Lest we

Morning rush. An old soldier stood by one of the concourse elevator banks in the bowels of the office tower where I sometimes hang out. Millennials blurred past the odd figure in his blue blazer, chest covered in medals, beret, ancient cloudy eyes. All had more time for their iPhones than a human anachronism with a box of poppies. War? A distant, discredited idea in a world more concerned with gender equality, Harvey Weinstein, carbon emissions and new emojis.

Where did you serve, I asked? “Korea,” he replied, coming to attention. Ironic, given the news. Twenty-six thousand Canadians fought there. Five hundred didn’t come back. Turns out he flew a jet fighter 65 years ago, when he was big, and twenty.

He pinned a poppy on my overcoat as if I were receiving the Victoria Cross. Thank you for your service, I whispered. How inadequate and lame that felt.

190 comments ↓

#1 Doug t on 11.10.17 at 5:05 pm

Peace

RATM

#2 I’m stupid on 11.10.17 at 5:13 pm

Both grandfathers fought during WW2. One got captured and sent to a work camp. The other returned home with a gift, a piece of grenade shrapnel in his arm. Hopefully we’ll never see the world at war again.

#3 Geoffrey on 11.10.17 at 5:14 pm

Thank you for sharing.

#4 BlogDog123 on 11.10.17 at 5:15 pm

re: Lest we…

The wars are getting more complex. Rather than fighting leaders, armies, nations… Now lone wolves, cults, small terror network cells, no one leader, social media brainwashing,…

#5 Spcc on 11.10.17 at 5:27 pm

My

#6 Unpopular opinion on 11.10.17 at 5:31 pm

Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. Defending your (home)country is one thing, flying overseas is another.

#7 great blog on 11.10.17 at 5:35 pm

enjoy reading it daily. Love today’s pictures.

have a nice weekend Garth

#8 mitzerboy aka queencitykidd on 11.10.17 at 5:35 pm

lest we forget

we would all be speaking a different language now if it weren’t for those Canadian gopher shooters in the world wars

#9 Dave on 11.10.17 at 5:38 pm

Central bankers would love to install their institutions in Iran, North Korea, Syria, etc.

War disguised as democracy and freedom.

#10 NoName on 11.10.17 at 5:40 pm

Interesting read

https://life.spectator.co.uk/2017/11/a-brief-history-of-battlefield-boozing/

#11 dakkie on 11.10.17 at 5:40 pm

DELETED

#12 Bill Grable on 11.10.17 at 5:44 pm

We will NEVER FORGET.

#13 The Technical Analyst, CSTA, CPD on 11.10.17 at 5:48 pm

I served in the Canadian Armed Forces (ARMY) Reg Force during the Gulf War I. Communications and Intelligence.

It is good to know Canadians remember. But it is best to not have another war.

—-
And in financial news:

Bitcoin: BTCUSD lost 10% of its value today and dropped form $7900 to $6461 over 3 days.

BTC is pure speculation supported by nothing created in thin air via a computer. Unless you have a risk profile of “extreme” currency is leagues better.

#14 Prairie person on 11.10.17 at 5:50 pm

My grandfather was gassed in the trenches. Went on medical leave. Was sent back into the trenches. Sniper and machine gunner with a deadly eye. When I asked him if he’d killed anyone in the war (I was a child), he said, “Thousands.” and he explained about an enfilade. We slaughtered young Germans just as they slaughtered us. Shrapnel tore through his right hand. It infected. No antibiotics in those days. He was in hospital for over a year and by then the war was over. Nobody cared. As a matter of fact there was a movement in Canada to keep Canadian soldiers from returning home because they were murderers and couldn’t be trusted. Romantic nostalgia nowadays but there were no jobs for returning soldiers. That’s why they rioted in Wpgs General Strike. Yes, I agree with Garth, we owe them our lives and the life we live but when you know your history you know that there were few breaks for returning soldiers.

#15 D Apostrophe on 11.10.17 at 5:50 pm

Virgins with rifles. Still the greatest generation.

#16 Sp on 11.10.17 at 5:56 pm

I hit enter by mistake.

The combination of my wispy memory and family being bad at passing on stories means I know virtually no family history from that time. I would have not had any lineage in Canada then. My grandfather went AWOL with about 3 or 4 guys in the North of Italy (Trieste I think). I assume hitchhiking was not an option and they would have had to evade any notice. At some point along the way, in the dark, they were dying of thirst and one or more them went to drink what they thought was water in the street only to realize it was blood. I don’t know if they made it all together to the same area but he ended up walking all the way to the Southern-most coastal area of Italy.

#17 Evangeline on 11.10.17 at 6:00 pm

Melanie Murray On Why Soldiers Enlist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNmQmagBcOk

Melanie Murray is a Canadian author who wrote “For Your Tomorrow” an emotionally gripping but non- sentimental book about the death of her 37 yo nephew, Jeff Francis, who was killed in an IED attack in Afghanistan.

Highly recommended.

#18 Pete from St. Cesaire on 11.10.17 at 6:01 pm

There are several fantastic films produced by the National Film Board concerning Canada’s role in the 2 world wars.
https://www.nfb.ca/film/fields_of_sacrifice/
https://www.nfb.ca/film/memorandum/
https://www.nfb.ca/film/mackenzie_king_crisis/

#19 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.10.17 at 6:02 pm

Was watching a tv show a few years back.
I sat up when I realized they were interviewing my fathers Uncle.
Had chest full of medals.
I didn’t even know he had enlisted in the military, much less served in WWII
He was a sailor landing troop transports on the Normandy Beaches on D-Day.
I had no idea.
He never talked about it.
Still doesn’t.

#20 The Great Gazoo on 11.10.17 at 6:04 pm

Nice touch Garth. Important reminder to us all to make an effort to give these people genuine acknowledgement for their service and sacrifice. I’ll bet what you did was appreciated.

Lots of people contributed. Grandparents hid 3 british soldiers in Northern Italy for 1.5 years during WWII – as did many of their neighbours in their small farming community. Some lost their life doing it.

Went to the Canadian cemetery in Normandy many year ago. Impeccably well kept.

#21 Bob Dog on 11.10.17 at 6:04 pm

Who financed WWII and how much profit was made from the interest paid for years after the war ended?

Without finance, psychopaths would be unable to initiate war.

#22 Darryl on 11.10.17 at 6:05 pm

Lest We forget

And unpopular opinion unit .

If we didn’t go into Korea then the Kim would possibly run the whole area including South Korea.

Should we have sat there while Hitler took over Europe?

Why do you live in a country where you can express your unpopular opinion ? Because others fought for your lifestyle freedom . The Kim would have you shot with an AAA gun . Or eaten by hungry dogs for expressing your unpopular opinion.

#23 Bottoms_Up on 11.10.17 at 6:11 pm

#6 Unpopular opinion on 11.10.17 at 5:31 pm
——————
So persecuted human beings in another country are not worth fighting for? Lots of humanity in you I see.

#24 acdel on 11.10.17 at 6:21 pm

I had a veteran the other day thanking me for wearing a poppy; I was dumbfounded! Both my grandpa’s served in the war; my parents grew up in Europe after the terrible aftermath with incredible hardships trying to survive, I thanked him for his service and looked around the mall I was in and it was very rare to see a youngster wearing a poppy. I know time goes on but many do not realize how lucky they are. Thank you all that served and supported, you were all very strong people.

#25 LivinLarge on 11.10.17 at 6:25 pm

Thank you Fearless Leader for changing the tone and substance in today’s post.

You are a man of character.

#26 Andrew Woburn on 11.10.17 at 6:33 pm

My father was 19 when WWII broke out in 1939. His war began by carrying poison gas cylinders to cover in the middle of a Luftwaffe bombing raid. It ended in 1947 when he left West Berlin where he had been a British military intelligence officer helping to control Russian aggression.

In between he escaped a military car crash and a train wreck and several motor cycle accidents including one in which his bike was run over by a German tank as he dove into a ditch.

His major escape was from an overloaded troop ship dive-bombed in the retreat from Dunkirk. The bomb blew out the ship’s bottom and it sank in 20 minutes killing 6,000. The remaining 2,000 troops were left floating and desperately swimming to avoid three German Stuka’s who were machine-gunning them in the water and using tracer bullets to ignite the oil floating on the surface.

He said a lone Canadian Spitfire suddenly came out of the sun and shot down two Stuka’s while the third ran away. He said the survivors were cheering like mad for Canada and that’s why we ended up emigrating here.

He was still only 27 when his war ended. He laughed when anyone tried to call him a war hero. “Hero, my ass,” he said, “I was scared stiff the whole time”.

#27 ww1 on 11.10.17 at 6:35 pm

#22 Darryl on 11.10.17 at 6:05 pm
Lest We forget
And unpopular opinion unit .
If we didn’t go into Korea then the Kim would possibly run the whole area including South Korea.
Should we have sat there while Hitler took over Europe?
Why do you live in a country where you can express your unpopular opinion ? Because others fought for your lifestyle freedom . The Kim would have you shot with an AAA gun . Or eaten by hungry dogs for expressing your unpopular opinion.

It’s not exactly an easy place to find, but if you are in Korea, this is well worth the trip : Gapyeong Canada Monument

You might want to google the history of what the boys in the PPCLI had to deal with on Hill 677 and why the Korea people built them a monument and the US government awarded then a Presidential Unit Citation.

#28 Brett in Calgary on 11.10.17 at 6:35 pm

#6 Unpopular opinion
“Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. Defending your (home)country is one thing, flying overseas is another.”

And if were the 1950’s you might be in his shoes… real classy leaving your name off a post where you bash a war vet. God I hate Canadians sometimes — so frigg’n privileged and hypocritical.

#29 raisemyrent on 11.10.17 at 6:37 pm

Nice post. Wife’s grandpa was in the RAF during WWII. He is colour blind so he couldn’t fly a plane, but he served as a solicitor nonetheless. Survived being bombed while posted overseas, first in London and later on the continent, only to go help with some paperwork after the war: The Nuremberg Trials.
Never talked about it. He is still sharp as a tack and we cherish our visits with him. He’s over 100 now. The Crown sent him a letter or his birthday. Veteran Affairs got him a new wheelchair not too long ago… a penny for his thoughts… one of these days.

#30 Felix on 11.10.17 at 6:38 pm

Filthy canines defiling the final resting places of our war heroes is just deplorable.

#31 gattu42 on 11.10.17 at 6:41 pm

“If we didn’t go into Korea then the Kim would possibly run the whole area including South Korea.”

May be. May be not. History is full of hypotheticals. But it’s now history. As long as we don’t use it as justification for future adventures.

We need to separate respect for veterans’ service from justifying political decisions that led to different wars.

#32 Andrewski on 11.10.17 at 6:43 pm

We should all approach any visible veteran, especially tomorrow & thank them for their service.

#33 Nonplused on 11.10.17 at 6:47 pm

#6 Unpopular opinion

Yup, that opinion will be unpopular. The Korean war was certainly more complicated than you describe. Without intervention by the west, what would South Korea be like? Given the way the North treats its own citizens, what would have happened to the South had they lost?

