Failure to launch

SWIMMER modified

When I married Dorothy, shortly after electricity was invented, eight of ten twentysomethings were like me. They went to university and left home. Forever. By 1981 almost a third of people that age were still living with their parents. A decade later it was 32%. These days the number is almost half – over 45% of adult children are in the basement with Mom washing their skivvies. It’s a social phenom.

Why? Beats me, actually. Couldn’t wait to get out and bite the world.

But I’m told there are two main reasons. Economically, fewer kidults are capable of being self-sustaining as they spend longer at school, chalk up fat educational debts, then graduate with high expectations into an environment of crappy entry-level jobs and insane living expenses. Second, they have copter parents who’d rather cling than launch. Protective and cloistering, they think junior can’t possibly leave until he has a condo and enough resources to protect him from all the potential hurt out there.

But there are costs. For the Millennials, this breeds dependence while shielding them for all the valuable things you learn from suffering, penury, loss and failure. For the parents, it’s a true economic cost – up to a decade more of picking up the overhead for an adult child. CIBC just did a survey on this, announcing the results Wednesday. The kids ain’t cheap, it seems.

So, 66% of parents say they’re feeling the financial impact of supporting their adult children. Of those shouldering the burden, 47% report this is hampering their ability to save money for themselves while a fifth say it’s delaying their retirement. About a quarter state they spend at least $500 a month supporting their spawn by paying for rent, groceries or cell bills.

Meanwhile, if this blog’s any indication, a mess of these Millennials have morphed into left-leaning, bitter, Boomer-hating, entitled baby socialists who come here to praise Mulcair, Norway and higher taxes. So, perchance their parents erred by not booting them out on their pliant, soft derrieres?

Or is such a generalization beneath me?

Jennifer believes so. In fact she probably thinks I suck. She emailed me two days ago. I responded, and have agreed to publish the following letter. If I do not, she threatens to drag me behind a speeding Vespa through a Pride parade wearing a Metallica shirt. So here it is:

“Hey Garth: I think it’s about time you got an actual Millennial perspective.  It’s very fun and trendy to bash us, our spending habits, our work ethic, how weirdly intense we are about our dogs, but I don’t think the generation wars are getting us anywhere.

“Literally just days ago, you advised an Vancouver Millennial about whether she should buy or rent.  She cited that she would have to spend $2.5k a month just to get a decent place close to work.  I guess I don’t really know how you can look at that figure, compounded with falling wages and higher debt and believe it’s the renter’s fault that prices are so out of whack.

“I own my own consulting business now, but before that I worked in corporate learning and development for 8 years.  All but one of my jobs (which was later outsourced) was a permanent job.  I have been on contract, no benefits, no job security for almost all of that time.  My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience.  He started his first professional job on Friday after a year of part-time employment as a waiter.  He sent out around 10-20 resumes ever day during that time for professional jobs. This new contracting job will pay around $30k a year.  My father, by contrast, a Boomer poster child, worked for the same crown corp for 27 years, collected a $1M+ public sector pension, has a basement full of toys and 3 SUVs in the suburban driveway, and has the nerve to say “Every time I hear a Liberal talk I hear a hand going in my pocket.”  Yeah, Dad, you do, TO PAY YOU AND YOUR PENSION.

“Every generation has challenges, I acknowledge that. But you can’t say that Millennials have a chance to make the investment guidelines you recommend for FI when more than half of our paycheque has to go just to keep a roof over our heads.  And you must know that rent is not the only cost that has increased exponentially. It’s increasingly difficult to find permanent work that is worth doing.  Not sure when your last foray into the private sector was at the peon level, but it’s just a fact that not all jobs are worthwhile, even to the company that hires for them. Companies have gutted their development and mentorship programs and management has been left wanting for many decades.  This leads to inefficiency and layoffs.  This doesn’t even include older working generations who cannot keep up with essential technological advances in the workplace.  Again, training programs have been gutted and outsourced. Maybe they are interpreting our “frustration that our managers fundamentally don’t understand the systems our business runs on” for “entitlement and laziness”? Just a thought.

“So I would ask, please, for a little consideration with regards to how “selfish and entitled” Millennials are.  Keep in mind you literally outline financial independence guidelines which, if trends continue in the direction outlined above, will always be out of our reach.  Are we wrong for just wanting enough to meet those guidelines?  If so, why recommend them?   Are we wrong for wanting use the technology that has been promised to improve our lives?  If so, why was it developed? Are we wrong for wanting to work towards a better future? If so, why did older generations want the same thing for us?

“Pensions, employee development, even permanent and paying (remember the rise of the unpaid internship in my lifetime) jobs are vanishing and not coming back.  I’m not going to say absolutely everyone my age is a winner, but that’s also true of any generation isn’t it?  I would ask to keep things in perspective. And as for the reason why we don’t vote, consider this: there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way, take necessary steps to address income and wealth inequality in this country, ensure transparency in the media and bust the corporate monopolies which pervade most of the Canadian market.  Who speaks for us?  Not really anyone, so it’s difficult to see participation in elected democracy for anything other than what it is: gently nudging someone you don’t want out of office, rather than getting behind someone who really speaks for you.

“We have our problems, but it’s disingenuous to say that we’ve created all of them. It’s disingenuous to say we’re selfish for just wanting to do what you yourself recommend.  Many problems were inherited, but are now ours nonetheless.

“All the best, Jen.”

386 comments ↓

#1 Randy on 09.02.15 at 6:00 pm

A degree in Liberalism makes one unfit for work.

#2 bdy sktrn on 09.02.15 at 6:00 pm

http://www.vancouversun.com/business/affordability/metro+vancouver+home+sales+continue+soar+summer/11334954/story.html

sales reached up to 30 per cent above the 10-year sales average,

In August, there were 3,362 property sales, a 21.3 per cent increase over the same month the year previous. In July, the number was even higher at 3,978 sales.

Board president Darcy McLeod said buyers are motivated and competing for a smaller supply of homes for sale than is typical at this time of year.

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Metro Vancouver totalled 4,281 in August, up 8.7 per cent over August 2014.

The total number of properties listed for sale on the region’s MLS is 10,897, a 26.2 per cent decline compared to last August and a 5.3 per cent decline compared to July 2015, according to the board.

#3 crymeariver on 09.02.15 at 6:01 pm

Oh please…millennial pussy cat
U know what’s tuff..being an immigrant from a country that when u arrive u are hated and called all kinds of nasty names. Working 16 hours a day for peanuts and sharing rooms with multiple strangers u don’t care to know. So just shut up and pay the rent now and go to work.

#4 Randy on 09.02.15 at 6:03 pm

Jennifer is why Tigers eat their young.

#5 old gringo on 09.02.15 at 6:05 pm

And if you buy that “I have a bridge for sale in London.
Hogwash!

#6 calgaryPhantom on 09.02.15 at 6:10 pm

I kind of agree with Jen, on the changing nature of employment. Up until end of 20th century, most of the work was done by humans. Today, machines and robots have essentially changed the nature of workplace. Unfortunately, the workforce hasn’t caught up with the speed with which machines took over.
But ultimately, i believe, workforce will adapt and find a new equilibrium.
Making a living was and always will be tough. Before, it was hard physical labor, today it is hard mental labor. Gotta work your way up girl!

#7 North Burnaby on 09.02.15 at 6:13 pm

Since the Shanghai stock market has been volatile these past weeks, guess where are the Chinese investors hiding their money? You guessed it! The YVR luxury real estate of course! http://bc.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=678448

#8 Lilyflor on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm

What she said

#9 Nick on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm

You could say the chickens are coming home to roost in Canada, in more ways than one….and they like their new digs!

#10 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm

Jen the problem is in your head.. Like most lately schooled you cap your capabilities in a narrow band. Not your fault, curriculums and stupid teachers that followed them did this to you…

First off, climate change..total ridiculous insanity. Ive been on earth since our ship landed in 1957. Climate exactly the same..winters are cold summers are hot..
You see their is a great orange ball in the sky called the sun that influences climate. Not hard for someone with an education rather than schooling to figure it out. Understand the funding parameters for science to pitch this bull shit.

More to come Jen.

#11 stickman on 09.02.15 at 6:15 pm

“…there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way…”

Greens: http://www.greenparty.ca/en/solving-climate-crisis

“…take necessary steps to address income and wealth inequality in this country…”

Greens: http://www.greenparty.ca/en/fairer-tax-system

“…ensure transparency in the media and bust the corporate monopolies which pervade most of the Canadian market…”

Greens: http://www.greenparty.ca/en/democratic-reform & http://www.greenparty.ca/en/investing-small-business

Who speaks for us?

Greens! There’s even tax decreases & corporate tax exemptions in there for Garth for job creators…

#12 NOTHING SURPRISES on 09.02.15 at 6:15 pm

Jen lays out her case very well.

I’m from your generation Garth.

I saw an article on the boob tube telling Canada how many thousands of computer programming jobs (coding) are not being filled.

Perhaps we need to look at what is required and what the Millennial generation is being educated and trained for, and perhaps we could close some gaps.

#13 Fowler on 09.02.15 at 6:18 pm

Yeah garth Millennials aren’t all selfish and self entitled.

But coming from a privileged boomer like yourself it must seem that way.

#14 Joe2.0 on 09.02.15 at 6:18 pm

DOWn to settle into the 15k range with in a week and then into the 14’s.
Markets are broken and can’t function without stimulus.
The big money’s bailing.

#15 Mean Gene on 09.02.15 at 6:18 pm

Well if I had degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience, I would broaden my horizons by working internationally, not navel gazing in Canada.

As Garth mentioned in the past, renting provides mobility, take advantage of it.

If you can’t attaint the material like your parents, then chase after a worldly adventure instead.

#16 4 AM Sunrise on 09.02.15 at 6:18 pm

I know it is risky for me to ask one of the most divisive questions of the 20th century, but it is very important to clarify: Old Metallica or New Metallica?

#17 Don't Believe The Hype on 09.02.15 at 6:21 pm

Garth, two quick things:
1. Jennifer’s letter is probably the most eloquent letter I’ve ever seen posted here.
2. If Jennifer was running for office I’d vote for her in a heartbeat. Wow!

#18 JSS on 09.02.15 at 6:21 pm

Sorry Garth (and all the seven figure net worth boomers on this blog).

But Jen is correct.

#19 Sam on 09.02.15 at 6:21 pm

Hi there Garth. Thanks a million. That’s literal! – for keeping me from buying a house. Meanwhile, I sympathize with Jen, but disagree with her (and her fellows) from ducking the vote because no one speaks for them. Jen, please use your right to vote for the least best option! And consider (along with your fellow millenials) to start a new party which is working for the issues which YOU feel are important. I might even vote for you. Cheers!

#20 Michael on 09.02.15 at 6:23 pm

Excellent post! Jen hits the nail on the head.

#21 RAINCLOUDS on 09.02.15 at 6:24 pm

When mommy and daddy call little Johnny or jane’s boss because the fruit of their loins was dissed in a performance review.

When an entire generation decides to not participate in the election process guess who’s agenda is pushed to the backburner.

When People think living in Vancouver/TO is the holy grail as opposed to a locale with half the rent…….

Houston we have a problem

#22 CJBob on 09.02.15 at 6:26 pm

All real estate is local. I’d rather own 10 houses on the subway line in Toronto and in Vancouver than 1 in Calgary. Yes, of course prices can come down in these cities. But because they could doesn’t mean they will.

#23 Daniela on 09.02.15 at 6:27 pm

My parents arrived in the mid 70s with $500 in their pockets and knew no-one. I was born 9 months after they arrived…they arrived with Bachelors degrees so maybe they had it “good”, but they paid for their own english classes, had to figure out their own where to live, navigate the prejudice that existed at the time etc…I had a much easier starting my life after graduating for university in 1998 with a BCom, but I also stayed at home for university, worked 2 -3 jobs to pay for tuition and did graduate debt-free. What I learned from my folks….! work smart and hard….its all about choices ultimately.

#24 Catalyst on 09.02.15 at 6:29 pm

While I find it hard to read with all of the question marks after every sentence….I agree that the workforce has changed and made it hard to earn a living (especially single) due to technological efficiency. I might also add that women in the workforce is (historically speaking) relatively new and this doubling of the workforce has had a harsh effect on wage growth and availability of entry level jobs.

As is the season, my mind turns to the politicians. I don’t find anyone is willing to ‘take on’ the loosely-regulated R/E industry or take on the public sector largess. All parties seem to offer more of the same and aren’t willing to put forward new ideas for fear of alienating some potential sucker, i mean voter. We have basically past the point where any politician can take on the public sector madness because without some of their votes, you will never get elected (see Hudak).

#25 Jimmy on 09.02.15 at 6:30 pm

Failure to Launch is quite a funny movie that tackles this topic.

#26 Justin on 09.02.15 at 6:30 pm

That’s a great rant Jen, but why do you have live in Vancouver? There’s great jobs in other parts of the country. If you move north your husband could get $100k/year job in engineering. I just don’t understand the unwillingness of big city folk to move where the jobs are. What’s in Vancouver? Hockey riots?

#27 Licorice on 09.02.15 at 6:30 pm

Just wait until all the cars and trucks are automated.

You think the employment scene is bleak now, wait until all the drivers are made redundant. It will happen most of our life times.

And let’s be honest, your typical truck driver isn’t cut out to be retrained as a Google Software Engineer…

#28 Randy on 09.02.15 at 6:31 pm

No wonder she’s a disaster. She is too focused on Climate Change…I mean weather.!

However she is correct about the corrupt left-wing media.

#29 Greengirl on 09.02.15 at 6:31 pm

If every non-voter voted green we would have exactly what you say is missing.

#30 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:33 pm

Jen as promised.

Ive bucked rivits, delivered pizza, started a mfg company, taught myself to program, and design rc aircraft, door to door sales , worked for the biggest banks on tradefloors in the USA and Canada. Have 3 business at the moment.

All without graduating high school. Imagen that if you can, draw back shit writing writing skills, did not stop me from being the most popular hands diwn comment poster on this pathetic blog. . But im educated. Not schooled.

Now thats a book my family keeps telling me to write.

My kids,

Son 1) top sales men in a multi national corp. Well into six figures. High school only.

Son 2) a reformed drug addict, now helping others kick the habit, will soon open his own rehab center..$$$$
1 year trious collage course.. Needed the ticket.

Son3) living in my basement, picks me up from bars, playing video games and occasionally writing ios apps. Launching an lcbo app in the apple store next week. Not a billion dollar app, but that one is coming. Two years in humber collage learning marketing, 3 months at bitmaker labs learning Ios. His side business. Selling something to Disney, classified now.

See the difference when you can prove to em, we have no limitations, only the ones we put on ourshelves.

They’re millennial

#31 zedgt87 on 09.02.15 at 6:36 pm

Its quite funny when the most entitled generation ever hates on millennials.

That is what this blog is slowly descending into.

#32 Sixtyfourk on 09.02.15 at 6:39 pm

Here is the problem:

“It’s increasingly difficult to find permanent work that is worth doing”

Unless you are financially independent, work is something you have to do so that you can pay your bills and do what you want in your spare time.

Until you accept this simple fact, you are going to be disappointed.

Welcome to the real world.

(Yes, some people love their work, or convince themselves they love their work — they are the lucky ones.)

#33 Renter's Revenge! on 09.02.15 at 6:39 pm

“My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience.”

Then he should be building robot clones of himself to go out and work for you guys.

#34 PretentiousHipsterBicycles on 09.02.15 at 6:40 pm

Oh dear oh dear oh dear….

The opinions spouted by Jen are so typical of millennials. Brainwashed into thinking that climate change is something that humans can control, and obsessed with “wealth inequality” as if taxing those who have worked hard to be successful is going to solve their own problems.

She should focus on getting her head down and spend less time moaning about how unfair life is. As for her BF who earns $30k per year while having two degrees… a typical case of an overqualified, under experienced guy – virtually unhireable as they have very little in real world experience and expectations that are through the roof.

By the way, I was born in 1983 and unfortunately would be classed as a millennial. Embarrassed of my generation is an understatement…

#35 ShawnG in TO on 09.02.15 at 6:41 pm

Hmmm, so young people don’t vote because there isn’t a party that will take on climate change when they have a problem making ends meet? News flash Jen, a major tackle on climate change will make everything much more expensive. Just look at the Ontario power rates.

As for the other points, there is a party that will do that. Altho in small steps. Hint, it’s not orange.

#36 Scott on 09.02.15 at 6:41 pm

Meh.. almost fell asleep reading that. Suck it up. It’s a tough world out there, and not everyone is well equipped to deal with it.

#37 Goldie on 09.02.15 at 6:42 pm

I fear that today’s post is going to bring out the ugly side of many of your readers. I think I’ll skip the comment reading reading today. See ya tomorrow.

#38 james on 09.02.15 at 6:43 pm

#12

“I saw an article on the boob tube telling Canada how many thousands of computer programming jobs (coding) are not being filled.”

A bunch of fluff from industry, nothing more. Canada produces a surplus of students in those areas.

The same thing happened during the dot com crash. Industry whined about shortages, governments increased spaces in programs, etc etc. Trouble is, economists who examined the evidence found no shortage. It was a price issue, not a labour issue.

I interview plenty of Canadian software engineers and computer scientists, and they are not telling me of a robust sector up there. Nor is there any reliable data to argue for a skills shortage.

Jen, Mechanical Engineering and Neuroscience have been associated with poor career outcomes for ages (in both Canada and the USA). The latter particularly so. There’s little you can do with a Neuroscience undergrad or masters; even if you get a PhD you are facing heavy competition and 5+ years of postdoc work. The jobs go to those from top programs, so a smart PhD grad from SFU or Laval is in trouble. Same goes for biomedical engineering, stem cell research, etc. All really interesting fields, but the job market is brutal.

I do feel for millennials. Hundreds of thousands of TFWs, increasing levels of automation, outsourcing, a lack of venture capital to create new businesses, an economy built on cartelization of key industries, etc etc. Living costs are crazy right now in the major cities, as they are here in the more desirable cities in the USA.

On the downside, however, I have noticed a major shift in the younger generation courtesy of teaching. There’s something about curriculum changes in high school and undergraduate university education that is leaving students without the ability to engage in critical thinking, or to accept criticism. I can’t tell you how many of my law students complain that ‘no one has marked their paper that hard before’. I can only imagine the success they will have as lawyers, not being able to write decently or take criticism. In many ways they are incredibly pampered emotionally, which is a very bad feature in the context of the current economic climate.

#39 Retired Boomer - WI on 09.02.15 at 6:48 pm

Well, Jen has made a decent pitch for her generation. As a Boomer, I can’t say we had exactly the same issues, as we did not. Ours did rhyme though. Never was it “easy” to find a job, good or otherwise.
Sure, maybe you got into the RR, or a union trucking operation as a casual worker, and IF you were good enough – maybe – got to work full-time, but you started at the bottom of the seniority list. Last hired – first fired!!
It didn’t take long to see the effect of that during the recession of 73-74 when the market lost nearly 50% of its value. Then 81-82 again same crap! Then the de-industrialization of America during the Reagan-Bush years.
Jobs went overseas, you found another but, it probably paid less, or had fewer benefits.
Here comes Clinton, NAFTA, bank deregulation. It blew it’s butt off under Bush in 2008, but we have been taking mfg jobs out of here all my dam life! Yes, we do have Amazon ‘fulfillment warehouses’, where you work hard get $12an hour. Many of the unionized grocery stores are gone, replaced by Wally Marts (non-union $9 an hour), or “employee owned” things where you may, or may not earn a sustainable wage.
I worked under a union for about a decade. Never again, as it held back my earning potential, but that was my attitude and it worked true for me.
While earning my wages, I also saved, and invested. Let us not forget THAT part. I’ll never forget my putting 10% of my “wage” of $7.39 an hour away back in the 1980’s.
Wife thought I was f*kn nuts. It really wasn’t that big a deal, when you have nothing, even less is just as easy to live on.
Yeah, the generations change, the problems not quite so much, they are still relatively close. Rhyme if you like.

#40 saskatoon on 09.02.15 at 6:48 pm

she has been hollowed out–a psychologically emptied victim.

you can tell this by the easy conflation of “I” with “Us” and “We”.

try re-reading her letter, and substitute “I” and “me” for all the “we” and “us” pronouns.

what will be revealed by doing so?

she is incapable of taking responsibility for her own life and actions–and her frustration and anger is proxied through elimination of self-identity.

the conflation of ‘self’ and ‘we’ function to rationalize/justify her obvious rage–but this rage is really an expression of how she feels about herself.

her self-hatred ultimately expresses itself through the reviling of others who do not “relate” to her chosen “causes”, which she lists: climate change, wealth inequality, transparency in the media, and corporate monopolies.

consciously or not, she has chosen these “causes” carefully, for championing them fully and forever is impossible.

like the “war on drugs” or the “war on terror”.

they are never-ending.

consequently, her proxied hatred can and will continue unabated, without end.

this is the very essence of severe inferiority complex disorder.

without intervention, she will become the most dangerous type of person.

#41 pwn3d on 09.02.15 at 6:49 pm

What a pant load. Boo hoo your husbands first job was as a waiter and now making 30k. Guess what, work hard and you will be rewarded with promotions and other opportunities. I doubt he is crying so much, it sounds like you’re bitter more about him than you are boomers.

Btw I’m a gen X, notice you don’t hear us whine about boomers, we know that we’re taking over and there’s going to be plum opportunities as they age. People can either whine about their situation or use it as fuel to have better. Guess which ones end up successful?

#42 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 6:50 pm

Millennial Maladies

Jen makes some very good points…

Unpaid internships are a sort of legal flouting of minimum wage rates. Immoral in my opinion. Opportunistic of the employer at best. Blatantly exploitive in many cases.

Most wage rates for professionals (I mean the high-paying jobs) are not really set in any kind of free market but rather by tradition and by employees associations and by self interest. (If a government manager pays his subordinate more he can justify a raise for himself).

Labour mobility is low. Its hard to get a good job partly because its hard for the incumbents to lose a good job.

In MANY cases millennials are responsible for their own situation but not in MANY other cases.

An individual millennial can’t really change the system so the best they can do is scratch and claw for that first decent job and just keep moving forward.

P.S. I did my part by recently retiring from a government job at 55 when most people in my job were staying on until 65 and even longer. ‘course I did that for my own benefit but the thought of opening up the position for a younger person also helped tip the balance in favor of me going.

Most government jobs are to some degree over-paid or over-benefited. As long as that situation exists I would be in favor of basically kicking anyone over 65 out of a government job. Especially anyone making really good money. And I would more strongly encourage anyone eligible for a 70% pension to get out as soon as that happens.

Alberta, for example could put in an incentive package to shed all those workers that can comfortably retire. Even if replaced this would lower costs (pensions are separately funded and these people are at top of scale salaries). These people tend to stick around after retirement spending money so the impact of the layoffs on the economy is minimal.

#43 OXI in GREECE !! on 09.02.15 at 6:51 pm

#211 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 5:30 pm
Silly Comment of the Day

#209 Sheane Wallace on 09.02.15 at 4:48 pm said:
#206 Vanecdotal

If Steve was a capable economist he would be working in the private sector.

***************************************
Truly a silly comment. The perks and power of being Prime Minister FAR outweigh the value of money once one already is making a comfortable living.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Dumberest comment of the day from Shawn….

Pulling in 500k to a million bucks a year and the freedom to use and spend it when and where you like is FAR superior to having a bunch of bison riding mounties follow you around like a virus everywhere you go as you kiss ass all around the world……while at home you keep hiring govt workers – twice as many as Germany – with the worst and most inefficient govt in the G20.

#44 Keeping the Faith on 09.02.15 at 6:51 pm

Pullllleeeaaassse!!!!
Waaaahhhhh Jennifer!!!!!

To all millennials,
Shut up and get to work!

Signed,
On behalf of all Gen X’ers

#45 Deb on 09.02.15 at 6:51 pm

Where, oh where, is the federal cabinet’s answer to Greta Garbo? We are now in a recession, going through wild market volatility and growing global uncertainty, and I haven’t heard a peep from Joe Oliver.

After learning of yesterday’s bad news, it was appropriate and expected that the minister of finance provide an economic briefing, a statement, a nice hello, something, anything. Instead we get a game of hide-and-seek. All we are told is that Joe is out knocking on doors in his riding and that he’s just too busy to comment on anything right now. Sure.

Ever since eyebrows were raised over his comment about passing responsibility for the national debt onto Stephen Harper’s grandchildren, it’s been painfully obvious that Oliver was muzzled. But his silence about the current economic situation has gone from being mildly annoying to downright bizarre.

Of course, it is all about control. And it appears that the person at the controls has read Plato and Machiavelli.

#46 Timoftrees on 09.02.15 at 6:52 pm

I dont get it- a waiter?! If you want to take control, grow a set, start a business, and work 70 hours a week for a few year s just to make above minimum wage. Invest, invest, invest. The lessons I’ve learned

1. Boomers have the bucks. Boomers are your friends.
2. Pay your employees as much as you can. Tight labour market means FIRE any one that isnt great.
3. Shake hands with everyone. Be genuinely interested in them. People (clients) are more interesting than you’d think.
4. Work your butt off. Cushy government jobs, union jobs, the ‘big easy’ are gone and i say good riddance! Adversity builds character. Makes life worth living.
5. Complaining, frankly, won’t help.
6. Vote Conservative. In extremis you have a self sufficient, hardworking and innovative capitalist society where work ethic and ingenuity is rewarded. The socialists utopia, or NDP gone wild, is North Korea.

#47 Get OFF my lawn, millennials!! on 09.02.15 at 6:52 pm

And leave my damned Harper sign alone!!

I am entitled to my entitlements, and don’t you ever forget it!!

#48 mid20millenial on 09.02.15 at 6:53 pm

“My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. He started his first professional job on Friday after a year of part-time employment as a waiter.”

A man with a mechanical engineering degree and neuroscience shouldn’t have problems finding a job. Maybe he needs to work on his networking and interviewing skills? Most importantly – why does he have 2 degrees? Maybe you guys would be in better shape if he didn’t spend 4 years on a degree he wasn’t going to use.

“Literally just days ago, you advised an Vancouver Millennial about whether she should buy or rent. She cited that she would have to spend $2.5k a month just to get a decent place close to work. I guess I don’t really know how you can look at that figure, compounded with falling wages and higher debt and believe it’s the renter’s fault that prices are so out of whack.”

Maybe said person shouldn’t try to live in the downtown area of the most expensive city in North America. Just saying.

“I’m not going to say absolutely everyone my age is a winner, but that’s also true of any generation isn’t it?”

Sounds like you’re not one either, Jen.

#49 young & foolish on 09.02.15 at 6:59 pm

Well, the boomers need somewhere to spend all that windfall after all. They hit the jackpot after all … a long period of domestic growth. Can future generations expect the same?

#50 Brian Ripley on 09.02.15 at 7:01 pm

I have charts and data updated with August data now for:

Vancouver: http://www.chpc.biz/vancouver-housing.html

and Calgary: http://www.chpc.biz/calgary-housing.html

Yes… credulous buyers at the high end can still be drummed up in Vancouver to go short cash and long a wasting asset. These real estate gods are now within reach of getting another double in price since the 2008 top before this decade ends (June 2018).

Calgary… not so much.

#51 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.02.15 at 7:02 pm

Sorry Jen.
But as a “End of the Baby Boomer” ( born early 1960’s) I NEVER had it easy finding a job. Between the older boomers not leaving their jobs and the nasty recession through almost the entire decade of 1970-80. There were’nt a lot of opportunities to “beef up” that resume with full time jobs.
A lot of friends my age studied nursing, teaching, etc. and when they graduated…..no jobs. Everyone and his dog had studied the same courses. The odd one studied computer engineering( One friend is a multi millionaire living in Cali reaping the rewards of a lost childhood spent studying…the lucky , studious bastard).
But I digress. The early 80’s( with 19% interest rate mortgages) were a blast for house repossessions, bankruptcies, etc.
The economy and job market is a crap shoot.
Deal with it.
P.S. I have a co worker that is talking about declaring bankruptcy like its about as troublesome as ordering a “double double” at Tims. And in the next breath he wants to know why I’m “wasting my money on renting when I can afford to buy”.
My explanation,” I think the real estate market in Vancouver is going to implode very soon.” falls on deaf (and almost bankrupt) ears.

Dont worry about what “others” are doing. Pay your bills, Save money….it aint easy but it IS that simple.

#52 Vancouverbound on 09.02.15 at 7:03 pm

I am a boomer. I worked by the North Pole for 2 years and truly understand what minus 60 is. I sold water softeners door to door in winter slogging through the snow for about $800/month. What I am getting at is everyone has rough patches in employment.
The people that seem to have money are the trades people. Not enough of them. Our education gurus keep pushing university degrees whereas maybe trades is a better option. Education comes in many forms.

#53 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 7:04 pm

I want double credit then!

From just above:

Truly a silly comment. The perks and power of being Prime Minister FAR outweigh the value of money once one already is making a comfortable living.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Dumberest comment of the day from Shawn….

**********************************
Okay, but I think I deserve credit for both today and yesterday since I made my comment late yesterday and you repeated it today. (I use the GF clock where a new day starts whenever Garth posts his new editorial)

P.S.

You never been Prime Minister Have you Oxi? What is a million or ten compared to the power of running this huge country and literally walking with Kings and Quuens. Ask Joe Clark what he would have given to get back in. He said and I quote from memory but accurate " no one would forego the chance to be Prime Minister" This was when he was considering another run for conservative leadership circa year 2000.

