data for flippers and speckers via the new registry in BC!

“Condo developers will be required to securely gather and report the identity and citizenship of anyone completing a contract assignment in a project.”

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/condo-and-strata-assignment-integrity-register-1.5032714

The registry stats will be revealing…

#21 Fast Eddie on 02.25.19 at 6:16 pm

Nowhere to hide anymore!!

https://www.canadianbusiness.com/business-news/first-of-its-kind-registry-in-b-c-targets-under-the-radar-condo-flippers/?utm_source=nl&utm_medium=em&utm_campaign=cb_daily&sfi=57016f841eb455e080ee59ff18f61fe9

#22 dakkie on 02.25.19 at 6:32 pm

Consequences of “Leaving Interest Rates Very Low for a Long Time”: Bank of Canada Governor Poloz

https://www.investmentwatchblog.com/consequences-of-leaving-interest-rates-very-low-for-a-long-time-bank-of-canada-governor-poloz/

#23 Ace Goodheart on 02.25.19 at 6:45 pm

Or she could move here and live rent free, investing the other $425,000.00:

https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/20344818/3-0-bedroom-single-family-house-1866-hibernia-road-caledonia-caledonia

Walking distance to shopping. She doesn’t even need a car. Sure it needs a bit of spit and shine, but you would be surprised how much of that you can buy in N.S. with a few hunnies……

#24 Long-Time Lurker on 02.25.19 at 6:50 pm

>For no one in particular. (Snicker.)

Socialism: opiate of the masses
by Jon Rappoport

September 1, 2017

Let’s get something straight. There is no pure form of socialism, where “the government owns the means of production.”

The means of production own the government, and vice versa. It’s always collusion. Elite power players stitch themselves together like a walking Frankenstein corpse.

Socialism can be done with a smile or with guns and jails. Styles vary.

In 1966, Carroll Quigley, author of Tragedy and Hope, wrote: “The Council on Foreign Relations [CFR] is the American branch of a society which originated in England [and] believes national boundaries should be obliterated and one-world rule established.”

You could call the CFR’s agenda socialism or Globalism or fascism or dictatorship—it doesn’t matter. For the sake of brevity, I’ll call it socialism.

At street level (not within the CFR), every proponent of the socialist “solution” either has no idea who installs it and runs it, or he astonishingly believes “the government” can be transformed into a beneficent enterprise and shed its core corruption, as it takes the reins of absolute power.

Meanwhile, the ultra-wealthy elites who use socialism as a weapon, while propagandizing it as our humanitarian future, know full well THEY will run it, and they have no qualms about placing severe limits on the freedom of populations. They want to impose those limits.

Hope and Change, the slogan of the former US president, was perfect for street-level socialists. It was vague enough to be injected with their own vague dreams and fantasies.

Colleges—or as I call them, Academies of Great Generalities—have been turning out these fantasists by the ton. “If I feel it, it must be true and good.”

One such idealist, back in the 1960s, was a young man named James Kunen. But smarter by far than most of his comrades, he wrote a book called The Strawberry Statement: Notes on a College Revolutionary. A member of the Left group, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Kunen recalled a curious event at the 1968 SDS Convention:…

https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2017/09/01/socialism-opiate-of-the-masses/

#25 Long-Time Lurker on 02.25.19 at 6:53 pm

https://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2017/10/02/the-delusional-karl-marx/

The delusional Karl Marx
by Jon Rappoport
October 2, 2017

Prepare yourself for a fantastical Karl Marx quote.

It’s the sort of statement a young person in college might find inspiring, if he had the ability to read it and understand it.

An increasing number of young college students want to believe in a better, more attractive future, in which little or no work will be required of them.

They’ll be provided a “free life.” Housing, food, clothing, an array of consumer items.

They want something resembling college life forever.

Here is the Karl Marx quote:

“For as soon as the distribution of labour comes into being, each man has a particular exclusive sphere of activity, which is forced upon him and from which he cannot escape. He is a hunter, a fisherman, a shepherd, or a critical critic and must remain so if he does not wish to lose his means of livelihood; while in communist society, where nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity but each can become accomplished in any branch he wishes, society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, to fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have in mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, shepherd or critic.” (The German Ideology, 1845-46)

I’ll break down Marx’s stunning assertion, section by section…

…In other words, Marx would live for free, unemployed, and do whatever he wants when he wants. And so could everyone else—but somehow the national production of goods and services gets done.

Magic. The magic of the Communist State.

I recommend Marx’s passage to teachers of logic. Have your students chew on it for a week, take it apart, analyze it. It’s a masterpiece of fallacies, taken to the extreme.

And by the way, there is no indication Marx was anticipating a society in which machines and AI would do all the work. If this were his ace in the hole, he would have to re-think his famous “workers of the world unite,” because there would be no human workers, aside from those who monitored and repaired the machines…

#26 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.25.19 at 6:55 pm

@#3 I’m stupid
“Obviously no one can predict when exactly we’ll go negative but I think a lot of steam is being removed from the economy….”
++++

Well. If the economic “ca ca” is going to hit the fan.
Lets hope the tail spin starts about 3 months before the election…….

#27 MF on 02.25.19 at 6:56 pm

#19 not 1st on 02.25.19 at 6:07 pm

I’m usually post about this topic but it needs to be said.

I know many new immigrant families in the GTA. Almost are having kids, raising families, going to school, finding jobs and doing well.

Why/how?

1) Because compared to the poverty/hopelessness of home, the stability/peace and chance to make money in Canada is attractive for having and raising their kids. Most traditional/religious families value children. To them the peace/stability of Canada is everything. It’s only us Canadian born, less religious, who are afraid to sacrifice. Most of us only care about ourselves and making money. We don’t know how to sacrifice (yes me included).

2) These families live multiple generations in one home. Childcare is taken care of, and mortgage payments/costs are split. Families are younger too.

3) The economy is actually pretty good despite the doom and gloom we always hear here.

4) They aren’t whining on this site about “government and taxes”. They are going to work, going to school, improving themselves and moving forward.

This forum, like all forums, can be a sounding board of whining. Yes there are people struggling, but there also lots who are succeeding. Guess who is louder though?

MF

#28 Smoking Man on 02.25.19 at 7:12 pm

T2 is Toast

http://presscore.ca/mccall-macbain-928000-gift-to-trudeau-represents-single-largest-lobbyist-bribery-scandal-in-canadian-history

#29 AB Boxster on 02.25.19 at 7:12 pm

It doesn’t really matter one way or the other does it?

The earth is supposed to end in 12 years according to some really smart climate savy Millennials, so planning for 2061 is a tremendous waste of time and effort.