Also never mentioned when talking about the Korean war was the 400,000 “volunteers” China sent in to fight for the North. That significantly complicated things.

It’s so easy these days to educate yourself about such things:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_War

You have a computer or you wouldn’t be posting so there is no excuse. It could be argued that the Korean War was very unfortunate and could have been avoided, but I don’t know that the world should have sat back and watched as the North over-ran the South. And the start of the conflict had roots that were 50 years old due to Japanese imperialism and the vacuum left after WWII. It is just simple nonsense to say it was about “killing foreigners”. Anyway you can read all about it on that wiki-link.

As everyone knows the situation in Korea remains very tense, but hopefully the war does not resume (it hasn’t officially ended, they have an armistice not a peace treaty. This is largely because China would not allow a US ally on it’s boarder, or so goes the thinking.)

North Korea is such a mess. It’s citizens are not allowed to know the truth, but if they were ever to know the wealth that has been created in South Korea they wouldn’t be able to look at their own situation the same. This has made the government of the North especially paranoid and in my opinion they are the chief reason the North hasn’t joined the world economy and has spent the last 50+ years getting ready to fight a war that should have been over a generation ago. It would be even more frustrating, I think, if North Koreans were aware of how rich China is now that they have joined the world economy.

Here is a picture of North Korea from space at night. You know what all that light to the north and south is? Wealth. You know what the darkness is? Poverty.

Anyway I hope Trump’s stance is all fluster, a new war in Korea will bring the Americans and Chinese dangerously close to direct conflict. But sometimes you have to act like you are more crazy to get a crazy person’s attention. What, IMHO, needs to happen is a peace treaty and de-militarization. But how can you negotiate that when the basis of the regime is militarization and a concurring of the South? It doesn’t make any sense because even if the North re-invaded the south and won (which they wouldn’t) it’s not like they would suddenly be rich like the south is. They would be just as, if not more so, isolated as they are now. All that would happen is the lights in the satellite map in the south would go out. With the loss of many lives.

South Korea has made many gestures to the North over the years suing for peace. In response the North is nuking themselves. Even China is getting worried about this because they are not sure the fallout is contained or can be contained. The whole situation is ridiculous on every level.

But, as messy as things are, you are a disgrace for suggesting one of our veterans, who put his life on the line for what seemed like a good cause at the time even if it did get out of hand, did it “to kill foreigners”. He was defending foreigners who were under threat. Shame on you.

I don’t believe Russia is any threat to Canada, nor do I think they mean to threaten us, but let’s say for some reason they came over the arctic in their masses and tried to take over Canada. I for one would appreciate whatever help we can get from our American friends.

#34 Courage and Poo on 11.10.17 at 6:48 pm

Rememberence Day has become the oddest of days, full of contradiction. As we try to remember the horrors of war and the sacrifices yet we perpetuate the never ending conflicts overseas. Lest we forget… our defence contractors. The military industrial complex makes me sick. We do not honour the sacrifices made.

#35 Nonplused on 11.10.17 at 6:52 pm

Whoops forgot the space picture:

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/02/140226-north-korea-satellite-photos-darkness-energy/

#36 MF on 11.10.17 at 6:53 pm

No the Millennials did not forget. There are tons of history and military enthusiasts among us. I’m one of them. Feel around a bit with a group of millennials and you will see.

In general, we are a peaceful generation who shun war because we are aware that it is hell. That’s the lesson of Remembrance day. Where we not only look back at the sacrifices of soldiers like the one you mentioned, but also how lucky we are that we can go about our day in peace while enjoying some emoticons.

Lest we forget.

MF

#37 cozydell on 11.10.17 at 6:54 pm

Thank you for the fitting tribute…..

My grandfather served and was gassed badly in WWI never to fully recover…

My father enlisted with 6 of his friends..2 days before leaving he cut his hand badly to the point he could not serve…his 5 friends went and never came back…

All wars sadly usually benefit the rich and sadly who fights these wars? Those without connections to pass, those with $ to influence others, the 99%.

Send the children of the people making the decision for any new wars…just maybe we will have peace.

#38 Rook on 11.10.17 at 6:57 pm

I know many millennials that are currently serving. We can only hope that they do not have to go through the hell that our veterans did to serve our country well.
Such a good man to stop and talk to the old soldier.

#39 Zapstrap on 11.10.17 at 7:00 pm

Buried my father this year who fought oversees for the RCAF in WW2. Can’t be many left … many thanks to those still with us, and RIP to all who are gone.

#40 brian on 11.10.17 at 7:01 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1tqtvxG8O4

#41 Sierts on 11.10.17 at 7:03 pm

Soldiers
(on all sides)

First they call you
Then they train you
Then they send you
Then they patch you up
Then they forget you
Or they insult you…

#42 AB Boxster on 11.10.17 at 7:03 pm

My uncle was a WWII vet and passed away this spring.
Legion members performed a Legion Tribute at his service.
Amazing example of respect for fallen comrades.

He enlisted at 17 years of age and was in battle in Europe.
He was involved in the liberation of Holland, and and married dutch girl, bringin her back to Canada.

Imagine.
17 years old and fighting in one of the worst wars ever.
For God. For Queen. For Country.
To do what was right.

Greatest generation ever.

#43 Smoking Man on 11.10.17 at 7:07 pm

I solute all those who have served be it dead or alive. Because of your sacrifice we can freely speak our minds.

I will do what I can to keep that treasured right intact no matter how much the Globalists try and shut us up.

RIP to the fallen

#44 Nonplused on 11.10.17 at 7:10 pm

#34 Courage and Poo

The defense industry in north america is certainly an overpriced scam. But that is because there is no war really worth fighting. If war breaks out (let’s pray it doesn’t), We will beat the plow shears back into swords in no time just as in WWII.

The overseas conflicts don’t go away because that’s what people do. They kill each other. It’s veiled in religion or culture or country, but it’s always over resources. Always has been all the way back to when our ancestors were killing each other with sticks and stones.

America is an empire now and history will record them as such. They seek trade over violence but unfortunately there is not much you can do when the other party wants violence over trade. You’d best have your own gun if you are going to a gun fight.

#45 Born a week after D Day on 11.10.17 at 7:10 pm

My uncles and cousins never discussed their war service – it was just something that they did. Most had no choice – they were conscripted. My cousin’s daughter posted his photo on FB – he was handsome, 18 years-old and was a soldier landed on the beach on D-Day. An uncle was there too, but in the navy (he served in all five theatres of WWll), scuttling ships to make a Mulberry Harbour. My step-father in law was and army driver who drove over a Mulberry harbour. Orphaned young and living on the streets, he lied about his age to enlist – he was about 16. Another uncle served at the battle of Arnhem, several friends were killed and another buddy lost his legs – and a lot of people wondered why he couldn’t settle down after the war – no such thing as PTSD then. A family friend was a pilot shot down over the Netherlands – the villagers maintain his grave in the church yard to this day.
Then there are other friends who I have met over the years who fought on the othe side – again, they didn’t get a choice – they were conscripted. And the refugees, the people who came to Canada as Displaced Persons. The people who survived prison camps in Germany and ASIs. They had heart-wrenching stories to tell.

Naysayers take note. Nobody enjoys being in the middle of a war.

We must never forget.

#46 Ed on 11.10.17 at 7:10 pm

My dad helped liberate Holland when he was 18. If we all had the balls he did there’d be a lot less sniffling & moaning in Canada…

God bless our vets.

#47 Danny on 11.10.17 at 7:11 pm

Remembrance Day is important pause from our consumer brain washed world to think about the importance of friendship and peace and human life.
The poppy I wear brings to surface the sufferance of ordinary people put on the front lines to lose their blood for Monarchies, dictators, etc….too often eager to build empires and conquer the weak.
Let us learn more about the loss of life that happened in Canada by invaders who had no intention but to conquer and kill setting in motion a sufferance that is present today in our Country by the aboriginal people.
And now our generation must owe up to those atrocities that were not truthfully taught in our schools because they were one sided lessons …..and intended to brainwash us and cloud the truth.

The education system succeeded because we were just kids….. but now as adults we need to learn the truth that our origins as a democracy was malicious and the future generations need to commit to the ever evolving basic nature of democracy and not get stuck in our old rituals but rather move on from “Pomp and ceremony ”

Remember the loss of life on all sides of battle and encourage our leaders to work for peace without bombs but with honesty of intent.

#48 JoeG on 11.10.17 at 7:12 pm

War is a racket.
By Major General
Smedley Butler

http://www.ratical.org/ratville/CAH/warisaracket.pdf

#49 Ace Goodheart on 11.10.17 at 7:13 pm

RE: #28 Brett in Calgary on 11.10.17 at 6:35 pm
#6 Unpopular opinion
“Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. Defending your (home)country is one thing, flying overseas is another.”

And if were the 1950’s you might be in his shoes… real classy leaving your name off a post where you bash a war vet. God I hate Canadians sometimes — so frigg’n privileged and hypocritical.”

That person is not really much of a Canadian. Not going to say “yeah we’re all like that”. Not sure where that person’s opinion comes from. Likely ignorance combined with malice.

Ask the South Koreans if they had a problem with the folks from Canada who came to help them. Having lived in South Korea I can tell you that the Southerners are very, very, very happy to NOT be part of North Korea.

Bitcoin came into existence the year the US banking system collapsed. Its initiating code contains the following statement:

“The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks.”

What we have today with Bitcoin most closely resembles a ponzi scheme. Which is unfortunate because it is a great idea. The problem is margin trading and borrowing that goes on in the trading sites.

People don’t need $8000.00 odd Canadian dollars to buy a bitcoin. They just need to borrow that amount, which is easy to do with margin trading on these coin trade sites where bitcoin is bought and sold.

If you let people trade this stuff on margin, you have this inherent pressure upwards on the price of each bitcoin, as people are trying to push up the value by borrowing on margin on the trades.

At some point somebody is going to see this situation as nothing more than a giant, internet based, margin debt driven ponzi scheme and the whole thing is going to collapse. It’s a shaky structure already. There is A LOT of margin trading going on. People who are buying these bit coins don’t actually have the $8000.00.

#50 MF on 11.10.17 at 7:14 pm

#29 raisemyrent on 11.10.17 at 6:37 pm

It sounds cliche, but people like your grandfather are heroes. Europe (and the world) came very close to being defeated by German forces, but the Brits were able to miraculously hold them off. Incredible.

#34 Courage and Poo on 11.10.17 at 6:48 pm

The day is not a contradiction at all. It is about the sacrifices of our men in uniform who do their jobs, and who often pay the ultimate price when they are asked. It’s not about whether a war was justifiable or not.

MF

#51 Rudygq on 11.10.17 at 7:19 pm

Mostly kids entering WWI, WWII and other wars. Doing what they were told, following orders diligently in the face ever present death. Going in because they believed in their country and what they were doing was right. To wear the uniform is to serve and give all of one’s self to King and Country. It is selfless, it is brave.