I think I read here that Garth also took a run at the conservative leadership once circa 1988 maybe?

He probably backed down when told he could not be a blogger in future after Al Gore would invent the internet.

#54 Get OFF my lawn, millennials!! on 09.02.15 at 7:04 pm

Jen, if you just stopped your damned whining and complaining and invested some dough in being an entrepreneur instead of wasting it at Starbucks, you might actually ACCOMPLISH something!!

Like this Boomer hero!!

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/bc-man-says-he-has-worlds-longest-cucumber-and-pickle/article26172849/

See, it’s not hard at all!!

Get to work, Jen!!

#55 young & foolish on 09.02.15 at 7:06 pm

Getting a ringside seat to Gen-Xers vs. Millennials …. see what you’ve started Garth?

#56 Chaddywack on 09.02.15 at 7:07 pm

“left-leaning, bitter, Boomer-hating, entitled baby socialists who come here to praise Muclair, Norway and higher taxes.”

Couldn’t have described Vancouver better!

#57 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 7:07 pm

Selling Water Softeners to the Inuit?

I am a boomer. I worked by the North Pole for 2 years and truly understand what minus 60 is. I sold water softeners door to door in winter slogging through the snow for about $800/month

*************************************
Was it a stove? That would soften the kind of water you find at minus 60. Water softeners at the north pole, really?

Did Santa Claus buy one?

#58 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 7:08 pm

Great topic, garth your going to be up late tonight.

Im in a room with a thousands boomer losers right now, i figure about 1/3 of em will be dead within five years.
I might be in that group if i dont slow down..

I only have one speed….to the floor

Its birthday bash for charmin at Senica….

Im eve’s dropping on all the tables around me..

Book food.

#59 MSM-Free Zone on 09.02.15 at 7:08 pm

Unlike many of the freedom-luvin’, gun-totin’, government-hatin’, Sun News brainwashed right wing-nuts here who frequent this blog to make their case with a few monosyllabic insults directed towards anyone who disagrees with their don’t-tell-me-what-to-do ideology, Jen comes across as a very observant, above-average, intelligent woman capable of thinking for herself.

Seems like I’ve seen this movie before. I believe was called the ‘sixties’.

Cue the insults.

#60 april on 09.02.15 at 7:10 pm

Edith #212 from yesterday’s post. Ross Kay is the source not HoweStreet.

#61 Mark on 09.02.15 at 7:10 pm

“Alberta, for example could put in an incentive package to shed all those workers that can comfortably retire. “

Why should already over-paid civil servants be paid more to actually leave the jobs early? Is it not a huge injustice to be handing cheques, sometimes for many hundreds of thousands, to a set of already wealthy senior civil servants? Money that has to be removed from the compensation packages of their replacements?

I think the system that government has constructed for itself, whereby people who have been employed with them the longest get paid the most, is fundamentally flawed. And that’s what needs to be addressed by policy makers. Otherwise, government will continue to increase in cost, and decrease in overall competence and effectiveness. Experience isn’t always an asset, and government employment practices dramatically over-value experience rather than true responsibility.

#62 PretentiousHipsterBicycles on 09.02.15 at 7:12 pm

#10 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm
Jen the problem is in your head.. Like most lately schooled you cap your capabilities in a narrow band. Not your fault, curriculums and stupid teachers that followed them did this to you…

First off, climate change..total ridiculous insanity. Ive been on earth since our ship landed in 1957. Climate exactly the same..winters are cold summers are hot..
You see their is a great orange ball in the sky called the sun that influences climate. Not hard for someone with an education rather than schooling to figure it out. Understand the funding parameters for science to pitch this bull shit.
=========================

Well said that smoking man!

#63 Joe2.0 on 09.02.15 at 7:15 pm

Lots of job opportunities in Asia teaching English.

#64 So on 09.02.15 at 7:17 pm

So, what is wrong with a “”Ride The Lightning” t-shirt?

Time for the youth to start their own party. Youth of Canada, you have nothing to loose but your chains (from your parents’ basement)!

#65 We all expect more... on 09.02.15 at 7:20 pm

I am a relatively late Generation X (late 30s) who can empathize with Jen to a certain degree.

I do believe that there has been a structural shift away from permanent positions with the global economy. Traditional economic sectors have been decimated (e.g. manufacturing) and local workers displaced with outsourcing in numerous fields and insourcing of foreign workers. Throw in a misallocation and capital and talent to the one sector that has had any growth – real estate and associated services – and you have some real challenges.

I completed my schooling early at the top of my class and graduated into a recession. I was unemployed after graduate studies for 6 months as I applied for any and all jobs (janitor, secretary, factory worker). I took contract work with low pay in sectors where I could learn something, lived overseas when no local jobs were to be had, and created my own consulting business on the side to make extra money.

I clawed my way up into senior management with a six figure salary, benefits and pension.

All generations that come out of post secondary education have expected a high paying job – they always have, and they always will, as the system promotes meritocracy and has a fundamental need to justify higher learning and its associated high costs.

But like Garth, I too just assumed that I would be independent and out the door upon high school graduation. I had a loving and supportive family, but the desire to make my own way was just too strong. There is no feeling like making it on your own.

I went to school 3000 miles away from home, worked overseas when the BC economy could not employ me, and strived to make something of myself.

Independence makes you ‘hungry’ – when you have to rely on yourself and your own pay cheque to make ends meet you soon try to think outside of the box.

The fact is too many millenials do not want to defer gratification. That is the key phrase – deferral of gratification. Why rent a dumpy east Vancouver apartment and feast on KD while taking the bus when you can live at home with your parents, where you have access to a nice house, cars, laundry, groceries and meals. To me, the latter represents a total abdication of personal responsibility.

A couple of points to consider when graduating:

* mobility is key – go where the jobs are, even if that means overseas to get the experience you need

* there is more to life than getting into the market at 25 – travel, move around, develop new networks of friends, take up hobbies because once saddled with a house, those become future goals

* be independent, as life is too short to say that you spent 1/3 or 1/2 of your life living with, and dependent upon, your parents

* return the favour to your parents – they went without to support you as a child so give them an opportunity to enjoy themselves without the financial burden of an adult child

#66 Marco on 09.02.15 at 7:20 pm

Millennial here. Life is hard now, life was hard then, life will always be hard. When I hear people complain I thrive and gorge the opportunities. The opportunities today are ridiculously plentiful. Competition is hilarious. Keep up the good work.

#67 crowdedelevatorfartz on 09.02.15 at 7:25 pm

@#37 james
Your concluding statement.
“In many ways they are incredibly pampered emotionally, which is a very bad feature in the context of the current economic climate.”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hits the nail on the head.
We are raising a nation of pampered “you can do no wrong” or “Good JOB” children that never hear a harsh word.
From the earliest school “sporting” events where “everyone wins!” to telling a child “good job!” every time they do the simplest of tasks.
We are raising a generation of kids that cant handle constructive critisism.
Will this doom Canada to become a navel gazing nation of “why me” whiners trying to compete with a global economy?
Possibly our only salvation willl be China.
The one child(preferrably male) policy in China has created an entire generation dubbed “little emperors’ by older Chinese citizens.
Spoiled by parents and grandparents, feted, lazy, obnoxious brats that eventually need help finding wives because they’ve spent their lives being catered to….
There is hope millenials, just dont sit around hoping, waiting and complaining for its arrival. Who knows, maybe being the wife of a Little Emperor will finally get you that house in Shaunessy……….

#68 Millmech on 09.02.15 at 7:27 pm

Poor Jennifer&hubby,
This is the main problem with millennialist getting degree after degree with no idea or job prospects for them.I can’t believable a man with two degrees is waiting tables.
If I was your husband what I would do is take the 4th class power engineering program by correspondence at a cost of $1500,once he has completed the course and past all the exams being that he has an engineering degree they will accept that as firing time and now he can apply and get a job for between $23-$38 /hr.And if he was really smart he would put his name on the list for the millwright pre apprenticeship program.This is a six month program and with his engineering and fourth class ticket he would be granted two years into the trade.So after six months of self schooling and six months of schooling and only having to serve two years of a four year apprenticeship your husband should be making a six figure salary and with the engineering degree he would be a prime candidate for any maintenance engineering or management job.
It’s not that hard don’t whine and put your nose to the grindstone for a few years.

#69 Grooby on 09.02.15 at 7:27 pm

Good points Jen, though the ‘not voting’ part is a bit silly. Surely in this election especially there are platforms that are better for addressing the issues outlined than others. There will never be a political party that checks every box.
So millenials, GTFO and vote.

Also, ignore the bitter angry comments. It’ll come from a bad mix of entitled misogynists.

#70 gut check on 09.02.15 at 7:29 pm

Jen,

I’m Gen X. I have had this conversation with boomers a zillion times and every now and then you’ll find one who admits that things are VERY different now and that Millenials have challenges that are daunting and unique. Most of the time though they get shockingly defensive.

In short: it’s no use trying. Just forget about them, forget about convincing anyone – EVER – that you have a tough road. I know it’s frustrating but I mean who are these people anyway? f#ck’em.

My advice? Just adjust. This is life now – no secure jobs, escalating expenses, lower standard of living, garbage food, poisoned environments. I’m sorry to say it, but that is where we are in Canada at the moment. All of that precious education you and your husband have is probably for naught. Don’t take it too hard, you’ve got lots of company. My degree was pretty much useless too and that was 15 years ago. The job market has been crap for a LONG time.

Instead of mourning what should have been and instead of wasting any more time being angry and frustrated by all the empty promises that ‘if you go to school and work hard you will succeed’ just adjust. :)

Self employment, visionary planning, multiple income streams, mobility… these are the future. Tech, trends, flexibilty.

You can do it – you’ve got chutzpah.
bury the past and move forward knowing that this is a tremendously tumultous time, full of opportunity for those people that are young enough, fast enough and creative enough to build the future.

Is that you? Might as well be, don’t you think?

#71 young & foolish on 09.02.15 at 7:31 pm

“Markets are broken and can’t function without stimulus.”

Hahaha … but what about “Real Growth on Main Street” … the kind that provides opportunity for Jen and her squeeze?

#72 Bytor the Snow Dog on 09.02.15 at 7:32 pm

Jen, uh, wow. Yes many of the problems you say exist are true, yet you and ball-less hubby choose to live in the most expensive city in Canada.

Principles are good Jen, but sometimes good ole fashioned pragmatism needs to take over.

#73 Bytor the Snow Dog on 09.02.15 at 7:34 pm

Oh, and Jen, if I was your father and found out that you disrespected what I did to pave your pampered way thru life I would disown you.

#74 Paul from London on 09.02.15 at 7:39 pm

Jen would like to bust the corporations, redistribute wealth, and income….in short, a very good communist. It’s sad that people like Jen who are not resourceful turn outward and blame others that have been resourceful their entire lives. It’s easy to just believe it is okay to take from others. Being a victim means you don’t have to be resourceful.

#75 mishuko on 09.02.15 at 7:39 pm

Haven’t posted in awhile but Jen is well… highlighting the epitome of my generation (such is the shame I must carry).

The moment you realize that your standard of living is going to be lower than your parents is the moment you will be able to move forward. Who cares what they have, focus on building YOU.

I’ve been fortunate in the sense I’m making above the median wage at the age of green age of 27. When my dad was my age he just came to Canada and was working as an intern earning 17k.

I don’t know what you’re complaining about though. I started as a ‘messenger’ on a contract with a degree in some liberal arts program and now I’m sitting in mid-office with full benefits.

Try working a little bit, put on a fake smile, fake a personality, pretend to be social and climb the ladder if you’re so hell bent on a permanent job and corporate pension. Oh and just bite your tongue a bit. It’ll help to just shut up and listen… no matter how wrong they are.

Oh did I mention work? Work the system, work your job, work the people, and as smoking man would say… work the herd.

Come on Jen you’re better than that. Don’t let me lump you with the rest of our self-entitled neo-liberal pieces that would promote LGTB’s but don’t even bat an eye at the fact WOMEN on average are paid less than a male doing the exact same job.

#76 NOT a Millenial on 09.02.15 at 7:40 pm

Jen is correct. Boomers got it EASY with overpaid/underfunded pensions. They paid peanuts on what is now million $ company retirement plans. Situation is most definitely harder today but that doesn’t mean you can’t make it.

Got to keep debt LOW, that’s for sure…..

#77 genxer on 09.02.15 at 7:44 pm

I agree with Jen in some ways the boomers had things easy with good jobs (with only high school diplomas) and cheap houses, yada, yada. I suppose the generation that preceded them had to deal with MUCH more crap – great depression, Nazi Germany, Communism – and they prevailed!

Seriously, your plight is similar to mine 20 years ago, so here’s some thoughts…

Go abroad for a few years, live cheap and SAVE! Asia is dying for English teachers and they offer cheap (or free) housing. Work hard for a few years and bank it (actually invest it). Then when you return, take the financial war chest and don’t settle in TO or Van – but choose something cheaper. It takes a bit of work, but it’s worth it.

Not to attack you, but if you go to the coffee shops, you can see the millenials sipping lattes and texting on their phones. Ditch the phones and save hundreds every year. Drink coffee at home (or not at all). Live like immigrants for a few years and even with a crappy, low-paying job, you will accumulate wealth over time.

#78 Mark on 09.02.15 at 7:45 pm

“Well, the boomers need somewhere to spend all that windfall after all. They hit the jackpot after all … a long period of domestic growth. Can future generations expect the same?”

The “windfall” is slowly dissipating as RE prices continue to fall across Canada. And future generations will have their proverbial day in the sun, albeit probably with other asset classes. Boomers are simply far too invested in RE and bonds for any fate other than a massive and persistent devaluation in RE to occur in the economy. Demographics do not support boomers having a wealthy retirement, especially at the expense of the relatively diminished stock of younger people.

Younger folks who align themselves with the boomers, by buying housing for top dollar, are aligning themselves with the same, perhaps worse financial fate than the boomers. The US circa 2006-present is an excellent example of what’s in the pipeline for the under-40-year-old crowd who took the plunge into leveraged home ownership.

#79 OffShoreObserver on 09.02.15 at 7:45 pm

More support for Garth’s thesis of a US Interest rate rise: http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2015/08/economist-explains-21?fsrc=permar|image3

#80 Mister Obvious on 09.02.15 at 7:46 pm

Jennifer,

Run, don’t walk to your local library and check out Jacob Sliverman’s book:

“Terms of Service: Social Media and the Price of Constant Connection.”

Read it from cover to cover. If nothing else it will make perfectly clear why the traditional career trajectories have now dissolved.

It may not be too late for you to avoid a life of micro-employment as a digital serf for a tiny handful of platform oligarchs (i.e. your Twitter, Facebook, Google & app makers etc.).

Learn technical hardware skills that are always in demand: Refrigeration and aircraft maintenance, real-time robotic servo control and telecommunication systems installation.

You are even better off as a building maintenance technician. BTW, that’s not a janitor. It’s someone who fully understands the complex systems of modern commercial buildings and can service the Programmable Logic Controllers that run them.

When all the ‘redundant/useless app’ writers have been let go from failed startups you’ll still be needed when the buildings they once worked in are re-purposed for more useful things.

Then learn something about finance. You don’t need an MBA. Take advantage of the world of information sources available to you (this blog being one) and figure out how money makes money. Then start small and begin making that money. Be very patient. You’ve got a long life ahead of you (whereas, if it makes you feel any better, I don’t).

Finally, get down on you knees and pray to the deity of your choice for the exquisite good fortune to be born Canadian. Take a look the poor souls trying to make it to Europe from hopeless war torn countries in the south. There but for the grace of random events go we.

#81 Lead Paint on 09.02.15 at 7:46 pm

#37 Goldie on 09.02.15 at 6:42 pmI fear that today’s post is going to bring out the ugly side of many of your readers. I think I’ll skip the comment reading reading today.
You’re wrong. Go to hell.

#82 Edward on 09.02.15 at 7:49 pm

I thought you might like this Garth. Donald Trump would have been better off financially if he had just invested his inherited money in an index fund in 1974. He made nothing, he inherited it all.

http://www.vox.com/2015/9/2/9248963/donald-trump-index-fund

#83 down and out on 09.02.15 at 7:53 pm

Jen it is all just stuff,live a dollar less than you make ,you have something boomers can never buy ,youth.

#84 Mr. Monday Night on 09.02.15 at 7:58 pm

Points on both sides here, but always an interesting discussion when GT pits the poor Millennials with the new ‘Greatest Generation Ever’.

I see many folks scolding Jen like they have all of the answers, and the problem is over-simplified with one solution: work harder or move to where the better jobs are.

I have well-educated Millennial siblings that are much younger than I and have witnessed first-hand this East Coast Gen-X’er move away from home and subsequently start over in five separate cities, and they have in turn very much embraced the concept of family and its importance, so they have struggled through several temporary contract jobs in order to stay close to home at all costs. I am not touting one strategy over another as I would not trade my experiences with theirs by any means. However, the answer for the younger set does not always have to begin and/or end with ‘work harder’ or ‘move away’. I can see how hard they’re working, and despite this I am afraid for them as I’m seeing more and more boomers retire with the positions retiring with them.

Also with the lack of jobs, people are delaying having babies and more and more couples are only having one. Immigration will not solve this issue unless immigrants are going to bring jobs and money with them.

p.s. I immediately validated Jen’s Millennial status by the use of ‘literally’, but how does one get to be a consultant in their early 30’s? Is 8 years of experience all that’s required?

#85 Harbour on 09.02.15 at 7:59 pm

I had my drivers license and bought my first car at 17 years old…. moved out of mom and dads basement at 21ish if I remember, pushing 60 now.

Millennials now could care less about a drivers license or owing a car. It’a different mindset, if they do leave the basement it’s to live downtown and share a cement box with friends.

#86 Vanecdotal on 09.02.15 at 8:08 pm

Uh oh, another ivorytoweritis-inducing polarizing post.

Jen echoes the (general) experience of myself & the majority of my peers also. (Gen X), now 2 generations behind the boomers.

#38 james

Agree. I’ve experienced both “kind” of Gen Y in my prev. line of work. My typical hires were the hungry, bolted from home after high school, made their way in the world-types. Some with minimal post-secondary, some self-taught, some with extensive post secondary. As long as they were qualified to do the (skilled technical) work, they got a starting rung on the career (not job) ladder and a fully-paid form of mentorship as a bonus.

OTOH, sometimes I’d inherit other people’s hires, and my dawg, can spot a “helicopter millenial” a mile away. High maintenance, nearly useless regardless of education level. Often inexperienced, lacking in basic business acumen. Prone to tantrums/breakdowns on the job(!) Almost always they were a “favour” hire. This often increased my own workload, just to compensate for their poor performance/attitude. They’re out there, the “entitled” ones.

Point is, Jen isn’t one of “them”. What she’s referring to is the new normal and has been for the last 2 decades. These sweeping generalizations apply to EVERY generation, btw.

I diversified out of that career 2 years ago, at huge financial risk, and into my own business paid primarily in $US. I finally saw the writing on the wall, but it took a while. This is the root of the angst in the younger generations, (adjusting for the entitled ones).

Jen: you MUST vote. Educate yourself and others on the importance of this. Educate yourself objectively on the issues. Be wary of groupthink in general, and know the bias of the person presenting info. Use critical thinking. If you want change, VOTE for it. Eventually candidates will present themselves, that actually reflect your perspective. Eventually they will get elected and form policy that reflects the needs of younger generations.

Guess who the largest cohort of voters is statistically? http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2010-19-e.htm

By a WIDE margin… not gen X or Y. Hint: It’s the Boomers… and the REALLY olduns’.

FB/Instagram/Tweet THAT… and effect some positive change.

#87 Rapier Wit on 09.02.15 at 8:10 pm

In some ways, I have to agree. My daughter has a PhD I. Biochemistry and is doing a post doc in a large Eastern research powerhouse. We’ve been looking in all the right places and – not a single academic position in Canada – even to apply for a job. It is a curiosity given the emphasis in training HQP by the Canadian granting agencies. I suspect many other “industries” are the same. Seems we are just playing at this 1st world economy thing.

#88 David W2 on 09.02.15 at 8:12 pm

She is right. There are too many people willing to sell out millennials or who have already! Who benefits from inflated house prices? Those who bought decades ago! Who will pay for those homes until they die and lose their shirts in the process? Milenials.

Jobs are hard to find, those that hire aren’t willing to train and if you so much as sneeze, you’re fired and replaced by a contractor or foreign worker. Boomers aren’t retiring cuz they don’t know what to do with themselves in retirement therefore openings for young ppl to move up aren’t being created!!!

#89 Mr.Hulot on 09.02.15 at 8:12 pm

Jen, way to put Garth in his place. Its about time he reconsidered his boomer bias

#90 Victor V on 09.02.15 at 8:13 pm

http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/09/02/consumers-drive-recovery-but-for-how-long.html

“Record levels of residential mortgage debt and consumer loans do make households, particularly those with high total debt service ratios and increased exposure to variable rates, sensitive to higher-than-expected costs should economic conditions deteriorate further and the labour market takes a sharp turn, or if rates eventually rise more sharply than anticipated,” Cooper wrote.

In 1990, Canadians were carrying $27.2 billion in interest and $1.6 billion in principal in mortgage payments. By the end of 2014, that had grown to $40.4 billion in interest and $31 billion in principal, Statistics Canada said.

On the non-mortgage side, such as auto loans and household lines of credit, Canadians were carrying $20.7 billion in interest and $5 billion in principal in payments. By the end of 2014, they were carrying $38 billion in interest and $59 billion in principal payments.

Monitoring household debt levels has becoming increasingly important since the financial crisis of 2008-09 when high U.S. debt loads, combined with the collapse of U.S. house prices, sparked a global recession, the Statistics Canada said.

#91 Retired Boomer - WI on 09.02.15 at 8:14 pm

Jen,

On politics… (poly = many, tics = bloodsucking parasite).

Pay no higher taxes than what you are required to pay. Get help from a PRO to set up and use TFSA, and RRSP to your advantage now -while you are still young (and know it all) – sorry, couldn’t help it.

You get ONE VOTE per person (except in Chicago where even the Dead vote)… sorry, again.

No political party has it perfect, some get closer to our individual marks than others… it’s called a ‘compromise’ and despite what you might have heard, it is NOT a dirty word! Yes, there are times when taxation seems unfair, then vote to make it LESS UNFAIR. There will always be the poor among us, there will always be the wealthy. Some have earned it, others may have inherited it, and never did a good days work in their lives! Deal with this, it is the universe here, there, and everywhere.

There is really no FREE LUNCH. If you wish to ‘live well’
it does not take much money, but does take some prioritization. Separate wants from needs. You earn enough to satisfy those ‘needs’.

Good luck to ya my young one. You should do OK, just watch what is really going on around you, and plan for your future now, they will change much anyway – trust me on that.

#92 parksville Senior on 09.02.15 at 8:21 pm

Garth, your website has a lot of wisdom, but your age is showing and you have ended up with an audience of angry old white guys’ that are “mad as hell and aren’t going to take it anymore” even if they can’t remember what they are mad about and why they voted for the dumbass harper govt.

We don’t have tp have an economy in recession-all it would have taken was a govt that ha heard of the great depression and Keynes (ever wonder why the US economy is going so great—IT IS BECAUSE OBAMA ISN”T HEADING A GOVT THAT BELIEVES R.B. BENNETT KNEW EVERYTHING.

Harper an Economist–biggest lie there ever was-and if Flaherty and the rest of the cabinet hadn’t been such a bunch of brown nosers, we could be sharing the growth that the US is enjoying.

The Democrats chose to build infrastructure on public debt, Canada chose to build cracker jack Condos on mortgage debt.

Robert Frost hade a poem about this but since most of your angry old white guys can’t read, it wouldn’t be worth my time to quote it.

PS -My constituency under reform was represented by Lee Morrison-the last honest man. Since then we have had David Anderson and he is a joke.

Happy that you steped out of the circle when you had a chance.

#93 Second Class on 09.02.15 at 8:23 pm

Garth,

Please don’t listen to her. My generation is lazy and useless. Full of people who wouldnt work outside because they were too good to get dirty. All of them waiting to get inheritence.

Its pathetic.

I do blame the boomer generation for unrealistic housing prices and my usless generation.

On the plus side. Its easy to succeed when everyone your age is lazy, self entitled and too busy worshipping their degree paid for by their parents to work.

Jen
I finished much less school then your husband. Probably unfair I make almost 10X as much… Engineers are like complaints, lots of supply, no demand.

#94 OXI in GREECE !! on 09.02.15 at 8:24 pm

#53 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 7:04 pm
I want double credit then!

From just above:

Truly a silly comment. The perks and power of being Prime Minister FAR outweigh the value of money once one already is making a comfortable living.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Dumberest comment of the day from Shawn….

**********************************

P.S.

You never been Prime Minister Have you Oxi? What is a million or ten compared to

THE POWER

of running this huge country and literally walking with Kings and Quuens. Ask Joe Clark what he would have given to get back in. He said and I quote from memory but accurate " no one would forego the chance to be Prime Minister"
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Thank you for showing us your true colors Shawn. Guess what? They all shit in a toilet power or not. I'll take my ten million and FREEDOM any day of the week…..or year for that matter.

#95 boomer on 09.02.15 at 8:27 pm

I’m a boomer. Part of the fattest birth rate of the 20th century. That means I had to compete against more people to get a job, any job that didn’t come through family connections, than any other generation.
But I had a cakewalk compared to my late father-in-law. He got out of high school in 1931. A very good year. 25% unemployment, no EI or other social assistance, no government programs to train or retrain people, no student loans, no bank of mom and dad, no easy credit. No nuthin’.
He dubbed around through the great depression, the one where there were soup lines 3 blocks long.
But things improved when he got a full time job on September 4, 1939. He got to go to Europe for 5 whole years! Unfortunately, his job involved confronting the Wermacht (look it up). Disciplined, superbly-equipped well-trained guys who fired real bullets and dropped real bombs. Foxholes are less comfy than any overpriced shoebox condo out there.
But he made it through and got home to Canada in time to start his life at age 32. With no money in the bank, a high school education and not much more experience other than dodging death.

#96 Entrepreneur on 09.02.15 at 8:27 pm

Jen, it is tough out there. Many youth are finding it hard and it is not the same earth when we were young. Our youth are worried about climate change and so are some of us older ones.

Do vote even if you do not agree with the system! Our youth will rise and take over but that will come in due time. Our system is about money and “look what I have but you don’t” but everyone is an equal. Jen, stick with your values and your calling card will come.

Hint: Of the three major parties running vote for the least evil of the three. With Harper we are in a mess, with Trudeau, Liberals, will be the same which leaves the NDP. I found the NDP in BC more for the people; they go around talking to ordinary people. I also find them environmentally concerned. They are not perfect but I feel the best of the three from my experience with the three parties.

#97 Tony on 09.02.15 at 8:28 pm

Have any of these millennials ever heard of the phrase “a second job”? Lazy is a understatement for this millennial generation. Their whole lives revolve around bitching about everything and blaming everyone else but themselves for their shortcomings.

#98 Vanecdotal on 09.02.15 at 8:28 pm

GT, props to you for publishing the alternate perspective, regardless of any ideological differences, you do seem to be man of integrity.

No wonder you got the boot from the Neandercons.

#99 Boomer Hero on 09.02.15 at 8:28 pm

Dear Jennifer….you have trained for the wrong profession(s) for the country you live in. Currently…only the civil service has wages over $100K p/a on offer. There are no businesses to consult with…and no engineering firms that require neuroscientists. Either get into the civil service or accept that you will never achieve the successes your father did…..and learn the location of your local foodbank and Value Village. If you want to succeed….get out of Canada….or start campaigning for the NDP in Alberta…where apparently civil service jobs are now sacrosanct and lay offs are officially the table.

#100 Linda on 09.02.15 at 8:30 pm

#18 JSS – Whether or not Boomers have a seven figure portfolio is not the point. Finger pointing & envy aside, the vast majority of Boomers who do have such a portfolio worked their tails off to get it, doing entry level jobs & working their way up. Recent generations claim Boomers had it easy. Try competing with literally thousands of your classmates to find work. Yes, there was a lot of work to be had, but many a Boomer in the prime of their earning years were booted out of their jobs when corporate cuts arrived. Many a Boomer had to pay for their own education, because not all Boomers had parents who could afford to pay for it. Sure, housing was cheap compared to today, but wages were much lower as well. And the infrastructure we enjoy today was most of it built by the Boomer generation & in fact much of it is still being built & maintained by that aging group because so many of them never went to college or university. Blue collar work was in general lower pay than white collar work but white collar work, as discovered by many, could easily be outsourced to less expensive locales. That was no fault of the Boomers, who wanted their children to have a better life than they.

Every generation has its challenges. Climate change is real, but based on evidence is a naturally reoccurring cycle. Human activity no doubt exacerbates it, but is not solely responsible for it. I live in Alberta & there was a time when that province’s climate was tropical. Humans were not yet prevalent or if they were they were barely past swinging from the trees. Yet the climate changed anyway….. Yeah, yeah, an asteroid strike most likely was the cause of the death of the dinosaurs & the ensuing Ice Age.
I’m not saying don’t do anything to mitigate our effects on the climate. I’m all for better technology & I think Canada should develop green technology that improves life for all of us, including the planet.