There’s a business opportunity there I think.

Helping this group spend all of their money over the next 12 years so that they can enjoy the remaining time left on the planet and then happily pass on when the earth ends. Or doesn’t.

#30 Demographics on 02.25.19 at 7:19 pm

#7 Wallflower – I too had a class in demographics, and this was evident by the statistics. Are you the one a few years ago that was looking for a new laptop by any chance?

#31 Paul on 02.25.19 at 7:22 pm

#4 The Greater Cauliflower on 02.25.19 at 4:53 pm
So, when I retire, I need to find myself some wealthy senior lady whose husband has kicked the bucket and left her a pile of cash and a lonely heart.
————————————————————————————————
True story, a friend and client of mine sold her 800k house to move into her new hubbies place. Worth 1.2 traveled for 2 years living the good life. Big problems she owed 650k she when she sold ,he has 900k mortgage both sixtyish. Tells me she is pissed at paying on his house debt and credit cards. Be careful to know who is zooming who!

#32 Jimmy on 02.25.19 at 7:25 pm

She should move to Panama. No joke.

#33 NoName on 02.25.19 at 7:47 pm

#26 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.25.19 at 6:55 pm
@#3 I’m stupid
“Obviously no one can predict when exactly we’ll go negative but I think a lot of steam is being removed from the economy….”
++++

Well. If the economic “ca ca” is going to hit the fan.
Lets hope the tail spin starts about 3 months before the election…….

It just might happen around that time.

https://tradingeconomics.com/canada/manufacturing-pmi

#34 Randy on 02.25.19 at 7:56 pm

I get it Garth…you are saying that I should buy a 2019 Corvette ZR1 before I die….Great idea

#35 Not 1st on 02.25.19 at 7:59 pm

It costs almost $13000 per yr per kid to raise a kid to age 18. Then easily tack another 5yrs on that with tuition. A family of 5 will need to find an extra 60k of before tax income. That’s not even counting resps and tfsa rrsp. Add in a mortgage and utilities and immigrants are struggling as well.

If 3rd and 4th generation Canadians can’t afford to have more kids then newcomers will struggle even more. Part of the economics of population is for someone to buy houses and if 3generations are living under one roof that blows that plan out of the water. Somewhere it will be felt in the economy. Canada will be poorer with our young carrying the burden.

A better plan is to raise the retirement age back up like Harper had it and encourage more part time work for older people.

#36 Rick on 02.25.19 at 8:05 pm

Women live longer because they nag US to death. Nuff said.

#37 PastThePeak on 02.25.19 at 8:08 pm

#2 I’m stupid on 02.25.19 at 4:46 pm
We’re definitely heading for a recession. I don’t care what the job numbers said in Jan.

Canary in the cole mine:

Car sales have been trending lower.
Home sales trending lower

Now I hear restaurants are beginning to be hit.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

One can’t predict the exact timing of a recession, as there are so many moving factors. But one also can’t ignore lots of data points indicating a tired expansion. In Canada, we have extremely high & still growing consumer debt, high & growing public debt, high and growing business debt. Negative equity growing in owned autos, and declining sales.

In the US, with a much more vibrant economy, they just had the worst retail sales drop month-on-month in Dec, since 2009.

It’s been said many times, but so much of consumer spending appears to have been enabled by debt, and that debt is maxing out, due to low wage gains and the end of the increasing household ATM.

Low interest rates bring consumption forward from the future, but eventually you arrive at the future and there isn’t anything else to bring forward – you have hit the debt wall.

Question: Would you put all of your money into the market today?

#38 akashic record on 02.25.19 at 8:10 pm

She can always marry a rich widow who inherited the money of her husband, who could not survive statistics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uG_IAexX7Y

#39 Nonplused on 02.25.19 at 8:13 pm

I think maybe one day people will come to the Stoic realization that trying to live as long as you can is a pretty silly goal, or at least a pretty silly #1 priority.

I imagine a day where science and medicine can keep people alive until they are 200. All of them plugged into respirators, unable to walk, being fed by a tube, on opiods because everything hurts, and watching TV. What’s the point? There is nothing good on TV now, what makes you think there will be in 100 years?

The fact that we so rage against our mortality is interesting. Perhaps that helps explain why returning WWII veterans who had been shot at and shot back started the motorcycle culture in the US, but many civilians were afraid of them (the motorcycles). Once you’ve seen a few comrades blown up, whether you’d call them friends or not they were on your side, I think you have a different perspective on how much a motorcycle changes your overall life expectancy. At least if you don’t drive it like an idiot.

In the age of nuclear bombs and the end of the INF treaty, global warming, insect die-off, over-fishing, peak oil, financial overreach, automation, ,AI, socialism, and transgenders competing in girls sports so they can steal up all the scholarships, yes you still have to plan to grow very old. But don’t expect to. Have a cigar and a scotch if that’s your thing. It probably won’t make a difference but you might enjoy it. Or go for a ride.

#40 PastThePeak on 02.25.19 at 8:13 pm

#22 dakkie on 02.25.19 at 6:32 pm
Consequences of “Leaving Interest Rates Very Low for a Long Time”: Bank of Canada Governor Poloz
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

And I don’t think he understands that *HE* is the person most responsible for this state. Carney had Canada at 1% (almost 1% above the US at the time), and then Poloz came in and thought the collapse in the oil patch required him to screw up the entire country by dropping interest rates right away.

RE and consumer debt skyrocketed. Kept it much lower as the US Fed passed us. Now we are pooched. Thanks Polozer.

#41 Superb forecasting on 02.25.19 at 8:27 pm

The dilettantes over at BCREA are hard at work with their crystals. Amazing how prices aren’t down at all, but you can scoop homes on the North Shore for 30 to 50% less than what they would have got in May 2016.

https://goo.gl/GF5xx6

#42 Vampire studies on 02.25.19 at 8:40 pm

Jane – join a co-op??

https://www.cbc.ca/thestatsoflife/episodes/season-2/retirement

#43 I’m stupid on 02.25.19 at 8:43 pm

#37 PastThepeak

Question: Would you put all of your money into the market today?

Depends:

What’s my age, earning potential, net worth?

If I’m under 50 with more than $2million liquid cash and I’m making 200k a year then yes.

The reason is that I have plenty of time to recover from a bear market plus my income is more than enough to support my lifestyle. So the 2million isn’t that important. With that said I wouldn’t buy individual stocks either. No need to gamble. And I’d hold bonds too.

60/40 Garth keeps talking about is a good strategy.