My Grandfather served in the Allied Forces because he believed a free world was worth dying for rather than doing nothing and live under tyranny. War is devastating, repugnant and unnecessary. May there never be another, but Canada we stand on guard for Thee! Veterans we thank you all for your service, your nobility and your sacrifice
We remember! Je me souviens!

#52 tulips on 11.10.17 at 7:21 pm

#46 Ed on 11.10.17 at 7:10 pm
My dad helped liberate Holland when he was 18.

———————————————————–

Many thanks.

#53 TRUMP on 11.10.17 at 7:21 pm

I really have 2 views on the subject matter.

Nevermind…… Thank you Garth for honouring that soldier. I just hate the idea of war. The conspiracy theorist have got me slightly convinced that every war fought in the past 200 years was fabricated by extremely wealthy individuals.

We invaded Iraq and applauded…….but we still can’t find those weapons of mass destruction???

#54 Ace Goodheart on 11.10.17 at 7:22 pm

What’s the one thing that always leads to an asset collapse?

Excessive leverage. Every time.

#55 Ace Goodheart on 11.10.17 at 7:27 pm

The secret to bitcoin’s meteoric rise:

https://cryptopotato.com/bitcoin-altcoins-margin-trading-beginners/

#56 Lost...but not leased on 11.10.17 at 7:29 pm

In memory of Canadian soldier William H.Bell….died WW1

Without getting into personal details…

Several years ago…one of my in-laws got a call from a Vancouver Sun reporter.

A person(early1990’s) had found some letters(from William H.Bell) in a box tucked up in a garage in a SFH that had been bought and was going to be demolished.

They realized the letters were of importance to somebody, so they contacted the Vancouver Sun to track down next of kin.

The Vancouver Sun traced the next of kin to an in-law, and published a full page story for Remembrance Day with excerpts of the letters.

” ALL WARS ARE BANKERS WARS “…The letters from William H. Bell were to his sister in BC….and gave a first hand account of the war. Like many young adults(he was in his early 20’s) he was sucked into this geo-political vortex of propoganda… and signed up.

His letters home ended up with an ever increasing tone of disillusionment, as he could not rationalize why he was in Europe fighting a war for _____?????

He was killed in action.

His grave?
…..is in Europe
….the Allies clearly respected his sacrifice
..as HE SHARES A GRAVE WITH THREE OTHERS PILED VERTICALLY.

PS my understanding is his letters(and legacy) are in a Canadian University and source reference for appropriate and relevant academic disciplines.

#57 calgaryPhantom on 11.10.17 at 7:32 pm

if every country minds its own business, guaranteed no war.

Things get messy when a powerful country decides to “Liberate” another less powerful country.

I feel sorry for the soldiers who are brainwashed into thinking that they are killing for the good of people. No wonder so many soldiers suffer from PTSD. Those who die are lucky. Those who live realize that they were played.

#58 stage1dave on 11.10.17 at 7:33 pm

Hmmm…I always get a bit melancholy around this time of year. Maybe it’s just this damned toothache…

Mind you, writing this out below a framed pic of my grandad’s regiment taken on May16 1916 before they shipped out may have something to do with it. Bunch of kids, fer chrisakes…half of ’em lied about their age (including grandad, because his father and brother were already in France) to get in and 80% of the guys in this pic never came back.

Strangely, Grandad and 4 of his compatriots from Goderich all came home (in his case, after being wounded twice and gassed) after making it thru Arras, Paeschandale, Vimy Ridge, and God knows what else!

He once had the time while recuperating in the hospital to actually carve the battle dates into a few pieces of shrapnel the doctors had removed from him…I framed them into the wall mount along with his medals. He really never talked about it, either.

(I find gazing at this wall mount has a tremendously theurapeutic effect when I think I’m having a bad day, incidentally)

Certainly a distant past to most Canadians, I suspect…I couldn’t relate to WW 1 when I was a teenager in the 70’s; it seemed like some long ago – far away slaughter. WW 2 certainly survived with a better reputation…maybe because “everybody’s” dad was in it (from my generation) and the weaponry was at least recognizable? Or because it was all over TV and in the theaters?

There’s a pic in the spare bedroom of a long-ago family friend, many years dead; running up a Hally MkIII in preparation for his 20th trip, I believe…he looks quite determined, as do the w/o and f/g…a week later on his next trip he got caught by an Me-110 on the return trip over the channel that shot out both port engines, all hydraulics, most electrics and killed the r/g. Badly wounded himself, he managed to nurse the kite to a crash landing in Norfolk county. And earn a DFC.

Dad spent a couple years in the Navy in WW 2, and I know nothing about it, but I do have a pic of his destroyer…he re-upped in 49 (air force) but never did get to Korea…mostly instructing on “yellow perils”, then moving on to jets (T33’s and Clunks) before retiring. He’d never really talk about it either, unless some silly story (usually humorous) popped out…

Uncles were all RCAF, F/C (mustangs) B/C (Lancs and Mosquitos) and one in the merchant marine…think he had a pretty rough time on the north atlantic over 4 years. Don’t remember any of them talking about their experiences either, certainly not to me.

I’m not supplying the above detail as a “brag” or any other self-serving interest; more of an observation about different generations’ motivation. I believe you’d have a very hard time getting anyone from the last couple generations these days to follow in the above footsteps!

(Hell, I’m not sure I would, for that matter)

We’re supposedly “better” informed now, but far more cynical…our leaders in the western world (and the institutions they lead, both private and public) have done themselves no favours over the last few decades. A multitude of irrefutable evidence shows that very few can be trusted to act in the public good. Of the touchstones our parents (or grandparents) cherished, or set store by; how many are believed in today?

That certainly doesn’t diminish our fathers’ and grandfathers’ effort, nor sacrifice. (just because I question almost everything authority tells me doesn’t mean I’m not capable of appreciating a previous generation and their motivation)

In short, I’m not going to hold a previous generation hostage to my current beliefs…and neither should anyone else.

The world has changed; and a level of doucebaggery is exposed daily that cuts through all levels of society…and most of its institutions…causing the average person to ask “WTF am I fighting for?”

(It must have been quite satisfying, decades ago; to have something to believe IN, y’know?)

On the other hand, one thing hasn’t changed at all…a painter buddy of mine did a couple tours in Afghanistan, and he won’t talk about it either.

Btw, great column & pic tonite!

#59 Guy in Calgary on 11.10.17 at 7:33 pm

I salute the finest generation of young men that liberated the world from an evil tyrant committing atrocities against humanity. They ran onto a beach knowing what was waiting for them. They fought because they had to, for the greater good. Remember those that served in hospitals and saved lives. They sacrificed themselves in a way that I will never understand, but I will try.

To you from failing hands we throw the torch, be yours to hold it high. Silence tomorrow at 11am is the least we can do.

#60 TurnerNation on 11.10.17 at 7:35 pm

I am also reminded the two countries our global rulers have always tried to bring down: with Walls, wars and dictators; and now, quieter weapons.

When you think quality cars, food, wines, clothing, appliances etc. its always German or Italian-made isn’t it.


Today they have us on smaller fronts: we bicker here over gender, immigration and economic status.

Divided we stand but united we fall.

#61 Ronaldo on 11.10.17 at 7:38 pm

My uncle was in the RCAF Bomber Command stationed in England in WWII and one of the lucky few to make it home as the survival rate in bomber command was so low. I was fortunate to have made contact with the skipper of this crew Reg Harrison two years ago and we had a nice chat. He sent me several photos of his crew including my uncle who received the George Medal for saving Reg’s life after their bomber crashed on takeoff at a base in England. The following is Reg’s story. He is 94 today and still very active and lives in Saskatoon.

http://www.thememoryproject.com/stories/2895:reg-harrison/

#62 Steven Rowlandson on 11.10.17 at 7:49 pm

What is the greatest virtue of manhood and leadership?

I’ll tell you. It is truth! Above all things it must be truth!

When a man lies or believes lies he murders some part of the world. History proves it and the majority enforces it after the fact. If you want to be a man tell the truth even when you will be killed, lied about or banned for it!

Garth will ban this posting.

#63 Dolce Vita on 11.10.17 at 7:53 pm

Ditto Garth.

#64 Raging Ranter on 11.10.17 at 7:56 pm

@# 6, your opinion is unpopular because it is wrong. Go ask the people of Holland how they feel about the Canadians who went overseas to fight.

@#60, Japan and Germany became what they are today because we defeated them. Unless you believe that a fanatical imperialist Japan led by an emperor and an equally fanatical Germany and Italy led by Fascists would have wound up exactly where they are today. See Russia for your answer.

#65 help? on 11.10.17 at 7:59 pm

I don’t believe Russia is any threat to Canada, nor do I think they mean to threaten us, but let’s say for some reason they came over the arctic in their masses and tried to take over Canada. I for one would appreciate whatever help we can get from our American friends.

…………

we’d be done if we didn’t get America’s help. Good grief

#66 bellend on 11.10.17 at 7:59 pm

unpopular opinion= uninformed opinion
but hey the feelz

#67 Tony on 11.10.17 at 7:59 pm

Re: #13 The Technical Analyst, CSTA, CPD on 11.10.17 at 5:48

Crypto Trader on youtube states Bitcoin is supposed to crash, he said November 15th or 16th or both days. He listed many reasons. The video was made well before today.

#68 Ronaldo on 11.10.17 at 8:01 pm

An interesting story by veteran John Maclean involving a former politician “Rene Levesque”, a distant cousin of mine on my grandmothers side.

http://www.thememoryproject.com/stories/3272:john-p.-maclean/

#69 Thank You on 11.10.17 at 8:10 pm

Thank you Garth for paying attention to what’s important.
Home more than a house, time more than property and respect to others more than self-absorption.

#70 TRON on 11.10.17 at 8:10 pm

A co-worker is Sargent in the Canadian reserves. He did a tour in Afghanistan as a combat soldier and fought alongside Afghani soldiers. He lost some buddies and saw his fair share of death. He’s told me his best friend is a poster child for PTSD.

He is married with 3 boys, and is a senior manager at a fortune 500 company. It’s a huge multi-national governed by SOX. The integrity training to satisfy the lawyers is almost weekly now. Most of the guys who make it to the top don’t come close to his leadership ability. He understands we are all humans first and employees second. That’s rare indeed in a fortune 500 (I’ve worked at 3 over my career) to have a leader who actually knows how to lead.

I’ve learned from him that fighting and being put into a place where people are killed is horrible. He reminds people that doing the right the thing is more important than doing the things that only help ourselves.

Those who go to war have experienced something that most of us never will. Their character, resolve and courage are on the line every time they pick up their riffle. The consequences of their actions can leave a child without parents, an innocent person being killed or your buddy not making it back home to his family.

We may have opinions about war, politics and the financial motives but we must never forget that the soldier risks their life so that we don’t have to.

Thanks for the post Garth.

#71 akashic record on 11.10.17 at 8:12 pm

War is hell. If you are somehow still alive at the end of it you spend the rest of your life trying to resurrect your soul that died while you were busy with survival.