#101 Freedom First on 09.02.15 at 8:32 pm

Jen. I hear you. I am a man, and, through circumstances beyond my control was on my own at the age of 17. I worked hard, went to night school and accepted that was just the way it was. Never on social assistance, and borrowed 0 to go to school. I am a boomer, and I am grateful how my life turned out. I never entertained self pity or entitlement, and I $hoveled $hit out of racetrack barns and washed toilets when I had to back then.

However Jen, I understand where you are coming from, as I am a man.

#102 PM on 09.02.15 at 8:32 pm

I’m a millenial, probably around the same age as Jennifer and while she made some good points she missed others. Yes, the job market is different. Certain career paths taken by our parents generation are evaporating or they have lost the sweet tasty benefits. Others new ones have been created and are as lucrative as ever. As a software developer I make near the low-end of a GP physician, there weren’t many jobs when my dad was my age that made doctor money without going to med school. Our middle class is shrinking, which you may call income inequality, but it’s important to recognize it’s not ‘disappearing’. It’s going somewhere else. Mexico, India, Brazil and China all have exploding middle classes that are an order of magnitude larger than what’s lost in Canada. For every Canadian manufacturing job sent overseas 4 rural Chinese are pulled out of poverty and now have a chance to have their children become educated and healthier. Sure it this change sucks for us but what makes Canadians more deserving of opportunity than the rest of the world?

Another one of the biggest things Jennifer failed to mention was how the world is a better place. Aside from crime rates and life expectancy rising certain things are more attainable than ever. Rapid advancement and globalization have made technology more accessible than ever. A 13″ color TV cost $1000 in the 1960’s. The same price (in 2015 dollars) gets you a 50″ flat screen. Plus we have phones that fit in our pocket, are 100x as powerful as the first Amiga my father bought in the late 70’s and cost 1/10th the price. Also, airline travel has caved in price. For my parents, flying was a big deal and something only the well off did. Adjusted for inflation, the price of a plane ticket is half what it was in the 1980’s. I see it, a much higher percentage of my friends have backpacked Europe, Asia and Africa than my parents ever did (with help from the nifty technology to translate and guide them to boot).

So, we have access to more information, entertainment and the ability to travel the world above what our parents had. That should allow us to live equal or more fulfilling lives than those filthy boomers right? Well not if all you care about is having the same quartz counter top as your parents. Yes, living costs are over-inflated right now and the job market is different than what your 60-year old high school guidance counsellor said but how can you ignore all the positive changes in the world, complain about the negative ones and then resent being called entitled. I dislike boomers who make broad generalizations about my generation too but I shrug it off because I can sleep a full night without peeing 3 times so I’m a little more relaxed.

The world is a fluid, changing place, sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. The sooner boomers and millenials alike recognize that, the sooner inter-generational pissing matches can take a back seat to discussing the challenges on the road ahead.

#103 MZ on 09.02.15 at 8:33 pm

One question – why does everyone seem to think that public service pensions are gifts? I have about $300 taken from each biweekly pay to go towards my pension, & have done so for the last 25+years. Not disagreeing with what Jen has said about millenial life, just tired of being vilified for having the foresight to get a job with a pension.
MKZ

#104 They don't have a clue on 09.02.15 at 8:35 pm

Love the blog, despite the drivel in the comments section. I have to say the last few days of Millennial commentary have driven me to head off on an old fashioned rant. I am a mid 70’s born Gen Xer/Slacker who graduated with (you guessed it) a Bachelor of Arts degree right at the tail end of the Chretien economic boom (tongue firmly in cheek). You want to talk about no hope for a job and prospect of 0 on the horizon angst? These Millennial’s have no clue! After a spell working 2 jobs during the day and teaching English to new immigrants at night I quickly came to my senses. Off to business school, hammered through an MBA in record time, then spent half a year fruitlessly applying to jobs all over Canada with little to no response. Subsequently packed my entire life into 2 bags and a one way ticket to Europe where my credentials would be better appreciated. A month later I was hired by an international company in Switzerland. I spent the next decade as an expat being transferred around Europe and even to Dubai firmly enjoying the perks of no house ownership and company rented villas, socking every penny away for early retirement and to support my now burgeoning family of 5. I guess that life was too good as I got the itch to return to Canada in 2011…and go to…you guessed it, Fort McMurray. Executive position and boom town salary awaited. Three years into that and now sitting here wondering why I sank my life savings into an over priced now undervalued house in the middle of Deflate-ville and waiting for the lay off axe to fall! Morale of the story? No house ownership builds wealth, if you can’t find a job in Canada, leave; booms and busts happen in a one trick (oil) country like Canada, get the right education and you will find employment. Me? My house tanks, at least I know if I move to another city in Canada some other sucker will have gotten it just as bad and the losses will be relative. Worst case…send me back to Dubai.

#105 Shante on 09.02.15 at 8:36 pm

This is a rebuttal to Jen’s email from your Sept 2 blog post. I’m a millennial too, but I really can’t bring myself to sympathize with her. I’m 25, just started my first actual job a little over a year ago after graduating from a questionable humanities masters program (I’m still in shock that I’m employed). My Husband is 31, barely passed high school, got a diploma in naval engineering and joined the navy. Combined we earn about 130k, pay $950 rent in a tiny one bedroom apartment, drive a beater 1996 Toyota, eat organic and spend lavishly treating our dog. We listen to Garth and are debt free. After all the bills are paid, we have $4,000 a month to invest. How is this possible? We don’t live in YVR, we don’t do what people our age do (i.e. get car loans, get a mortgage, visit Starbucks daily, shop for tight jeans in trendy places), and most of all, we are okay with the fact that we’ll probably live in our small apartment for a long while since housing is out of our reach.

Would I love a bigger place? Yes. But that would ruin my chances of early retirement. Do I think my job sucks? Yes. But then again, I don’t work in a sweat shop somewhere in the Third World.

People like Jen make me feel really blessed that I don’t spend my time groaning about how unfair life is. Maybe it’s because I come from a shitty developing country and living in Canada makes me feel like I have it all, or maybe I’m just a realist and make use of every opportunity that comes my way. I’m so over being labelled as a whiny millennial. I refuse to be one of them.

Anyway, thanks for your awesome (and free) advice, Garth. My portfolio is balanced and diversified. My TFSA is almost maxed out and I’ll be opening an RRSP next year. My dog will be set for life if I die early.

Cheers,

Shante (not real name, lol)

#106 Randy Randerson on 09.02.15 at 8:36 pm

Easy to wallow in self-pity, but difficult to change one’s environment. I wonder why Jen didn’t consider moving out of the city and follow the jobs, considering if his hubby is as well qualified as she stated, the States could be a good destination. I for one is happy to left Victoria and Vancouver to work in northern BC. Not exactly sunshine and unicorn, but I’m seeing my FU money piling up, and financial independence went from impossible to definitely possible.

#107 Nodebt on 09.02.15 at 8:39 pm

Hey Jen, go live with your mommy and daddy!

#108 Tony on 09.02.15 at 8:39 pm

Re: #56 Second Class on 09.02.15 at 8:23 pm

Made the brilliant comment:

“I do blame the boomer generation for unrealistic housing prices and my useless generation”.

Sorry but the fact is the Millennials are the base of the pyramid of the housing market. As can be seen in America where the Millennials stopped buying the market collapsed. The Millennials are responsible for the overvalued housing market in Canada. Please don’t blame the banks for granting your generation mortgages as Millennials blame anyone and everyone they can.

#109 Joshua in Calgs on 09.02.15 at 8:46 pm

I’m a millennial and think the biggest problem with my generation is that they are emulating the former, and not etching their own place in time.

They want what they’re parents have but are not able to afford it due inflation/ bubbles/ stagnant wages etc. But why do we have to have a house, two vehicles, and a bundle of children?

Perhaps our generation should be called the mobile generation. Being able to pick up and roll out to where the jobs are on short notice.

Trust me, if Google and Apple get their self driving cars ready to roll there will be a new market for contracting incredible talent.

Imagine living in Halifax and getting a contract gig in Ottawa? Hop into your self driving car, video conference and begin the work via your LTE networked device. Arrive to perform the physical manipulations (ie repairs, upgrade, education etc.) and then pop into your car and head back to the Atlantic.

That could be something cool that Millennial’s could pioneer!

But I digress, most of my friends are concerned with things that really don’t matter (houses, cars, shopping – dear God, you wouldn’t believe the shopping).

For those that are curious, people should check out Elon Musk’s current thoughts on profit and the human race. He is certainly on to something.

#110 Capt. Obvious on 09.02.15 at 8:48 pm

Well. I’ll just note that observing the world isn’t fair does not make it so. All you can do is keep plugging away. Waiting for a savior is not a good way to go about your years. Waiting for politicians to fix your world to your liking, doubly so.
If you’re so disappointed with the current main political parties, join one of the fringe ones. Get active. Apathy is not an excuse.

I suppose I’m fortunate that I haven’t ever had lean times. I have been full time employed since graduating 14 years ago. I have worked insane hours in some of those years though. It’s not all roses and sunshine.

My biggest advice to anyone starting out would be to not be defined by your degree. It’s just a starting point. Most jobs do not fit neatly into what one studied.

#111 Jsan on 09.02.15 at 8:52 pm

Canadians need a good slap across the side of the head to wake them out of their stupor. It’s stunning how out of touch with reality they are.

“If Canadians are worried about the recession economists keep talking about, it’s tough to tell. A new survey by the Bank of Montreal found that almost a quarter of Canada’s citizens are still living paycheck to paycheck. Roughly 25% of respondents said they had hardly anything set aside, and more than half reported having less than $10,000 in emergency funds.

Meanwhile, consumer confidence is up. A recent Bloomberg survey showed that Canadians are less worried about the economy than even a few months ago.”

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/topstories/canadians-are-not-ready-for-a-recession/ar-AAdQulj?ocid=iehp

#112 the Jaguar on 09.02.15 at 8:57 pm

#100 – PM Excellent, excellent. The best, most thoughtful post.

#113 Basil Fawlty on 09.02.15 at 9:00 pm

There are a large number of people who deny that the current changes in our climate are man made. Many of these deniers suggest that the scientists studying climate change are biased, because they are bought off through research grants etc. Even if this was 100% true, have any of these deniers considered the money spent funding denial think tanks, by the energy industry? The amount of money spent funding denial think tanks, makes science grants look like a skinflints convention.

#114 Trojan House on 09.02.15 at 9:05 pm

She had me at:

“My father, by contrast, a Boomer poster child, worked for the same crown corp for 27 years, collected a $1M+ public sector pension, has a basement full of toys and 3 SUVs in the suburban driveway, and has the nerve to say “Every time I hear a Liberal talk I hear a hand going in my pocket.” Yeah, Dad, you do, TO PAY YOU AND YOUR PENSION.”

But lost me at:

“there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way, take necessary steps to address income and wealth inequality in this country, ensure transparency in the media and bust the corporate monopolies which pervade most of the Canadian market.”

#115 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 9:05 pm

#102 MZ on 09.02.15 at 8:33 pm
One question – why does everyone seem to think that public service pensions are gifts? I have about $300 taken from each biweekly pay to go towards my pension, & have done so for the last 25+years. Not disagreeing with what Jen has said about millenial life, just tired of being vilified for having the foresight to get a job with a pension.
Mz.
……..
Your 300 a week that goes to your pension comes from me..

Have some respect …

#116 LH on 09.02.15 at 9:08 pm

Jen is a loser, like most of my generation.
Thank goodness, as their non-education makes my work a whole lot easier.

Signed,

LH, born 1984

#117 Capital One on 09.02.15 at 9:14 pm

#102 MZ

The issue isn’t how much you put into your pension; the issue is how much WE put into your pension. Your employer’s contributions are far more generous than contributions in the private sector.

So, employees in the private sector do not understand why they must fund someone else’s retirement at a far higher level that they don’t – and never will – have.

Public sector wages, pensions and benefits must move back to the “average” in the private sector.

CO

#118 Linda on 09.02.15 at 9:15 pm

#102 – I hear you on the pension, but have to ask – did you actually have the foresight to get a job with a pension, or was it more like you got a job & a pension was one of the conditions of employment? Because I too have a job with a pension, but in all truth had I been given the option I’d have happily ditched the pension plan in order to have those pension deductions in my pocket to spend as I saw fit. I’m glad to not have had the choice now when retirement is not that many years away & I now appreciate how valuable a pension is, but way back then? I had no clue how valuable it would be & even if I had known, likely would have ditched it anyway because I would never have believed I’d stay with one employer long enough to make it worth my while.

#119 Mantra on 09.02.15 at 9:17 pm

Playing the generation card is for fools.

Born to be entrepreneurial or born to be good at selling is a huge advantage.

Investing in yourself, building your own brand is always better than do it for others.

Living your own dream has the best chance to make you happy and wealthier than working for other people’s dream and business.

There is no future in “employment”.

“Human labor” is an endangered species – human ingenuity, creativity has limitless potential.

Taking risk is crucial.

Knowing that you are the creator of your own reality is fundamental.

Blaming anything or anyone for your failure is total waste of time. It is easier and more fun to change yourself than trying to change others.

It’s easier to become rich by doing something you love at perfect level than trying to perfect how to get rich. If this is not available to you you can still do the TFSA stuff as prescribed by Garth and do well if you live long enough.

#120 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 9:17 pm

#113 Trojan House on 09.02.15 at 9:05 pm
She had me at:

“My father, by contrast, a Boomer poster child, worked for the same crown corp for 27 years, collected a $1M+ public sector pension, has a basement full of toys and 3 SUVs in the suburban driveway, and has the nerve to say “Every time I hear a Liberal talk I hear a hand going in my pocket.” Yeah, Dad, you do, TO PAY YOU AND YOUR PENSION.”

But lost me at:

“there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way, take necessary steps to address income and wealth inequality in this country, ensure transparency in the media and bust the corporate monopolies which pervade most of the Canadian market.”
….

Cut her some slack, al gore was a hero in the class room when my kids went for there indoctrination and programing.

Good thing they where Lucky enough to have a mental case as a father..

Its not teaches I dispise , its there total lack of Objectivity , common sence, critical thinking…

They swallowed , and never questioned.

That makes my blood boil…

#121 Suede on 09.02.15 at 9:23 pm

Jen,

Widen your perspective.

Go to Vegas and become a hostess – make $100k+ a year

Husband can become a bartender or door man – another $100k+. All in tips and paper handshakes.

Then take your money and buy some of the hottest real estate in America. It’s very affordable. 300k for a 4bed with pool. Hell, you can afford to get a maid too.

The world is massive and opportunities abound everywhere.

Don’t let your degrees limit you. This is 2015.

The new rich don’t care about paperwork. Only if you can close a deal or get the job done.

#122 Harbour on 09.02.15 at 9:27 pm

#108 Joshua in Calgs

But why do we have to have a house, two vehicles, and a bundle of children?
…………………………………………………………………..

You don’t and don’t let anybody tell you different

#123 Fred Forks on 09.02.15 at 9:27 pm

To those who mentioned programming jobs — there is indeed a huge shortage of developers right now, in the GTA no less. My company and others are looking for back-end web developers (Ruby on Rails, Symfony, Etc.) and mobile developers (iOS and Android).

These technologies are incredibly hot and in-demand and I know of organizations who are bringing talent from South America and Europe because they can’t find local talent (believe me it’s not cheaper to do this).

Honestly I don’t see a huge barrier to entry in technology — drop $1500 on a macbook and start learning (endless learning opportunities online, most free). Or do a bootcamp like HackerYou or Lighthouse Labs and give a dramatic boost to your resume and number of opportunities.

This is one small example however I’m sure there are other industries in similar circumstances. I believe there are opportunities for millennials that don’t mind rolling up their sleeves. And they do exist because I’ve hired them.

#124 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 9:28 pm

#115 LH on 09.02.15 at 9:08 pm
Jen is a loser, like most of my generation.
Thank goodness, as their non-education makes my work a whole lot easier.

Signed,

LH, born 1984
…..

I love this man, he gets it….

#125 Ontario's Left Coast on 09.02.15 at 9:29 pm

Jennifer is very articulate and made several excellent points. Based on her passion and desire for positive change, I’d say she’s going to be just fine. Back off, haters; you’re starting to sound like those old guys on the theatre balcony from the Muppets show.

By the way Garth, you did okay tonight as well.

#126 richard on 09.02.15 at 9:30 pm

That why I cant find workers for my moving company lol !! The only people who apply are over 45. I guess their parents are long gone and have no other way of supporting themselves apart from good old fashioned hard work…

#127 Internet_Guy on 09.02.15 at 9:30 pm

Hey Jen:

“Are we wrong for wanting use the technology that has been promised to improve our lives? If so, why was it developed? ”

Why was it developed? To fill the coffers of certain companies with money, *not* to improve *your* life. (It’s my field of employment…sorry…)

#128 Republic_of_Western_Canada on 09.02.15 at 9:30 pm

Sounds like daddies little girl for some reason has to live in Van (with all the associated crazy costs), but is nailed to the cross of an infinite-contract revolving door job scene.

News-time, chick. It started to get that way since the 1980’s.

Up until about that time, if you had a job in timber, minerals, government admin or tech, fishing, house-building, certain trades & professions, and the Port of Vancouver you were comfortable or better. Since then most educated white people were simply better off moving to Alberta, Utah or Texas, Singapore, or down to Seattle and points south (with the exception of the years Defense tanked in Long Beach).

If you graduated from Sentinel high school and lived with the folks up in the British Properties, it was a bit different. You kept your wing of the house (or the whole thing after taking over the family money/business when the folks moved to Palm Desert) while remaining well connected with local society.

For the rest, it was financially advisable to move on before getting too old and settling deep roots into the weirdness of the lower mainland.

#129 Sheane Wallace on 09.02.15 at 9:31 pm

The only chance for the millennials is to refuse to work. Screw the baby boomers, demand social assistance ahead of the boomers.

#130 Mister Obvious on 09.02.15 at 9:31 pm

#88 David W2

Boomers aren’t retiring cuz they don’t know what to do with themselves in retirement therefore openings for young ppl to move up aren’t being created!!!
——————————

I retired in 2007 at the age of 56. I was warned that was too young and told stories about uncles who retired at 55 and died of uselessness by the age of 60.

I’m well into my ninth year of uselessness with no end in sight. Monday mornings I still can’t believe I don’t have to haul my butt off to another week of corporate slavery and pointless, asinine meetings.

I felt far more useless in my former life. My last job was to squeeze tiny increments of efficiency out of machinery that produced the brain dead magazines you find at supermarket checkouts. It was highly technical engineering dedicated to the service of low-brow print.

Sure, it was well paid and challenging work, but let’s face it, you’ve got to lift your head up and take look around sometime. There was a huge education awaiting me. Not from any university but rather from the prestigious school of “Enough Free Time To Think”.

I had no idea what kind of world had developed around me over the decades I collected those fat paychecks. It isn’t until one makes a full transition to corporate and societal uselessness that clear analysis can begin.

But be careful. Don’t try to break free until you’ve accumulated enough wealth to thumb your nose at the man permanently. Until then, keep up the brown-nosing and play the game. In the meantime, save and invest wisely. In my experience: the sooner the better.

#131 DM in C on 09.02.15 at 9:31 pm

Whatever. Our millennial 20 year old launched himself at the ripe old age of 18 — spent half a year in California bumming around then half a year in Vanc. He’s now working FT, in fact got a promotion to be the youngest manager in his retail chain’s territory. He’s got it. He rents with a roommate, spends 25% of income on rent, and is very happy with things.

Meanwhile his boomer grandparents overspent on everything, took early ‘disability’ pensions and are living hand to mouth, smoking and drinking Tim’s every day and just got denied a second mortgage on their home.

Us? We’re doing just fine, thanks. We live and work in Calgary in Non-O&G jobs (software and shipping) and don’t have all our eggs in the RE basket. We also don’t buy toys.

Seems our family is made up of contrarians. :-)

#132 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 9:32 pm

#120 Suede on 09.02.15 at 9:23 pm
Jen,

Widen your perspective.

Go to Vegas and become a hostess – make $100k+ a year

Husband can become a bartender or door man – another $100k+. All in tips and paper handshakes.

Then take your money and buy some of the hottest real estate in America. It’s very affordable. 300k for a 4bed with pool. Hell, you can afford to get a maid too.

The world is massive and opportunities abound everywhere.

Don’t let your degrees limit you. This is 2015.

The new rich don’t care about paperwork. Only if you can close a deal or get the job done

….

What the hell, some of humanity is starting to understand..

Well done Suede..

Dr Smoking Man
Phd Herdonomics
Citizen of Nectonite.

#133 JimH on 09.02.15 at 9:34 pm

Thanks, Garth! Jen’s post will keep me smiling for the next several weeks; in spite of any market vicissitudes we may have to endure!

What a whiner! If where you’re at lacks opportunity, move on. It’s a great, big world out there with opportunities abounding!

Tunnel-vision kills!

#134 eddy on 09.02.15 at 9:35 pm

Edmund Rothschild suggested that a solution to climate change was dry ice machines, yep

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CH2SfNGmmVc

#135 stage1dave on 09.02.15 at 9:36 pm

Well said, Jennifer; it’s always nice to hear from someone eloquently stating their POV. Besides, Millenials are my principal audience…somebody’s gotta school ’em about Nazareth & Head East, right?

I also get a sense of someone who’s concerned about “other people” whom you may never meet, & about the general health of our planet & society; all laudable & worthwhile concerns…the country would be a better place with a few more of you.

Unfortunately, I can’t help with job placement. I can tell you that the rental situation in central AB is getting cheaper as well, but lacks ocean views, mountains, rain, & any coffee shop conversations that do not concern ag, oil, or the NDP lately…

Btw, if you are planning to drag our host down the street in a Metallica tour shirt, please do so gently…some of these are worth a great deal of money, and are quite difficult to locate. I know, & have many.

One previous poster suggested a “Ride the Lightning” shirt; IMHO that person should be approached with caution. An original RTL tour t (particularily a “wild oats” print) is very desirable & quite expensive…in fact, if any blog dawgs have one available, I’ll buy it. Size M please…must have 1985 c/r marks & clean tags.

Besides, Mr. turner provides to great a public service to be sentenced to road rash!

#136 Gas Insane on 09.02.15 at 9:37 pm

Okanagan gas now at 1.25 to 1.28 a litre for regular and 1.42 for premium…

Another thing real estate you can’t buy anything liveable in Alberta or BC for less than 200,000! Like even in nowhere Alberta they want 60,000 for a rat hole in the middle of freakin nowhere who owns all this stuff? Who’s holding on to all these properties at insane prices. Who in their right mind would live in small town BC or Alberta with limited services and high fuel prices well especially in BC. I have a friend in okanagan trying to sell a beater house 350,000 I wouldn’t give him 25,000 crappy location eyesore view… Leads me to believe Canadians are mentally challenged. this is a freakin mania that needs to end!

#137 Kreditanstalt on 09.02.15 at 9:39 pm

All moot, Garth. Out of anyone’s hands. Economy is on autopilot downward.

While the institutionalized condition of more-or-less permanent no-growth drones on, even the zillions of “consultants”, government “workers” and armchair mutual fundees will have trouble…

Millennials are nothing if not delirious optimists, but whatever Jen and cohorts may think may not pay the bills…

#138 Andrew Woburn on 09.02.15 at 9:41 pm

Early boomers thought they could prevent war by singing peace songs and by sticking flowers in the barrels of soldiers’ guns. Millennials appear to believe that if they can get everybody to ride bicycles to work, we can all be saved from global warming. Plus ca change.

My advice to Jen, who seems like a bright young woman, is to stop focussing on the things you can’t control. Even if all 36 million Canadians became environmental saints overnight, it wouldn’t make any real world difference and nobody else would care. Instead figure out how your generation can gain political influence. If none of the parties are speaking for you, take one over. It’s been done before. The Liberals would be a good choice as they seem to have no sense of direction.

I agree things are tougher than older generations yet comprehend but they are going to get a lot worse as jobs vaporize. If you don’t help yourselves, no one else will.

#139 farmwife on 09.02.15 at 9:42 pm

#27″And let’s be honest, your typical truck driver isn’t cut out to be retrained as a Google Software Engineer…”

And thank the good lord for that..if your consuming it, it came by truck and if your eating farmers grew it. Without the ordinary working Canadians doing all the grunt work to keep this country going it would be a sad world for the upper class.

I enjoy this blog but cannot really identify with a lot of the posters here as I feel their thoughts are far removed from those of us who reside in the real world.

#140 Mark on 09.02.15 at 9:42 pm

“To those who mentioned programming jobs — there is indeed a huge shortage of developers right now, in the GTA no less. My company and others are looking for back-end web developers (Ruby on Rails, Symfony, Etc.) and mobile developers (iOS and Android). “

Sounds like a bunch of nonsense. I follow the job boards at a major university in the computer science/engineering area, and I’ve yet to see any of the Toronto based firms looking for people in any significant quantities. And programmers still make a mere pittance compared to professionals in other sectors such as investment banking. There might be a ‘shortage’ at relatively low salaries of highly experienced people, but that’s not indicative of a widespread shortage of programming talent. Hence, it is rather disingenuous to make such a claim.

“These technologies are incredibly hot and in-demand and I know of organizations who are bringing talent from South America and Europe because they can’t find local talent (believe me it’s not cheaper to do this).”

Yes it is much cheaper to do this, because the foreigners can essentially be indentured into working the 80 hour weeks. They don’t have the expectation of affording Canadian housing over the long term, nor a Canadian retirement. Therefore, they can, and do work for cheaper.

Sorry to have broken it to you, but you’ve fallen for the ruse concocted by some overly entitled people that there’s a ‘shortage’ of programming talent. If compensation packages and working conditions are appropriate, good talent is a dime a dozen in Canada.

#141 Nora Lenderby on 09.02.15 at 9:47 pm

Some very insightful comments.

My advice on Jen’s story is she should consider doing what I did in her situation in 1982. Emigrate. In her case to other parts of Canada or somewhere else. Live frugally and save. Seriously consider not having children (this will probably be controversial).

As for much the rest of it, I agree with her. One major change from the ’70’s is the massive price increases in higher education. Not surprising that so many younger people are struggling.

#68 Millmech on 09.02.15 at 7:27 pm had some good things to say. I’d add in “elevator mechanic” to his list.

All the denial bluster about climate change won’t make any difference. It’s happening. More extreme climate events. And I’ve seen the destruction of the health of the seas in my lifetime. All the disappearing reefs, the plastic crap in the oceans, the formerly thriving marine communities reduced to much simpler ones.

Some things get better. We now frequently see ospreys and sometimes bald eagles on the St. Lawrence. American birds are coming here for the cheap summer rentals and even cheaper fish :-)

#142 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 9:48 pm

RE: #10 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm
Understand the funding parameters for science to pitch this bull shit

Yea, take that greedy scientists! ’cause the oil companies spend $0 pitching their own denier bull shit.

#143 salonist on 09.02.15 at 9:49 pm

couple of years back, mentioned that my daughter and a few girfriends at university had a few too many beers.
decided that their university degree was of no value and would open up a brothel instead.
after the hangover she mentioned this crazy idea to her
cousin.
her cosin ,millennial, on a financial expedition
graduated, top 2% at her university
occupation, call girl,.high end clients
crunched the numbers,clients, expenses, taxes, shelf life
3 year plan

#144 Internal Auditor on 09.02.15 at 9:51 pm

Interesting letter and I get the frustration on her part. I’ve been through entry level thing twice, once in 2003 and again in 2008. I went to college for a 2yr program and after working in a non-related field I realized I needed something “more”. I ended up going to business school with an open mind with a bilingual skill-set to major in HR. As a result of my open mind I ended up enjoying accounting and majored in it. Thankfully, I had an offer 10-11 months before I started work. Most of my friends in marketing, HR and e-commerce had little to no prospects because they did not market themselves properly, relied on someone else to get them a job and/or majored in something that was not meeting market demands.

I’m glad I specialized in a field that is progressive and will be in demand for a while. I’ve had other friends hit reset and it’s worked for them OR they’ve decided to be the best in their field and although not glamorous they’re getting paid for specializing (audit, plumbing, stone mason, strategy, sales etc).

We can blame the school system, parenting, starting school too young, debt, unfair expectations etc. At the end of the day we need to manage our careers properly and uniquely. Sending out 20 resumes a day doesn’t mean anything. I’d rather send out 1 a day and meet the recruiter for coffee, or find someone on LinkedIn at the company, or send an email as a follow up or even go to a networking event to get an introduction. Bottom line is most people (even many of our parents) don’t know how to manage their career. So take stock and figure out a way to manage your professional life.

#145 you've gutted our country Boomers on 09.02.15 at 9:53 pm

#3 crymeariver on 09.02.15 at 6:01 pm
“Oh please…millennial pussy cat
U know what’s tuff..being an immigrant from a country that when u arrive u are hated and called all kinds of nasty names. Working 16 hours a day for peanuts and sharing rooms with multiple strangers u don’t care to know. So just shut up and pay the rent now and go to work.”

Both of my parents are immigrants.

My mother came over on a workers scheme – had a permanent job with benefits within 2 weeks of landing, and she has a high school education! With her earnings, she was able to buy a brand new 900sf condominium in Toronto at age 25, with 20% down, which was 6 months of her income at the time. She retired in her 50s with a DB pension.

My father arrived speaking no English. He has 2 years university, no degree. He became a manager, working in the private and public sectors. Retired mid-50s with DB pension.

My parents have been mortgage-free since the early 90s. No debts. Paid university tuition for 2 children.