If I was 28 with 100k to invest and an income of 85k not married, I’d have an all stock portfolio. Why not, lots of time to recover. Still using etfs that track all the major indexes. No bonds.

If I was 60 or older it would be more tricky. Too many variables to answer.

#44 Sail away on 02.25.19 at 8:44 pm

#4 The Greater Cauliflower
So, when I retire, I need to find myself some wealthy senior lady whose husband has kicked the bucket and left her a pile of cash and a lonely heart.
——————————
#11 Damifino
My dad died years before my mom. He left her plenty to carry on. I couldn’t believe the losers and freeloaders coming out of the woodwork.
______________

Damifino, so… what are you saying about The Greater Cauliflower?

#45 VicPaul on 02.25.19 at 8:54 pm

#32 Jimmy on 02.25.19 at 7:25 pm

She should move to Panama. No joke.

~~~~~

No kidding, no joke. The Pensionado program the Panamanian government offers saves on utility bills, flights…a host of items -all with proof of $1000 USD/yr (or equivalent) guaranteed pension (gov or private sector). Other countries offer similar inducements (Malaysia, Costa Rica, et al)
My retirement dream is to spend a couple months in Boca del Torres, come back to visit the kids… then off to Da Nang, Vietnam for a couple months (the street food is cheap and awesome)- then zip back to Canada for a wedding – then off to northern Croatia for a…
Just gotta avoid the chaos…

#46 Raging Ranter on 02.25.19 at 8:55 pm

Move to lovely Fredericton and buy a lovely house for $200k. Invest the other $250k or so, and she will live well, surrounded by lovely Martimers. Did I mention it’s lovely there? Just be prepared to make the odd trip to Montreal and spend some money for diagnostics at a private clinic – NB has by far the longest wait times for diagnostics.

#47 Sail away on 02.25.19 at 8:59 pm

The doom and gloom here is surprising. Buy when blood is in the streets – if everything goes sideways with consumer debt and recession, blood will be everywhere. Bargain days are coming if you’ve been prudent over the last 10 years. Opportunity, my friends.

#48 Reality is stark on 02.25.19 at 9:18 pm

Demographics mean nothing in this country. We can import all the people we need and select judiciously. The fact that feminism and family court rape has led to increasing distrust among the sexes just leads to higher quantifiable domestic unhappiness. That is irrelevant to a government that can circumvent domestic disharmony and welcome those with a more positive family friendly outlook from overseas.
Our future has nothing to do with females outliving males, females despondent due to male emotional unavailability. The fact that we can piggyback on US economic strength and import good values more than makes up for the stupid societal structure that promotes gender distrust that we covet so much.
Jordan Peterson is right.

#49 Yuus bin Haad on 02.25.19 at 9:23 pm

Garth is certainly old enough to remember “Lady Jane” (HINT: it was a “B” side)

#50 TurnerNation on 02.25.19 at 9:24 pm

#34 Randy here is the Corvette footage, there’s no replacement for displacement.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BepyvR8FfGK/?taken-at=89964

Bonus, Smoking man outruning the 5.0 down South in a 5.0 https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjqi7e7hO5z/

#51 deaf in one ear on 02.25.19 at 9:38 pm

Married men live longer than bachelors, probably due to the healthy influence of their wives. But married men are more willing to go to war and die on foreign soil.

#52 Bev on 02.25.19 at 9:57 pm

Um, rent is not $1700+. Our daughters pay $1200/monbth for one bedrooms IN Van.

#53 AfterTheHouseSold on 02.25.19 at 10:01 pm

#117 Flop
Re: pasting excessively long articles

Seems no one asked you to run the pasted posts in their entirety.

The text is far from concise, rarely informative or on topic.

“If the host of this blog thinks that they are too long he could edit them or mention something to me.”

OR you could just respect his rules as laid out and show him the consideration he deserves without him wasting his time editing or asking you.

“We have a great platform here to share information, but people want to use it to spew at each other.”

And here you are spewing out at me in response to the polite explanation I posted to you. A simple thank you would have sufficed. You’re welcome.

#54 retiredboomerinvictoria on 02.25.19 at 10:08 pm

I try not to comment on Blogs, because I get carried away, and then make no sense sometimes. LOL

This is an amusing strategy for young people can get a FREE house. They would need to choose to live in a small town, buy a house under $200k, both can work at minimum wage jobs, which are plentiful, and should be sufficient ($14-$15/hr x 2 workers) = $50k – $60k year total.

If they have 2 kids, they will get almost $1,000 free each month, from the Child Benefits. Use that to pay the mortgage. Apparently, the house will be paid off in 17 years. During this time, the parents can save $1,000 a month, to put into both their TFSAs.

Ross Kay’s Podcast says this can be done. You’re Welcome.

https://www.howestreet.com/2019/01/28/free-home-program-reaches-merritt-and-princeton-in-bc/

#55 cramar on 02.25.19 at 10:18 pm

Lady Jane:

1. Sell the condo
2. Invest the proceeds
3. MOVE! To where you can rent for $1000/month.

#56 Thinking about leaving on 02.25.19 at 10:42 pm

“She should move to Panama. No joke.”

Doesn’t she lose OAS if she’s no longer a resident?

#57 Smoking Man on 02.25.19 at 11:02 pm

Not good. Big vote split in Banbury between CPC PPC

Sing might win it.

York Simco CPC. Quebec is going green.

No one is going to be able to predict Oct..its going to be a mess.

#58 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.25.19 at 11:13 pm

@#53 AftertheHouseSold …For a loss.

there were only crumbs in commission fees for the starving Church Mouse Realtor….
So sad.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coMPdvrLDuw

I like the verifiable facts in easy to read jargon with the odd pun tossed in.

Its so much more refreshing than the MSM, CREA regurgitated , massaged, tweaked BS we are so often shovelled…..
If you dont like it….scroll past….

#59 Unhinged Trader on 02.25.19 at 11:17 pm

I’m a 32-year old Boomer.

Why do Millennials choose to be dog parents rather than raise families? Did no one teach them that dogs live like 9 years and don’t pay into social security?

#60 praire person on 02.25.19 at 11:20 pm

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-securities-commission-fraud-1.5032729

#61 Wally Wing Nut on 02.25.19 at 11:22 pm

Looks like Trump just figured out a recession in 2020 due to his policies. Will be surprised if he even runs for a second term.

#62 Paul on 02.25.19 at 11:28 pm

2300 Canadian jobs gone.

https://www.narcity.com/ca/on/toronto/news/payless-launches-the-largest-liquidation-sale-in-retail-history-across-canada-today

#63 NFN_NLN on 02.25.19 at 11:35 pm

> “In a dozen years there’ll be 5.1 million senior women.”

Time to repeal Bill C-36 Garth?

#64 DON on 02.25.19 at 11:58 pm

But the tightening of credit rules and pessimism about the future mean buyers are scarce and sellers are being forced to be patient or offer heavy discounts — and sometimes both.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-25/most-properties-on-market-since-2012-but-where-are-the-buyers/10838172