#72 norval on 11.10.17 at 8:14 pm

#60
Verrrry Interesting!
Excellent Points!

#73 Tony on 11.10.17 at 8:17 pm

My grandfather on my mother’s side was a Regimental sergeant major and fought in both World Wars. He enlisted underage at age 16 on purpose because he loved war. He was sad when the second World War ended.

#74 just a dude on 11.10.17 at 8:20 pm

Indeed, Lest we forget.

Garth, thank you for this post.

#75 Tony on 11.10.17 at 8:21 pm

Re: #13 The Technical Analyst, CSTA, CPD on 11.10.17 at 5:48

Bitcoin likely fell because of the news about Gold Bitcoin and its launch this November 12th.

#76 Boonerator on 11.10.17 at 8:22 pm

For those that consider elites sending unwilling youth to a meat grinder, read one of the many free PDFs of this. The quote is from the Wikipedia article.

“War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning (ISBN 1586480499) is a 2002 non-fiction book by journalist Chris Hedges. In the book, Hedges draws on classical literature and his experiences as a war correspondent to argue that war seduces entire societies, creating fictions that the public believes and relies on to continue to support conflicts. He also describes how those who experience war may find it exhilarating and addictive.”

#77 For those about to flop... on 11.10.17 at 8:26 pm

Number 27 on my “To do” list this weekend was” Find poppy photo for Garth.”

Normally it’s “Find puppy photo for Garth.”

He beat me to it with a beauty.

Sometimes my job gets in the way of this blog and so I’ll submit this article as a makeweight…

M43BC

“This Map Shows the World’s Biggest Oil Exporters

Despite investment into alternative energies, oil is still the world’s most traded commodity. Want to know where it comes from? Here are the world’s oil exporters, ranked by revenue and global market share.”

Top 10 Exporters of Crude Oil
These are the top ten exporters of crude oil, ranked by earnings and their percentage of the world market.

1. Saudi Arabia – $136.2 Billion | 20.1%

2. Russia – $73.7 Billion | 10.9%

3. Iraq – $46.3 Billion | 6.8%

4. Canada – $39.5 Billion | 5.8%

5. United Arab Emirates – $38.9 Billion | 5.7%

6. Kuwait – $30.7 Billion | 4.5%

7. Iran – $29.1 Billion | 4.3%

8. Nigeria – $27 Billion | 4.0%

9. Angola – $25.2 Billion | 3.7%

10. Norway – $22.6 Billion | 3.3

#78 FOUR FINGERS WATSON on 11.10.17 at 8:32 pm

Je me souviens.

#79 Crazy millennial on 11.10.17 at 8:37 pm

Sp on 11.10.17 at 5:56 pm
I hit enter by mistake.

The combination of my wispy memory and family being bad at passing on stories means I know virtually no family history from that time. I would have not had any lineage in Canada then. My grandfather went AWOL with about 3 or 4 guys in the North of Italy (Trieste I think). I assume hitchhiking was not an option and they would have had to evade any notice. At some point along the way, in the dark, they were dying of thirst and one or more them went to drink what they thought was water in the street only to realize it was blood. I don’t know if they made it all together to the same area but he ended up walking all the way to the Southern-most coastal area of Italy.

Funny…my wife’s grandfather has a similar story. Went AWOL and walked down to southern Italy with some other guys.

#80 bring_it_on on 11.10.17 at 8:38 pm

Wonderful post. Despite our differences (lefty versus right, poor versus rich, millenials versus boomers, homeowners versus “serfs”), we can all agree on the importance of honouring remembrance day and reflecting on the huge sacrifices made… Great post…. thanks…

#81 Waldguy on 11.10.17 at 8:46 pm

“So many bright futures consigned to the ashes of the past.So many dreams lost in the madness that had engulfed us.Except for a few widely scattered shouts of joy,the survivors of the abyss sat hollow-eyed and silent, trying to comprehend a world without war.”
― Paul Fussell, Thank God for the Atom Bomb & Other Essays
Forget not.

#82 Smoking Man on 11.10.17 at 8:47 pm

My take on T2 bailing on trans Pacific.

Trump put him on his knee and spanked him
Listen you little shit if you think your getting NAFTA as a door way for off shore shit to be back door and kill American jobs your dumber than Smoking Man thinks.

Make a choice kid. Nafta or China.

#83 Warren-the lagging indicator on 11.10.17 at 8:51 pm

Because words are not enough.

#84 viorelli on 11.10.17 at 8:53 pm

Hats off to all vets who served the country and contributed in defeating the evil. Both grandparents served here, but on the Soviet side. Grandma lived in the occupied Ukraine when german SS gunned down the entire village, only her and a 6 years old boy made it out of the mass grave, joined the partisans, became a sniper, sent many Nazis and their collaborators to the early grave. They even gave her a red star for courage in 1945. Grandpa was in mobile artillery, was in Stalingrad, Kursk, went through Austria and was taking Berlin street by street. Wounded twice, ended up in a filed hospital with my grandma where she was also wounded by Hitler yugen outside of Prague in 1945, that’s where they met and continued on. Both didn’t love the commies either, my grandpa was telling me to run if I had the chance: “the villages in Austria and Germany are nice! Paved with cobble stones, civilized people, clean, but evil for murdering so many. Grandpa was of Jewish faith, Grandma was orthodox Ukrainian. What a mess this whole thing was, millions of innocent lives lost on all sides because of evil politicians and brainwashed sheep.

#85 IHCTD9 on 11.10.17 at 8:55 pm

I am another chump who was born a Canadian as a direct result of WW2. Canadian forces Liberated my parent’s country from occupation, and I see a couple dogs here with family who actually had their boots on the ground in that operation back in 1945, a salute to you! I can tell you dogs that the few remaining (mostly Women) Dutch Canadian folks in my area who lived through WW2 have never forgotten. They STILL have a small gathering in May to remember the day their freedom came, and thank the Canadian Men and Women who brought it. My Grandparents on both sides left The Netherlands and came here explicitly because to them, there was no better place on earth to start over, than Canada.

#86 MSM-Free Zone on 11.10.17 at 8:56 pm

Human beings are, with a few notable exceptions, generally programmed to be decent in nature.

When humans go tribal seeking a saviour is when things get ugly. Throw in a flag, religion, political ideology, etc, and there is always some insecure, attention-seeking, wealth-craving, power-hungry, or religious opportunist nut job ready to rise to absolute power and screw things up.

After that, all bets are off.

#87 jess on 11.10.17 at 8:56 pm

World peace? These are the only 11 countries in the world that are actually free from conflict

As new wars and civil unrests seem to be flaring up every week, we look for the only countries in the world that could be considered ‘conflict-free’
Thursday 14 August 2014
==============
2017 vision of humanity
global peace index violence cost the economy 14.3trillion, 93 countries were more peaceful and 68 countries became less peaceful.
http://visionofhumanity.org/#/page/indexes/global-peace-index

===
bring greed to justice
The scheme used two companies registered in the British Virgin Islands and set up by Mossack Fonseca, the Panamanian law firm at the centre of the Panama Papers leak.

It has has taken 10 years to bring group to justice, including a 10 month trial costing the tax payer tens of millions of pounds.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/11/old-etonian-son-judge-jailed-five-years-role-100m-celebrity/

https://www.michaelwest.com.au/paradise-papers-media-ignores-real-tax-culprits/

#88 Pete on 11.10.17 at 9:01 pm

#6 unpopular…

how ignorant and cowardly!

My father (and company of heroes) served in wwII so that we could keep our freedom. Unfortunately, that freedom is wasted on some.

Never forget!

#89 Smoking Man on 11.10.17 at 9:02 pm

For Vietnam vets. Enjoy.

https://youtu.be/xvaEJzoaYZk

That had to be the worced war ever. Snakes, swamps and mamma son.

#90 IHCTD9 on 11.10.17 at 9:13 pm

#6 Unpopular opinion on 11.10.17 at 5:31 pm
Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. Defending your (home)country is one thing, flying overseas is another..
————-

Right. Human beings being slaughtered by the MILLIONS, but don’t go help them because they’re overseas.

You are a colossal ####### idiot.

#91 For those about to flop... on 11.10.17 at 9:15 pm

Recent Sale Report.

This one seemingly sold only in the last few days.

4743 Collingwood St.Vancouver.

Ask 2.45

Sold 2.38

Tax assessment 2.81

Dunbar area still has some fight in it yet…

M43BC

#92 conan on 11.10.17 at 9:16 pm

Lest we forget….the madness of war.

Will not be long before sneak attacks are accomplished using only drones. Japan leading the way is my best guess.
https://youtu.be/NbNv7njA-Aw?t=12

#93 Keith on 11.10.17 at 9:18 pm

Break out a handkerchief for this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNF28p6wkOs

#94 Lost...but not leased on 11.10.17 at 9:21 pm

Increasingly …I can see now why Garth is often torn playing the censor..aka “DELETED”

..its not so much a function of censorship, but avoiding compromising situations and turf wars amongst posters.

Our political masters love nothing more than have us pit one side versus the other…but REGARDLESS…once we realize this..the truth cannot be suppressed.

#95 Contrarian Coyote on 11.10.17 at 9:24 pm

#58 stage1dave on 11.10.17 at 7:33 pm
Hmmm…I always get a bit melancholy around this time of year. Maybe it’s just this damned toothache…

Mind you, writing this out below a framed pic of my grandad’s regiment taken on May16 1916 before they shipped out may have something to do with it. Bunch of kids, fer chrisakes…half of ’em lied about their age (including grandad, because his father and brother were already in France) to get in and 80% of the guys in this pic never came back.

Strangely, Grandad and 4 of his compatriots from Goderich all came home (in his case, after being wounded twice and gassed) after making it thru Arras, Paeschandale, Vimy Ridge, and God knows what else!

=====

My great-grandfather was gassed at Paeschandale. I was lucky enough to meet him briefly before he passed on. He was on oxygen tanks in his last years. His son, my dad’s dad was a Hasty-P and PPCLI in WW2 and drove a tank in Italy and other parts of Europe.

Sadly, he passed on as well in the mid 80s, but I was lucky enough to spend many of my younger years with him at his small farm. He’s the one I think about the most on November 11th.

Maternal grandfather was part of the liberation of Netherlands. Great guy who was lucky enough to back it with only an elbow injury from a stray German bullet. He ended up working his way up in management for the Trent-Severn Waterway. Wished he hadn’t passed away when I was so young as I never really got to know him.

#96 Smoking Man on 11.10.17 at 9:25 pm

For the ww2 vets if any still around.

You know this one. Its been a year since I said good by to dad but he loved this one. Millenials not so much

https://youtu.be/lXQ03XUwe_s

#97 Rick on 11.10.17 at 9:25 pm

Posting here is easy. How many will attend tomorrow’s ceremony?