I, on the other hand, was born in Canada. I speak 3 languages fluently. Hold 2 passports. I have a graduate degree and a professional designation. I have 10 years work experience in my field. ALL my jobs have been on contract – no benefits, no security. The pay has ranged from great to lousy, depending on the economy and the demand for my skills at the time. I cannot afford a home in Toronto where I was born, and actually pay it off, and save for retirement, and raise children – like my parents did! I am mid-30s, single, renting, and childless. Take a look at your future Canada.

#146 Amber Alert - Missing Finance Minister on 09.02.15 at 9:59 pm

We interrupt this intergenerational slugfest with the following breaking news:

Joe Oliver has been missing for days! Why? And where is he, as Canada wrestles with recession and a critical election?

If you see him, please contact your local Elections Canada and/or Conservative Party officials.

Subject may be wearing duct tape across his mouth and an adult diaper. Approach with pity.

https://twitter.com/hashtag/wheresjoe

#147 Republic_of_Western_Canada on 09.02.15 at 10:00 pm

#68 Millmech on 09.02.15 at 7:27 pm

You’re not going to get a job with a 4th class steam ticket these days, even with an engg degree. Minimum 3rd, with steam time. Millwright/engg pairing would be good too. But one of those three would have to be the core discipline, the other two mostly for supporting contextual knowledge.

I’m guessing he’d have to deal with the engineering/ trades industrial antagonism thing too, in order to advance. Not sure how that would work.

#148 Boombust on 09.02.15 at 10:01 pm

Good for you, Jen. Well said!

#149 Hawk on 09.02.15 at 10:03 pm

Jennifer makes in her long letter three points that I agree with and I am generally quite conservative in my political disposition.

1. Government people are overpaid (aka her “dad”) and this is a major drain on our society.

2. Outsourcing of jobs is wrong. It is the responsibility of every citizen, to compete and struggle with fellow citizens in their own country for work. It isn’t their responsibility to subsidize corporations, by on the one hand allowing big business to sell here and still use foreign labor. Tata consultancy services and many other outsourcers should be sent packing and laws put in place that prohibit outsourcing or TFW.

3. Governments have no right whatsoever to run debts and deficits, pampering current generations with pensions and luxury and leave future generations on the hook to pay debts and interest.

But Jennifer, if you don’t fight back, nothing will change.

#150 Crazyfasteddy on 09.02.15 at 10:04 pm

Jen for PM. And I’m a GenXer.

#151 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 10:04 pm

The Dumberest Comment of the day

Crap, Smoking Man easily beats me out for that title with his comment about government pensions:

He said:

Your 300 a week that goes to your pension comes from me..

Have some respect …

*************************************
Government hired the man and paid him what it paid. A fair bargain in the market. Both parties got what they wanted. To imply that his pension contributions came as a sort of handout from taxpayers is moronic. It was paid as compensation just like for any private sector worker.

Congratulations SM on winning dumberest comment of the Day.

#152 Setting the Record Straight on 09.02.15 at 10:05 pm

@#139 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 12:10 am
Corporations have no nationality and are fully mobile. If it’s that simple to tax and retain jobs, why has it not happened? Think. — Garth

That’s exactly the problem. Corporations have too much freedom to move money around internationally. Our trading partners need to get together and write laws that prevent this method of tax avoidance. Instead, they participate in the race to the bottom in tax rates while trying to woo businesses to set up shop in their own country. Reciprocal tax agreements need to be included with every trade deal.
Some politicians themselves carry large sums of cash across the border in a paper bag and see nothing wrong with that. Maybe that is really the root of the problem. We need to get money out of politics…..
.
..
I just answered my own question: We are doomed.

&&&&&&&
Yes let’s have all the government’s get together and form a cartel. Just watch what happens to taxes if there is no place to run to.
What we need is more government’s &more competition. More tax havens.
Lower taxes.

At least if Corps can optimize, you can buy their equity.

#153 For those about to flop... on 09.02.15 at 10:09 pm

Not to sure that the generational comparisons do anyone any good.
I was born in the mid 70s
I’m sure some people thought that the 70s were great .
I’m sure some people thought that the 70s sucked .
Repeat for the 80s ,90s and the start of this century
Someone is always having the time of their lives while your working you butt off and vice versa.

#154 Setting the Record Straight on 09.02.15 at 10:14 pm

@#151 Llewelyn on 09.02.15 at 8:42 am
#128 Idealoop

My nephew who has far more experience with social media warned me not to pay attention to, or respond to, pejorative comments submitted by trolls. I had no idea what he was talking about until Saskatoon claimed that concern for the less fortunate was stupid and dangerous and suggested that taxation to support essential public services was theft.

I am embarassed to admit that I rose to the bait tossed out by Saskatoon several times before realizing what was going on. If he really believes the nonsense spewed out with such anger I offer nothing but pity. If he is just being foolish to get a reaction he should be ignored.

$$$$
But it is theft. That’s just a matter of logic. You think theft is ok if the majority favour it.

#155 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:15 pm

Why would Jen’s husband study engineering and then study neuroscience if money was an issue?

It makes you question his priorities and decision making.

And if he believed that there would be a job at the end of 2 onerous degrees, who fed him that lie and why was he so gullible as to accept it?

Too many questionable decisions.

#156 Dual Citizen In Canada on 09.02.15 at 10:16 pm

Jen, our education system has failed your generation. Hey, it failed mine too. If the school curriculums and teachers do not change as our world changes, generations will always be left struggling. Rather than giving degrees in fact regurgitations, give them for practical applications of knowledge and creative problem solving. Then an only then will the new generations understand how to survive in an ever evolving world and human species.
As a start, change EC0101 to GT101!

#157 BG on 09.02.15 at 10:17 pm

33 years old here. I guess an early millennial?

On one hand, I empathize with Jen and other millennials struggling, but on the other hand I’ve been lucky enough to find opportunities to evolve in my career.

I believe in hard work because I’ve been there and it worked for me, but people who succeed usually forget that it’s only one of the factors.

By the way, the world needs idealists to challenge the old fart thinking we witness so often in this comments section.

#158 Panhead on 09.02.15 at 10:20 pm

Yabut … sooner or later these are the people that are supposed to be paying for seniors “golden years” … n’est pas?

#159 gut check on 09.02.15 at 10:21 pm

@ #137 farmwife on 09.02.15 at 9:42 pm

amen to that

#160 TJM on 09.02.15 at 10:21 pm

I think Jennifer has made a lot of very good points and has made them rather well.

It’s easy to deride a whole ‘nother generation, as well as to deride someone for deriding a whole ‘nother generation.

But it seems clear to me that the non-discretionary costs of becoming an adult and achieving independence are much, much higher than they used to be. I can see it in how much I have to pay for rent, for example.

The other thing is that more things, and more expensive things, have now become necessary to function competitively in the world. Twenty years ago I shared a land line with a roommate and I had an answering machine, and my share of the phone bill was $15 a month. I didn’t need more because no one expected to be able to get ahold of me at any time, anywhere. Now you need not just a cell phone to function compatibly with the world, but increasingly a smart phone, with a data plan, running you at least forty bucks a month (not including the cost of the phone itself, which turns to socially-obsolete molasses every three years and needs to be replaced.) You need internet at home for 50+ bucks a month if you want to access job opportunities in the place where they’re actually posted, whereas in the past everyone would look at the same want ads in the 25-cent newspaper. (Sure, you can go to the employment office where they have computers, but that puts you at a disadvantage relative to whoever has a computer and internet.)

When I was a teenager in the 1980’s, bus fare was about 75 cents. Now it’s almost five times that, while minimum wage has about doubled and inflation certainly has lagged behind 5x.

You can have your politics, and reasonable people can differ about whether an NDP government would be a disaster or a utopia or something in between. But it is really, really easy for someone at a certain stage of life to lose touch with what it is like to be at a younger stage of life, and to misunderstand what the actual conditions are now. It’s a thing that I, now in my mid-forties, always guard against in my own thinking, because it is just too damn easy to say “kids these days” and forget that we were not so wise then either.

And I look around objectively (it helps that my girlfriend is ten years younger than me, so I have more of a window into that demographic than I might otherwise) and I see that there are fewer chances, and certainly fewer second chances, out there. Thirty years ago, you could make many more mistakes before you were financially ruined; today, all it takes is picking the wrong major in school.

So when in doubt, my inclination is to give the younger, less established folk the benefit of the doubt. Otherwise it’s just too easy to punch downwards.

#161 Setting the Record Straight on 09.02.15 at 10:22 pm

@#157 Retired Boomer – WI on 09.02.15 at 9:26 am
#142 J MAN

You have just described the fallacy of “FREE TRADE”

If I take my company, whose combines state, Federal and taxes eat up 21% of revenue, add in payroll costs (my share) 34% roughly…. then off shore it.

Lower foreign taxes, a tax credit FOR moving… the country loses business taxes,payroll taxes, property taxes.. the ancillary impact on regional employment…AND then you get to run a trade deficit -which you will pay for- for buying my now imported crap at nearly the same price, or the same price when I made it here…

Do you feel abused?

&&&&&&&

Absolutely!
You know when a company moves from New Jersey to
Alabama, there needs to be tariff set up to compensate the middle class in New Jersey for this despicable action!

#162 Nora Lenderby on 09.02.15 at 10:22 pm

#216 Bytor the Snow Dog on 09.02.15 at 7:17 pm
… I will tell all that I used the nom de plume of “Shecky Greene”, and I posted a bunch of horse jokes.

Neigh, I bet you say that to all the fillies, you saucy gelding…it would take a lot more than horse talk to get my crupper off!

Folks need to lighten up.

For myself I agree, but what if one isn’t temperamentally inclined to lighten up? It’s not always easy.

I’m assuming that people come here because they are interested in improving their financial situation. There is probably nothing more fraught with anxiety in some cases.

Frankly, looking at the economy, I don’t see much to laugh about, which is perhaps why I laugh so much.

#163 604renter on 09.02.15 at 10:22 pm

You had us at the ridiculous cost of living. And you lost it all at “no job worth doing” i was unemployed once for 2 days – and then worked at a few terrible jobs earning little. Thats life. People today are too entitled. And if money is your thing then work smart – not necessarily hard. Netflix’ motto ‘Hard work is irrelevant”

#164 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:24 pm

Jen sounds as bad as the boomers who fear change. She and her husband can use their mobility to land jobs outside of Canada and return later with a ton of cash and experience.

Instead, her and her husband are smashing their heads against the wall trying to live the life of their parents. Looking for things like ‘job security’.

Anybody who hadn’t been living under a rock knows that there’s no such thing as ‘job security’ in the private sector.

Jen and her husband are just as guilty of fearing change as their boomer counter parts.

Instead of changing and adapting, they’re praying and living in fear.

#165 45north on 09.02.15 at 10:26 pm

our managers fundamentally don’t understand the systems our business runs on”

Jennifer sees this lack of understanding in her clients. I saw this in 39 years in the Federal Civil Service.

I mean there were intelligent managers who worked hard to understand the business and there were others who didn’t. Over the years there were more systems and they were more complicated.

So today in a globally connected economy, there is a lot more to understand and I quite simply accept that we ( as a society ) are not making the necessary investment.

But let’s apply her criticism to her:

there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way, take necessary steps to address income and wealth inequality in this country, ensure transparency in the media and bust the corporate monopolies

“climate change”, you sure you understand everything? ocean currents, CO2, the hydraulic cycle, volcanoes, the sun’s output, population growth, industrialization. I think we agree that man-made CO2 is increasing but what about the sun’s output?

“income and wealth inequality” again sure you understand everything? historical precedent, regional disparity, racial, language differences. Every night Garth warns that over-investment in real estate will result in fundamental long term discrepancies. In stark contrast to the three major political parties, who agree on the continued promotion of real estate.

“transparency in the media” and “corporate monopolies”. Well Jennifer, I believe that individual hard work and sacrifice will address these issues. I would point out that Garth has provided us with a concrete example of hard work and sacrifice on one particular issue. Again in stark contrast to the three major political parties.

#166 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:26 pm

#26 Justin on 09.02.15 at 6:30 pm

Completely agree.

Jen and her husband have demonstrated questionable decision making.

And if millennials have a reputation for complaining, then it appears well deserved.

#167 Bottoms_Up on 09.02.15 at 10:28 pm

Jen, don’t worry, 30 years from now millenials will be in power and payback will be fierce. Why don’t you run for office? ; o

#168 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:32 pm

#138 Mark on 09.02.15 at 9:42 pm

Nobody should take Mark’s opinion on jobs.

He couldn’t find a job for 7 years and has shown absolutely no ability to find a job today.

I know a number of senior recruiters and even one who heads their own firm. They all say that there is an overwhelming number of IT jobs but dearth of candidates.

Unless someone has had success actually finding jobs, I would ignore them.

#169 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 10:35 pm

RE: #114 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 9:05 pm
#102 MZ on 09.02.15 at 8:33 pm
One question – why does everyone seem to think that public service pensions are gifts?
……..
Your 300 a week that goes to your pension comes from me..
Have some respect …

The bonus/pay/pension of the CEO’s of the companies that you purchase stuff from also comes from you via higher prices than you would otherwise pay.

Respect is earned, not demanded.

#170 OttawaGuyRenting on 09.02.15 at 10:36 pm

Jen says – “how weirdly intense we are about our dogs…”

Funny you say that –
I heard through the grapevine that the CDN Vet Association – “college of CDN veterinarians” are struggling.
Visits and new “patients” are way down.
Lack of traffic yet adoption at an all time upswing is a result of ZERO cheddar in the bank to help sparky.

The quote from the source “we can’t figure out how the millens will spend $100 on foie gras and IPA on a typical wknd yet let the retriever go 3 years without a check up
By the time hipster glasses and Acura Suzy leave the condo with “buster” and head to one of our shops it’s because the cancer is leaking out the poor fellas [email protected]@e”

Sign of the times.

Funny because after I was told this I asked a close friend about which Vet he takes his boxer for check ups.
“Aaaah Juniper is healthy – we took her to the vet when she was a puppy”
That was 7 years ago.

Look for the Vet Assoc to pull together Adverts in coming year or so aimed at the above.

#171 AB Boxster on 09.02.15 at 10:36 pm

Garth,

Thanks for publishing Jen’s comments.
—————————————————

Jen, I believe that your generation will have huge issues to address that will be unique to your generation.
For Example:

1. The rest of the world wants in.
Once developing countries (China, India, Africa) want a piece of the worlds wealth. Hell most just want clean water to drink. Rightly so.
The hollowing out of north american manufacturing was the beginning of this trend.
High value jobs such as information technology are following.
Auto manufacturing is moving to Mexico.

North American income and society will be impacted.

2. Technology will have huge future impacts.
Robo-investing, virtual legal assistants, self driving vehicles, artificial intelligence, etc will all have massive impacts on society.
Personal computers have been around for around for only 25 years. But the changes that are coming will come quickly, and will likely cause huge future societal upheaval.

So autonomous cars are perfected.
Society saves billions in accident costs.
Companies save billions in wages.
But what to do with the 4 million jobs in the US alone ($148 billion in wages) that would be lost?
(Well-Perhaps all these folks can become website designers or video game programmers)

3. Climate change will have impact.
The same idiots that use every gadget or marvel created through science, are quick to discount the scientists who overwhelmingly agree that climate change is real.

Will continuing to pump C02 into the earth’s atmosphere mean an end to the earth?
Not likely, the earth has been around a very long time. Most of it has been without human life, though.

Climate change will certainly have impacts in terms of coastal sea levels, intensity of weather events, and the success or failure of natural global ecosystems.

Most boomers really just don’t care, as they will not be around to experience the impacts.
But those who choose to deny it are fools.

4. Global Debt is crippling economies
The unfettered and uncontrolled mess created in the 2009 financial crisis has resulted in the most massive
level of world debt ever.
This is a huge problem that most just chose to ignore.
But this issue cannot be ignored.

The boomer generation and earlier really did not have to deal with any of these sorts of issues.
For F sake , the biggest challenge that most had with technology, was deciding whether to buy VHS or Betamax. (And most got that one wrong)

So my advice to Jen follows:

1. Stop listening to boomers or anyone older than you.
We did have our challenges with jobs and the economy no doubt. Sure there was the odd recession that hurt, and getting that first job was not always easy.

But, there is no arguing that the boomer generation had incredible benefits that your generation will certainly not:

Affordable education
Affordable housing
Massive economic growth.
Huge increase in real estate values.
Our paradigm is so vastly different than your is and will be.

Really, if we give you any ‘sage’ advice it’s best just to nod and smile. Treat us like you would treat your 90 year old granny with dementia, who tells you she is ‘pitching for the BlueJays tonight’.

2. Change the economic, societal and environmental paradigm that the boomer generation created.

Stop consuming junk.
Refuse to buy the boomer’s overpriced homes.
Live frugally and only buy from companies that commit to sustainable creation and production goods.
Only buy from those that pay a living wage.

Or whatever, you choose, it your future.

3. Develop, fund, support and vote for candidates that can affect change.
Remember, in 30 years the boomers will all be dead and gone. Our philosophy, economic system, environmental solution, greed, racism etc. can be replaced with something new.

What will it be?

#172 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:37 pm

#131 JimH on 09.02.15 at 9:34 pm

Completely agree.

Jen’s letter was just a whine fest.

I hope other millennials aren’t like that.

Whether you believe you can or cannot, you are right.

It’s not surprising that whiners can’t find jobs.

It’s just like whiners who say they can’t get girls.

They give every excuse in the book, make questionablr decisions, and never take personal responsibility.

Same deal.

#173 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:40 pm

#129 DM in C on 09.02.15 at 9:31 pm

Kudos to you and your child.

Now this is a solid example of the Millenial generation.

Anyone can be a complainer. That’s easy.

#174 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 10:40 pm

#70 gut check on 09.02.15 at 7:29 pm
Jen,

I’m Gen X. I have had this conversation with boomers a zillion times and every now and then you’ll find one who admits that things are VERY different now and that Millenials have challenges that are daunting and unique. Most of the time though they get shockingly defensive.

In short: it’s no use trying. Just forget about them, forget about convincing anyone – EVER – that you have a tough road. I know it’s frustrating but I mean who are these people anyway? f#ck’em.

My advice? Just adjust. This is life now – no secure jobs, escalating expenses, lower standard of living, garbage food, poisoned environments. I’m sorry to say it, but that is where we are in Canada at the moment. All of that precious education you and your husband have is probably for naught. Don’t take it too hard, you’ve got lots of company. My degree was pretty much useless too and that was 15 years ago. The job market has been crap for a LONG time.

Instead of mourning what should have been and instead of wasting any more time being angry and frustrated by all the empty promises that ‘if you go to school and work hard you will succeed’ just adjust. :)

Self employment, visionary planning, multiple income streams, mobility… these are the future. Tech, trends, flexibilty.

You can do it – you’ve got chutzpah.
bury the past and move forward knowing that this is a tremendously tumultous time, full of opportunity for those people that are young enough, fast enough and creative enough to build the future.

Is that you? Might as well be, don’t you think?
……

Damn, someone else with a brilliant mind, wtf is happening to the world…

Its the ucc im thinking, Nectonite messages getting out there..nah, get check figured it out…

Nicely done gut check.

Pencil me in as a fan….

#175 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 10:43 pm

RE:#162 45north on 09.02.15 at 10:26 pm
I think we agree that man-made CO2 is increasing but what about the sun’s output?

We have satellites in space to measure this. Scientists take this data into account when studying climate change.

#176 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:48 pm

Jen’s rant is unbelievable. Just as bad as that #donthave1million crap.

Apparently for Jen there are jobs ‘not worth doing’ even when you have no money. Well who’s doing them then? Obviously you’re better than them (and better than the job).

Can’t afford where you live? So why are you living there?

What is most frustrating is that there actually Canadians who live with REAL hardship that are willing to do whatever job it takes and live wherever they can in order to put food on the table.

I knew a single mom who was raising 3 kids herself. I’m sure if you told her that a job wasn’t worth doing, she would slap you across the face. Do you think she had the ‘hardship’ of going to university for a decade to get 2 professional degrees? No, because she had to work to put food on the table.

This was just a stupid letter by an oblivious person.

#177 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 10:50 pm

RE: #149 Setting the Record Straight on 09.02.15 at 10:05 pm
@#139 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 12:10 am
&&&&&&&
Yes let’s have all the government’s get together and form a cartel. Just watch what happens to taxes if there is no place to run to.

As a citizen there already IS nowhere to run to. Taxes are not punitive at these levels. Corporations CAN run as the system is setup now as per Garth.

What we need is more government’s &more competition. More tax havens.
Lower taxes.

That means personal income taxes will rise to make up for the shortfall in corp taxes resulting in less incentive to work for a wage.

At least if Corps can optimize, you can buy their equity.

I am doing this. Hedging my bets. Higher wages is better though because it lets me buy more shares.

#178 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:52 pm

#104 Shante on 09.02.15 at 8:36 pm

Amazing post.

Garth should post letters from people like you instead of the crap letter from Jen today.

No offense Garth.

#179 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 10:52 pm

#140 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 9:48 pm
RE: #10 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm
Understand the funding parameters for science to pitch this bull shit

Yea, take that greedy scientists! ’cause the oil companies spend $0 pitching their own denier bull shit.
…….

Sorry man , when me , Jeremiah Jones, Blythe Barrington, and Charles Ashman landed in a cemetery in 1957.. And assumed the first four names on the headstone we saw…

Climates been the exact same since…..

Now if you want respect from me, please tell me you have skin in the game, you got some climate sales and profit at stake for the bull shit show…

Outher wise… Hire a financial advisor to handle your loot. You are to dumb to do it yourself.

#180 Ken Nash on 09.02.15 at 10:53 pm

I kinda like the idea of a multigenerational home. Sorta like Dallas but on a smaller scale. I don’t think millennials complain much or are lazy. They could be more rebellious. After all look a the rusting piece of garbage they’ve been left.
http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21662567-puzzling-weakness-manufacturing-new-rustbelt

#181 Nagraj on 09.02.15 at 10:56 pm

” … if this blog’s any indication, a mess of these Millenials have morphed into left-leaning, bitter, Boomer-hating, entitled baby socialists who come here to praise Muclair [sic], Norway [oh god, not Norway again] and higher taxes.”

So?

We managed to get Jr thru the first two years of Harvard without borrowing, The third year however was gonna need a student loan. Dang. This during the GFC. So I’ve got CNN on while I’m cookin’ dinner and WHOA! on comes this Harvard poobah and says – because of the GFC, Harvard is converting all student loans to grants. So I phoned the wife (who was at work) “Good news, dear.” Jr finished the four years owin’ nuthin. God bless America.
But there’s more. The Harvard IoP (Institute of Politics) paid everything re his three summer IoP jobs in Washington, Chapel Hill (NC), and Denver, transportation, lodging, living expenses AND some fun money.

Keep trashing young people, ye righteous Canadians, see where it gets yas all: an NDP gov’t in Oct is a given.

You say to me “Higher education is a privilege, not a right” and I say to you “Drop dead.”

#182 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:57 pm

#103 They don’t have a clue on 09.02.15 at 8:35 pm

Another amazing story.

Kudos to you!

#183 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 10:59 pm

#148 Shawn on 09.02.15 at 10:04 pm
The Dumberest Comment of the day

Crap, Smoking Man easily beats me out for that title with his comment about government pensions:

He said:

Your 300 a week that goes to your pension comes from me..

Have some respect …

*************************************
Government hired the man and paid him what it paid. A fair bargain in the market. Both parties got what they wanted. To imply that his pension contributions came as a sort of handout from taxpayers is moronic. It was paid as compensation just like for any private sector worker.

Congratulations SM on winning dumberest comment of the Day……
………

Dude did you need ti adverize with such obviousness you are a govt teet sucker…

Anonymity brother…whats wrong with people.

I have so much to teach, and running out of time.

#184 HellYeah on 09.02.15 at 11:01 pm

Some good points in the letter. My take is that one must be creative and willing to have several careers over one’s lifetime. That’s the key difference between the “new” and “old” generations IMO. Yeah, I guess there’s still some public sector stuff, but your mech Engs and neuroscientists and computer programmers of today can’t expect to be doing the same thing 5 or 10 years from now.

Also: remember the slanty houses on Shaw in the 416? They sold for $630k. Each. So over $1.2mil for the pleasure of tearing down two houses and rebuilding a foundation on top of a creek bed.

Also: old Metallica.

#185 Millmech on 09.02.15 at 11:05 pm

Jennifer,
Both my kids are millennials,got trades training in high school and one who is 24 this fall got a new contract at his work is now making just over $38/hr,he will easily break $100,000 this year.
When my kids were deciding what to do for careers I told them to look for careers with lots of older workers and not a lot of young workers.I made sure that they interviewed lots of people in industry because the info they were getting from their teachers and guidance counsellors was that they should get careers as teachers,lol.

#186 lala on 09.02.15 at 11:08 pm

Boring post. Jane please don’t write to Mr. Turner again, ever. What a waste of bandwidth. Millenials suck, they are weak and very dependent to technology. You free to delete as you please Mr.Turner.

#187 common sense on 09.02.15 at 11:15 pm

Great post #166 AB BOXSTER..

Jen: Adopt or die…it’s simple..

Get on with it…actions speak louder than words…

#188 Mark on 09.02.15 at 11:15 pm

“I know a number of senior recruiters and even one who heads their own firm. They all say that there is an overwhelming number of IT jobs but dearth of candidates”

Not sure why you persist in concocting nonsense, but you totally missed the point of what I stated. Shortages would only be accompanied by skyrocketing wages and widespread demand. Neither of which exist in the IT profession, notwithstanding your claim which is a pile of nonsense. Additionally, you made additional claims which prove that you do not know what you are talking about.

Raises for IT personnel have been few and far between. Substantial chunks of graduating classes have been forced out of the profession since the peak in the early 2000s. Many top grads can’t even buy themselves a job interview. And there appears to be no willingness of firms to hire up-and-coming talent and train/familiarize them. IT ‘shortages’ are entirely concocted by the ‘overly entitled’ merely to curry favour for the use of TFW’s.

#189 kommykim on 09.02.15 at 11:16 pm

RE: #176 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 10:52 pm
Outher wise… Hire a financial advisor to handle your loot. You are to dumb to do it yourself.

How are those Bombardier shares working out for you?

#190 cramar on 09.02.15 at 11:18 pm

Okay Jen, It is tough for Millennials today. We all accept that. Your lengthy missive outlines all the problems you are facing today. But nothing about what you can do about it, or what you intend to do about it. Throwing up your hands in frustration over the way it is will not help.

For those insisting that housing costs too much in Van & TO, then get the heck out! Figure out what you can make a living at in a smaller community and MOVE. You realize that the world of employment has changed. Determine what you can do that society will pay you for and go for it!

You didn’t create the problems you inherited, but you did make choices in your lives that lead to your current situation (education, career, location). Your choices make your life. As I told one Millennial who never researched the job prospects before entering university, “If you want a better life, learn to make better choices!”

#191 Debtfree on 09.02.15 at 11:18 pm

Jen do you really think the corporate pensions just magically appear after the work is done ? They actually appear by having between 5 to 10 % of your pay check being put into a pension fund . It’s not intitlement . It’s hard work . Most of the rest went into feeding and housing you . Few of us expect or imagine you paying us back . Wipe the snot off your nose and be grateful . Without us there would have been no you .

#192 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 11:19 pm

Good night dogs

#193 Love my Kia on 09.02.15 at 11:20 pm

31 zedgt87 on 09.02.15 at 6:36 pm

Its quite funny when the most entitled generation ever hates on millennials.

That is what this blog is slowly descending into.
********************************************
Agreed. Too many blog dogs concerned about ‘I got mine’ and who cares about anyone else. A sad state of affairs if humanity has come down to this.

It sounds apocalyptic, but one day your actions will be held to account against you in one way or another, count on it.

Thanks Garth for letting her speak her peace without snarky rebuttal. Too bad you couldn’t silent the dogs for a day too.

#194 Rick on 09.02.15 at 11:31 pm

Life is not fair today…

How about bread lines during the depression.

How about life in England or Germany during
and after WWII.

How about the industrial revolution that killed a crapload of professions.

Buttercup…today is easier than it has ever been! You are lucky to be born when you were!

Put on your big girl pants, get out there and grab the world by the balls…and stop complaining…and tell your
friends to shave their stupid beards.

#195 Pearl Arbour on 09.02.15 at 11:32 pm

Garth

Chinese naval ships doing recon off US mainland…could a Pearl Harbour style attack be in the offing….remember PH was largely caused by economic factors as the US tried to squeeze the econo-vice on the Japanese via oil…..

We do indeed live in interesting times…

#196 Buystander on 09.02.15 at 11:34 pm

Everyone seems to believe houses will increase in price forever. Switch careers and become a real estate agent.

#197 BS on 09.02.15 at 11:34 pm

“It’s increasingly difficult to find permanent work that is worth doing”

That sentence says everything you need to know about millennial’s today.

Myself and my brother both own successful businesses and are Gen-Xers. We both started at the bottom in different industries. The jobs were minimum wage doing absolutely the worst work imaginable in Canada. Dirty, shift work, part time, weekends, on call, no benefits, no love, little pay. You learn a lot doing that type of work. Your boss learns more about you and those that excel in those positions move up and onto better things. Those that say “this is not worth doing” go nowhere. They either never take the job, quit or get fired and repeat the cycle over and over again.