I know…Australia. But!

#65 DON on 02.26.19 at 12:17 am

Without knowing the full details of Jane’s situation

If I was giving advice to my Mom:

I would say sell and realize the windfall, travel (couch surf with the family/friends) or rent a nice small (safe) place in a quiet neighbourhood or small city and live off the proceeds.

If family ties permit she could move to the Island (North Hawaii) and rent in Port Alberni, Parksville, Chemainus, Nanaimo, some places in the Greater Victoria Area or Sooke to start with. The rent gets cheaper as you go North or remote for obvious reasons. Price to pay for quiet.

But now is the time to pull up the boot straps and get er sold! There is no better time to sell then now, time to fish for a greater fool.

#66 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.26.19 at 12:22 am

LADY JANE LYRICS
[Verse 1]
My sweet Lady Jane, when I see you again
Your servant am I and will humbly remain
Just heed this plea, my love
On bended knees, my love
I pledge myself to lady Jane

[Verse 2]
My dear lady Anne, I’ve done what I can
I must take my leave for promised I am
This play is run, my love
Your time has come, my love
I pledge my troth to lady Jane

[Verse 3]
Oh my sweet Marie, I wait at your eaves
The sands have run out for your lady and me
When luck is nigh, my love
Her station’s right, my love
Life is secure with lady Jane

#67 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.26.19 at 12:31 am

DELETED

#68 jane24 on 02.26.19 at 1:44 am

Lady Jane needs to have the guts to move. The world is out there. My son lives like a king in Vietnam on $21,000 a year. He’s not coming back any time soon.

Alternatively do what most of the world does and move in with your family younger generations. The anglo saxon world is the only one that expects seniors to live a lonely independent life. In my Italian town of Irsina, the seniors are out partying till midnight as I hear them coming home. I have been in bed for hours by then as I am an anglo saxon!

Now I want to tell you about the funeral of my father’s friend that I attended yesterday. I only ever knew him as a sweet elderly GENTLEMAN although I knew he was 100 years old, hiked and cycled till he was 95 and went out for a family meal 2 days before he died. Well it turned out:
. He was a member of the British expeditionary forces evacuated from Dunkirk.
. Stormed the beaches of Normandy on D day
. Received the French Medal of Honour
. Beat the Nazis out of a Belgium village who sent representatives to attend his funeral.

We will not see men like his generation again. Here is the kicker for Garth fans though. He set up a business in his 30’s which he sold when he was 53 years old and retired. He was retired for 47 years. I now have a new goal!

#69 David Driven on 02.26.19 at 4:08 am

Women are just as screwed as every other Canadian . Trudeau creates short term jobs for religious migrants in exchange for votes and Provincial NDP creates the low paid service jobs that drive women into third world poverty. Both these flaccid politicians are job killers regardless what the lowlife propagandists of the CBC say.

You don’t buy a house on a prostitues income. Unemployed historically high income resource workers are sellers not buyers. Socialism is a false economy. Moistens pulling rickshaws is a BC disgrace.

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/record-numbers-of-international-tourists-flock-to-b-c

#70 SoggyShorts on 02.26.19 at 5:36 am

@29 nonplussed
If tech/medicine gets us to 200, I’m pretty sure it wouldnt be 120 years of diapers.
When the average was 60, the % of infirm years was close to now, no?
So if we live to be 200 on average I would think infirm years would start I the 170s

#71 NoName on 02.26.19 at 5:59 am

Interesting, why would someone hord 100us bills.

https://twitter.com/carlquintanilla/status/1100046505262698497?s=20

#72 Mean Gene on 02.26.19 at 6:44 am

No mention of the “90 minus your age” rule of thumb when it comes to Real Estate and net worth.

Good luck Gracy.

#73 MF on 02.26.19 at 6:54 am

#68 jane24 on 02.26.19 at 1:44 am

“My son lives like a king in Vietnam on $21,000 a year. He’s not coming back any time soon.”

-How old is your son? Does he have a family??

“We will not see men like his generation again”

-What a weird statement. Those men fought evil so we don’t have to.

MF

#74 Hamsterwheelie on 02.26.19 at 7:28 am

I will send this off to my dad because he’s in a similar, slightly better, financial position. We have encouraged him to sell his bigger than needed home, invest those funds and live a life free of property maintenance (he hates fixing or renoing anything) & capital expenses.
Seems that as we age we get less flexible in our ability to move houses or lifestyles, even for the better and even more so when single. Yet, this is the time he could be liiving in a co-op with a group of friends, snowbirding it en masse to Fla on trikes or shuffleboarding on deck 5…if he makes decisions towards that effect – actively and intentionally. (Instead of insisting that its too much trouble to move)
My husband and I, in our late 40’s are going over these outcomes for him and by extension, us, to map an old age collectively, as gracefully as possible. Just as we want different things out of life now vs in our 20’s another 20 years will be vastly different again.
If life is like a waterpark then I’ll meet you in a few years at the lazy river, no log jam, no wave pool, pirate ship, or financial waterslides for ‘future-me’ thanks. Iwanna be here just lying on my back, sweetly navigating within a gentle current floating on an inner tube with friends and family all around.

#75 Millennial Realist on 02.26.19 at 7:33 am

A perfect example of what’s to come has just unfolded in Burnaby last night.

https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/2019/02/24/how-canadian-populism-is-playing-out-in-the-burnaby-south-byelection.html

Jagmeet and the NDP win. Libs close. And the Right?

The Conservatives had their vote cannibaized by the PPC. The PPC took 1/3 of the Conservative vote (!), better than expected.

http://enr.elections.ca/ElectoralDistricts.aspx?ed=1676&lang=e

(Cons and PPCers were reported distributing messages saying that a vote for each other was a vote for the NDP. Confusing, to say the last.)

Thank you to all the Paleo Boomers out there, and the many here in this comments section :)

Thanks to you, the Libs, NDP and Green will rule the future.

Your stubbornly stupid adherence to the fallacy of failed trickle-down economics and Ayn Rand nutbarism will guarantee a centre-left Millennial government for the next generation across Canada, and long after you are gone.

And a better, fairer Canada for all.

Welcome to the future!

#76 AfterTheHouseSold on 02.26.19 at 7:44 am

#58 crowdedelevatorfartz
Re: pasting excessively long articles

If it isn’t Mr Flop’s lap dog. How predictable.

The post in question was in regards to the lengthy pasted article ‘womens pay gap’ (like the lengthy pasted ‘what its worth’, where it went, what its doing, how it got there, articles) and the confusion it caused to a few posters.