#98 Gentle ,Loving Kindness on 11.10.17 at 9:26 pm

My wife and I visited Omaha Beach last year. We were told the survival rate for the first wave of soldiers was less than 5%. Their job was to get to a pill box and put a grenade in it. After about an hour, the incoming soldiers could not touch the sand for the bodies, but on they came. We also visited Belgium and saw the bunker where Dr. J McCrae (a Guelph lad), wrote “In Flanders Fields “during WW1. Canada punched above her weight during both WW1 and WW2. We stand on the shoulders of the greatest generation.

#99 VICTORIA TEA PARTY on 11.10.17 at 9:26 pm

I WAS PRIVILEGED TO HAVE MET THREE CANADIAN VC WINNERS

Given where my life has taken me low these past many years a very high-point was having the incredible opportunity to shake hands with three VC winners in Vancouver decades ago.

— George Pearkes (WW1): He received the VC because of his actions at the Battle of Passchendaele, in Belgium in late 1917.

At that time he was a 29-year-old acting-major who led a small number of his men through the battlefield muck to face down German opposition and hold his ground.

The citation says: “…he showed…a surpreme contempt of danger and wonderful powers of control and leading…”

–Ernest “Smokey” Smith in October 1944 (WW2) of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada Regiment: Private Smith, 30, fought off two 40-ton German Panther tanks, using PIAT anti-tank guns and also killed a number of German infantry soldiers while he and a few comrades were trying to establish a bridgehead over the River Savio during a rain storm in northern Italy.

In this fight he was also able to rescue a wounded fellow soldier.

The citation says: “…by…outstanding devotion to duty and superb gallantry…his comrades were so inspired that the bridgehead was held firm…”

Lieutenant-Colonel Cec Merritt, 33 years old: CO of the South Saskathewan Regiment at Dieppe, August 1942 (WW2).

During the battle (both he and his battalion were a part of a very much larger beach-landing operation involving thousands of Canadian, British and American soldiers/commandos) Colonel Merritt urged his men on to help him to capture a bridge from the Germans.

Later back on the beach he oversaw withdrawal of wounded soldiers aboard a disembarking vessel to England.

He stayed behind to fight a rear-guard action thus protecting that retreat. Twice wounded that day he was captured by the Germans and spent the rest of the war in captivity.

His lengthy citiation reads in part: “…To this commanding officer’s personal daring the success of his unit’s operations and the safe re-embarkation of a large portion of it were chiefly due.”

When the war was over Merritt served in federal politics, while Smith and his wife ran a travel agency on the west coast.

Pearkes’ stellar post-WW1 career eventually took him into federal politics, promotion to the rank of Major-General and in the 1960s he served as Lieutenant-Governor of BC for more than eight years.

These men each lived into their 90s.

They have left us now as have all Canadian VC winners from those two world wars.

We will never forget them and all the other Canadians who have served.

For those soldiers now serving Canada, we wish them well. Return home safely.

Lest We Forget.

#100 Freebird on 11.10.17 at 9:26 pm

Thank you to my late Blue Noser grandpa (ambulance core) and late father-in-law for their service. My late French Cdn gran and mom-in-law did their part on this side. All came back to raise families and live too short lives. And thank you to all the military and family who support them here and abroad.

I dont support war but I will always support the soldier.

#101 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 9:30 pm

Time to move on, people.
Heroism implies free will.
Canadian, Australian an New Zealand sheeps were sent to slaughter by the British Overlords.
No choice.
Remember this when you put the plastic poppy on your lapel.
And study history.

#102 Smoking Man on 11.10.17 at 9:33 pm

And to the loyal wife who reluctantly comes along for epic road trips. She’s a bit afraid.

Babe. You don’t need hair dye or diet pills. No matter what you look like to your eyes in the mirtor this is all I see when I see you. I fell in love with you when you were 17 and I was 19.

Poor kids today . They ate never going feel that. Lesbonic spiteful education. Lots of me out there. But not enough I’m thinking.

To the wife. Its what I see.

https://youtu.be/1l0xpkk0yaQ

#103 Lady Jane on 11.10.17 at 9:36 pm

Sobering post. Thank you.

#104 For those about to flop... on 11.10.17 at 9:45 pm

Recent Sale Report.

Another fresh one.

3755 w 13th ave ,Vancouver.

Asking 3.98 then 3.68 then 3.58 then3.38

Sold for 3.16

Tax assessment 3.78

Crap house ,nice view.

A developer might have just bought this house to bulldoze, build new and try and get 7/8 million out of it…

M43BC

#105 RWZero on 11.10.17 at 9:53 pm

“Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. ”

It would be good if someone broke into your house one day with a weapon, and the police responded: “Sorry man, defending your own home is one thing; defending someone else’s, that’s another.”

#106 DON on 11.10.17 at 9:57 pm

Classy post Garth.

To all those who serve and protect our freedoms I salute you.

These men and women faced many unknowns and certain death to protect us. Remember their sacrifices and understand what they gave us.

#107 DON on 11.10.17 at 10:12 pm

My grandfather lost three brothers in WW2 – he never spoke of killing wasn’t proper. I miss that generation.

Yes they were drafted – but they believed they were saving the world and they did.

Ponzi – while I get it – still POOR FORM

#108 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 10:15 pm

So he was a Canadian who flew a plane in the Korean War.
For the glory of Mc. Arthur.
70 years after we still have no peace in Korea.
What have we learned?

#109 DON on 11.10.17 at 10:15 pm

Flopper…

Will you be using pink Santa Claus or pink Christmas Tree instead of pink snow this year? Thanks for the post buddy!

#110 Dave on 11.10.17 at 10:16 pm

Thank you Garth for your touching post

#111 MF on 11.10.17 at 10:21 pm

#99 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 9:30 pm

Disagree. The British commonwealth, along with the Russians, saved Europe from a despicable evil. I will wear that plastic poppy not only to remind myself of that FACT, but to remind everyone else as well.

MF

#112 BK on 11.10.17 at 10:23 pm

So what your saying is millennials dont care? I happen to be one and know of so many more who take remembrance day and vets seriously. I can think of another group of people that would be on their iphones and not care. Your last weeks worth of blogs are making me sick. Canadians who work and live here arent entitled to homeownership? But offshore investors and new wealthy immigrants who may not stay are…. Dont tax people with empty housing tax…Absolutely tax them to death. They are mostly offshore investors or canadians who have multiple properties because of luck and windfall gains. Most of those people make half of what I do and ive been priced out of a one bed condo built in the 90’s in poco. The rental market in van is horrible. You have no idea. For the ones that own multiple properties for a place to chill downtown for three nights (small%) collateral damage. Suck it up you can afford it. Figure out something like the rest of us poor bas [email protected]&/ds.

You stand in sad contrast to the stories of selfless service that have graced this blog tonight. – Garth

#113 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 10:24 pm

#105 DON on 11.10.17 at 10:12 pm
My grandfather lost three brothers in WW2 – he never spoke of killing wasn’t proper. I miss that generation.

Yes they were drafted – but they believed they were saving the world and they did.

Ponzi – while I get it – still POOR FORM
———–
My mother, an Austrian married a German.
And lost her husband and 5 brothers in WW2.
In War, there are only losers.
So, please stop glorifying it.

#114 45north on 11.10.17 at 10:35 pm

Victoria Tea Party:

George Pearkes (WW1): He received the VC because of his actions at the Battle of Passchendaele, in Belgium in late 1917.

Ernest “Smokey” Smith in October 1944 (WW2) of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada Regiment: Private Smith, 30, fought off two 40-ton German Panther tanks, using PIAT anti-tank guns and also killed a number of German infantry soldiers while he and a few comrades were trying to establish a bridgehead over the River Savio during a rain storm in northern Italy.

Lieutenant-Colonel Cec Merritt, 33 years old: CO of the South Saskathewan Regiment at Dieppe, August 1942 (WW2).

In both the First and Second World Wars, Germany was the aggressor and its defeat has made the world a better place. I’m now reading Margaret MacMillian’s “The War that Ended Peace”. I find it amazing how Germany’s rulers prior to the First World War, failed to consider the best interests of the ordinary German citizen. I found it ironic they did not understand that Germany was in the strongest position in Europe and that another five years of peace it would have been the master in Europe. P337: “Hugo Stinnes was right when he said before the Great War that in a few years Germany would be the economic master of Europe.”

#115 MF on 11.10.17 at 10:38 pm

Some awesome stories from blog dogs about family members tonight. Thank you.

#96 Gentle ,Loving Kindness on 11.10.17 at 9:26 pm

” Canada punched above her weight during both WW1 and WW2. We stand on the shoulders of the greatest generation.”

You bet we did. We also entered ww1 in 1914 and ww2 in 1939. Right from the beginning, unlike our neighbour down south.

MF

#116 VanMan on 11.10.17 at 10:42 pm

Garth, millenial here, long time reader. I think this is my second time leaving a comment. This post touched me, we TRULY need to take a moment and thank all who have, and continue to, put their lives on the line protecting this country. Thank you

#117 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 10:45 pm

By nightfall on 12 April 1917, the Canadian Corps was in firm control of the ridge. The corps suffered 10,602 casualties: 3,598 killed and 7,004 wounded.
————
Vimy Ridge was all but 8 km wide.
1 meter for every casualty.
The horror.

#118 dr. talc on 11.10.17 at 10:51 pm

#90 conan on 11.10.17 at 9:16 pm
Lest we forget….the madness of war.

Will not be long before sneak attacks are accomplished using only drones. Japan leading the way is my best guess.
https://youtu.be/NbNv7njA-Aw?t=12

—–
the official pearl harbor story is for children
the ‘conspiracy’ version ie fdr had ‘prior knowledge’ is for children
the truth is -those docked ships were empty

#119 OttawaMike on 11.10.17 at 11:00 pm

Best post ever today, Turner.

Ì wear the poppy for all the fallen Canadian soldiers but also for my great grandmother who died in her bed in a Bavarian town that was night raided by English Lancasters dropping fire bombs. Also for my great uncle Otto who couldn’t take the stress of facing another onslaught against the Russians and chose to pull a grenade pin and fall on top of the grenade instead.

The repercussions of my war scarred parents were even felt by me through my childhood in the 1960’s.

#120 Blacksheep on 11.10.17 at 11:02 pm

“All had more time for their iPhones than a human anachronism with a box of poppies. War? A distant, discredited idea in a world more concerned with gender equality, Harvey Weinstein, carbon emissions and new emojis.”
————————————–
Research the book, “The fourth turning” it explains it all.

The real danger, is not forgetting the sacrifices made by past gens, (unfortunate pawns) it’s ignoring the damaging and very real horrors of war and discounting the risk of a new entanglement.

Almost every night on the idiot box, I see some new drama, glorifying war and the military, as heroes.

These poor brainwashed parties that serve (sacrifice?) unnecessarily, only to support corporate driven ventures, end up dead, crippled, or psychologically damaged (who wouldn’t) not to mention the toll on the local citizenry that likely runs at a 100 to 1 in death count.

What the F are all these unfortunate souls (US solders) doing in the 700 plus, foreign global bases? Bring them ALL home and put them to work fixing the crumbling infrastructure of North America.