Anyone who ever makes it on their own has to go through tough times, do hard work they don’t like and in the end they are more successful because of it. Always been that way and alway will be. As a business owner I actually keep my business small because I don’t want to baby sit entitled millennial’s who want to pick when they work and what time they show up, if they show up because “this is not worth doing” on a particular day. My brother has a company that requires lots of workers, all well paid, and the stories he tells me are beyond belief.

People wonder why companies are hiring temporary foreign workers. It is not about paying less, it is about hiring workers with a proper attitude and work ethic.

Jen, one day you and your hubby will get it. It is not about the current system, it is about you.

#198 MF on 09.02.15 at 11:37 pm

Great letter Jen. What you speak of concerning the nature of work is 100% true for us. Doesn’t matter what degree you have because there is always a glut of applicants in every field for every position, lots of contract work, low pay, unpaid garbage etc. Add to that the trainwreck housing market and the cost of living here in the gta and it’s a recipe for disaster. 2008 changed everything. You can even see big differences between us and Gen X that entered the workforce and bought houses from 2000-2007.

The only thing to do is adapt and be flexible, which is what Garth recommends. Learn how to invest and avoid debt. Realize that most people living the high life are living off of debt and nothing more. Moving abroad is also an option, even though it’s difficult to get up and leave your family/friends. This is what I should do, but frankly I’m having trouble doing it as well.

Couple points: my boomer parents help me out too. Obviously not as much as what Garth wrote about above but enough that I know that they are there for me if I need. It really depends on the family dynamic. Our family is close. I watched my dad slave away in an unforgiving job working horrible hours for his pension for the better of 30 years (mom stayed home). He did this so that he could give me and my brother the comfortable life that we have. We are ever grateful for this. Helping me and my brother out seems to give my parents a lot of pleasure tbh.

Bottom line is not all boomers don’t get the situation and not all millennials are just leaching as much as they can (a lot of us are in la la land though).

#161 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:24 pm

Gotta say I find myself nodding in agreement at every one of your posts. This one is great advice as usual. I even wish I had to balls to get up and go.

#157 TJM on 09.02.15 at 10:21 pm

Also a great post.

#3 crymeariver on 09.02.15 at 6:01 pm

Lol.

MF

#199 CleverTitle on 09.02.15 at 11:40 pm

“It’s increasingly difficult to find permanent work that is worth doing. ”
And this is the crux of the problem. Work is something you have to do to feed your family.
Not something that has some inherent “worth”?
While I agree that it’s a very different world today from when I graduated, work is still something that has to be done to earn money.
If it feeds your soul – bonus.

#200 Pearl Arbour on 09.02.15 at 11:40 pm

sorry forgot to add

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34131429

Five Chinese ships seen off Alaska coast, Pentagon says
—————————————————————
Technically this is also just off the Canadian coast as well! Should we dispatch the flotilla of sea kayaks of which the Canadian navy is largely comprised…or maybe get all the kids to flyby with their toy drones

#201 BS on 09.02.15 at 11:48 pm

My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. He started his first professional job on Friday after a year of part-time employment as a waiter. He sent out around 10-20 resumes ever day during that time for professional jobs. This new contracting job will pay around $30k a year.

How could this happen? One full year of part time work before starting his professional career? As a lowly waiter no less. This is unbelievable Jen. Somebody needs to do something. I have never heard of someone working as a waiter for ONE FULL YEAR prior to getting a job in the field they wish. That must have been one tough year.

And on top of that you worked in corporate learning and development for a full 8 years with no job security before starting your own consulting company. That is terrible! How did you survive those 8 years of working with no job security? The stress that must have put you through to know your job was not guaranteed to death must have been tough.

I am voting NDP for sure. This has to stop! How will the millennials survive under these terrible inhumane conditions?

#202 Thanks Obama on 09.02.15 at 11:48 pm

#30 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:33 pm

Jen as promised.

Ive bucked rivits, delivered pizza, started a mfg company, taught myself to program, and design rc aircraft, door to door sales , worked for the biggest banks on tradefloors in the USA and Canada. Have 3 business at the moment.

All without graduating high school. Imagen that if you can, draw back shit writing writing skills, did not stop me from being the most popular hands diwn comment poster on this pathetic blog. . But im educated. Not schooled.
—————————-
Think I found Old-Economy Steven
http://www.quickmeme.com/Old-Economy-Steven/

#203 Doug in London on 09.02.15 at 11:48 pm

@James, post #38:
What you say is consistent with my findings. A lot of employers want someone under 30 years old with over 40 years experience in the EXACT kind of work their company does and be fully up to speed a year ago. They will accept nothing less and bellyache about a skills shortage when such a person doesn’t magically appear out of nowhere.

The idea has been mentioned many, many times about how the only work Millenials like Jen can find are these temporary contract jobs, while a lot of these Boomers are in permanent full time positions. That’s so ass backwards. Shouldn’t the Boomers, who have their houses paid off and have accumulated wealth (and thus don’t need as much money) be the ones working the temporary assignments?

#204 MoM on 09.02.15 at 11:50 pm

Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, It’s about learning to dance in the rain.
I’m a genXer and have come to terms with not having control over life. No one does. You may not have your dream job, sophisticated downtown condo or fancy car. Waiting for a job “worth doing” is wasting YOUR time. Get on with it and start somewhere. Start now and open your mind to anything. If you really want something “worth doing” go into healthcare or social work and make a difference. Alternatively since there is also no perfect politician (who shares all your concerns) to vote for you can run for office in your local riding. If that’s not a job “worth doing” why expect anyone else to do it?

Think rents are high? Ever hear of roommates? I left home at 19, always had roommates even for the first six months after I married. It’s just what we had to do.

My SIL is 47 with a 17 year old and has been living in her parents basement, unemployed for the past 13 years. She’s waiting to find the perfect job that has meaning to her. The 17 year old refused to get a summer job even though her friends did. Kid thinks her mom will support her the way the grandparents support their daughter. Lucky for my SIL her parents have money. When they pass and they are in their mid 80’s, the daughter will not have the means to support herself or her daughter. It’s the white elephant in the room. No one in the family will talk about the future. That’s a whole other topic…

#205 Dr Bambam on 09.02.15 at 11:51 pm

Jen, there most certainly is a party that generally represents your generation quite well: The Green Party.

#206 pwn3d on 09.02.15 at 11:52 pm

omg I started reading a comment and then started thinking this is the dumbest response possible and then I noticed who wrote it, mark is back. Now I have to go back to reading who is posting first before reading the actual comment. what a hassle.

#207 devore on 09.02.15 at 11:54 pm

#6 calgaryPhantom

I kind of agree with Jen, on the changing nature of employment. Up until end of 20th century, most of the work was done by humans. Today, machines and robots have essentially changed the nature of workplace. Unfortunately, the workforce hasn’t caught up with the speed with which machines took over.

Oh, please. It’s not like the trends haven’t been clear before Ford even opened his first factory. Machines work harder, are more accurate and precise, don’t get tired or take sick days, don’t sleep, are easily retooled, and operate cheaper than equivalent human power. If you’re training to dig ditches or tighten bolts on an assembly line or perform any sort of manual labor or a menial task (like driving, heads up for all the wannabe truckers and bus drivers), the writing’s been on the wall since before your parents were born.

Create/add value, or get out of the way, because a machine, robot, or AI is on its way to replace you and do it better.

#208 Doug in London on 09.02.15 at 11:55 pm

@Millmech, post #182:
Some things never change. School guidance counsellors are just as useless now as when I was in High School 40 years ago. It reminds me a lot of South Park, where the only person who gave the kids any useful guidance was Chef, not the teachers or useless Mr. Mackie.

#209 Tiger on 09.02.15 at 11:58 pm

1) Why are jobs so hard to find this year??

http://forums.redflagdeals.com/why-jobs-so-hard-find-year-1729063/

2) Can’t find a part time min wage job, starting to get angry, about to go postal

http://forums.redflagdeals.com/cant-find-part-time-min-wage-job-starting-get-angry-about-go-postal-1801915/3/

#210 Steve French on 09.03.15 at 12:02 am

Smoking Man you have barely written 3 pages on that novel you’ve been working on for the last 3 years, but have the temerity to lecture Jen and the Millenials about how to work hard?

pffftttt….

These millenials need to grow up.

For example, when I was young… my momma was soooo poor….

… pot belied kids from Africa was sendin’ her money.

#211 Sydneysider on 09.03.15 at 12:09 am

That letter is well-written, but scary in terms of what it reveals about the younger generation’s lack of understanding about how life operates.

My kids also claim to be deprived in terms of what they can do and have, but the reality is that they live and eat better than did the rich men of the 1970s. They have better health and teeth too, apart from being on the chubby side. In the early 1980s, when I lived in Kitsilano for a while, everybody was skint, but it was a pleasant life.

Does the writer own one of those cellphone thingies? I hear they are expensive.

#212 MF on 09.03.15 at 12:10 am

#182 Millmech on 09.02.15 at 11:05 pm

Good advice, except I think it is a lot easier to tell your kids that now than when I was leaving high school in 2001/2002. Back then everyone who was a pot head, skipped class, and was overall rough around the edges went into the trades. I didn’t even look at them because I always got decent grades and thought they were “below me”. How pathetic? But it’s true.

The big message we all heard was that the future would be an information economy, and that you better be equipped with technology and language capabilities to cope. Those skills were to be found in university, even if it meant studying the social sciences.

Those predictions were all wrong of course, and my tradesmen friends are doing a lot better than my university friends (on average) now.

Nowadays it seems different. The word is out now, and the tide seems to be turning. Lots of young high school kids I work with are considering college instead of uni automatically, like we did. It would be funny if we end up with a glut of tradesmen in the future? I doubt it though. Lots of older guys retiring like you said.

Buddy of mine is from Ecuador. He says back home a university degree is a ticket to a great job, and there is an abundance of labour and tradesmen looking for work. It is the opposite from what we have here. One almost wonders if those guys who learned trades in the early 2000’s simply lucked out by being in an environment that encourages building condos over research and development, scientific discovery, and technological advancement like Canada.

MF

#213 K.L. on 09.03.15 at 12:13 am

Jen had a lot of good points, pensions suck up and enormous amount of tax dollars that could be put to better use elsewhere. Also what’s so bad about living at home? It makes financial sense. How heartless can you be about complaining about how the poor boomer generation has to retire late cause they are God-forbid helping out someone besides themselves (their children). If my son needed to live with us later he’s welcome. Rent-free and Id get him groceries too. Granted I can afford it but even if I had to budget I’d still do it because he’s my child and I love him. These kids that stay at home may be afforded better job prospects in the area, better internships leading to better career and all sorts of advantages. I think it’s smart.

#214 Gen X Confessions on 09.03.15 at 12:13 am

Jen has some good points. The company that gave me my first professional job straight out of University used to hire a batch of new grads every year. Only a few short years later that changed to outsourcing to India for the majority of new hires.

I can honestly say I am a bit mystified as to why the Millennials have gotten labelled as lazy. There is one Millennial in my office and she works her ass off and good social skills as well. This summer I had a sewer backup in my basement. The restoration company sent a clean-up crew – University students I would guess. Never heard a complaint out of any of them and they got the job done on time. Chatted and joked with each other while they worked – made the best of a crappy job (pun intended). I could give more examples. Maybe this is a subculture? Maybe this is because we are not in a big city? Don’t know – this is just what I see day to day.

I disagree with Jen on the voting thing though. There will never, ever, be a party that speaks for you if you don’t start voting. They only pander to those that vote.

#215 the greatest fools on 09.03.15 at 12:31 am

Only the greatest fools spend their time pitting different generations against each other.

It would be a shame if a generation at the end of their working life would not be much better off than a generation at the beginning of their money making life.

Truly stupid people, when they run out of the blue pill find enjoyment in their remaining years patting their own back how much better, smarter they are than the younger ones.

By the time true comparison can be made, all the “wise” boomers here will be dead. If they reincarnate, they will have to listen to all the bullshit from the old, stupid millennials.

Garth, please write more about how to make money – even dog stories are better than the fake daily sitcom of boomer vs millennials.

Why play the music for the demagogues when your wife and dog is not relying on bait-click revenue?

#216 Underhoused on 09.03.15 at 12:37 am

Dear Jennifer,

Thanks so much for confirming my suspicion that Millenials are whinging idiots.

As a GenXer, I worked my a** off to beat the odds in a field in which the average successful job candidate represents literally the top 1% or less of the pool. My partner, also a GenXer did the same. We moved out, lived in shared houses and crappy apartments in questionable neighbourhoods, lived on a budget, saved what money we could, invested it as best we could, voted (both of us have also contemplated running for office, you do have that option), and focused on being the best we could be to meet the challenges we knew that we would face.

I never gave two hoots about my Greatest Generation dad’s government pension. Like many, he deserved every penny because, despite being a child of the Depression and a WWII veteran, he chose to serve the greater good in a job that contributed to keeping the Cold War from heating up and not his own greed.

Take responsibility for making the best you can of what life hands you. My generation did it because seriously, none of our Greatest Generation parents — having been through far worse — would have put up with our complaining about the stuff you complain about.

#217 alberta wrench on 09.03.15 at 12:42 am

To the guy that said the trades are the ones with money. . There is no money here keep moving nothing to see here . Please advise all kids to go get a degree instead of a trade nope no money to be made here (sarcasm) I still shake my head at all these kids who believe trades are for dolts im not worried about making the rent payment, and most likely never will be for the foreseeable future . Yes the young generation has no idea how to make do and build themselves up. They want a lifestyle right now and feel entitled to it, even if they took a degree that isn’t worth toilet paper

#218 Gen X Confessions on 09.03.15 at 12:46 am

#165 Leo Trollstoy on 09.02.15 at 10:32 pm
#138 Mark on 09.02.15 at 9:42 pm

Nobody should take Mark’s opinion on jobs.

He couldn’t find a job for 7 years and has shown absolutely no ability to find a job today.

I know a number of senior recruiters and even one who heads their own firm. They all say that there is an overwhelming number of IT jobs but dearth of candidates.

—————————————————–

Strangely, of all the stuff Mark makes up, the stuff about lack of I.T. jobs is the only thing that bugs me.

I just sat through being on a hiring panel for an intermediate level programmer job and we couldn’t find anyone despite multiple rounds of interviews. My husband also recently had the same experience at a different company – although they decided in the end to hire a new grad and train them up. And no, we were not offering low wages.

I can tell you though, that IT is absolutely ruthless in demanding that you keep your skills current. It is also painfully obvious that a lot of candidate have atrocious communication skills. If you are experienced and out of work in IT – take a good hard look at yourself in those two areas… and please, “Dear Sir” is no longer acceptable.

#219 Exurban on 09.03.15 at 1:04 am

Both my kids are millennials,got trades training in high school and one who is 24 this fall got a new contract at his work is now making just over $38/hr,he will easily break $100,000 this year.

Trades are indeed underrated, not just financially but in terms of avoiding office politics. However, your son may not be quite as far along as you think. $38 per hour x 40 hours a week x 52 weeks a year = $79,040. He’ll have to work some serious overtime to break $100k.

#220 bdy sktrn on 09.03.15 at 1:07 am

3. Climate change will have impact.
The same idiots that use every gadget or marvel created through science, are quick to discount the scientists who overwhelmingly agree that climate change is real.
—————————————-
i was, am, and have spent a decades working with those very scientists who create all these marvels.
almost all of whom were competent and useful, the others became climate preachers after ample proof of not having any skill or insight in the world of real science.

sorry you have been duped.

#221 Retired Boomer - WI on 09.03.15 at 1:12 am

#158 SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT

Moving from NJ to AL is not quite the same thing as moving from the US to a 3rd world hell hole where you can pay 5-10% of the payroll cost, and 7-10% of your former taxes, import the stuff tariff FREE…. AND still get your wholesale price!! (hint: Transportation is pretty cheap)

“FREE TRADE” for the maker yes, for the country, and the people therein… not so much.

NJ Very high property tax, high business taxes, local BS up the ying yang, the definition of a high-cost place

AL Very high sales taxes (paid by the consumer), low property taxes, fairly low local BS to permit, site etc.

ON THE CHECK

NJ: Workers NEED about $34-38 per hour to live decently.

AL: Workers NEED about HALF per hour for same standard
and better quality.

Where would you tend to site a business?

#222 GsAmazon on 09.03.15 at 1:14 am

Never a dull moment, eh Uncle Garth? Great letter, hilarious post.

#223 Retired Boomer - WI on 09.03.15 at 1:22 am

#137 FARM WIFE

Spent most all of my life in Transport. Steel Wheels, rubber wheels, logistics & warehousing.

Yup, you got it my dear lady. Well Said!

Ask the Millenial if they are willing to DO this work??

it might be beneath their dignity…

#224 millenial1982 on 09.03.15 at 1:22 am

Well I have to admit sadly I was a failure to launch for awhile however in 3 years post grad I managed to pay off 20K in student debt, a 20K used car loan and save a down payment on a home in just 3 years time on a 40K year at the time salary. Yeh it sucked, built up major anxiousness to get the hell out and what not. But I still enjoyed my youth and had fun doing things that cost next to nothing. Sorry Jen, don’t feel your pain fellow millennial. How about getting proactive and being creative with your employment to make best of your situation. Have to agree with the smoking man generalization here, sounds like you are to rigid on the play book and looking only for that one in a lifetime job. How about as one example say finding an employer focused on results rather than time on the clock? Say, become attractive by offering to get the job done on half the salary but the catch is on your terms (time). Utilize technology, get creative, work hard and get the job done in a 1/4 time to your advantage. Find a couple jobs like this or more to make it work. Life is ebb and flow, if you want to be rigid like an artery you don’t have a chance. It’s really not that hard, think more like an entrepreneur and put the Kleenex away.

#225 Great Canadian Housing Bubble Co. on 09.03.15 at 1:24 am

Having traveled extensively over the past decade, I have to conclude that the idea of children leaving the house and never return after turning 18 is a very Western-concept. One that is actually only been popular over the past 70 years.

Coincidentally, this has also been the time of extreme growth in Western countries, particularly in North America, followed by extremely low interest rates and high consumer debt loads.

One wonders whether this has all just been a temporary apparition, and that we might be better off coexisting in an environment where aging parents can be looked after by their children as in much of the rest of the world.

Scratch that … I’m not wiping my father’s butt.

#226 Turtle on 09.03.15 at 1:25 am

Hey Jen,

Money is nothing more than labour units. You trade your labour for units and than units for something you need/want. Focus on that. It is important: FOCUS on MONEY.

Too many people with too many degrees know too much about everything. There is no time to earn money. Too busy with everything but earning money.

Take yourself off Facebook. It is for people with money, not for people with time. Start packing. You will regret you have not done it earlier.

Good luck!

#227 bdy sktrn on 09.03.15 at 1:27 am

“Aaaah Juniper is healthy – we took her to the vet when she was a puppy”
That was 7 years ago.
———————————
healthy 7yo dogs don’t go to the vet for yearly checkups. i’m 48 and never really had one.

buying overpriced food/beer instead of vet services when there IS a problem is something only a foolish loser would do.

more on topic – millen’s are mostly terrified of hard work and not having unfettered 24/7 netflix.
the ‘men’ scare me the worst – they think man purses are cool, seem afraid to drive, terrified of any risk, and would wet their pants if required to change a tire or use a power tool larger than a can opener.

#228 Waterloo Resident on 09.03.15 at 1:42 am

My solution to the unemployment problem is simple:

Have the government give out EDUCATIONAL GRANTS that cover 100% of their educational costs (including housing and such), like like it was in the 70’s, for all careers involving the TRADES (plumbing, electrical, HVAC, etc.) And make it so that all students currently enrolled in a trade already has a spot lined up for him when he graduates, a position where he will work for two or three years for free while he APPRENTICES and learns his / her skills (sort of a ‘Internship’ for trades people.) The government pays the employers who hires these apprentices enough money to cover all of their ‘TRAINING’ costs they incur.

This should not only get rid of employers complaining about there is not enough trades people, it will also give a lot of young people a way to a successful way to earn enough money to actually afford to live.

( Actually, this is what Germany is doing right now, so why don’t we just copy their ways?)

Now if an idiot like me can figure this out, why is it that they government cannot?

Way too many people are going into trades these days only to find out that there are no employers willing to take them on as APPRENTICES, so these bright young students are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

#229 Mike T. on 09.03.15 at 2:11 am

well, I am not doing it for you, but do a quick summary of how man made rules changed from when Mr. T. was 20 until now

it’s not that life back then was a paradise and now it’s crap – but how much more money did people get to keep? LOTS

and shit costed A LOT LESS

man made rules

the biggest problem we face is we don’t know what we are, the elites do and this is the advantage they hold

turn off the teevee, stop watching the news, make your own observations about what YOU SEE

#230 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.03.15 at 2:12 am

High paying jobs happen when you have a labour shortage.

Best way to achive this is by removing corp tax all together. Make it zero, nada, nothing.
A stampede of cash and investment will come to Canada. Jobs for all.
But then, the commies in provincal govts will scoop it, negating any gain…
Bad idea..sorry, thought i was onto something.
—————
Great parody, Smoking Man.
But most of the time, just repetitious and boring.

#231 jane 24 on 09.03.15 at 2:56 am

Super letter Garth, very well written and argued.

As I have said a 1000 times on this blog to young people complaining that life in Canada has changed for the worst – move. There is a whole new world out there with very exciting prospects for young educated people especially in those countries undergoing their industrial revolutions.

If you insist in staying in Canada and complaining that it is not 1980, then whose fault is it? Times change.

People emigrate to follow the jobs around the world. Always have and always will. Pack your suitcase. I loved my time in Dubai.

#232 BC Guy on 09.03.15 at 2:56 am

I agree with Jennifer 100%.

Garth, you are so out of touch with what is going on in Canada’s working class down here at street level.

I am college-educated, worked for several high-tech companies in Toronto and Vancouver starting in the 90’s. My parents were poor and didn’t give me any money for my education. I worked part-time jobs during school, took on student debt, which I paid off when I graduated. I’ve always lived frugally and known how to save money and spend wisely.

I’ve had success in my career over the decades, but the job market now in most sectors is so competitive, every job has dozens of qualified applicants to choose from. I have lots of experience with big-name companies, don’t have tattooes, am clean-cut, am articulate, professional, well-groomed, a clear communicator, adaptable …. blah, blah, blah. It doesn’t matter because there are so few mid or upper level jobs out there (neither corporation or a government). Any jobs that are available have many applicants. Competition is fierce, and the corporations know this.

Corporations are doing everything to reduce costs: reduce salaries, reduce benefits, reduce pensions, outsource, off-shore, downsize .. you name it.

The lucky ones are the teachers, doctors, nurses, senior civil servants, senior execs, business owners, who all have gold-plated salaries, benefits, pensions, houses.

Some may say: create your own company, become an entrepreneur. I’ve tried so many high-tech ideas over the years, the R+D costs are enormous. So along with working full-time to pay the bills, I’ve tinkered part-time on many creative high tech ideas. But the chances are about the same as buying a lottery ticket. Every time I would think I had a winning idea, I’d do some market research, then discover that someone somewhere else (California, Germany, China, wherever) had the same idea and has a 6 month head start on me.

So Garth, stop your tired right-wing rhetoric about the so-called entitled Boomer-hating, basement-dwelling, Norway-loving Millenials. It’s old. It makes you sound like a cold-hearted, greedy 1%er who is out of touch with reality up in your ivory office tower in downtown Toronto.

I am voting for the NDP because the wealth-disparity in this country and the world has reached an all-time extreme, where even hard-working, well-educated, middle-class workers are having an extremely difficult time finding work and/or keeping their job, and affording a decent place to live. I don’t expect the NDP to have all the solutions, but at least there is some glimmer of hope that they may start to level the playing field.

#233 Kebo on 09.03.15 at 3:42 am

AB Boxster: fantastic post!

Millennials are going to have to figure it out for themselves and trying to emulate the Boomers is just not working out.

I sympathize with Jen, because she is only trying to follow the advice of her parents’ generation: stay in school, get a job in something you’re interested and the money will follow, buy real estate (renting is for suckers) etc. All advice that worked for boomers and is not working for millennials.

AB Boxster is absolutely right. Forget about what your parents have told you. Use your own critical thinking skills. Figure out some unconventional ways to get ahead. Because the conventional ways are played out. No use crying about it.

#234 Vundo on 09.03.15 at 3:55 am

A very good letter. Things were very different for our parents. Leaving home at 17, using your undergrad years and subsequent backpacking trip through Europe to “find yourself”, making enough money over summer break to pay for a whole year of university, buying a house at the beginning of your life because it is both affordable and expected, being handed a decent job because having a BA implied critical thinking and communication skills… all quaint relics of a time that ended decades ago. The people around here warn us not to listen to mom and dad about buying houses, yet sing in harmony with them when it comes to pretending that jobs and the rest of the economy are like they used to be. Entry level positions are no longer designed to allow entry into anything. They are now designed to ensure permanent servitude unless one can claw their way out via education funded by some combination of debt and grants from the bank of mom and dad.

Also, to those who think moving out to the sticks should be mandatory for those without millions: what kind of jobs are out there? Arts? Culture? Opportunities to live car free? I would not want to waste my life waiting for some big retirement payday while living miserably until I am old.

#235 eddy on 09.03.15 at 4:04 am

climate change has been exposed as a fraud by max ratt in 3 podcasts
http://maxratt.com/blog/

its an agenda
watch your wallet

#236 Freedom First on 09.03.15 at 4:05 am

I am strongly leaning to vote Liberal. Give the young guy a chance and hope the team is strong. Would like to vote NDP, and tax the rich, but that might include me. Not to be mixed up with my own personal belief that the rich should definitely be taxed higher. However, my definition of the rich is anyone who has more than I do. My own Freedom First is unconditional. No exception. No exclusion. All human beings are equally beneath me.

#237 Climate Cycles & So Much More on 09.03.15 at 4:15 am

Just Some Of The Things You Recently Did Not Want To Know About Climate Change And So Did Not Bother To Ask

“..consider this: there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way…”–Jennifuddle [Name changed to protect the goofy, guilty woman.]

That’s for sure! Let me help.

Climate change is real and is coming soon, so bundle up.

It is as sure as the rising and setting of the sun, so you had better get used to the idea and buy a good coat, some mittens, and boots to prepare for it. This coming winter will be cold and snowy. It will be another annual example of potentially killer climate change.

But cheer up. Next summer, the climate will change for the better, as the sun warms things up, melts the snow, and causes pretty flowers to appear. It will be another annual example of improving, refreshing climate change, especially if you own a classic Ford Mustang convertible and have some naturally good and wonderful urge to cruise around and enjoy the fresh air and beautiful scenery.

It is unthinkable that anyone could deny climate change when it happens so obviously every year, year after year. The deniers must live in ivory towers and never step outside into the real world.

I do understand that some complete morons did get it all backwards and thought that warming was bad and that freezing was good. Of course, anyone with even two brain cells to rub together knows better. Those who don’t have even two brain cells to rub together can rub their hands together to try to stay warm this winter.

Some people wonder about the recent drought in California, USA. Is it caused by human activity? Well, maybe it is, in a roundabout way. Lets take this on in a TRULY MEANINGFUL way. One interesting religious theory says that when too many people sin too badly for too long (exactly like the people in Hollywood, CA, USA–always acting badly and pretending that evil is good and that good is evil), God will sometimes go over to the thermostat that controls the sun and crank it up a few notches to scorch their heads to punish them for their bad behavior. Since Hollywood is incorrigibly wicked and utterly refuses to repent, it uses its “artistic license to sin” to twist the matter and blame the drought on other people enjoying their convertibles, rather than on Hollywood people enjoying their fornication, adultery, and utter depravity of the unmentionable sort (unmentionable due in part to “politically correct” speech laws). School kids love this global warming/changing nonsense because it allows them to imitate all the rotten examples that Hollywood sets in everything while pretending that they are noble heroes concerned about saving the planet.

#238 Climate Cycles & So Much More on 09.03.15 at 4:18 am

Just Some Of The Things You Recently Did Not Want To Know About Climate Change And So Did Not Bother To Ask

“…consider this: there is no major political party on the landscape now that will take on climate change in a meaningful way…”–Jennifuddle [Name changed to protect the goofy, guilty woman.]

That’s for sure! Let me help.

Climate change is real and is coming soon, so bundle up.

It is as sure as the rising and setting of the sun, so you had better get used to the idea and buy a good coat, some mittens, and boots to prepare for it. This coming winter will be cold and snowy. It will be another annual example of potentially killer climate change.

But cheer up. Next summer, the climate will change for the better, as the sun warms things up, melts the snow, and causes pretty flowers to appear. It will be another annual example of improving, refreshing climate change, especially if you own a classic Ford Mustang convertible and have some naturally good and wonderful urge to cruise around and enjoy the fresh air and beautiful scenery.

It is unthinkable that anyone could deny climate change when it happens so obviously every year, year after year. The deniers must live in ivory towers and never step outside into the real world.

I do understand that some complete morons did get it all backwards and thought that warming was bad and that freezing was good. Of course, anyone with even two brain cells to rub together knows better. Those who don’t have even two brain cells to rub together can rub their hands together to try to stay warm this winter.

Some people wonder about the recent drought in California, USA. Is it caused by human activity? Well, maybe it is, in a roundabout way. Lets take this on in a TRULY MEANINGFUL way. One interesting religious theory says that when too many people sin too badly for too long (exactly like the people in Hollywood, CA, USA–always acting badly and pretending that evil is good and that good is evil), God will sometimes go over to the thermostat that controls the sun and crank it up a few notches to scorch their heads to punish them for their bad behavior. Since Hollywood is incorrigibly wicked and utterly refuses to repent, it uses its “artistic license to sin” to twist the matter and blame the drought on other people enjoying their convertibles, rather than on Hollywood people enjoying their fornication, adultery, and utter depravity of the unmentionable sort (unmentionable due in part to “politically correct” speech laws). School kids love this global warming/changing nonsense because it allows them to imitate all the rotten examples that Hollywood sets in everything while pretending that they are noble heroes concerned about saving the planet.