It had nothing to do with real estate.

Try to keep up.

#77 jane24 on 02.26.19 at 8:05 am

Son is 33 and working in Hanoi. We hope he stays there as a warm place for his old parents to go for a few months in winter! Hanoi is very polluted. The town of De Nang is where you want to go or the beach towns in Vietnam are incredible.

#78 not 1st on 02.26.19 at 8:11 am

Angus Reid on the SNC corruption scandal.

http://angusreid.org/snc-lavalin/

#79 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 8:15 am

@#57 Smokey
“No one is going to be able to predict Oct..its going to be a mess….”

+++++

Worse than now?

@#73 MF re: JaneTwoFour
“What a weird statement.”

+++++

Its probably the stress of Brexit.
You’ll get used to it.

#80 Remembrancer on 02.26.19 at 8:19 am

#71 NoName on 02.26.19 at 5:59 am
Interesting, why would someone hord 100us bills.

https://twitter.com/carlquintanilla/status/1100046505262698497?s=20
————————————————————-
According to author William Gibson in “Spook Country” the US $100 bill is the official currency of Bad Shit…

#81 Remembrancer on 02.26.19 at 8:23 am

#76 AfterTheHouseSold on 02.26.19 at 7:44 am
#58 crowdedelevatorfartz
Re: pasting excessively long articles
————————————————–
Bro, its 2019, just dismissively TL;DR shame it and move on…

#82 Remembrancer on 02.26.19 at 8:30 am

#75 Millennial Realist on 02.26.19 at 7:33 am
(Cons and PPCers were reported distributing messages saying that a vote for each other was a vote for the NDP. Confusing, to say the last.)
——————————————————-
Completely predictable rats in a pit scenario actually.

Planners of all stripes will take note and game out accordingly for October, except for Team Mad Max, they’ll act like some sort of Con doomsday cult to drive another 4 years of Lib majority so they can say I told you so on the supposed ruins… Go Blue.

#83 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 8:34 am

#48 Reality is stark on 02.25.19 at 9:18 pm

Demographics mean nothing in this country. We can import all the people we need and select judiciously.
____

For now yes, but as far as I can determine; this is not expected to continue.

These days, it may look like there is a never ending supply of folks who will immigrate at the drop of a hat, and that it is no big deal for them to do so. The reality is of course, that it IS a big deal. Conditions and prospects in the homeland have to be downright rotten before anyone would consider pulling up stakes for good.

Everything I’ve read about Canadian immigration says we will be less and less able to attract high quality economic immigrants. StatsCan says future immigration will come primarily from the middle east and Africa.

So far, I’ve seen little to smile about when it comes to future age and population demographics in Canada.

#84 Phylis on 02.26.19 at 8:37 am

#71, $100 is the new $20

#85 Smoking Man on 02.26.19 at 8:39 am

Millennial Realist on 02.26.19 at 7:33 am
A perfect example of what’s to come has just unfolded in Burnaby last night.

https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/2019/02/24/how-canadian-populism-is-playing-out-in-the-burnaby-south-byelection.html

Jagmeet and the NDP win. Libs close. And the Right?

The Conservatives had their vote cannibaized by the PPC. The PPC took 1/3 of the Conservative vote (!), better than expected.

http://enr.elections.ca/ElectoralDistricts.aspx?ed=1676&lang=e

(Cons and PPCers were reported distributing messages saying that a vote for each other was a vote for the NDP. Confusing, to say the last.)

Thank you to all the Paleo Boomers out there, and the many here in this comments section :)

Thanks to you, the Libs, NDP and Green will rule the future.

Your stubbornly stupid adherence to the fallacy of failed trickle-down economics and Ayn Rand nutbarism will guarantee a centre-left Millennial government for the next generation across Canada, and long after you are gone.

And a better, fairer Canada for all.

Welcome to the future!
………

I think you’re right. But when your ideology runs out of other people’s money. Make sure you have more than one dog.

Make sure they big and fat.. lessons from Venezuela.

#86 LP on 02.26.19 at 8:45 am

#54 retiredboomerinvictoria on 02.25.19 at 10:08 pm
I try not to comment on Blogs, because I get carried away, and then make no sense sometimes. LOL

***********************************
Don’t worry about it…it’s just that we (the boomers) have so much knowledge in our heads that it sometimes becomes like RAM(random[ly] accessed memory).

“I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
“No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
– Winnie the Pooh

#87 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 8:48 am

The elections by the numbers…. (sorry if this bores you AfterTheHouseSold…for Less)

Burnaby:
NDP wins(no surprise). 36%(8884) of votes cast to 26%(5930) for the Libs and 22.5% (5133) go to the Cons.
Of 76,224 registered voters only 22,776 (less than 30%) bothered to vote in a hotly contested riding.

York-Simcoe:
Cons win( no surprise) 54% (8,929) of votes cast, Libs 29% or 4811, NDP 7.5% or 1244 votes.
Of 83,178 registered voters only 16,564 (less than 20% ) turned out to bother voting ( the weather?).

Outremont:
Libs win (no surprise in SNC land) with 40% ( 6086) of votes cast to NDP ‘s 26% (3925 votes) followed by the BLOC and the Greens with about 11% each of the votes cast.
Of 70,415 registered voters…only 15,055 (21% )braved the unplowed sidewalks in SNC’s stronghold to vote for “their ” Party.

Conclusion?
While the votes were no surprise in each riding the LACK of voters in an election year during a political corruption scandal certainly is…..

Perhaps voters “registering” their disgust at the entire system…. Or the lack of choices…. to be bothered dedicating an hour or two spent walking in to a polling station to vote.

A harbinger of an apathetic Fall election where “Selfie” wins a minority?
The most important issue in the coming Fall election?
Will he dye his hair grey to look “stately” or is he dyeing out the grey to look young?
Only his makeup artist knows for sure.

#88 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 8:57 am

@#81 Remembrancer
“Bro, its 2019, just dismissively TL;DR shame it and move on…”
++++

Does “LOL” pass the brevity test? Or should I have just said “lol”? Or just :)
As a Boomer my memory, or “remembrancing” is fading somewhat……I’ll try and keep up.

#89 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 9:11 am

#59 Unhinged Trader on 02.25.19 at 11:17 pm
I’m a 32-year old Boomer.

Why do Millennials choose to be dog parents rather than raise families? Did no one teach them that dogs live like 9 years and don’t pay into social security?
___

Hard to blame them. I remember before Ms. IH and I had kids, we wanted to have a few things established first before we had kids. Student loans paid off, make a plan and start investing for the long haul, and buy an affordable house that would allow all the costs of living to be paid with room to spare. This was accomplished 2 years after tying the knot.

Even with all this in place, we went through periods where we pounded into overdraft every month, the demands of parenthood were high, and long lived. For years we worked and ran a household – not much else.