Ron Paul had it right 10 years ago, what a shame we were to ignorant (too early?) to recognize the insights of this gentle man for the betterment of our global society.

All due respect to those that served, but getting played by the system, to repeat the foolery of the past simply has to stop.

Resist.

Do not consent to being a cog in the gears of the machine….

#121 Long-Time Lurker on 11.10.17 at 11:05 pm

In Flanders Fields

by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

#122 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 11:05 pm

DELETED

#123 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 11:18 pm

DELETED

#124 conan on 11.10.17 at 11:22 pm

#116 dr. talc on 11.10.17 at 10:51 pm

I heard that all of the aircraft carriers were conveniently away. So some truth to what you say.

#125 Lost...but not leased on 11.10.17 at 11:25 pm

” ALL WARS ARE BANKERS WARS”..

Tonites’ homework is connect the dots below (OR simply do a GOOGLE search).

–Napoleon,
–Duke of Wellington,
–Battle of WaterLoo,
–“Red Shield”

Regardless of one’s allegiance…..WAR is THE most profitable endeavour known to man,which is why it will never be abolished.(aka bad for busine$$)

#126 BK on 11.10.17 at 11:30 pm

I stand in contrast to selfless blah blah. I will prob be one of very few on this blog supporting our vets in full uniform all day tomorrow. Dont give me that…. all I said was I didnt agree with a lot of things you said and today post took a knock at millennials not caring about our vets. You should appologize for that.

#127 US visitor on 11.10.17 at 11:42 pm

The poppy is the best tradition Canada has.

Quote from my mother-in-law, a Russian DP (displaced person – no country of citizenship). Married to a Pole- who served and survived in the Polish army.

Travelling in the US right now – can pick the Canadians out by the poppies!

#128 Manitoba Whale on 11.10.17 at 11:49 pm

Thanks for the post.

As a child of immigrant parents, who endured the terrors of occupation and eventual liberation, I thank the men (and women) who were involved over the years.

While visiting war graves in Holland of soldiers who hailed from our Canadian city, my 17 year old daughter found the grave of a soldier of her own age. That hit home for all of us.

‘Highway of Heroes’ by the Trews gets me choked up every time I hear it. Definitely worth listening to.

#129 NEVER GIVE UP on 11.10.17 at 11:51 pm

My Uncle Walter was Shot down over Munich on his 12 sortie near the end of WW2.

I rescued a sheaf of 30 letters from him during the war from my Grandparents belongings when no one else was interested. I am now compiling them into digital as reading the handwriting is like reading a foreign language.

The Province of Saskatchewan Honors the war dead like no other province.
Everyone who dies in War service has a Lake or a peninsula or an island named after them.

My Family didn’t know this until we were contacted by a war historian named Doug Chisholm .
He informed us that not only was there a lake named after my Uncle but they were 3 very large lakes in a trio that were named. This is a great honor to him and something that our family takes pride in now.

Sadly I did not ever meet my Uncle as he died 11 years before I was born.
I have memorabilia on our picture wall along with a great picture of him and a picture of the Lakes named after him.

Those were different times.

#130 Nonplused on 11.10.17 at 11:58 pm

#65 help?

“we’d be done if we didn’t get America’s help. Good grief”

Umm, I think that’s what I said. Or meant at least.

#131 I think about these people often. on 11.10.17 at 11:59 pm

My Dads, Grandad, Uncles, Father in Law all served in combat roles Army, Air Force or Navy. Not sure how old you who wish to disrespect these men are; so will cut you some slack, but your unpopular opinion is easy for you to state. Look at it this way, if our parents, grandparents, great grandparents hadn’t marched, flown or floated into battle across this planet chances are pretty good you and I wouldn’t be here. Those who survived might be dealing with a completely different and unpleasant reality. Pick up a book, read and learn. No one I know who went (most are now gone) thought it was glorious, they didn’t talk about it because it was so utterly awful. They sure didnt want us or you having to do a repeat. If they were not wounded physically they all had terrible memories of knowing full well they had killed people. They looked at it as a duty as something they were doing for the future. They might be disappointed how it is now but they did what they did for the right reasons. Think about this Saturday wont you I am a senior now and too old to care to argue with people who think they know everything. Do what you can to bring people together not divide them.

#132 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.11.17 at 12:05 am

Xin Lai (awake)
China poised to overtake the US.
Cover of the latest Der Spiegel.

#133 Millennial on 11.11.17 at 12:05 am

You could respect our veterans without taking potshots at Millennials. Some do come to this blog for valuable insight. Some do respect the sacrifices our veterans have made. I’m all for poking fun at our generation, you dish out plenty to the boomers too, but this honestly seems to be poor taste, even for you Garth. I guess that just makes me a safe space millennial.

#134 John in Mtl on 11.11.17 at 12:10 am

Thank you Garth, for devoting your post today to all those brave (mostly) young men and women who fought and died so that we can live peaceful lives, free of conflict. I for one am grateful that I never had to get involved in one; however I would never hesitate to defend our country despite my advancing age.

To all veterans, all over the world, THANK YOU!

Band of Brothers – Requiem for a Soldier

You never lived to see
What you gave to me
One shining dream of hope and love
Life and liberty

With a host of brave unknown soldiers
For your company, you will live forever
Here in our memory

In fields of sacrifice
Heroes paid the price
Young men who died for old men’s wars
Gone to paradise

We are all one great band of brothers
And one day you’ll see we can live together
When all the world is free

I wish you’d lived to see
All you gave to me
Your shining dream of hope and love
Life and liberty

We are all one great band of brothers
And one day you’ll see – we can live together
When all the world is free

#135 Casual Observer on 11.11.17 at 12:23 am

#30
Wishing for you that you might someday find a 4 legged friend who pierces your heart with the love that so many of us count ourselves lucky to have had. The image today appears to me to be an exceptional & emotional display of both affection & remembrance.

You could only be so lucky ! I hope someday you will be.

#136 Viorelli on 11.11.17 at 1:03 am

My grandpa, who was a tank driver for the red army, didn’t even want to fight, the Rabbi told him: ” you run and save your family if you can, or you smile and look into the enemy’s eyes when they kill you. Don’t take the sin of killing another human being, be it enemy or friend! Let them take that sin, they will not be able to travel the stars when they die, but you will.” Grandad didn’t listen, as if he didn’t fight, the Soviets would shoot him anyway, and send the whole family to Siberia as traitors. Now this is his real story. That’s probably why many Jews went to the gas chamber without fighting. My Ukrainian side of the family were real fighters, just like their kossak ancestors. We don’t know the right from wrong in many cases.

#137 VICTORIA TEA PARTY on 11.11.17 at 1:07 am

#112 45north

GERMANY “DESTINED” TO LOSE BOTH WORLD WARS

A book entitled “History of the German General Staff” tells the story of the Prussian-inspired military apparatus from its beginnings in 1657 to its”death” in 1945.

The general staff’s job was to win wars for Germany and its predecessor kingdoms before the 1850s.

Dealing with their work-ups to both world wars, the book details nervousness about committing Germany to such “adventures” because more planning was needed.

But events in the summer of 1914 forced Germany into war and the rest is history. The generals lost control.

Similarly, in the 1930s the generals were also worried. Some wanted to wait until the 1940s beforwe attacking its neighbours.

But Hitler had his agenda and the Soviet Union was his big target.

The generals failed to persuade Hitler to back off and the second world war broke out in September 1939.

The invasion of the Soviet Union began in June 1941 but after making huge progress until the autumn, the Germans began to be hobbled by Russian resistance and the winter.

By January 1943, and losing the Battle of Stalingrad the prospect of defeat loomed larger for Germany, never mind whatever that country’s military was doing elsewhere.

The general staff was loyal and deployed its troops over the centuries. It won and lost various conflicts. These victories were supposed to benefit the populace. That worked out for the folks sometimes but not in the 20th century.

It was all over for the German General Staff in 1945, and Germany, as the Soviets swept into Berlin in April of that year and the rest of the Allies poured in from the west.

And millions of innocents died in the process. All that planning for nothing.

I must read MacMillan’s book!

#138 Pretentious hipster bicycles on 11.11.17 at 1:18 am

Dear BK,
You sound like you belong in north korea or some other dictatorship hell hole that our vets fought against, not Canada.

#139 Catherine on 11.11.17 at 1:22 am

I went to Arras, to Vimy, to Beaumont-Hamel. It’s beautiful country. Follow the highway and every corner you turn has a new graveyard with 500, 800, 1500 graves. The scale of death on that peaceful landscape where there is very little but empty fields, is incredible. They must have asked themselves every day “what are we fighting for?”. We remember them, the lives cut short, and reflect on their families undoubted anguish; and we harbour the (futile?) hope it doesn’t happen again.
Thank you for this post, Garth.

#140 The Awakend One on 11.11.17 at 1:41 am

Thanks Garth, for remembering those who have served: they often hold only one stock – and they risk it all…
so we can own many ETFs…

Escaped from the commie-held tropical Nam, migrated to the balls-freezing Shilo in Winterpeg… to here, 18 years of service and still going strong… from plain olive to cadpat… from ILTIS to crew-cabs to G-wagons…

Militi Succurrimus
Anonymous, C.D.

#141 People are Strange on 11.11.17 at 1:50 am

We are so lucky we can sit and whine about real estate or market fluctuations. Our grandparents lost their lives or witnessed their friends die for our country and the freedoms we have. That is why we have to protect it. That is why we can’t let others just take our land with piles of money. We have to make it possible for our kids to be able to share in the Canadian dream of having a small piece of this land. Let’s stop being suckers!

#142 Leo Trollstoy on 11.11.17 at 2:25 am

JT2 is following in Donald Trump’s footsteps.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-10/tpp-talks-stall-after-justin-trudeau-canada-fails-to-show-up/9140250?pfmredir=sm

He’s learning. Good boi

#143 Spock on 11.11.17 at 4:07 am

Well put GT and in such simple words.

—————————-

#6 Unpopular opinion: not sure how you can look at yourself in the mirror each day and still be able to sleep. What a classless coward.

#6 Unpopular opinion
“Guy went to a foreign country to murder people. Not cool. Defending your (home)country is one thing, flying overseas is another.”

#144 Confused on 11.11.17 at 4:09 am

Agree with the sentiment re: remembering to remember, but don’t understand the reference to gender equality, as if we can have one but not the other… Millennials are believe it or not capable of multitasking and pursuing 1, 2 or many social goals.

#145 Honey Dripper on 11.11.17 at 5:25 am

Lest We Forget!

Compared to that veteran my 18 years of peacetime service pales to his.

#146 Trudi on 11.11.17 at 6:08 am

very classy post Garth…I do so respect people who can pause and reflect on how we became to be the great country we are (warts and all). Thanks.

#147 Take a moment.... on 11.11.17 at 6:29 am

Lest We forget

#148 Victor V on 11.11.17 at 6:35 am

Thank you to those who served and fought for the freedoms we enjoy today. I will always remember.