#239 TRT on 09.03.15 at 5:21 am

@millmech

$100K?

Time to immigrate some trades workers.

Trade certification is the biggest scam going on. The apprenticeships are a scam to limit entry. 5 years to become a plumber ? Haha.

Let’s open the trades floodgates.

#240 Eddie on 09.03.15 at 5:35 am

I agree with Jen. In today’s world, young people can work hard & smart, and only a small % will “make it” (and not neccessarily the smartest or hardest working ones, I find that a lot of it is based on pure luck).

The rest are screwed. That is the reality of today’s job market.

#241 courage and poo on 09.03.15 at 6:31 am

The truth of the matter is that we live in Canada. And compared to most of the rest of the world, it’s amazing here. All this whining is pure rubbish! There is more than enough opportunity in this country. If you can’t find a job, its cause you suck, and people don’t want to hire losers. Screw mentorship and training programs, that’s useless. Open a webpage and start learning, OMG, in the age of internet, this is all absurd. If you’re in a classroom or training program, it has to be because you need the paper at the end of the program to do the work (like an electrician apprenticeship program). Welcome to the real world, get uncomfortable. Besides, money is cheap these days, central banks have been under ’emergency’ rates forever to stimulate the economy. If you can’t make it now, you will never make it. Wondering where you should start to make a better life, i’ll tell ya: stop eating shitty food and take care of your brain (google how) so that it has an opportunity to work properly. Either pull yourself up by your bootstraps, or remain in your wallowing mediocrity.

Meanwhile, In Sweden, banks are refusing to open savings accounts BAHAHAHA. So tired of big governments.

#242 courage and poo on 09.03.15 at 7:00 am

When people lose everything, and have nothing left to lose, they lose it. That’s not where we’re at in this country, unlike other places. So enjoy.

#243 D on 09.03.15 at 7:02 am

Garth you should have taken one for the team and put on the Metallica shirt. This chick can’t get her life together and she is worried about the questionable science of climate change. Back in the 70s we were being told that a new ice age was coming, then in the 80s due to “global warming” we were told we were only 10 years away from the point of no return. We should all have died off years ago. Climate alarmist are no different than doomers and gold bugs. Get your priorities straight, ignore the noise.

#244 Sheane Wallace on 09.03.15 at 7:12 am

#43 OXI in GREECE !!

I did not say a clerk in a bank.

PM ‘runs’ a country, supposed responsibilities are huge.
He for example oversees hundred of billions in an ‘insurance’ company called CMHC.

You are saying he makes more than leading hedge fund managers on wall street that manage funds 1 /100th of the size of the Canadian economy?

#245 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at 7:35 am

This is why we must reject Stephen Harper’s Canada.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/602525/Europe-migrant-crisis-dead-child-washed-up-beach-Turkey

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2015/09/03/canada-rejected-request-to-take-in-family-of-drowned-syrian-boy.html

The limp body of that little boy could have been a happy child in Canada.

But his family’s application was rejected, by a bureaucracy, stifled from and terrified of doing the right thing in Stephen Harper’s xenophobic and divisive autocracy.

(Sadly, I wonder if some on this blog would be more moved if this was a puppy on the beach, instead of a child. Hope not)

This is the same kind of fear disabling our public servants that muzzles those who might speak to warn us of threats like climate change.

The boy on the beach.

THAT is Stephen Harper’s Canada.

We should all be ashamed of the toxic and incompetent neo-conservative bullshit we have tolerated for far too long.

No more.

October 19 is the end of that.

Time for a new Canada.

Anything will be better than this.

#246 MillennialTory on 09.03.15 at 7:39 am

Nothing wrong with wearing a Metallica T-shirt. EVER!

#247 Julia on 09.03.15 at 7:39 am

#67 crowdedelevatorfartz

We are raising a nation of pampered “you can do no wrong” or “Good JOB” children that never hear a harsh word.
From the earliest school “sporting” events where “everyone wins!” to telling a child “good job!” every time they do the simplest of tasks.

******************************
I have an elementary school child and hockey player and that is my biggest pet peeve.

Real life has winners and losers. You should want to win and strive for that. You didn’t win? Figure out why and what you can do better next time.

Otherwise you get young adults that get shocked when they don’t get what they want or the grades they want because they tried hard.

#248 Millmech on 09.03.15 at 7:56 am

#144
Lots of work for 4th class,I can choose from at least 8 jobs and start Monday no BS.Noticing care homes looking for 4th class guys now also,growing field of opportunity.

#249 Incubus on 09.03.15 at 7:58 am

“My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. ”

How many languages does he speaks?

I guess probably only english , learn German and to to Germany.

I bet he would get a job within days.

Even refugees without skills get job in Germany.

#250 Prairieboy43 on 09.03.15 at 8:29 am

Big Wolf pack here. The herd needs to be culled. I am a hunter.
PB43

#251 SunShowers on 09.03.15 at 8:36 am

#99 Linda on 09.02.15 at 8:30 pm
Recent generations claim Boomers had it easy. Try competing with literally thousands of your classmates to find work.
————————————————–
Older generations claim Millenials have it easy. Try competing with literally tens of thousands of well educated immigrants and TFWs to find fewer jobs.

Don’t get me wrong, immigrants have got every right to be here, but this is just the nature of our job market right now in a global economy. More people (regardless of where they come from) + less jobs = lots of disillusioned people looking for work.

#252 paul on 09.03.15 at 8:42 am

#228 BC Guy on 09.03.15 at 2:56 am.
————————————————————-
If you think the NDP is going to level the playing field boy you should stick to your job that some forward thinking capitalist created for you.
The very guy that got the jump on you and that you want to take from!

#253 paul on 09.03.15 at 8:49 am

#240 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at 7:35 am

This is why we must reject Stephen Harper’s Canada.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/602525/Europe-migrant-crisis-dead-child-washed-up-beach-Turkey

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2015/09/03/canada-rejected-request-to-take-in-family-of-drowned-syrian-boy.html

The limp body of that little boy could have been a happy child in Canada
———————————————————-
So this is Harper’s fault a Child drowns half a world away!
I can see way Garth would not want to to be a Politician.

#254 gut check on 09.03.15 at 8:51 am

@ #199 Thanks Obama on 09.02.15 at 11:48 pm
#30 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:33 pm

Jen as promised.

Ive bucked rivits, delivered pizza, started a mfg company, taught myself to program, and design rc aircraft, door to door sales , worked for the biggest banks on tradefloors in the USA and Canada. Have 3 business at the moment.

All without graduating high school. Imagen that if you can, draw back shit writing writing skills, did not stop me from being the most popular hands diwn comment poster on this pathetic blog. . But im educated. Not schooled.
—————————-
Think I found Old-Economy Steven
http://www.quickmeme.com/Old-Economy-Steven/

***********************************

Not in the LEAST.
Old economy Steve is a hilarious meme, but Smoking Man does not – in any way – fit that profile.

#255 Julia on 09.03.15 at 8:51 am

#166 kommykim

The bonus/pay/pension of the CEO’s of the companies that you purchase stuff from also comes from you via higher prices than you would otherwise pay.

************************
To be fair, you have a choice to purchase from those companies. Further, you need to pay to get people that can run companies to be successful for the benefit of the shareholders. You get what you pay for.

#256 Ce 6/8 II on 09.03.15 at 9:00 am

‘My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. ‘

And he can’t find work.

Several years ago pundit George Jonas (Barbara Amiel’s ex-) wrote an excellent column outlining why the emphasis on degrees and higher education was so wrong-headed. In the 1960’s, Jonas wrote, government planning elites looked at the income levels of HS grads and college grads and saw a huge difference. The solution, as they saw it, was to make college education available to all and then income levels would automatically rise. Being government types, however, these guys never considered supply and demand and never thought that there might be, for example, too many engineers or neuroscientists for the labour market to absorb.

Which is a roundabout way of saying that Jen and her overqualified husband and other degree-bearing millenials have been sold a bill of goods about the value of a college degree. Medicine? Sure. Astrophysics? OK. PhD in molecular biology? Why not? These are RARE and difficult-to-obtain degrees and will be worth something in the labour market. On the other hand: Engineers? Dime a dozen. Sociology? Don’t make me laugh. Arts? Good luck with that.

Over-educated, over-qualified millenials are under-experienced and present little value to a prospective employer. How this problem will be resolved beats me, but dumping on boomers – not all of whom are rich – and voting for Mulcair will only exacerbate the problem. JMHO

#257 Andrew on 09.03.15 at 9:01 am

Hi Garth,
My wife and I would count as millennials as well, born 83 and 85. I would like to say that it’s not so bad out there. Jennifer sounds like she came from a privileged home.

We grew up on a single income, mom and dad lived paycheck to paychek, no emergency fund, no monthly savings always had maxed out credits cards and overdraft, making minimum payments. They provided and we survived. After 29 years pops was let go from his paper mill job with a $300k pension. Unfortunately for him, without even a high school diploma finding new work was difficult and the pay nowhere near as good.

Luckily for me I was grown up, done university and out of the house by then. I couldn’t leave fast enough, I don’t know what these weirdos are thinking living in their parents basements in their mid 20’s.
Was it hard to live sometimes? Hell ya it was. I partied like a rockstar for that first 6 months. 22 and single in a new city. I had never seen so much money and I didn’t have to pay my students loans for 6 months. I lived my life with a maxed out credit card, maxed out over draft, making the minimum payments every month, saving no money at all. I thought it was normal. As time went on priorities change and finally paying debt and saving becomes important. All this buy now and pay later catches up with you.

Jen’s husband has a mechanical and neuroscience degree and his starting salary is $30k? That’s $14/hour. Might as well move to Calgary and become a receptionist, or a Dairy Queen supervisor. Both jobs pay more.

#258 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at 9:03 am

#248 paul

You said:

“So this is Harper’s fault a Child drowns half a world away!”

——————————————–

Did you even read the story?

A request to allow this family in was HAND DELIVERED to Chris Alexander months ago.

A Stephen Harper cabinet minister.

Who expresses in his actions the essence of this so very hyper-PMO-controlled government.

It was rejected.

Harper has promised to allow in 10,000 Syrian refuges, but where are they? No one can find more than few.

Instead, Canadian forces are used in the Middle East to help make life so unbearable that people are forced to flee.

Harper makes fun of Trudeau sending clothing to help the Syrian refugees.

I’ll bet some clothing, maybe a life jacket or two, could have helped that boy’s family.

Chris Alexander has suddenly discovered compassion, and “suspends” his campaign for a day to deal with this crisis.

How cynical.

How opportunistic.

How calculating.

How inhumane.

These people are making us look awful all around the world right now.

You right wing extremists who post so many comments on this blog – you really want to vote for these people?

(And no, thankfully, many commenters here are not right wing loons, and actually quite thoughtful)

What a horrible look in the mirror we are getting today.

#259 jane 24 on 09.03.15 at 9:10 am

My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. ”

How many languages does he speaks?

I guess probably only english , learn German and to to Germany.

I bet he would get a job within days.

Even refugees without skills get job in Germany.

__________________________________________

Have you actually been to Germany? Most business there is conducted in English, the international language but you are right on the job front, lots of jobs, cheap rent and a low cost of living. Berlin rocks, EU centre now for both art and music.

#260 lee bow on 09.03.15 at 9:36 am

Instead of making some money she’s worried about global warming. There is a lot of jobs. Learning and development is not the moneymaker in most companies. May be Jen’s hubby should do electrician’s license.

#261 Bondgirl on 09.03.15 at 9:37 am

Bashing the young generation is what old people do for entertainment. Yes, its silly and pointless and unhelpful. But it makes them feel good, or at least it gets their minds momentarily off their looming dependence on diapers, so they’re not going to stop. Pay no attention to these old geezers. Or, better yet, bash the bashers.

Now here’s what I (a GenXer) have to say to you: If you can for a minute allow yourself to zoom out of your situation and look at the long-term picture, you’ll see this: Your parents enjoyed a rising standard of living partly as a byproduct of massive colonial-era transfers of wealth from other parts of the world, which then, fast forwarding to the post-WW2 period, was followed by a huge capital-driven, industry-driven boom leading to the creation of an increasingly affluent consumer society and the rise of the welfare state in much of the western world. It was a non-stop party. Then, industry realized that there was even bigger money to be made by tapping into the essentially free labor of the subhuman masses in the previously plundered colonies, and globalization was quickly born. Some cry that it is modern-day slavery, others cheer that it the best thing since slavery. No matter which camp you personally belong to, the fact is that the western consumer class largely ignored the story of Third World labour, shrugging “I care about human rights and all but frankly I care more about my wallet”. Fair enough. They had a point. But to broaden my point, I believe that the western consumer has been able to maintain its standard of living due to three factors: 1. the availability of cheap goods & services made possible by labour arbitrage. 2. huge advancements in technology 3. Debt. Wages have remained stagnant (counting out the wages of top level management, which have exploded, but we won’t talk about that because it’s not polite), and had the above-mentioned three factors not existed, our standard of living would have actually fallen. Meanwhile back at the ranch, I mean, in the Third World, for eg, in countries like China, state-sponsored capitalism (oxymoron? Maybe not) has allowed for the creation of a huge class of the “super-rich” as well as an expanding middle class. So industry suddenly has a brand new BFF: the Asian consumer class. Did you know that 45% of the world’s luxury goods (yes, think BMWs & Louis Vitton handbags) are sold to the Chinese consumer? That number is up from 0% 10 years ago. Yeah, wrap your head around that little factoid. And industry hasn’t even begun to tap into the subhuman masses and consuming classes of India yet! This party has just got started baby! And Canada isn’t really on the guest list.

So where does that leave us? I’m not sure. We are definitely at a cross-roads. But I do believe this: it is totally unrealistic for millennials in the west to expect to have what their parents had. Theirs was a uniquely special era, shaped by forces that no longer exist. What you need to begin studying is: what are the forces that are shaping and will shape YOUR lives. Don’t look to your parents for answers. They have no clue. You and your cohort are going to have to come up with solutions that fit you, because it is you guys who have everything to gain (or lose).

You cannot afford the luxury of not voting – that’s something I urge you to reflect on more carefully. Imagine a starving man going to a buffet and refusing to eat anything on offer because there are no gluten-free options. Beggars can’t be choosers. And you can’t afford to be cynical. You know what they say: “a cynic is just a disappointed idealist”. So don’t lose your hope. Study society. Study economics. Understand the world, especially the huge role technology is playing and will continue to play in shaping things. Study the sustainability movements, the self-sufficiency movements that are brewing all over the world. Study the different political campaigns and back the party whose philosophy resonates most strongly with you. If we lose democracy, we will lose everything – that is one thing I am absolutely one hundred percent sure about. Your husband is both an engineer and a neuroscientist. Talk about off-the-charts analytical capabilities. You own you own business – so you guys obviously have the combined brainpower to figure this out for yourself. Go for it. Travel the world. Look beyond Canada. Become part of a new revolution. Save the world. Yanno?

And read this:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/aug/28/canada-stephen-harper-harder-to-vote

#262 Hot Albertan Money on 09.03.15 at 9:39 am

“I own my own consulting business now, but before that I worked in corporate learning and development for 8 years. All but one of my jobs (which was later outsourced) was a permanent job. I have been on contract, no benefits, no job security for almost all of that time. My husband has degrees in mechanical engineering and neuroscience. He started his first professional job on Friday after a year of part-time employment as a waiter. He sent out around 10-20 resumes ever day during that time for professional jobs. This new contracting job will pay around $30k a year. My father, by contrast, a Boomer poster child, worked for the same crown corp for 27 years, collected a $1M+ public sector pension, has a basement full of toys and 3 SUVs in the suburban driveway, and has the nerve to say “Every time I hear a Liberal talk I hear a hand going in my pocket.” Yeah, Dad, you do, TO PAY YOU AND YOUR PENSION.

Is she comparing her father’s lifestyle, at the end of his career, to her/her husband’s lifestyle at the begining of their careers?

That’s a dumb comparison. Apples and Oranges

Did her father have “a basement full of toys and 3 SUVs in the suburban driveway” when he was her age and starting out? I’m guessing not.

#263 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 9:41 am

#242 Julia on 09.03.15 at 7:39 am
——————————-
Winning should not be the main goal. I think that’s largely to blame for the greed and corruption you see from white collars. Trying hard, doing your best, and IMPROVING are more noble goals in my mind.

Face it–we all live in Canada and therefore are all ‘winners’. Who cares if the referee in the hockey game blew the call (whether out of incompetence or bribery). The most important thing is that you did the best you could. Yes it is ok to be upset about not winning, but perspective is needed.

#264 cramar on 09.03.15 at 9:41 am

#129 DM in C on 09.02.15 at 9:31 pm

Meanwhile his boomer grandparents overspent on everything, took early ‘disability’ pensions and are living hand to mouth, smoking and drinking Tim’s every day and just got denied a second mortgage on their home.

———–

Proof that this is not a generational thing. Every generation has those who have a foolish lifestyle, make unwise choices, and harvest what they plant.

#265 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 9:45 am

#238 D on 09.03.15 at 7:02 am
———————
Sorry, you’re wrong. The science on climate change has been proven. Besides, dumping gigatonnes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere can’t be having an effect on weather now, can’t it?

#266 Leinnay on 09.03.15 at 9:52 am

I came from a third world country five years ago with $50 bucks in my pockets (this number is exact and true). I came with a master degree, I was 27 at the time, I came alone, no family in Canada…

At the beginning I did pluming, construction, carpentering, horse shit shoveling (for real), tree planting, roofing, you name it (I had no qualification for any of this, but yet I did it). I thought about going to Alberta to extract oil from the ice. I thought about catching Blue Crabs in the Arctic. Luckily I did not have to: after a few months I got my first professional job, very low paying.

In my mind failure was not an option: I would succeed in Canada or die trying.

Then I switched jobs until I am making 100k yearly. On one year I had two jobs and made above that mark.
Then my wife came from my same country a year ago. After a year she got a 70k job.

So, with our poor English (really poor indeed), with our little knowledge of this land, with barely no connections, we managed to at least work for a decent pay.

If there is no job market for you profession, then why did you study that in the first place? If you find no jobs in your profession, why don’t you try construction or any other rough jobs? I can tell you for a fact that there are lots of opportunities to work in Canada. The problem is people here consider those opportunities beneath them and prefer to stay in their parent’s basements.

I find it hard to believe kids in Canada cannot do the same. I really think there is a problem of social attitude in that generation.

#267 George S on 09.03.15 at 9:59 am

“year of part-time employment as a waiter. He sent out around 10-20 resumes ever day during that time for professional jobs. This new contracting job will pay around $30k a year.”

Interesting that there were 3000+ jobs to apply for. Professional jobs yet. There must be something wrong.

No political party has proposed any meaningful strategy for dealing with climate change because no one else in he world is doing anything about it either so why should we.

Only 35 years ago 14% was considered to be a super good mortgage rate deal only available privately. That’s why the only granite counter tops were on the sides of 40 storey buildings owned by financial companies.

Smoking Man: You are also paying for private business owner’s and employee’s pensions as part of the price of the things you buy and the services you purchase. The cost of pensions is built into the cost of everything. In countries where there are no pensions you rely on your family to support you in your retirement so you have to provide your children with a reason to support you which also cuts into your income. The reason that government workers have a comparatively good pension is that most of their work cannot be outsourced for many reasons including national security and a comparatively large portion of their compensation package is not paid to them but is held back as a “contribution” to their pension plan. The return rate on the investment is relatively low but consistent through good times and bad so it may seem relatively high now but was relatively extremely low for a lot of years.

When my kids were little they were complaining a bit about me not over-the-top praising them for doing some simple thing. I explained that they were capable of doing really good work because they were blessed with being very intelligent and had a good brain. If they were mentally challenged then I would praise them for doing something simple like brushing their teeth correctly by themselves but otherwise they have to work to higher standards.
The way over the top praise for simple things is likely what raises the hackles of most boomers. Most boomers were psychologically and physically abused through their entire education. That was the way it was.

#268 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at 10:02 am

GeorgeSoonToBeRetired

Speak for yourself.

Not to me it isn’t.

I do not think we should simply take in 10000 people from a part of the Mideast that is a hotbed of extremism. Just take a look what is happening in Europe if you want an example of what is possible. The plight of those people is horrible but why doesn’t some of the other Arab states take them in?

We already have a lot of people working here providing a service, going about getting citizenship the proper way. My girlfriend is an example. They deserve it first.

Mf

#269 The Other Chris on 09.03.15 at 10:03 am

My wife is in a bit of the same position as Jen’s husband. She did her undergraduate degree in engineering, then went on to do a Ph.D. in one of the sciences. In retrospect it was a very poor career decision; her earning prospects would have been better staying in engineering. The problem is that the media pounds the youth with this narrative of “get higher education” and “STEM”, and youth with no work experience don’t really appreciate that you need to go into specific fields in order to have good career outcomes. Plenty of the hard sciences don’t pay well at all, and have poor job prospects, even with a PhD.

#270 working guy in BC on 09.03.15 at 10:03 am

@TJM #157

You said: “You need internet at home for 50+ bucks a month if you want to access job opportunities in the place where they’re actually posted, whereas in the past everyone would look at the same want ads in the 25-cent newspaper. (Sure, you can go to the employment office where they have computers, but that puts you at a disadvantage relative to whoever has a computer and internet.)”

Thanks for the post. Minor correction though. The Conservatives shut down the employment centres that students and young people used to be able to go to to use computers to search for jobs and write resumes. Their justification was everything can be accessed online. CBC reported in 2012:

“The federal government is shutting down its seasonal student job centres, saving $6.5 million annually, and instead is bolstering online job resources for youth.

Canadians accustomed to visiting a Service Canada Centre for Youth to hunt for a summer job no longer have that option. The offices were located across the country, and were generally open from May to August.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/student-job-centres-shut-down-across-canada-1.1225459

#271 Whaaaat on 09.03.15 at 10:14 am

#246 SunShowers on 09.03.15 at 8:36 am

More people (regardless of where they come from) + less jobs = lots of disillusioned people looking for work.
———————————————————————-

Bang on. The more people we let in, the less businesses need to pay anyone. Harper claims to have created $1.3 million jobs since 2008/2009. Well the population of Canada has grown by $1.8 million people since 2011 so sounds like we are barely keeping pace. What a great leader.

#272 Bob on 09.03.15 at 10:19 am

Jen,

I don’t know what you are complaining about. I came to Canada with a couple thousand dollars in my pocket and had a tough time getting to where we are today. I am not a boomer – gen-x if you want to label me.

Life challenges are normal and they help us to develop character. You need these challenges in your life and without them you will fail.

At your age you probably don’t want my advice but if you do here it is…

1) Stay out of debt except for a mortgage. Make sure the mortgage is not more than 20% of your take home pay.

2) Invest 15% of your income the way Garth suggests you do it.

3) Have a couple kids, don’t work too hard, and enjoy your life.

4) When your dad passes on as we all do eventually, you can look forward to a sizeable inheritance that you can use to add to your bottom line.

5) Oh yeah, stay married and be patient with your husband and give him a break.

That’s about it…

I look forward to emails from you in 30 years time. I am sure you will be singing a different tune if you pay attention to a few of the people that come here. That includes Garth…

#273 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 10:19 am

Merchandise Trade Figures Look Good

Stats Can new report out today. Trade deficit narrows (in dollars) (harder to gauge volumes)

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150903/dq150903a-eng.htm?cmp=mstatcan

Most surprising stat:

Exports to countries other than the United States were up 2.9% to $10.7 billion in July, led by an 11.7% increase in exports to China.

What the? A 12% INCREASE in exports to China. The place where the economy was reported to be so bad it would drag down the world?

Maybe it was just a price increase and not so much a volume increase? In any case, very positive for those Canadian companies that got the money.

#274 Axehead on 09.03.15 at 10:21 am

Jen,

Boomers were told, in school, to fear a coming ice age. You were told to fear a rapidly heading earth. I was taught that CO2 is plant food and I suppose they forgot to mention that to you during grade 10 science class. In my day, teachers wore ties and dresses, didn’t drink coffee in class, we didn’t watch movies unless they were educational (and boring, especially the one about the toy wooden canoe floating down a river somewhere that winded around the whole country) but they decided that sexual education and environmental awareness was more important than reading/writing/arithmatic for you. It was hard to find a job back then, it’s hard to find a job now. They used to play the national anthem before the movie started back then and everyone stood up, now the limits are off for everything from language to sexuality. The hard working and creative and persistant and wise were successful then, same as you today. Things change and things stay the same.

If you get what you ask for from your politicians: money directed to climate change (this is a politicaly motivated money transfer scheme supported by scant and dubious scientific evidence – have you actually read the reports and purported evidence yourself?), socialist redistribution of wealth and intense corporate persecution…we all get equally poorer because the money, wealth, industry and purpose will go where it’s wanted.

It’s as wonderful now as it was then, and it’s as shitty now as it was then, and there’s just as much opportunity now as there was then.

I think you need to grow up.

#275 Vicpaul on 09.03.15 at 10:21 am

#80 Mr. Obvious

Wisdom, with a blend of compassion and encouragement.
Thanks for sharing…again. )

#276 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 10:24 am

Residential Construction Spending was strong in Q2

… with some weakness in Alberta, but overall was very strong.

“Investment in residential construction totalled $28.9 billion in the second quarter, up 4.0% from the same quarter in 2014.”

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150903/dq150903c-eng.htm?cmp=mstatcan

Make of it what you will… I am making no interpretation just showing the link that Q2 was strong.

#277 Nora Lenderby on 09.03.15 at 10:24 am

#203 pwn3d on 09.02.15 at 11:52 pm
…mark is back. Now I have to go back to reading who is posting first before reading the actual comment. what a hassle.

Mark usually uses bold markup in his posts. Helpful for those who are hard of understanding and the visually impaired…

#225 Mike T. on 09.03.15 at 2:11 am
…turn off the teevee, stop watching the news, make your own observations about what YOU SEE

Best practical suggestion that can be instantly applied today. Same for video games and social media. Keep track of your time.

And just like that, you have 5 hours more spare time every day to do all the things you never have time to do…

#228 BC Guy on 09.03.15 at 2:56 am
the world has reached an all-time extreme, where even hard-working, well-educated, middle-class workers are having an extremely difficult time finding work and/or keeping their job, and affording a decent place to live.

I’m not unsympathetic. This is an apparently intractable problem in many countries (youth unemployment). If you have the freedom to move somewhere else, I advise you to do so. It will be a quicker solution for you personally than any change in government, revolution etc.

Any new government will be up to its withers in crises and supplicants. It might be too busy to hear your prayers.

#278 Nora Lenderby on 09.03.15 at 10:29 am

#253 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at 9:03 am

I agree. This is the defining issue of our species.

In deep water, the tsunami approaches unnoticed.

#279 Dup on 09.03.15 at 10:29 am

One day I asked my barber which is quite old. How was the job market in your day? He said: There was a high demand for people in all areas. You started a job in the morning and if you did not like it by the afternoon you left and found another one in the same day. Wow, try that now days. It is about supply and demand.
Questions: How many of you baby boomer’s still type with two fingers? How many of you make over 100K/year?

#280 Llewelyn on 09.03.15 at 10:32 am

One thing that seems certain to me is that after picking all of the low hanging fruit our Federal and Provincial governments proceeded to pluck a good portion of the fruit required by future generations. Whatever contributors to this blog might think of citizens who had the misfortune of entering the labour force after 2000 one thing seems certain –

The Federal and Provincial governments will find it very difficult to squeeze additional juice out of their wages.

The juicer for personal income tax is running at maximum. If the Canadian economy does not begin to expand something is headed for the fan.

In 1965 when I was 18 years old total revenue collected by the Federal and Provincial governments was $15.4 billion. Personal income tax generated $3.47 billion or 22.5 % of government revenues.

In 1965 corporate income taxes generated $2.3 billion or 14.9% of total revenues.

By 1975 when I finished my education and entered the labour force total revenues collected by the Federal and Provincial governments had increased to $62.5 billion. Personal income tax generated $19.2 billion or 30.7 % of government revenues.

In 1975 corporate income taxes generated $7.9 billion or 12.6% of total revenues.

The latest budget projections for 2015 indicate that personal income tax will generate over 40% of Federal and Provincial government revenues while corporate income tax will generate less than 11% of government revenues.

You can hardly blame younger Canadians for questioning the current dependency of personal income tax while the coupon clipping, portfolio watching, generation lobbies for additional tax cuts for multi-national corporations whose profits are at an all time high and who are sitting on trillions of dollars in cash.

In 1965 total debt of the Federal and Provincial governments was less than $30.0 billion. In 2015 total debt exceeds $1.1 trillion. The result of saddling future generations with an additional $1.07 trillion in debt is an environment where personal income taxes and various other taxes and pension payments contributed by the general population generate over 70% of Federal and Provincial government revenues.

The percentage of the labour force employed by major Corporations is actually declining while the percentage of the labour force supported by the public sector is increasing each year. Expenditures incurred by all levels of government are increasing at a time when the ability to extract revenue from ordinary citizens has been maxed out.