The typical Millennial has a lot of school debt, lives in a city where they can’t afford more than a crap 1 bedroom condo, and has nothing left over at the end of the month to stash for retirement. That’d make me think long and hard about starting a family.

Add on to that the knowledge most of us older folks never possessed prior to the internet or before the passage of the last 25 years: 50%+ divorce rates, bread winners and Men getting destroyed in divorce court, the rise of Women economically (with their attendant raising of the bar for their partners). Mils just have to spend 5 minutes Googling and take in all the pitfalls you could dream up. Us Gen X+ were completely ignorant to all of this stuff (or not subject to in the first place).

None of this improves anything for society at large, but I can’t say I’d wouldn’t be holding off too if I were in their shoes.

#90 Asterix1 on 02.26.19 at 9:35 am

National Post: The mortgage ‘stress test’ has started harming Canadians more than it helps
By: Christopher Alexander, RE/MAX INTEGRA

How much did Remax pay for this garbage to be published?

Our MSM has no guts, no shame and worst of all have lost all credibility!

#91 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 9:46 am

@#75 Millenial Surrealist

“And a better, fairer Canada for all….”
+++++

Brought to you by the SNC-Liberal Party of Canezuela.

#92 AfterTheHouseSold on 02.26.19 at 9:56 am

#87 crowdedelevatorfartz

Actually not bored at all. The low voter turn out numbers were of particular interest. Thank you for laying out the results in a very readable format. Good post.

#93 David Driven on 02.26.19 at 10:11 am

You guys gotta give your heads a shake. Why marry an aged crone with inheritance money when you could marry a young hottie and give her a great education? Investing in a medical degree or other post graduate degree will be the best return on your sex life a guy could ever make. The crone will dry up and nag while the hottie just keeps showing her flexible appreciation. Is it just me that thinks this way, anyway….try it….worked for me.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/canadians-keep-using-their-homes-as-atms-even-as-market-swoons-1.1217838

People this stupid make me laugh. Instead of cashing in on the one asset that’s appreciated, they turn it into debt prison? Every cent you borrow on a HELOC becomes another monthly payment. How stupid do you have to be to turn liquid equity into putrid stinking debt? Ever hear of moving , paying cash and investing the surplus ?

#94 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 10:11 am

#75 Millennial Realist on 02.26.19 at 7:33 am

Thanks to you, the Libs, NDP and Green will rule the future.

Your stubbornly stupid adherence to the fallacy of failed trickle-down economics and Ayn Rand nutbarism will guarantee a centre-left Millennial government for the next generation across Canada, and long after you are gone.

And a better, fairer Canada for all.

Welcome to the future!
____

I remember a long time ago when I too, thought that politicians made all the difference, and that they had the best interests of their constituents in mind.

I am older and wiser now. I know exactly why 3/4’s of the riding never bothered voting.

I still vote, but you won’t hear partisan nonsense like “and a better, fairer Canada for all” or any other stupid tripe like that coming out of my mouth (unless they’re paying me good money to say it).

I cast my vote, then I go home and choke off their main revenue arteries. I see with reasonable clarity how things go in big politics – someday you will too – if you can lay your bias and partisanship aside.

I guarantee you 110%, there will be no more fair or better a Canada because the NDP won the riding as opposed to some other party.

Seriously though, you must know that right? Somewhere deep inside your brain, the unbiased truth still speaks and is trying to be heard.

IMHO, the sooner you start listening, the better.

#95 PastThePeak on 02.26.19 at 10:11 am

#75 Millennial Realist on 02.26.19 at 7:33 am

The Conservatives had their vote cannibaized by the PPC. The PPC took 1/3 of the Conservative vote (!), better than expected.

Thank you to all the Paleo Boomers out there, and the many here in this comments section :)

Thanks to you, the Libs, NDP and Green will rule the future.

Your stubbornly stupid adherence to the fallacy of failed trickle-down economics and Ayn Rand nutbarism will guarantee a centre-left Millennial government for the next generation across Canada, and long after you are gone.

And a better, fairer Canada for all.

Welcome to the future!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Let me get this straight:
– You are calling the “Cons” (meant as a general insult to anyone right of centre) stupid for vote splitting.
– You will blame any elected Liberal & NDP gov’t on these Cons (vs. the people that actually voted Liberal and NDP).
– Any problems resulting from said future Liberal or NDP governments are Cons fault
– BUT -> you believe that right-of-centre policies are stupid…and hence one would think you are more supportive of Liberal and NDP policies. So basically you think conservatives should save you from your own preferred parties and policies???

Wow. Such cognitive dissonance. No wonder the country is f**ked…

#96 No Soup For You on 02.26.19 at 10:33 am

3 shots at the polls and didn’t come up with anything. Pack it in Mr. Bernier. You are done. No soup for you. Another Conservative mis-step that comes around about every 20 years or so.

#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 10:45 am

@#92 AfterTheHouseSold
” Thank you for laying out the results in a very readable format. Good post.”

#######

Damn!
A compliment!
What am I supposed to do with THAT?

#98 NotLegalAdvice on 02.26.19 at 10:53 am

#43 I’m Stupid:
“If I was 28 with 100k to invest and an income of 85k not married, I’d have an all stock portfolio. Why not, lots of time to recover. Still using etfs that track all the major indexes. No bonds.”

Hi Stupid, I am 28 years old. I am married, but have 200k to invest. What is a good ETF that tracks all the major indexes? Give me a few examples please.

Thank you,

#99 dharma bum on 02.26.19 at 10:57 am

Dear Lady Jane,

The solution is obvious.

Lose the attachment to the condo and to the neck of the woods you currently live in.

Cash out NOW.

Invest the money, move somewhere cheaper, and rent a nice place.

You are way better off than most. But you have to play it right.

Owning a condo when you’re old is pointless.

Living in the GVA unless you are loaded is just stupid.

Get out while you still can.

#100 not 1st on 02.26.19 at 10:59 am

I know reading millennial realists diatribe along with others from the daycare generation can be disturbing. Venezuela like in fact. They don’t even know they are voting for their own self destruction until they are using leaves for toilet paper and eyeing up the local zoo animals for your next meal.

Fortunately there are still adults in the country. Silent majority who are working to fix this all for the kiddies. Hopefully they will have the grace to say thank you when it all washes out. Step 1 is to take out the master of evil Liberal govt. NDP and greens take care of themselves eventually.