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2015/11/05/six-rules-of-poppy-protocol-for-remembrance-day.html

#149 NoName on 11.11.17 at 8:18 am

@33nonolaused

I don’t believe Russia is any threat to Canada, nor do I think they mean to threaten us, but let’s say for some reason they came over the arctic in their masses and tried to take over Canada.
___

Noone have come over, Facebook ads and twitter twits should be enough to overtake us here in Canada. Gov. and media did excellent job of drumming us down…

Anecdotal thing from book it takes a tribe by that british dude, can’t remember name, perfectly shows state of today’s society.

He was running triathlon and his wetsuit zipper was stuck, at the point he was well behind so he couldn’t win, as enyone around him, he asked for help from people who were in transition as he was and no one would spare few seconds to help him…

#150 Millennial Realist on 11.11.17 at 8:37 am

War? A distant, discredited idea in a world more concerned with gender equality, Harvey Weinstein, carbon emissions and new emojis.

—————————————————————-

Disappointing that this blog would equate gender equality with Harvey Weinstein in the same sentence as equally negative and trivial.

Did you serve in our forces, Garth?

My family has. One of the motivators has been, precisely, creating a better world where men and women are equal.

Please edit that sentence.

Thank you.

I served in the Reserves. Sentence stands. – Garth

#151 Manitoba Whale on 11.11.17 at 8:54 am

Stuart McLean of ‘Vinyl Cafe’ fame read the following short letter several years ago on his show. It puts things in perspective, no matter which side of any conflict war you or your family were fought for or lived through.

https://www.vinylcafe.com/storyarchive/2016/11/22/charlie

#152 Manitoba Whale on 11.11.17 at 8:58 am

Excerpt from the Trews ‘Highway of Heroes’

I served with distinction
No visions of glory
I served without question
Or personal gain
Seek no justification
It’s not part of my story
And it offers no comfort to the ones who remain

Carry me home down The Highway of Heroes
People above with their flags flying low
Carry me softly, down The Highway of Heroes
True Patriot Love
There was never more

#153 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.11.17 at 9:02 am

@#110 BK
Your incessant whining about jobs, foriegn ownership and unaffordable housing on the eve of Rememberance Day is a confirmation of all that is wrong with our materialist society.
Good job.

#154 acdel on 11.11.17 at 9:04 am

A Poem Worth Sharing

He was getting old and paunchy
And his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the Legion,
Telling stories of the past.

Of a war that he once fought in
And the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his buddies;
They were heroes, every one.

And ‘tho sometimes to his neighbours
His tales became a joke,
All his buddies listened quietly
For they knew where of he spoke.

But we’ll hear his tales no longer,
For ol’ Joe has passed away,
And the world’s a little poorer
For a Veteran died today.

He won’t be mourned by many,
Just his children and his wife.
For he lived an ordinary,
Very quiet sort of life.

He held a job and raised a family,
Going quietly on his way;
And the world won’t note his passing,
‘Tho a Veteran died today.

When politicians leave this earth,
Their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing,
And proclaim that they were great.

Papers tell of their life stories
From the time that they were young,
But the passing of a Veteran
Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

Is the greatest contribution
To the welfare of our land,
Some jerk who breaks his promise
And cons his fellow man?

Or the ordinary fellow
Who in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his country
And offers up his life?

The politician’s stipend
And the style in which he lives,
Are often disproportionate,
To the service that he gives.

While the ordinary Veteran,
Who offered up his all,
Is paid off with a medal
And perhaps a pension, small.

It is not the politicians
With their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom
That our country now enjoys.

Should you find yourself in danger,
With your enemies at hand,
Would you really want some cop-out,
With his ever-waffling stand?

Or would you want a Veteran
His home, his country, his kin,
Just a common Veteran,
Who would fight until the end.

He was just a common Veteran,
And his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us
We may need his likes again.

For when countries are in conflict,
We find the Veteran’s part,
Is to clean up all the troubles
That the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honor
While he’s here to hear the praise,
Then at least let’s give him homage
At the ending of his days.

Perhaps just a simple headline
In the paper that might say:
“OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,
A VETERAN DIED TODAY.”

#155 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.11.17 at 9:26 am

@#97 Vic Tea party
“Ernest “Smokey” Smith in October 1944 (WW2) of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada Regiment: Private Smith”
+++++

Good old Smokey.
Met him at a gala in his honor in Richmond a year or so before his death.
( it was a non smoking room and someone handed him a huge cigar on the way to the front of the room which he immediately fired up on stage to the amusement of the crowd and the horror of the politicians to his left and right)
Great guy.
Two things shocked me.
How small he was. Seemed to stand about 5ft 6in.
and several of his platoon mates were there. They were tiny men as well.
And
How tiny and plain the VC medal is.
Nothing ostentatious about it. A small bronze medallion with a tiny purple ribbon.
After everything was over the crowd quickly left ( the high ranking officers and politicians in govt limos natch)and a few of us stayed with him and his daughter for a few drinks. He seemed pretty content. Told us a few stories about getting in trouble with superior ranks for insubordinantion, drinking, fighting, etc.
When he left with his family it was in a mini van cab….not a limo.
He passed away about a year later and the State funeral in downtown Vancouver was immense.
A Gun carriage to to bring him to the church, Honor Guard, RCMP honor guard, Jet fly past, the works…. and of course what would a funeral procession in Vancouver be without heckling protesters……they’re nothing if not childishly predictable.
The crowd, to their benefit ignored them, and the police quietly hauled the ignoramuses away.

#156 Ace Goodheart on 11.11.17 at 9:34 am

RE: #106 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.10.17 at 10:15 pm
“So he was a Canadian who flew a plane in the Korean War.
For the glory of Mc. Arthur.
70 years after we still have no peace in Korea.
What have we learned?”

Korea is a very peaceful place. I have lived there. It is not a war zone and has not been one since 1950.

The problem is not lack of Peace in Korea. The problem is under developed, entitled little boys making their pointless “mine is bigger than yours” conflicts into global catastrophes. Trump on one side and funny hair Kim on the other. Two people who are not fit to lead a boyscout expedition to the local fishing pond. So immature that they are not even functional people.

As long as the world is governed by little rich boys who never grew up, we will not have any peace.

#157 Evangline on 11.11.17 at 9:53 am

Mark Knoffler

Brother in Arms

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23KHLW2dw_o

#158 Evangline on 11.11.17 at 9:53 am

**Brothers**

#159 Dissident on 11.11.17 at 9:59 am

Lest we forget indeed.

We still live in a world where ego-obsessed, toxic masculine leaders so much as sneeze at each other, and there is talk of war. (Actually, all it takes is a keystroke and 140 characters). Y’all know who I’m talking about.

Not sure why there was the need to stick it to the Millennials by diminishing the importance of other social and environmental issues (that affect everyone). Seems unnecessary. You can keep the ‘new emojis’ though. I don’t care where they put the cheese on the burger.

Was watching a documentary called “Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade” and its mind boggling how intertwined the global governments are with the military industrial complex (Lockheed Martin anyone?), with, of course, the US being the largest exporter of arms, followed by Britain (Thanks Tony Blair). War is a business. Instead of taking a ship over to a neighboring land and colonizing it after a bloody takeover war, Columbus-style, governments now just sell their arms to ‘opposition armies’ who do their dirty work for them, and hence “War in Syria, in Iran, in Iraq..etc etc”. Bush invaded Iraq on “bad intelligence” and Obama launched drone strikes from the safety of his office. They basically outsource their colonization and then get paid for it too. Ordinary citizens, like the old soldier, are mere pawns in this government-corporate game of Stratego. They give “the ultimate sacrifice”. Its the people who never served and have no idea of war realities that romanticize and wax nostalgic over something that was anything but romantic. Let us not forget the other, less grand wars that are still being waged around the globe (for power and profit), and the subsequent victims of those wars.

People get to fuss about gender equality and other burning social issues when they have life and liberty. For that we have veterans to thank. First things first. That should have been obvious to even a SJW like you. — Garth

#160 Ace Goodheart on 11.11.17 at 10:08 am

Nothing is going to happen with regard to the North Korean – U.S. ongoing “war of words” conflict. Here’s why: China controls North Korea. The Kim family are Chinese lap dogs. That is the reality in that area of the world and it has been that way for a long time. The Chinese view Trump’s weird lopsided manner of engaging with funny hair Kim as more of an annoyance than anything else. It requires them to put out fires constantly and it is irritating them. They don’t want a US – North Korean war and likely would not tolerate that occurring.

Will the USA invade North Korea? Not likely. Why? Well, they’d have to borrow the money from China to do it:

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/11/11/in-china-trump-becomes-the-capitulator-in-chief-burman.html

#161 Raging Ranter on 11.11.17 at 10:15 am

Ponzias Pilates, I study history precisely so I don’t end up spewing nonsense like yours.

#162 Your Possible Pasts on 11.11.17 at 10:20 am

They flutter behind you your possible pasts
Some bright-eyed and crazy some frightened and lost
A warning to anyone still in command
Of their possible future to take care
In derelict sidings the poppies entwine
With cattle trucks lying in wait for the next time
(Roger Waters)

#163 Ace Goodheart on 11.11.17 at 10:36 am

RE: “People get to fuss about gender equality and other burning social issues when they have life and liberty. For that we have veterans to thank. First things first. That should have been obvious to even a SJW like you. — Garth”

The interesting thing about gender equality is that it is not like other equalities. One will find when examining very well developed and socially aware societies, that equalities follow on development and civilization. The more enlightened and civilized a society, the more equalities one generally finds.

Gender equality is the one anomalous result in that experiment. It is a funny one. At the point of social collapse, when there is no functioning society at all, that is the point at which genders are most equal. It’s a weird funny thing. The more civilized a place, the less likely it is that you would find gender equality.

That is what worries me about what is happening right now. Particularly in the USA. If you get complete social breakdown in the USA, then due to that country being basically an armed camp, with everyone having a gun, you end up with a very large bloodbath. The USA, for reasons unknown, is currently lurching towards full gender equality, in a very bumpy and unplanned way.

For some reason, everyone is suddenly becoming aware that the whole fascination with the endless ridiculous promotion of the heterosexual male sex drive, at the exclusion of everything else, has been an utter disaster and has harmed millions of people (including the males).

That situation is usually one of the “canary in the coal mine” early indicators of impending social collapse.

The genders are most equal when there is no society at all. Social organisation tends to promote inequality, gender based stereotypes and gender roles, which become more cemented and pronounced, the more organised the society becomes.

Anarchy for some reason breeds equality (however temporary) between the genders. It’s an odd world.

#164 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.11.17 at 10:42 am

DELETED

#165 Ponzius Pilatus on 11.11.17 at 10:45 am

DELETED

#166 Millennial Realist on 11.11.17 at 10:53 am

People get to fuss about gender equality and other burning social issues when they have life and liberty. For that we have veterans to thank. First things first. That should have been obvious to even a SJW like you. — Garth
—————————————————————–

Wow. You have really exposed yourself Garth, for which I guess we should be thankful.