Clearly additional debt is not the answer so I find it very strange that Garth and many contributors to this blog seem unwilling to consider any increase to the share of revenues generated by corporations.

The benefits of $1.07 trillion in long term debt are locked up in millions of investment portfolios so it does not surprise me that younger Canadians might feel just a touch bitter.

#281 Calgary Rip Off on 09.03.15 at 10:33 am

Sorry, the generation that is self entitled is the baby boomers.

Not through intention but sheer volume of people has created many of the problems in the economy. Not to worry, give it another 20-30 years, most of the problems will go away.

Meanwhile, you have many 20 year olds that are motivated and working hard and adding value in many places.

At my work meanwhile, some, not all, of the baby boomers complain about stupid things such as their chair quality or their plane flights. They talk as if they are important. While all this talking is going on, despite the reality that they are working part time and getting a pension, in reality earning more than the full timer, they continue to whine. These people are a waste of space.

What is really nice is that many of young people are now out and voting. As a consequence the “progressive” conservative party was thrown out in Alberta. In NW Calgary due to Jim Prentice quitting now another election is being held. If the NDP gets in good luck to the corporations having their taxes lowered. Raise their taxes. My taxes will likely go up as well. That is ok. At least the taxes are going for something rather than just paying someone in office’s salary. It isnt like the oil companies have any clout with the sheer volume of reserves in Saudi Arabia. They are held hostage to the reality that bitumen/fracking cant compete with ready oil that Saudi has.

For those that are right wing, due yourself a favour: Go marry an American and join the IRS and police state usa down south. http://www.policestateusa.com/

#282 Daisy Mae on 09.03.15 at 10:34 am

#95: “I found the NDP in BC more for the people; they go around talking to ordinary people. I also find them environmentally concerned. They are not perfect but I feel the best of the three from my experience with the three parties.”

******************

Notice the NDP in BC are never re-elected? Always…one term.

#283 kommykim on 09.03.15 at 10:36 am

RE: #250 Julia on 09.03.15 at 8:51 am
#166 kommykim
The bonus/pay/pension of the CEO’s of the companies that you purchase stuff from also comes from you via higher prices than you would otherwise pay.

************************
To be fair, you have a choice to purchase from those companies.

True, but you have to purchase essentials, such as food, clothing, & shelter to survive. Those things are all provided by companies which have a CEO. You may have your pick of CEO, but you still have to support at least ONE CEO’s lavish compensation package per industry.

#284 Vancouver Real Estate on 09.03.15 at 10:56 am

Greater Vancouver detached homes set a new price record. Up almost 20% from August 2014. Now, $1,474,475.

http://www.bnn.ca/News/2015/9/3/Greater-Vancouver-house-prices-soar-20-to-average-147M.aspx

http://www.yattermatters.com/2015/09/vancouver-did-it-again/#more-39785

#285 Sam on 09.03.15 at 10:58 am

and so it begins,

http://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/mortgages-real-estate/almost-half-of-homes-in-new-york-and-d-c-now-losing-value

#286 The real Kip on 09.03.15 at 11:01 am

Hey Jen, on that voting thing, you are absolutely right. Don’t bother voting, the Boomers will and we’ll take care of everything!

#287 Eddie on 09.03.15 at 11:04 am

Its interesting that old people don’t understand that they didn’t earn their retirement money.

There is no gigantic money pot you put money in to, and then when you retire, it comes out of the pot.

One generation raises the next, and the next generation pays for the previous one’s retirement. That’s the way it works.

The reality for baby boomers is that THEIR PARENTS handed them a world with abundant economic opportunities. We are handing the millenials a completely messed up world where a random few “make it” and the rest become disillusioned working minimum wage.

Oh, but how those who “make it” like to gloat! Like it was all based on their hard work. I’ve got bad news for you. You made it not because you worked hard, but simply because somebody had to.

#288 Julia on 09.03.15 at 11:19 am

I guess perspective varies on what you observe and learn from your parents.

I am GenX. My parents are immigrants. My dad came here first with his brothers to find new opportunties (read: any work). Live in hostels and even in a small beat up car at the beginning. Started at the very bottom. The 3 brothers were able to afford a small apartment together.
Later, they were all able to branch out and live on their own. My mom then came over.

I was born a few years later, followed by my siblings.
My dad busted his butt and my mom stayed home with us until we were old enough, then she took on a minimum wage job to keep busy but also to save money to afford some travels or luxuries.
I stayed home though University while also working 2 jobs.
I finished without student debts and left home, now working full at 1 of the jobs I had during school, moving slowly up the ladder. Not the career I thought I would have but it has worked great and I still bust my butt today.

My mom is now retired from her minimum wage job, after raising 3 kids (all out of the house) while also successfully beating breast cancer.
My dad eventually started his own business, which grew to the point where he sold it for a significant sum and now remains on a part time management contract because he enjoys what he does. They downsized their mortgage free home a few years ago for a small condo and travel the world by renting apartments or condos in different places for a few weeks at a time.

That is what success is to me. I have it easier thanks to them.

#289 Burton on 09.03.15 at 11:19 am

Hey Jen,
As I told my kids when they came whining ” life sucks and then you die” so get over it and do something. Life is not fair.

#290 kommykim on 09.03.15 at 11:19 am

#231eddy on 09.03.15 at 4:04 am
climate change has been exposed as a fraud by max ratt in 3 podcasts
http://maxratt.com/blog/
its an agenda
watch your wallet

There is an organisation that now scans the internet for climate change denier rhetoric, logs the IPs, identifies the perpetrators, and records it in a searchable database. When the day of reckoning comes, they claim that they will release this database into the public domain. Mob justice will take care of the rest.

#291 Julia on 09.03.15 at 11:24 am

BTW Garth, you are pretty quiet on the comments today.

#292 drbrain8 on 09.03.15 at 11:31 am

Get rich or try dying.

#293 BS on 09.03.15 at 11:36 am

Older generations claim Millenials have it easy. Try competing with literally tens of thousands of well educated immigrants and TFWs to find fewer jobs.

There are not fewer jobs and more competition for the jobs than in the past. Unemployment is lower now than it has been in the past decades like the 70s, 80s and 90s.

Do millennials ever wonder why a company would hire a TFW or recent immigrant over a person born here? The person born here should have a huge advantage with language, culture and even networking. Just read the millennials comments on this blog and you quickly figure out why they are passed over for jobs. It is called entitlement. The TFW or recent immigrant are happy to do the job and perform to a high standard where the millennial spends most of the day complaining about the job not worth doing. In a few years those new immigrants are the ones doing the hiring the the millennial is still looking for the job worth doing.

#294 Alberta Ed on 09.03.15 at 11:39 am

Can’t say I have a whole lot of sympathy for poor Jen. Came to Canada with just a few bucks in our pockets 45 years ago. Started at the bottom, both worked, struggled a lot of years, took some significant risks, changed careers and moved (several times) to where the opportunities were. Put the kids through university. Found a good financial adviser, thankfully. Wasn’t easy. We didn’t feel entitled to anything.

#295 Prairieboy43 on 09.03.15 at 11:42 am

There is a book called “168 HOURs you have more time than you think” By Laura Vanderkam. A good read on how to utilize TIME wisely.
PB43

#296 Capt. Obvious on 09.03.15 at 11:46 am

@ Ce 6/8 II Astrophysics? OK.

Let me stop you right there. Your own supply and demand equation dictates this cannot be a good degree to pursue. There may be few people with these degrees but there are even fewer positions in existence that can absorb them.
Niche degrees are not an answer.

#297 randman on 09.03.15 at 11:49 am

WHAT?!

The benchmark house in Vancouver is over $1 million? Toronto is just under that?

Are you out of your ****ing minds?

Canada learned nothing from the United States and our housing bubble and both deserves to and will have a monstrous blow-up and crash.

As for those of you in the Canadian Real Estate Market, since you saw what happened here and know, but are involved in this anyway, perhaps those who wind up under a freeway overpass will decide that the endless excuses I’m sure you will be putting forward simply don’t was

Well at Least Karl Denninger agrees with Garth on ONE thing!!!

http://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=230623

#298 Godth on 09.03.15 at 11:51 am

#70 gut check on 09.02.15 at 7:29 pm

I’m Gen-X too, had the same conversations for years. The responses from the WWII vets (the old guys when I was younger) was often “I’m glad I’m old, you guys are screwed”. The boomers usually respond with a variation of “It’s more fun to make a mess than to have to clean it up! Thankfully I’ll be dead before the SHTF”.

I agree with you otherwise as well. Maybe the millenials should take their educations and collectively run. Leave all the entitled, grumpy old farts to stew in their own debts.

I moved to Europe at 18, I got the hell out ASAP. In fact I was bailing my parents out before I left and still paid for my own way out.

Run kiddies run.

#299 Mister Obvious on 09.03.15 at 12:02 pm

#228 BC Guy

“My parents were poor and didn’t give me any money for my education.”
———————————–

My parents were not poor and still didn’t give me any money for my education.

I’m sure they would have, but I simply didn’t ask for it. I chose to work as a grunt in construction labor jobs for several years until I could pay my own way through BCIT by the age of 30.

I had to do everything my own way. (I still do.) Finally, myself and three other very focused peers made a clean getaway from our parent’s basements. We shared accommodation in an East Vancouver dump while we obtained usable technical educations.

Partying of any any description was put on strict hold for over two years. We considered it fine sport to ‘out-skinflint’ each other on every expense.

We knew who our potential employers were going to be before we began our courses. Industry was essentially broadcasting to us what skills they needed and were waiting with appropriate jobs on graduation day.

I had fiddled around with two years of liberal arts courses at Douglas College a decade earlier while still living with mom & dad. It was big fun and I learned plenty but not a scrap of it constituted a semblance of job market preparation.

I was filling in time and I knew it. The alternative was more of that low skilled, low paying grunt work I eventually had to accept to improve my prospects and finance a practical education.

#300 World Traveller on 09.03.15 at 12:04 pm

@#37 james
Your concluding statement.
“In many ways they are incredibly pampered emotionally, which is a very bad feature in the context of the current economic climate.”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hits the nail on the head.
We are raising a nation of pampered “you can do no wrong” or “Good JOB” children that never hear a harsh word.
From the earliest school “sporting” events where “everyone wins!” to telling a child “good job!” every time they do the simplest of tasks.

***

I worked with a girl that was constantly looking for positive feedback (even saying how great she was because she did a lot of phone calls that day, lol). She was so annoying at this and would have a temper tantrum if she didn’t receive positive feedback, that she ended up getting the boot!
I’m sure the different coloured hair everyday was probably the clincher.

#301 chapter 9 on 09.03.15 at 12:08 pm

#148 Shawn

Government hired the man and paid him what it paid. A fair bargain in the market. Both parties got what they wanted. To imply that his pension contributions came as a sort of handout from taxpayers are moronic.

For the record federal,provincial and municipal public servants retire earlier,have superior pensions,better job security and miss more work than their counterparts in the private sector. Who pays for this? Toothfairy, Santa Claus, no, it’s the Canadian taxpayer to the tune of $20 billion a year.

#302 Edmonton Fool on 09.03.15 at 12:10 pm

Calgary home sales down 27% in August

http://www.ctvnews.ca/business/calgary-home-sales-down-27-in-august-1.2545141

#303 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 12:12 pm

I’m in my 30’s and I don’t agree with Jen. She does sound entitled. No job is perfect but they are out there.

I grew up in rural SK. My first job was pumping gas, sweeping floors, and cleaning toilets. I didn’t like it and it certainly wasn’t meaningful but it was a job and I was young.

After high school I worked as a labourer in construction. It was hard work and didn’t pay well ($8-$10/hr) but it was a job. I worked hard and established good references. I didn’t go to university, I took a 2 year college course in computer technology because that’s what I could afford. I didn’t have a lot of great job options in SK but I took the best available. It paid $35,000 per year. I worked hard, did more than I needed to and tried to established myself as an asset.

I’ve worked myself into a manager of technology position with a national corporation. I have staff working for me with technical diplomas, undergrad degrees, master degrees and PHD’s.

The problem with the highly educated people I interview is that they don’t have all that much experience. In most case they have weak real world references and the education background they have, doesn’t always apply to the real world. They expect $80,000/year+ even though I can get better work from a lesser educated programmer working for $50,000.

Just because you have paper credentials doesn’t mean you are employable. Finding a job is hard and you have to prove yourself. This is the way it was and will always be. Good jobs are out there but they won’t come easily. You actually have to work. Nothing doesn’t happen overnight, it takes time. My parents never had granite or stainless. Everything they had took decades of hard work. It’s the same with me and it will be the same with my children…

#304 Berniebee on 09.03.15 at 12:16 pm

Dear Jennifer,

There are places in the world, where because of either abject poverty or other circumstances, no matter what level of education and drive you have, the odds are very much against you. Vancouver is one such place.

You really need to emigrate to basically any other medium/large size city in Canada.

And about boomers:
1) They never used the term “work worth doing”.
2) The vast majority of boomers do NOT enjoy a public sector pension.

#305 George S on 09.03.15 at 12:22 pm

Climate change predictions are based on computer models that are very similar to a computer football game where all the player stats are stored in the game and you set up the scenario by choosing which plays to make in the game and which players are on the field. The outcome depends on the input. All based on statistics.

Computer models are continuously refined and made more accurate as more data on the effects of changes in the inputs are documented. It takes many years to perfect a computer model but in perfecting it you are mainly narrowing the range of outcomes and increasing their probability from a given set of inputs. There is always the probability of something like an asteroid or volcano that renders all this effort irrelevant.

So what the models say is that when you up the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere the earth gets warmer in proportion to the increase in the concentration of CO2. It is verifiable and accepted as fact by most scientists. All the other consequences that are predicted have a certain probability of occurring that varies according to the model used to predict them. This is why people argue about it.

The main good thing about limiting our carbon use is that it will wean us off the use of fossil fuel for everything before we are forced to do it when it runs out and we will be able to use the last bits of fossil fuels for important things like growing enough food for some ridiculously high population of people.

It is like trying to predict the bursting of Canada’s real estate bubble. It should have burst by now and has been on the verge of bursting for a long time, but for some reason it is holding on.

#306 gut check on 09.03.15 at 12:26 pm

Fictional entry:

I came to Canada in 1951 with 3 Latvian coins in my hand. In my hand, not my pocket, because my pockets had busted holes in them rendering them useless. I learned to clutch everything I owned – a habit I still have to this day – which at the time was my passport, my three coins and my autographed picture of Elvis. Elvis was everything to me back then – I had no family, no friends. I was a lone wolf, having been left to fend for myself naked on a hilltop on the Latvia-Estonia border when I was a mere 4 years old.

I knew what I had to do even at that tender age – I struggled to collect coal that fell of the backs of delivery wagons and then sold it to hard on their luck elderly citizens of the border towns of the two countries. This is where I learned to bargain. You ever try facing down a drunken post war soldier in the freezing Latvian winter at 4 years old? when you know your next meal depends on you being able to hold your ground? it wasn’t easy, I tell you.

After arriving in Canada with hopes of a better life I learned quickly that I was still operating under my own steam. I slept in mailboxes and coin return slots but every morning I got up and stealthily snuck into Walgreen’s drugstore where I would open the toothpaste and squeeze a little onto my finger so that I could have peppermint breath for the many job interviews I had lined up before my shift at the sweatshop. You read that right – the only place I could find work in Toronto was in a back alley stitching house putting together low end jockey shorts. It was a living and in spite of the whippings I was grateful for every hap’ny I took home.

In this time my only solace was looking at art in the galleries, appreciating fine music which came for free from the radio in the sweat shop, and enjoying the culture in the city on my two hours off per day. Thank God for artists I thought to myself! But it wasn’t until later, when I met one, that I realized that they all should have been engineers and medical doctors or financial planners instead. Who needs the creative professions!?

I digress…

I’m very proud that I was so smart, so sacrificing, and am now so humble from my hard times. I have turned all of those terrible years outward onto society and I make sure to berate anyone who might be struggling in their youth. Why should I give them any sympathy??? Yes, I think this is the best way.

Myself, I didn’t abandon any of my 18 children on hilltops, but maybe I should have. Maybe then the whole world would be full of people like me. The best and smartest people of all.

Uz veselibu!

#307 NoName on 09.03.15 at 12:28 pm

Jenn if you that its tough now wait until kids come up in a picture.

and on a side note #efficiency

patronizing Jenn, and sucking-up to Mrs Tylenol at the same time…

#308 Ponzius Pilatus on 09.03.15 at 12:33 pm

If I’d get a few bucks every time I read the sentence “I came to Canada with just a few bucks” …………

#309 Renter's Revenge! on 09.03.15 at 12:36 pm

#285 kommykim

“There is an organisation that now scans the internet for climate change denier rhetoric, logs the IPs, identifies the perpetrators, and records it in a searchable database. When the day of reckoning comes, they claim that they will release this database into the public domain. Mob justice will take care of the rest.”

Good idea, kill everyone who argues with you. Science is a blood sport and only the winners get to live. The punishment for being wrong should be severe!

#310 Smoking Man on 09.03.15 at 12:41 pm

#285 kommykim on 09.03.15 at 11:19 am
#231eddy on 09.03.15 at 4:04 am
climate change has been exposed as a fraud by max ratt in 3 podcasts
http://maxratt.com/blog/
its an agenda
watch your wallet

There is an organisation that now scans the internet for climate change denier rhetoric, logs the IPs, identifies the perpetrators, and records it in a searchable database. When the day of reckoning comes, they claim that they will release this database into the public domain. Mob justice will take care of the rest.
…..

Send me the organization name, i will gladly submit my photo, real name addess.

With a letter saying, I AM A PROUD CLIMATE CHANGE DENIER !!!!

#311 Julia on 09.03.15 at 12:41 pm

#258 bottoms up

Winning should not be the main goal but you should want to win and strive for that. Nothing wrong with wanting to win.
Learning from losses and seeing what you can do better next time is wanting to improve.

Yes, perspective. I prefer someone who strives to win then someone who just tries hard. It’s all in the attitude though.

#312 MF on 09.03.15 at 12:48 pm

#289 Alberta Ed on 09.03.15 at 11:39 am

I should have stopped reading after “45 years ago”. Did you not read Jen’s argument about how the nature of work has changed?

We millennials are the future. We will be paying your hospital bills so maybe you should take the knowledge you have learned in the past 45 years and tackle the problem looming in this country rather than complain about “entitlement”.

#288 BS on 09.03.15 at 11:36 am

The quality of the jobs has diminished. Read Jen’s letter again. That’s the problem, when the cost of living has skyrocketed, and the jobs that pay a fair wage have vanished, you have a problem.

#284 Burton on 09.03.15 at 11:19 am

You sound like a great parent. My parents never pushed me and my brother, but we saw them lead by example. Actions are louder than words.

#267 Bob on 09.03.15 at 10:19 am

This is sound advice. I would argue that things have changed since 2008. Most of Gen X had already entered the workforce and bought houses by that point. The differences between most gen x and most gen y is pretty stark. The advice is solid though.

MF

#313 saskatoon on 09.03.15 at 12:54 pm

#151 Setting the Record Straight

of course it is theft–stolen through state initiated force.

only those who are without a sense of self cannot fathom it being as such.

after all, if a person has no concept of themselves as an individual, responsible, free human…

how could someone steal from them? or anyone for that matter?

notice also how i never commented that “concern for the less fortunate was stupid”.

i have NEVER said this.

word games, name-calling, and rhetoric are all the unhinged government boot lickers really have.

almost every statist comment here attests to that.

oh…and snark.

they also have snark.

#314 Bill on 09.03.15 at 12:55 pm

#289 Alberta Ed on 09.03.15 at 11:39 am

Opportunity was abound. Jobs galore and good paying. Taxes were reasonable. You could buy Van real estate.
We are a picked over nation with mega newbies on the bid. Big BOX everywhere…just try and open a Home Hardware today. My Kids are facing SERIOUS headwinds.

#315 RayofLight on 09.03.15 at 1:18 pm

#27 Licorice
It will get better than that. Wait until a cheap battery is developed that will give an electric car a range of about 500 miles, and can be charged in about 10 mins. An electric car is an incredibly simple machine. The motor/generators are current technology and the “Transmission” is nothing more than an electronic frequency generator. (Double the frequency to the motor doubles the speed of the car). The battery is the key. This would be the “tipping point”. The auto industry, the auto repair ,car dealerships, and oil & gas industry as we know it would essentially vanish. No need for an 8-12 speed mechanical auto transmission when a simple frequency generator will do. The trends ahead suggest Nano- technology, 3D printing, solid state batteries, materials science and “Internet of Everything” could develop synergies we can barely now foresee. Add in complete robotic production facilities, you could design your car on your i-phone and see delivery next week. Badda- Bing,Badda- Boom !!!

#316 Mister Obvious on 09.03.15 at 1:18 pm

#282 Eddie

“The reality for baby boomers is that THEIR PARENTS handed them a world with abundant economic opportunities.”
—————————————

Fascinating! Could you elaborate further on how our boomer parents came to supply those opportunities?

With two world wars and a global depression behind them the place was in rather a shambles by the time I showed up.

Do tell…

#317 Incubus on 09.03.15 at 1:21 pm

@ #254 jane 24 on 09.03.15 at 9:10 am

Yes they speak english but they won’t accommodate you for long if you don’t speak german.

#318 Mike on 09.03.15 at 1:46 pm

Thank you, Jen. I enjoyed your letter. You should have your own blog.

#319 SunShowers on 09.03.15 at 1:46 pm

#288 BS on 09.03.15 at 11:36 am
“There are not fewer jobs and more competition for the jobs than in the past.”

Of course there is. As Linda said, Boomers had to compete for jobs with their classmates. Millenials have to compete for jobs with their classmates, and the classes graduating in India, China, and everywhere else who have the means to immigrate. You can’t just ignore the implications of a global economy. Also, read #266.

“Unemployment is lower now than it has been in the past decades like the 70s, 80s and 90s.”

Only if you ignore the entire context of this issue and consider only the raw unemployment rate over time.

Go to Statscan and restrict the unemployment data to 15-24 year olds (you know, recent university graduates, the age group most Millenials are now) and you’ll see the unemployment rate for this age group is higher now than in most of our history since the 70s.

The rest of your post I’ll chock up to angry and uninformed cane-waving. If you stereotyped about immigrants the same way you stereotype about Millenials, Garth probably would have deleted your post.

#320 Ce 6/8 II on 09.03.15 at 1:48 pm

#300 George S:

In a word, rubbish.

Read this: http://ktwop.com/2013/06/21/global-warming-theory-lacks-a-falsifiable-hypothesis-and-climate-policy-lacks-conditions-of-success/

Look up ‘Falsifiable Hypothesis’

#321 Godth on 09.03.15 at 1:56 pm

#306 Julia on 09.03.15 at 12:41 pm

That’s the wrong attitude Julia. Look at Greece, they’re losers. They’re abandoning their children and eating out of dumpsters. The winners made deals and the winners will be paid at any cost. You have to go for the juggler whenever you can in this world Julia, eat or be eaten. Winner take all.

If you teach your kids to share you’re raising culls. Sharing sucks! What’s mine is mine and what’s yours will be mine too – loser.

#322 raisemyrent on 09.03.15 at 1:56 pm

oh my, what can I say that hasn’t been said? Dunno, there’s no way I can read all the comments.
My gf and I (Both born in ’84) were laughing through Jen’s post. random generalisations and opinions presented as fact. such anger. she thought she was sorting us out and made a fool of herself.

– Jen, forget about robots, and get to work. Life is tough. Blame your dad (and possibly mum) for not teaching you that, not for the “job market”.
– Everything you own, from your smartphone to your clothes through your organic food comes from somewhere, through the hard work of someone. Do your part. You don’t deserve it all by virtue of being human. That’s life, there’s billions of us, so chip in.
– We’ve been sold this idyllic idea of rewarding work, not unlike the concept of “love” has changed through the years, through Disney movies, romantic comedies, and talk of the perfect “one”. Reality kicks in sooner or later, whether you realise it or not. No one is perfect for you, find someone with whom you can have a good partnership, sustainably, and perhaps that can pull his own weight, instead of your twit of a bf who blames the world. I graduated with an undergrad in civil engineering and was making more than twice what he sold himself for. I call cereal boxes on his degrees, or some personal stuff (i.e. people skills, entitlement) that he made up for by studying all that stuff. which brings me to
– when I was hired for my first real job, my then boss told me I was hired for my personality and attributes, not what I knew. He said, we look for what we cannot teach, everything else you need, you will learn here. So good luck. btw that was in 2007, and he has since gone from office corner manager to the CEO of the same 3+ billion company. stop emailing resumes and getting angry for not being offered millions. go and do some networking fcol
– I don’t subscribe to ALL of Smokey’s education diatribe, but take one of his points. His children have pulled through because of what you cannot learn in school. Resent your parents for the right reasons. Your programming taught you that every answer is a valid answer. Wrong, do it again. The world is eating you alive. get fighting.
– some things you cannot teach, and you have to learn (sometimes by going through it and looking back). save this post and read it in 5-10 years. you will be embarrassed, as you sit there older and wiser, or just older (and likely to have reproduced). Probability places my bet on the latter, but hey, you’re special!

#323 ozy - Jen, you're a good kid on 09.03.15 at 2:10 pm

Jen, you’re a good kid! So, I’ll help you out.

Rent a basement for $600 and take the bus. Buy quality foods in bulk when reduced (yes, it happens, even at no frills). Don’t own a car. Never eat out. Ok, pizza-pizza medium peperoni walk-in for $5 you can indulge on once a month. Don’t spend any money on hotels or travel further than 150KM. Better, use your vacation time (paid or unpaid) to take exams/certifications that are in demand. No course should be more than 1 week, btw. Load as mush overtime at 150% rate – you have nothing else purposeful to do anyway, right? Unless you volunteer at sick kids.

You and the boy will build $300000 in 10 years, even on a $70000 salary combined Then go flip houses. Of course, by then, you’ll know the value of money, so you’ wont hire a loser, but a good agent (and cheap). Your net worth in another 6 years? 1 million.

This is how is done baby, life waits for no one. Stop the whining. It’s almost pathetic. Tell your friends too.

Ahhh, and what stops u of launching a party at provincial level… I guess everyone is sick of “liberal SEX” curriculum, anal & stuff taught in 7th grade… capitalize on that and do a revolution. Remember, Spartacus was a real slave in shackles in most oppressive empire….. but I guess it comes to what blood you have in your veins…. check your DNA. I bet is zero % tracian.

#324 Axehead on 09.03.15 at 2:21 pm

#300 George S

You cannot prove that a change in climate is systemic nor can you measure if a change is caused by human intervention. This is not scientifically achievable. Have you read ‘Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’? Can you count how many times the word ‘probable’ is used?

The real science (grade school) is thus: CO2 is plant food, therefore more CO2 produces more plant growth, thereby producing more Oxygen, thereby balancing out the system. This is empirical science, proven thru experimentation, unlike the theoretical and political nature of the climate change bull shit fed to our children through the education system and via MMS.

Jen is the result of an educational experiment gone wrong; she doesn’t even know what to believe anymore because she hasn’t taken the time to challenge all her assumptions and find the real answers out for herself.

A nation of fat young sheep waiting for the slaughter.

#325 Sean on 09.03.15 at 2:33 pm

First time comment.

I would love to know where Jennifer and hubby live. It seems they as “Smoking Man” suggests, have really limited themselves by placing themselves in too small and focused of a job market.

My wife and I have moved 12 times in 10 years of marriage. Each time to pursue better employment opportunities. We now reside in Brooks, AB. a place I never would have believed I would live. We love it here and by not limiting our market, have found meaningful employment.

Also, we have never owned property, and intend to rent as long as we can.

If there is no meaningful employment where you live, move. Do not limit your horizons. And don’t bitch about it. Starting to sound like an entitled millennial.

#326 TheLaughingCON on 09.03.15 at 2:33 pm

RE #268 Shawn (the retired @55 public servant)

“Merchandise Trade Figures Look Good”
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150903/dq150903a-eng.htm
=====================================

Do they? Really! Why not use your know-it-all head to think about the “record”numbers:

We may report in C$ but the international trade is done in US$ (and possible few other currencies)

Lets recalculate these result using BoC exchange rate look-up tool here:
http://www.bankofcanada.ca/rates/exchange/10-year-lookup/

Export in July were C$45.5 Billion.
The exchange rate provided by the tool above – one US$ for July fluctuated between 1.2566 (Jul.2) and 1.3060 (Jul.24) with the average for the month being 1.2865.

C$45.5 B divided by 1.2865 is equal to U$35.37 Billion for July.

Now the exports for June 2015 were originally released as C$44.6 Billion but were revised down to C$44.5 Billion with the today’s release.
One US$ in June fluctuated between 1.2209 (Jun.18) and 1.2550(Jun.1) with the average for June being 1.2366.

C$44.5 B divided by 11.2366 is equal to U$35.99 Billion for June.

Or in reality we exported 1.72% less merchandise US$ in July compared to June.
Record numbers my ….
===================================
And now on another chef d’oeuvre of yours:
“Government hired the man and paid him what it paid. A fair bargain in the market. Both parties got what they wanted. To imply that his pension contributions came as a sort of handout from taxpayers is moronic”

When the government hired the man 30 years ago and set up the DB pension plan they had 10+ contributors for every single retirees at the times and the people in charge expected this will be the case going on. The realities now thank you to the grossly over-paid public servants retiring at 55 and generally living longer than they worked/contributed, drawing pensions almost equals to their salaries at the end of their employment and with less than 2-3 contributors per retirees the government pension plans are are deeply underfunded (the Federal government is more than $200 Billion underfunded)
Guess who pick up the shortages and is expected to fully pay for them – it is people like Jen!