#101 maxx on 02.26.19 at 11:02 am

Here’s a simple equation for government and central bankers to keep in mind. This might be used, for example, for macro-planning purposes:

Artificially (and moronically stupid) low rates = increasing consumer debt and/or lowered spending = real economy decline, job loss and stressful personal money problems = chronic gonad shrivelling = critically declining fertility rate = enormous stress on government coffers = an increasingly barren real economy.

That graph is not going to change anytime soon.

#102 JB on 02.26.19 at 11:07 am

“I presently live in a North Van condo where the assessed value has gone from $274,300 in 2016 to $480,900 in 2019. It is a 1 bedroom, 600 sq.ft. space, wood construction with an outdoor patio. Rents start at $1,700+ for a 1bedroom unit. A 600 sq.ft. unit is presently listed for $465,000.

“Ideally, I think it might be time to find a rental in a concrete building that would meet my needs until I check out, or switch off, whatever old farts do when they croak. My opinion on diversity has evolved to hating the odour of pot smoke and the screeching banshee boinking noises at 2am. I’m also done writing letters to the strata.
………………………………………………………………..
That is typical of all condos, either get used to smelling your neighbors shit and noise or move. The old wrinklies that think about living out their retirement years in peace are dumb as shit. Wait until the neighbor starts renting out!!!!!

#103 MF on 02.26.19 at 12:12 pm

7 jane24 on 02.26.19

How is he living like a king though? 21k/year sounds like a local wage to be honest.

Many people live and work in these third world countries temporarily for some enjoyment, but don’t plan on having kids there.

MF

#104 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 12:21 pm

#97 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.26.19 at 10:45 am
@#92 AfterTheHouseSold
” Thank you for laying out the results in a very readable format. Good post.”

#######

Damn!
A compliment!
What am I supposed to do with THAT?
____

Don’t try to make a decision right now. Wait until the shock wears off, and then decide how to handle it! :)

#105 paul on 02.26.19 at 12:23 pm

71 NoName on 02.26.19 at 5:59 am

Interesting, why would someone hord 100us bills.

https://twitter.com/carlquintanilla/status/1100046505262698497?s=20
——————————————————————–
We fixed that here has to be $100’s $1,000’s are illegal in Canaderrrr.

#106 For those about to flop... on 02.26.19 at 12:23 pm

Permission to post.

Permit # 0006

Granted by Mr G. Turner…

M44BC

“Are Taxpayers in Your State Giving More Money to the Feds than They Get Back?

Tax season is in full swing, and it’s fair to wonder what you’re getting for all your money. It turns out for people living in most states, the federal government is spending a lot more than it’s receiving in tax revenue.

40 out of 50 states are getting more, sometimes a lot more, from the federal government than they’re paying in taxes.
Taxpayers in Virginia receive more than $10,000 on a per capita basis than they pay, the biggest imbalance of any state in the country.
Several states in the Northeast pay thousands more in taxes than they receive from the federal government.
Our data come from the SUNY Rockefeller Institute of Government’s 2019 report on fiscal policy. The report breaks down how much money each state pays to the federal government through taxes on a per capita basis (pink), plus how much the feds sent back in the form of expenditures (green). Expenditures is a broad category and covers a variety of things, including direct payments to people like Social Security, contracts for local governments, wages for federal workers and sub-contracting work. We ranked the states moving clockwise from high to low on the net difference between the two figures, showing a unique take on the balance of payments between federal and state governments.

The first and most obvious insight in our visualization is to understand which people are receiving more money in federal outlays than they’re paying in taxes. Virginia, Kentucky and New Mexico top the charts as the top three getting the most money back. For example, in Virginia, people on average contribute $10,571 in federal tax revenue but benefit from $20,872 in federal outlays. Granted, many of these expenditures are payments to the federal workers who actually live in the state, but it’s still a nice return for the state.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, several states are actually in the red. Connecticut, New Jersey and Massachusetts each contribute thousands more on a per capita basis than they receive back from the feds. California is the closest to breaking even at a net difference of $12 per person, which is slightly more than the state’s minimum wage of $11/hour. Bear in mind our visual doesn’t take into account the overall size of the allocations. California looks small only because it’s a per capita figure. In reality, we’re talking about billions of dollars in money flowing back and forth.

In the final analysis, 40 out of 50 states are getting more, sometimes a lot more, from the federal government than they’re paying in taxes. There’s a net negative balance of payments across the country. That’s why the federal government is running a massive deficit of around $1 trillion this year. Unless and until politicians are willing to let their states contribute more than they receive, this situation will likely only continue to get worse.”

https://howmuch.net/articles/federal-budget-receipts-and-expenditures-across-the-united-states

#107 Find flop a job on 02.26.19 at 12:31 pm

106 For those about to flop… on 02.26.19 at 12:23 pm
Permission to post.

Permit # 0006

Granted by Mr G. Turner…

M44BC
……….
Gofundme.com/findflopajob

#108 JB on 02.26.19 at 12:46 pm

#99 dharma bum on 02.26.19 at 10:57 am

Dear Lady Jane,

The solution is obvious.
Lose the attachment to the condo and to the neck of the woods you currently live in.
Cash out NOW.
Invest the money, move somewhere cheaper, and rent a nice place.
You are way better off than most. But you have to play it right.
Owning a condo when you’re old is pointless.
Living in the GVA unless you are loaded is just stupid.
Get out while you still can.
………………………………………………………….
A nice place is anywhere where you don’t see a high rise condo! And now you can relax, breath fresh air and enjoy those last few years.

#109 Buy? Curious? on 02.26.19 at 12:51 pm

DELETED

#110 Tater on 02.26.19 at 1:04 pm

103 MF on 02.26.19 at 12:12 pm
7 jane24 on 02.26.19

How is he living like a king though? 21k/year sounds like a local wage to be honest.

Many people live and work in these third world countries temporarily for some enjoyment, but don’t plan on having kids there.

MF
————————————————————–
Average wage is 5k a year in Vietnam. GDP per capita is around 7k.

#111 LivinLarge on 02.26.19 at 1:11 pm

Bank earnings week in full swing and BMO surging over $100. Their commercial lending portfolio up over 50%…wonder if that’s in part due to the fact that BMO were the first bank to lend to cannabis producers?

Is there something else that might such a commercial portfolio increase when others missed projections…like BNS?