You’ve just stated that (currently Boomer) patriarchy is primary, all other rights and opportunities flow from that.

Women, minorities, millennials….stay in your place and bow your heads.

Truly paleo of you.

Such are not the values that my family fought for.

Lest we forget.

#167 Dissident on 11.11.17 at 10:59 am

#161 Ace Goodheart on 11.11.17 at 10:36 am

Interesting point of view, Ace. Its generally true – in a moment of anarchy, everyone is equal. Organization does tend to produce inequity.

In WWII, gender equality was actually advanced because women were asked to step up and fill the gaps in labor left open by the men who were overseas serving in the war. It was a crisis situation. That’s where you get the Rosie the Riveter “We Can Do It” poster. War was actually a chance for women to prove that they can do a man’s job, literally. Women made the bombs and bullets, and the men delivered them overseas. While the patriarchy was absent, women helped run the show at home. But of course, once the men returned, most women returned to their roles as 50s housewives. But the advances had been made, and there was no turning back. There are many innovations that came from the great wars, social justice being one of them :) Those women played a part in securing life and liberty on the home front, as did veterans overseas, and to them, I am thankful.

#168 FredfromKitchener on 11.11.17 at 11:03 am

Wow, nice column.

#169 Jose on 11.11.17 at 11:08 am

USA is a very imperfect place, but it is the best place in the world. Way better than socialist Canuckistan.

#170 Loser on 11.11.17 at 11:09 am

Garth your a loser. No need to get in a generational dig on mellenials. I’m sure plenty of old boomers and gen x we’re also whizzing past him on their phones, but hating on mellenials is trendy I guess.

I saw what I saw. – Garth

#171 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 11.11.17 at 11:32 am

Tears came to my eyes as I read you blog today. It was so heartfelt and true. Tears come to my eyes when I think of my Dad sitting in a German POW camp for 2 years before he was liberated. Tears are not enough though.

#172 For those about to flop... on 11.11.17 at 11:40 am

It’s probably irrelevant now that the Bunfight has started ,but I was so tired last night i only just noticed now that I failed to put up the link to the article that I posted at # 77…

M43BC

One Map Shows the World’s Biggest Oil Exporters

Despite investment into alternative energies, oil is still the world’s most traded commodity. Want to know where it comes from? Here are the world’s oil exporters, ranked by revenue and global market share.

https://howmuch.net/articles/world-map-of-crude-oil-exports-2016

#173 FOUR FINGERS WATSON on 11.11.17 at 11:49 am

#127
The Province of Saskatchewan Honors the war dead like no other province.
Everyone who dies in War service has a Lake or a peninsula or an island named after them.
……………………….

Manitoba did the same. My uncle had a lake named after him.

#174 FOUR FINGERS WATSON on 11.11.17 at 11:58 am

I served in the Reserves. Sentence stands. – Garth
…………………….

Well done Garth. Thank you for your service.

#175 Gender equality ? on 11.11.17 at 12:10 pm

Dig a blog poster just remind us not to forget about gender equality ?

Are u also inferring gender identity ? You see in Ontario sexuality is not binary . Rather a spectrum

And no , I’m not kidding ….sorry . Welcome to progressive Canada

One last question .. would you like to be addressed as ‘he , him ‘ , ‘she , her ‘ or ‘it’

Kindly advise

#176 conan on 11.11.17 at 12:17 pm

#135 VICTORIA TEA PARTY on 11.11.17 at 1:07 am

I remember taking a WW2 history class in 4th year. At one point we learned about this particular theater. The Generals told Hitler “, do not divert from attacking Moscow. Do not turn around, and go for the southern oil fields.”

Turns out that Moscow was the railway hub for the entire nation. There is no Russian re supply to these southern oil fields if Moscow was taken.

Hitler was a murderous goof. We got lucky that he did not listen to his generals.

#177 akashic record on 11.11.17 at 12:38 pm

#164 Millennial Realist on 11.11.17 at 10:53 am

People get to fuss about gender equality and other burning social issues when they have life and liberty. For that we have veterans to thank. First things first. That should have been obvious to even a SJW like you. — Garth
—————————————————————–

Wow. You have really exposed yourself Garth, for which I guess we should be thankful.

You’ve just stated that (currently Boomer) patriarchy is primary, all other rights and opportunities flow from that.

Women, minorities, millennials….stay in your place and bow your heads.

Truly paleo of you.

Such are not the values that my family fought for.

Lest we forget.

The basic laws that make people equal are in place now in Canada and many other countries.

Passing a law is a change from one day to an other, but society is like a ship, it take takes a long time reach the course after the target was set.

Laws are for the society as a whole but individuals who need to do the transformation.

As long as an individual doesn’t break the laws, that provide equality for any other specific person, everybody is OK.

Whether that individual agrees or not, “loves” or not the other person. Love, respect is achieved, not legislated.

Making it into a race and championship that who gets “there” first or faster is not only not wise, but also not fair. People who spent most of their life under different circumstances, zeitgeist, need to walk much longer distance than their peers who are born into the new direction.

The only way to prove that you are “more awakened” than someone else is to show what good you do for those others.

#178 Cowtown Cowboy on 11.11.17 at 12:43 pm

War is not hell, Hell is war.

#179 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.11.17 at 1:10 pm

@#157 Dissident
“We still live in a world where ego-obsessed, toxic masculine leaders so much as sneeze at each other, and there is talk of war….
+++++

Like PM Margret Thatcher and the Falklands ‘War”? Margret Thatcher who was sinking in the polls and along came a jingoistic winnable “fight” that some cynics suggested possibly got her re-elected?
A masculine/feminine leader like that?

https://www.google.ca/url?url=https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/apr/09/margaret-thatcher-falklands-gamble&rct=j&frm=1&q=&esrc=s&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwjT94LTjrfXAhWrw1QKHT8CBHIQFgggMAM&usg=AOvVaw2TTPJQBDblPqTHbQDH5GcL

Or Prime Minister Indira Ghandi who created “The Emergency” on India’s population?
You know… Suspension of civil rights, mass arrests, forced vasectomies to entire towns….” Harmless things like that?

https://www.google.ca/url?url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Emergency_(India)&rct=j&frm=1&q=&esrc=s&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwi35KqcjbfXAhVhVWMKHc9gDBcQFggUMAA&usg=AOvVaw24P3muCmOMM4KMzLI6RTlC

Not to worry Dissident. Female leaders are just as capable of horrific misdeeds…..
Just give them a chance to show you what ever a man can do they can do “better”…….

#180 Lost...but not leased on 11.11.17 at 1:32 pm

Soldiers silence….

With some exceptions, Spielberg’s “Saving Private Ryan” was likely the most graphic depiction of war at the time.

Hollywood had somewhat sanitized war movies as “bang boom you’re dead fall down”.

I don’t blame soldiers for being silent, as I think that once training is over and they enter the actual battlefield, they begin to question the mission.

If they survive, they return home having been immersed in the culture they fought in and back to the culture of the home front.

They often realize at the core there was no basic difference between the two and what purpose was served?

#181 Dissident on 11.11.17 at 2:44 pm

#177 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.11.17 at 1:10 pm

*yawn* I thought you were better than a straw man argument. Wait. No. I didn’t. Oh yes, and your attempt at the “exception that proves the rule” argument. You know what a statistical outlier is, right?

Keep trying. Those straws are hard to grasp. :D

#182 tamara on 11.11.17 at 3:24 pm

Perfect post Garth.

Our family attends the Remembrance ceremony every year. I never want our children to forget the hero’s that have fought, or fight, for our country – or to give up hope that we can live in peace.

In the past few years, I have noticed a larger number of people, including young people, attending the service. I take this as a hopeful sign that they are not all apathetic.

#183 Steven Rowlandson on 11.11.17 at 4:24 pm

@64 Japan and Germany became what they are today because we defeated them.

Quite true! Those countries and their founding peoples are well on their way to extinction due to their defeat and post war policies. But then again those who defeated Japan and Germany have the same problem…. They just have a hard time believing it.

#184 crowdedelevatorfartz on 11.11.17 at 5:10 pm

@#179 Dissident

:D

*******

Well, since your mouth is wide open( as usual )
Perhaps I should stop grasping at straws and focus on that flapping tongue?

#185 We remember on 11.11.17 at 10:01 pm

Hey Ponzi #108
50 million in South Koreans are thankful we were
there!

#186 not so liquid in calgary on 11.11.17 at 10:24 pm

— excellent article showing how Canada constantly punches above her weight. Written by a former Brit, now Canadian himself:

http://mcplpaulfranklin.blogspot.ca/2010/12/tribute-to-canadian-soldiers.html

#187 M on 11.11.17 at 11:49 pm

Patriotism- the virtue of the vicious said Oscar Wilde.
To qualify the sense I am using it: any serving man deserves compassion and respect.
Including Koreans that fought heroically to defend their country that was under attack by a coalition of the willing. Remember Golf 1 ?
As a strategic move Canada was another lapdog in a poorly designed move (remember 1 billion , 6 fighters and Libya ?). Once a colony …always a colony. As a respect for serving men (and a few women) how about moving into protest every time a senseless war is begun ? That is RESPECT. Don have innocent human beings killed on the altar of false ideology. For the serving men (and a few women) everywhere are innocent human beings. Yes..including Koreans that died defending their country. So…what that war achieved ? not much,… gave chinese a beautiful occasion to kick the crap out of the anglo-saxon (mainly) coalition. Not much else. Came back home tail between the legs and with a good short term memory- Brits and Canadians didn’t get into vietnam. Korea and Vietnam are very similar stories up to a point. I hope nobody – by now- believes “the red menace”. Reds EVERYWHERE never amounted to more than a dead bloated cow.NOTHING worked in those countries.
Where is Vietnam now ? …and where is Korea ?
..oh yes… good ol’ Kim… must be an idiot NOT to have a bomb or two considering what US does all over the world.
Smarten up! Poppy is good..but for the different reasons most people wear it.

#188 Jon on 11.11.17 at 11:59 pm

Where is the bitcoin guy his mighty coin has plunged 22 percent in last 72 hours? Let me guess its a steal right now lol.

#189 Greg on 11.13.17 at 2:29 am

Garth I just wanted to say thank-you for this.And yeah. Millenials I fought for you earlier and I will continue to fight for you.

But now you need to fight for all of us. You need to take Canada to where it needs to be. I have faith in you. But it starts with humility. Don’t forget remembrance day.

Lest We Forget.

Lest. We. Forget.

Good night dogs and happy dreams.

#190 Antsville on 11.13.17 at 2:36 pm

#133 Millennial on 11.11.17 at 12:05 am

Stop whining. Read through this blog and you’ll see that it teaches many things including this: you can’t be ageist towards anyone – except, of course, millennials. So we are gonna go ahead and stereotype all you millennials as uncaring and self-centred. And if that means slipping in a jab in the midst of a post that honours all those who serve (maybe except millennial soldiers), so be it.