#112 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 1:43 pm

#93 David Driven on 02.26.19 at 10:11 am
You guys gotta give your heads a shake. Why marry an aged crone with inheritance money when you could marry a young hottie and give her a great education? Investing in a medical degree or other post graduate degree will be the best return on your sex life a guy could ever make. The crone will dry up and nag while the hottie just keeps showing her flexible appreciation. Is it just me that thinks this way, anyway….try it….worked for me.
_____

I think there is already an online “sugar daddy/mommy” app just for those kinds of arrangements.

One thing out there that seems to be on the decline is romantic love/partnerships in general. Marriage is on the decline, while “multi-families” are increasing. These are folks coming together primarily for various types of support.

Also, alternative relationships are on the rise including polyamory, partner sharing, polygamy, economic unions, various FWB arrangements, the whole sugar mom/dad (ie. whoring yourself out for a lifestyle/education/consumer goods etc..). All this stuff is reasonably regular news in various segments of the MSM. CBC likes to talk about polyamory. Pretty much all of it is non monogamous.

Marriage itself is changing as well – with the top end Men and Women marrying each other which has led to first time ever markers indicating the probability of a Woman getting married – markers that used to point the opposite way.

If I had to guess, the traditional family unit is toast, along with traditional marriage for most of those without a good education and a good paying job.

I fully expect that old school romance and love will soon take a backseat to security, lifestyle, or some form of cake eating arrangement (ie. live with older person A for security/money, sleep with hot young person B, chill with cool person C for companionship etc…).

#113 espressobob on 02.26.19 at 1:44 pm

#98 NotLegalAdvice

With 200k to invest it might be in your better interest to have a pro manage this matter.

I hear there is a former MP who runs a blog and has a thing for canines who does portfolio stuff.

That’s good advice.

#114 not 1st on 02.26.19 at 1:50 pm

Living like a king in a 3rd world country is fine until somebody notices you and decides to black bag you and call your family for ransom.

#115 tccontrarian on 02.26.19 at 1:51 pm

“But, I hear you say, what of the risk?”
———-

There are risks in doing, and there are risks in NOT doing – practically ANYTHING!
Gotta calculate ALL risks on either side (ie action and inaction), and then proceed with the option that seems most appropriate (not necessarily the easiest one, emotionally).
I went through this ‘dilemma’ when I was deciding whether to sell my house (mostly paid off), and to rent while investing my money. At a certain point, I realized that I just couldn’t not do it – and the rest is history.

To pound the point further, my gains last year were enough to pay my rent for the next decade, should I choose to keep renting (which I’m not). So, Jane, sell the box in the sky and get smart(er) with your money.
Even at Garth’s 7% annualized returns, you’d be better off by selling and investing (wisely).

TCC

#116 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 2:00 pm

Lady Jane could move out here among the ice floes of rural Ontario.

Not too far from me is a development – all very nice small nice homes. Adult community (that’s no kids allowed), and the entire place is aimed directly at retirees. It’s actually a pretty nice development in a cool location, and there are a lot of senior specific activities and services available. The place is chock full of retirees.

A nice place there is 350-400K though, so not much left after the condo sale. But lifestyle difference would be ultra screaming bonkers huge.

#117 IHCTD9 on 02.26.19 at 2:02 pm

#113 espressobob on 02.26.19 at 1:44 pm
#98 NotLegalAdvice

With 200k to invest it might be in your better interest to have a pro manage this matter.

I hear there is a former MP who runs a blog and has a thing for canines who does portfolio stuff.

That’s good advice.
__

I’ll second that. 200K at 28 is a great place to be. Don’t screw it up, let a pro handle it, you’ll retire early as a millionaire.

#118 AfterTheHouseSold on 02.26.19 at 2:05 pm

#104 IHCTD9
“Don’t try to make a decision right now. Wait until the shock wears off, and then decide how to handle it! : )”

Don’t over think it guys. It was a good post, credit where credit is due. The previous ones, not so much.

I do enjoy your posts IH, in the top few. Thanks for the belly laugh! : )

#119 NoName on 02.26.19 at 2:35 pm

@ihctd9

sugar mom/dad

I usto worked with this dude, and he and a employer had some grudge going way back, so every once in a while topic would come up, and he wold tell me. lad dont worry i’ll get them. When i retire and get old ill merry someone lot younger, so they keep paying DB survivor benefit forever. He retired few yrs before they put a lock on a door, now iam wonderig will he folow it true. Actualy i dont, if his wife turns the light of first, knowing his personality he will definetly do it.

#120 Exurban on 02.26.19 at 2:41 pm

“… plus OAS and CPP which total $2,318 monthly …”

That’s a remarkably high amount. Did she wait until age 70 to start collecting them? Right now maximum CPP for a person retiring at 65 is $1,154.38 a month and maximum OAS for a person at 65 who has lived in Canada for 40 years since age 18 is $601.45. To get to $2,318 you’d have to delaying taking both of them (and continue paying CPP premiums) for at least four years. It is possible, but not many people are collecting that much.

#18 Pot Smoke
“The standard of living in Vancouver has plummeted. It is a joke now. Keep destroying the dollar and purchasing power and pretend that there is no inflation. Keep those rates low. Life has improved so much for Vancouverites over the past decade.”

Couldn’t agree with you more, and it’s going to get worse. More millions of unskilled uneducated third world immigrants, more taxes, less roads, no pipelines, more crime, more junk condos. Sure this is going to work.

That includes the $1,146 from her work pension. – Garth

#121 Penny Henny on 02.26.19 at 2:46 pm

#56 Thinking about leaving on 02.25.19 at 10:42 pm
“She should move to Panama. No joke.”

Doesn’t she lose OAS if she’s no longer a resident?
//////

Nope

Countries where Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan Payments are Made in Foreign Currency

https://www.canada.ca/en/services/benefits/publicpensions/cpp/cpp-international/benefit-amount.html

#122 Solution Is Simple on 02.26.19 at 3:14 pm

Sell out those tax free condo dollars; invest the difference with a fee based financial advisor who will look at everything; and move into an upscale apartment building because they exist. You can acquire this elsewhere for a larger new apartment that will cover most of the costs such as heat, water, 5 new appliances, and air conditioning with a ductless mini-split for about $1,000 a month or go for a two bedroom for a little more with the transit bus at the door, or underground parking if needed.

#123 David Driven on 02.27.19 at 9:34 am

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