#327 Godth on 09.03.15 at 2:34 pm

#315 Ce 6/8 II on 09.03.15 at 1:48 pm

Just invest in Carbon trading schemes, game the hell out it, get rich and shut-up. There are too many human resources on this planet, reducing energy throughput is the best way to cull the herd. Nobody can point the finger this way. What other option do you suggest? Round them all up in cities and drop nukes?

#328 Exurban on 09.03.15 at 2:37 pm

GenX Confessions #215

Strangely, of all the stuff Mark makes up, the stuff about lack of I.T. jobs is the only thing that bugs me.

If you lived in Vancouver, his assurances that real estate is not really going up would bug you also.

#329 maxx on 09.03.15 at 2:44 pm

#13 Fowler on 09.02.15 at 6:18 pm

“Yeah garth Millennials aren’t all selfish and self entitled.

But coming from a privileged boomer like yourself it must seem that way.”

Privileged? I rather think Garth WORKED his way to his apparent privilege….and he’s still WORKING.

As for Jen:

“This doesn’t even include older working generations who cannot keep up with essential technological advances in the workplace.”

Sweeping generalization and largely untrue, coming from a member of a cohort that often has a problem doing mental math.

Cry me a torrent Jen. Every generation has its challenges, only some whine like overgrown, helicoptered babies. Blame those foolish, hovering parents, not boomers at large, as that is just stupid.

As for it being fun and trendy to bash Millennials, not so sure. I couldn’t care less. However I do think you ought to get back to WORK!

#330 Tax guy on 09.03.15 at 2:48 pm

#149 Setting the record straight

Industrialized countries are already well on the path to coordinating efforts to track and tax international movement of assets. Just google “OECD BEPS project”.

Some comments on here seem to suggest corporate assets can cross borders without incidence of tax. Not true. Canada and most other countries impose withholding tax on such payments, as well as an emigration/”exit tax” when such assets are removed from the country permanently.

#331 cramar on 09.03.15 at 2:58 pm

#265 working guy in BC on 09.03.15 at 10:03 am
@TJM #157

You said: “You need internet at home for 50+ bucks a month if you want to access job opportunities in the place where they’re actually posted, whereas in the past everyone would look at the same want ads in the 25-cent newspaper. (Sure, you can go to the employment office where they have computers, but that puts you at a disadvantage relative to whoever has a computer and internet.)”

Thanks for the post. Minor correction though. The Conservatives shut down the employment centres that students and young people used to be able to go to to use computers to search for jobs and write resumes. Their justification was everything can be accessed online.

———

For students, their school is a hub for net access. For others, every public library I know has free Internet access and great printers for .15c a sheet. Plus hotspots all over now. You don’t “need” $50+ Internet access.

==============

#267 Bob on 09.03.15 at 10:19 am

4) When your dad passes on as we all do eventually, you can look forward to a sizeable inheritance that you can use to add to your bottom line.

——–

Not necessarily a done deal! Just had another Boomer over for lunch and he told us that he cut his only son out of his will since his son has not talked to him in years. Not the first time I’ve heard this. Point 4a) should be added, “Honour your parents if you want any inheritance.”

===============

#274 Dup on 09.03.15 at 10:29 am

Questions: How many of you baby boomer’s still type with two fingers? How many of you make over 100K/year?

————

Back in the 1960s in high school I had typing class. Mechanical typewriters to boot. That’s how I learned to type.

#332 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:06 pm

The Real Shawn

Shawn on 09.03.15 at 12:12 pm (298) said:

I’m in my 30’s and I don’t agree with Jen. She does sound entitled. No job is perfect but they are out there.

****************************
Hey dude, Nice Name! and I applaud this apparent use of your real name. But I sort of own the real estate of the name Shawn on this blog as I have been here for years. Please find a new name or add your last name.

#333 Bill on 09.03.15 at 3:07 pm

#288 BS on 09.03.15 at 11:36 am
Oh Ya you can look at the numbers all you want.
It does not at all portray how shitty the pay is these days if you get a job. My wife works at the bank and it pays the same as the grocery store did 25 years ago. Do you know what a steak cost then and now!?
I had a restaurant. Halibut was $1.75lb and today its $25.00
There no jobs in this town. Does your numbers show the underground economy? The amount of drug heads rolling around is astonishing…My buddies are cops…
I know whats going on from the bank…There’s a ton of people scraping by. Most small business just make ends meet.
If your an immigrant its the land of opportunity. If you have been here 50 years its not the same good old.
FYI My wife came here from the Philippines 37 years ago. MANY dead beat people come into the bank with their gov cheques that do absolutely nothing but suck the social net dry..She is disgusted now she is aware…Love the country but HATE the Gov.

#334 Nosty, etc. on 09.03.15 at 3:17 pm

#10 Smoking Man on 09.02.15 at 6:14 pm — “First off, climate change..total ridiculous insanity.”

Whoa! Mercy! Remember the UN (Gun and population control), etc. — Mega A21, which is probably combined with this — Why did Obama nationalize the food chain? Toasty Warm The war between China and the US.

#335 cramar on 09.03.15 at 3:19 pm

TO ALL THE POSTERS with immigrant parents arriving in Canada with nothing…THANK YOU FOR THEIR INSPIRING STORIES!

Just came to mind was a newspaper article I remember reading decades ago. It was about a new immigrant from Korea (if I remember correctly). He asked a friend where the jobs were (industrial subdivision) and to drop him off there in the morning. He then went to every building and in broken English asked if they had work for him to do. By lunch time he was hired! The factory owner said why wouldn’t he hire this fellow since he actually wants to work. He said with typical Canadian youth, nobody wants to work.

Sounds like nothing has changed in a generation. Wonder what happened to this Korean fellow. Probably went on to be great success.

#336 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:24 pm

Mortgage Delinquencies

Canadians Bankers associated just posted the mortgage delinquency rate for the latest available month – June.

This is the 90 day delinquency rate.

So how does it look one year after oil started to slide and 9 months after it really started to crater?

Well all of 2.7 in each 1000 mortgages are at least 90 days delinquent. 27 out of 10,000.

Just 13,000 out of 4,669,000 montages.

The increase in this rate in the 9 months ended June 2015? and in the year ended June 2015? What increase? there was a slight DECREASE in delinquencies.

Explanation?

People are paying their mortgages?

Manipulated numbers and forgiveness of lateness? Maybe.

Delinquencies are near record lows.

If the data is to be believed there are fewer people behind on their mortgages after a year of low oil prices than at the start of that year.

If anyone is hoping to see delinquencies and foreclosures and desperation in home sales this data is not showing it yet. Not even a hint of such.

I have been watching for these delinquencies to spike ever since about 2008, instead they have fallen steadily after a little increase in 2008 2009.

Strange but true.

#337 Happy60 on 09.03.15 at 3:24 pm

Sorry, Jennifer, but you lost my sympathy with your stereotypical remark about older workers not being tech savvy. I couldn’t survive in my job otherwise.

#338 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:42 pm

Link to Mortgage delinquency figures

http://www.cba.ca/contents/files/statistics/stat_mortgage_db050_en.pdf

Interesting, but meaningless. — Garth

#339 George S on 09.03.15 at 4:01 pm

Ce 6/8 II and Axehead:
I am not saying that everything that all the climate change people are saying is true. What I am saying is that there is a high probability that the global temperature is rising right now, just a little bit, likely from the increase in atmospheric CO2. Seeing as how according to every bit of data that I have seen and that even the most hard core global warming deniers accept (except for possibly fundamentalist christians) shows that 20,000 years ago most of Canada was covered by up to 2 km of ice and then things warmed up and it all melted and sea level rose more than 400 feet. That is climate change.
The measured CO2 level has been steadily rising. The Oxygen level has not risen accordingly so the plants aren’t doing their job by absorbing all the CO2. When the CO2 levels were really high in the past there was tropical forests in the arctic. I have seen and handled the wood. the growth rings are unique because of 6 months of no light growing season. That is global warming and climate change.

We should all hope and pray (if so inclined) for global warming, enough to offset the coming glaciation and massive global temperature drop when the earth’s axis tilt and orbit and solar output all line up. That likely won’t be for a while, enough time for “The Great Simplification” to occur, and after that nobody will be worrying about climate change.

It is all fine to think that a cheaper, better battery is going to solve everything but you have to get the energy to charge that battery somehow. Right now any excess power in the grid comes from coal or natural gas. As it turns out oil is a really good energy storage medium with hard to beat specs.

#340 kommykim on 09.03.15 at 4:02 pm

#321TheLaughingCON on 09.03.15 at 2:33 pm
the government pension plans are are deeply underfunded (the Federal government is more than $200 Billion underfunded)

Considering that the Chrétien government raided the PSPP of $30 BILLION in 1999 to help offset the deficit, you can hardly blame this on the public servants.

#341 riasemyrent on 09.03.15 at 4:06 pm

how many millenials had/have blogs? I guess they instagram or whatever now. Garth posts every day. We can’t even read the free advice every day. I don’t even think I feed my pets every day. He takes Sunday off, and in the past few years I’ve read, he almost missed a post just once, when he got his bionic leg.
I can’t picture a successful millenial (a wha?) keeping up a free blog with such dedication. just a thought.

p.s. Karly or whatever her name was a few days ago complaining about not being able to rent a 2 bedroom in Vancouver for less than $2,500/m… sigh, live in a 1 bedroom. You’re not special. work up. someone has to be the hump in the bell curve (most people!). Also, learn to look, don’t take a random sampling and then go online to complain about it. I’ve worked in fort Mac, Ft Sask, Edmonton, revelstoke, etc. my old boss used to say first you do something for the company, then the company does something for you. When the time came (still in my mid 20s!) I asked for a transfer to vancouver all expenses paid, and I got it. I was only 4 years into my employment, and loaded with valuable experience (when things got bad there, I got another job elsewhere easily). Haven’t got a dime from my parents since I graduated school. Now I live where I want (in a Yaletown penthouse) BECAUSE I CAN AFFORD IT. Also, my rent is only $2,800, so look harder lol

#342 Ivan the Moderate on 09.03.15 at 4:09 pm

” He sent out around 10-20 resumes ever day during that time for professional jobs. This new contracting job will pay around $30k a year. ”

Spamming companies with resumes does not achieve anything. One should do a least some research and do a targeted-position oriented resume and CV. HR department receives thousands of resumes for each position. If they see a generic one, it gets thrown away and it never reaches the hiring manager.

Better to send 1-2 a day, but customised and matching the exact job description.

By showing enthusiasm and learning on the job, a person with such degrees can double the entry level the salary within 3-5 years.

#343 bdy sktrn on 09.03.15 at 4:09 pm

#327 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:06 pm
The Real Shawn

Shawn …
*************
Hey dude, Nice Name! and I applaud this apparent use of your real name. But I sort of own the real estate of the name Shawn on this blog as I have been here for years. Please find a new name or add your last name.
——————————

this ‘shawn’ thing has gone on for too long.

we need a new system.

it’s impossible for us non-shawn(and variants) people to remember who the heck is who.

some standardization is in order.

how about you go with shawn83 or shawn54 or shaene91 or shawn w49 , at least we know if you a boomer,x,or millen shawn-sheen-shanee-shaney or whatever!

the ‘real’ or first one, if that is you, gets to keep whatever name he wants , maybe shawn007 or shawn#1…

#344 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 4:09 pm

#321 TheLaughingCON on 09.03.15 at 2:33 pm
——————————
nice try, wrong again. The federal public service has a pension plan fund that is now independent of general revenues. This means current and retired employees (and employer) pay directly into this fund, that is managed by a professional investment board. There is no ‘tax payer on the hook’ for this. And recent analysis indicates the fund will grow until the 2040s.

http://www.investpsp.ca/en/invt-fast-facts.html

#345 Setting the Record Straight on 09.03.15 at 4:10 pm

“Hint: Of the three major parties running vote for the least evil of the three. ”

“The lesser evil is not necessarily marginally acceptable.”

“If voting mattered they’d make it illegal”

#346 jas on 09.03.15 at 4:10 pm

Jen has some valid points.
you can’t just brush them off.

as for the other young lady who makes 120k/yr and is complaining about 2.5k monthly rent in vancouver, she has a coice…..she can move out to nearby towns and commute.
I commuted 3 hrs round trip each day when worked in vancouver.

#347 Paul on 09.03.15 at 4:12 pm

#253 GeorgeSoonToBeRetired on 09.03.15 at

9:03amChris Alexander has suddenly discovered compassion, and “suspends” his campaign for a day to deal with this crisis.

How inhumane.

These people are making us look awful all around the world right now.

You right wing extremists who post so many comments on this blog – you really want to vote for these people?

(And no, thankfully, many commenters here are not right wing loons, and actually quite thoughtful)

What a horrible look in the mirror we are getting today
———————————————————-
To use your words
How cynical
How opportunistic.

How calculating.

Is it for You and the Toronto star to use a child’s death for Political gain.

#348 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 4:12 pm

#319 Axehead on 09.03.15 at 2:21 pm
————————————
Your point is irrelevant. CO2 and CH4 are proven greenhouse gases. The end.

#349 bdy sktrn on 09.03.15 at 4:16 pm

#332 Happy60 on 09.03.15 at 3:24 pm
Sorry, Jennifer, but you lost my sympathy with your stereotypical remark about older workers not being tech savvy. I couldn’t survive in my job otherwise.
—————————
there are always exceptions. if you are 60 and can forward an email you are one! cool.

know anybody else your age who is fast on a pc?

tech savvy by age
60+……. 2%
50-60…..11%
30-50…..35%
0-30…….90+%

#350 CHERRY BLOSSOM on 09.03.15 at 4:16 pm

DELETED (Anti-immigrant)

#351 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 4:16 pm

#305 Smoking Man on 09.03.15 at 12:41 pm
——————————
That now puts you in the realm of the ‘man on the moon’ deniers, and anti-vaxxer crowd. Nice.

#352 JSS on 09.03.15 at 4:21 pm

I don’t know what’s with kids these days. In my time, I used to snow shoe to school. I then went to university and got an arts degree in english literature. I then joined a company as a mail room clerk and worked there for thirty years and retired as VP with a DB pension. During this time, I met the love of my life, and got married. Had three kids. I also invested in the stock market in 1971, I took a buy-and-hold approach since. And twenty years ago I bought some rental properties too. I also had some spare time, and started a business, and sold it for a handsome profit. I should also add that I have a paid off 3,500 square foot triple garage home that I bought for $250,000 25 years ago that’s now worth around three times.

Why can’t kids these days just do what I did and be successful? I worked hard. And working hard always brings success. Us boomers are special.

#353 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 4:21 pm

#300 George S on 09.03.15 at 12:22 pm
———————–
You do realize there are models and predictions (much like weather predictions, or stock technical analysis), and also real data? That real data has shown ocean acidification, oceans rising, surface temperature increasing, and gigatonnes of carbon building in our atmosphere?

#354 Nora Lenderby on 09.03.15 at 4:21 pm

#308 saskatoon on 09.03.15 at 12:54 pm
#151 Setting the Record Straight
of course it is theft–stolen through state initiated force. only those who are without a sense of self cannot fathom it being as such. after all, if a person has no concept of themselves as an individual, responsible, free human…how could someone steal from them? or anyone for that matter?
notice also how i never commented that “concern for the less fortunate was stupid”.i have NEVER said this.
word games, name-calling, and rhetoric are all the unhinged government boot lickers really have.
almost every statist comment here attests to that.
oh…and snark. they also have snark.

Even Mr. T. finds it within his kind nature to put snark on the menu sometimes. Could he be a tad exasperated?

Anyhoo…I have thought about your posts – do I detect a core of anarchism/libertarianism? Interesting.

Although you are consistently trollish (abuse people, mistake their good intentions, and then claim to be a victim) there is something perhaps you could explain.

How do you propose we get from what we have now to your ideal scenario? What is that ideal scenario?

Societies, states, civilizations (in the sense of large groups living in cities) are not really about committing violence. They are actually about the fear of violence. Defense.

Almost all that I am aware of, grew out of fortified villages (usually on hill tops). Life outside those was crude and unpleasant, waiting for the warlord to come and take your crops, your animals and perhaps kill you and your children and carry off your womenfolk. No-one, including the warlord, had much of anything worth having by today’s standards, except perhaps lice, but I digress.

What we have now is the partially finished result of a long process that will continue after we are all dead. A compromise. Some parts of the world are at different stages. Mostly people have tacitly agreed to not kill, steal, rape or cheat one another, most of the time.

Unless you are a child or at some disadvantage (which you may be) you pay taxes to the state that then (ideally) provides the protection, the infrastructure and the justice system that allows civilized life to exist. I mean civilized in the sense that you can carry your iPhone into a coffee shop, buy a cup of coffee and get a wifi signal (not that I ever do this, but let’s assume I could if I wanted).

#355 Setting the Record Straight on 09.03.15 at 4:25 pm

@108
“Elon Musk’s current thoughts on profit and the human race. He is certainly on to something.”

Gotta agree there. He has poor people subsidizing rich people. That’s smart.

#356 Julia on 09.03.15 at 4:34 pm

#331 Shawn
Mortgage delinquency rates. Here’s a thought: Used to be that mortgages were standard products. Fixed amount, amortization, interest fixed or variable but with repayments in principal and interest. Declining balance.

What is the most popular product now? Home equity lines.

People bought homes and had a standard mortgage. Then the value of the house goes up and [email protected] says: you should convert your mortgage to a home equity line. Then you have all the flexibility you want to renovate, travel, buy a car etc…

Only mandatory payment is the interest and as long as you still have borrowing room on the line, you don’t really have to shell any cash.
Balance stays the same or increases until the cap is reached. Or people request increased line based on increased house values.

Ticking time bomb really. The delinquency will come later.

#357 jas on 09.03.15 at 4:35 pm

Jen is stating the reality about jobs in the present times.

Those who state their story of coming here with little money should know that you can’t compare blindly the present to the past.

Has anyone got figures in terms of % between present and those past times for various living costs?

#358 Jackie on 09.03.15 at 4:35 pm

@101 PM
I think that was one of the best, most balanced posts I have ever seen on this blog. I am a tail end Boomer who has had my ups and downs, worked hard for everything I have, appreciate and am grateful for it, and still learning new things every day from the fantastic millenials on my team. We learn from each other, I think, and there is genuine mutual respect there, and real camaraderie, too. I enjoy them immensely. They have a different way of looking at the world and I enjoy our debates and conversations and the journey we are on. It’s so nice to read something in a similar vein from another millenial. Thank you again.

#359 Smoking Man on 09.03.15 at 4:51 pm

#346 Bottoms_Up on 09.03.15 at 4:16 pm
#305 Smoking Man on 09.03.15 at 12:41 pm
——————————
That now puts you in the realm of the ‘man on the moon’ deniers, and anti-vaxxer crowd. Nice.
……..

How typical of a tree hugger. cant defend your views wth logic and fact, so resort to name calling qne mobbing.

Dude , the weather is exactly the same today, than when I arrived from Nectonite in 1957

#360 Setting the Record Straight on 09.03.15 at 4:59 pm

@168
Really, if we give you any ‘sage’ advice it’s best just to nod and smile. Treat us like you would treat your 90 year old granny with dementia, who tells you she is ‘pitching for the BlueJays tonight’.

$$$$$

Let’s hope you are the first person to whom she applies that advice.

#361 enthalpy on 09.03.15 at 5:07 pm

besides the climate change malarkey … her letter is pretty much spot on.
God forbid she brings up some of these issues. Boomers take it as crying and whining. When its reality. Sounds like they are putting one foot in front of the other and making it work. It doesnt mean you can’t speak of these issues.

#362 Axehead on 09.03.15 at 5:15 pm

#339 #343 Bottom Feeder.

Wrong. Example: Alberta government handed over 1 Billion to teachers union to pay for pension underfunding (most likely due to poor investments – wish some fool taxpayer would do that for me) in return for their acceptance of wages and refusal to strike. We, the people, pay for the pensions.

Wrong again. Nobody refutes that CO2 is a gas that potentially can cause the greenhouse effect; the point made in previous posts is that you cannot causually link it to human activity through empirical scientific experimentation.

Back to Jen and this post…I’m with SM (for once), things are the same, yet things are different at the same time (including the weather): stop complaining and get to work.

#363 pwn3d on 09.03.15 at 5:17 pm

GenX Confessions #215

Strangely, of all the stuff Mark makes up, the stuff about lack of I.T. jobs is the only thing that bugs me.

If you lived in Vancouver, his assurances that real estate is not really going up would bug you also.

———-

Or if you lived in Toronto! I’ll be listing soon, will report back with the results. I’m so sorry I didn’t sell 2 years ago… not!

#364 Godth on 09.03.15 at 5:49 pm

#349 Nora Lenderby on 09.03.15 at 4:21 pm

“What we have now is the partially finished result of a long process that will continue after we are all dead. A compromise. Some parts of the world are at different stages. Mostly people have tacitly agreed to not kill, steal, rape or cheat one another, most of the time.”

Unless they’re barbarians, then we do them a favour by conquering them. There’s nowhere to expand to now though, unless you believe the story being floated about us colonizing the moon, or Mars, or whatever pie in the sky is about.

Look no further than all the refugees fleeing resource wars. Blowback, and the barbarians are swarming through the gates.

#365 The Dude on 09.03.15 at 5:57 pm

The main thing that jumped out at me, as always, was “job worth doing”.

I am also a millenial (born in ’87).

My parents, and my grandparents, wanted a stable job that provided a reliable, livable income. That was the goal.

Most of my generation want a job that does that, plus is fulfilling, and allows them to pursue their passions.

For most of Western history, you’ve pursued your passions once the bills were paid, and work was done for the day, not at work.

As has been mentioned on here several times, there are jobs like truck driving, in which there is a demonstrated lack of drivers, which has cranked up the TFW program for truckers to 10/10.

That’s a job that as a company driver you would make 50-60k a year. A job where in your downtime you can study and take classes to improve yourself in the direction you want to go while paying your way.. start building your own trucking company by buying your own rigs etc..

That is but one example.

My grandfather was an immigrant truck driver from Ireland here in Canada starting in the late 1950’s. Did he want to do something else with his life career wise? He probably would have.

But reality has not yet been made real to many of my peers. Sometimes you have to work in jobs you never thought you would consider, to keep moving forward.

Life is hard. It’s harder when you are stupid. It’s hardest when you don’t work and make an income.

#366 TheLaughingCON on 09.03.15 at 5:59 pm

Re #335 kommykim (the public servant)
“Considering that the Chrétien government raided the PSPP of $30 BILLION in 1999 to help offset the deficit, you can hardly blame this on the public servants.
===
Nice try for deflection BUT:
1. $30 Billion in 1999 are $41.02 Billion in 2015 according to the Bank of Canada inflation calculator;
or
2. C$30 Billion in 1999 was around U$20 Billion in 1999 (one Canadian dollar was around 66-67 cents US for that year)
One US$ invested in S&P 500 in Jan.1 1999 grew to U$1.57 (dividents included and adjusted for inflation) by Dec.31, 2014
So your U$20 Billion in 1999 if invested will be equal to U$31.4 Billion by the end of 2014
Use whatever exchange rate you want – still no where near the hundreds of Billion in unfunded pension obligations (backed by the plebs outside of the public service)

=================================
Re #339 Bottoms_Up (the public servant)
“nice try, wrong again. The federal public service has a pension plan fund that is now independent of general revenues. This means current and retired employees (and employer) pay directly into this fund, that is managed by a professional investment board. There is no ‘tax payer on the hook’ for this. And recent analysis indicates the fund will grow until the 2040s.”
http://www.investpsp.ca/en/invt-fast-facts.html

Another BS
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canadian-politics/canadas-152b-public-pensions-arent-prepared-for-work-force-changes-ag-warns

Until the plan administrators and auditors are willing to sign for the plan sustainability with their life, their properties and that of their relatives everything is a smoke designed to mask the future liabilities expected to be covered as usual by the people who often do not have any work pensions but bottomless pockets

#367 Josh in Calgary on 09.03.15 at 6:02 pm

Jen,
The “Older” generation has been lamenting the quality of the “Younger” generations for thousands of years. It’s basically just a right of passage.

As other on here have said, it’s absolutely a crap shoot as to wether you’re born into a good economy or not. There are many times in the past several decades where people faced difficult times and got through it (most complaining along the way I’m sure).

The important bit is to play the hand you’re dealt to the best of your ability. And part of that (as Garth suggests) is avoid strapping yourself down to a house and lots of debt. That’s a good idea when the economy is rapidly expanding … but when it’s not flexibility is key and nothing destroys options faster than a lot of debt. Find where the opportunities are and go there. Find what jobs are available and train for them, etc.

And finally VOTE for pete’s sake. It doesn’t matter if there’s no one worth voting for. Vote anyways. They won’t start listening to your opinion until they know that you’re actually going to vote.

#368 ItsNotJustTheMillenials on 09.03.15 at 6:05 pm

#200 Doug in London on 09.02.15 at 11:48 pm

@James, post #38:
What you say is consistent with my findings. A lot of employers want someone under 30 years old with over 40 years experience in the EXACT kind of work their company does and be fully up to speed a year ago. They will accept nothing less and bellyache about a skills shortage when such a person doesn’t magically appear out of nowhere.

That’s EXACTLY the problem. And it’s worse in IT than anywhere else.

If you don’t have 3 years of intensive experience in version 2.3.0.1.a of whatever that went v2.0 three years ago, then Yolanda in HR screening glazes over.

Never mind a relational DB is a relational DB, object programming is object programming, and financial business analysis can use standard modelling in more than just one industry.

Generally, having a transport license that you use to drive red trucks doesn’t preclude the use of blue trucks. And calculating process reactivity of some hydrocarbon flowing through stainless pipe isn’t totally different form the same process flowing through mild carbon steel pipe.

But you’d be surprised how screwed up most HR departments (or even hiring managers) get when picking one poor bastard over another to fill some position. And as far as working into a position? -Fuggedaboudit. “We got no time for training or bringing you up to speed. But we do expect you to show that you can constantly learn throughout your [brief] future career here!”

#369 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 6:12 pm

Meaningless Mortgage Delinquency Numbers?

Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:42 pm
Link to Mortgage delinquency figures

http://www.cba.ca/contents/files/statistics/stat_mortgage_db050_en.pdf

Interesting, but meaningless. — Garth

**************************************
Well, might be meaningless because these days people can tend to borrow other money to make the mortgage payment. Also, I suspect the banks avoid delinquencies by allowing skipped payments and making various payment arrangements.

BUT this is simply the data and it shows no spike in delinquencies. I find that strange about a year into low oil prices and after a lot of layoffs.

Even in Alberta, the mortgage delinquencies have not moved as of June. Strange?

The 90-day delinquencies in the U.S. at the height were well over ten times as high.

Also, this appears to be just traditional mortgages. With a total of 4.7 million this would not seem to include lines of credit. And anyhow if it did I would expect higher delinquencies.

#370 OXI in GREECE !! on 09.03.15 at 6:13 pm

#239 Sheane Wallace on 09.03.15 at 7:12 am
#43 OXI in GREECE !!

I did not say a clerk in a bank.

PM ‘runs’ a country, supposed responsibilities are huge.
He for example oversees hundred of billions in an ‘insurance’ company called CMHC.

You are saying he makes more than leading hedge fund managers on wall street that manage funds 1 /100th of the size of the Canadian economy?
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

HAHAHAHAHA…..no not at all. I was suggesting that if honest steve was "such a GOOD economist" then in the private sector he would pull down a large brick of cash.

But shawn says he would rather be Darth Vader because "Canadians….you DONT KNOW the POWER of the DARK SIDE !!!!" And of course….if you follow steve….you know who his masters are. And they are not Canadian.

#371 ItsNotJustTheMillenials on 09.03.15 at 6:27 pm


Raises for IT personnel have been few and far between. Substantial chunks of graduating classes have been forced out of the profession since the peak in the early 2000s. Many top grads can’t even buy themselves a job interview. And there appears to be no willingness of firms to hire up-and-coming talent and train/familiarize them. IT ‘shortages’ are entirely concocted by the ‘overly entitled’ merely to curry favour for the use of TFW’s.

Well said. And it’s not just ‘new grads’. Too many organizations are looking for monkeys to grind out script code, usually on some gawd-awful microsoft environment, for some brain-dead application context.

To be fair, that’s probably the only work area and tool set most of them know nowadays.

#372 Nora Lenderby on 09.03.15 at 6:31 pm

#338 bdy sktrn on 09.03.15 at 4:09 pm
#327 Shawn on 09.03.15 at 3:06 pm
The Real Shawn

the ‘real’ or first one, if that is you, gets to keep whatever name he wants , maybe shawn007 or shawn#1…

I’m on it! The second Shawn changes his handle to Shawn the Sheep…

#373 ItsNotJustTheMillenials on 09.03.15 at 6:44 pm

#230 Vundo on 09.03.15 at 3:55 am
???
Also, to those who think moving out to the sticks should be mandatory for those without millions: what kind of jobs are out there? Arts? Culture? Opportunities to live car free? I would not want to waste my life waiting for some big retirement payday while living miserably until I am old.

‘Moving out to the sticks’? That’s the biggest indication of an attitude problem right there.

There’s lots to do outside of the lower mainland. Just open your eyes and get used to a decent life.

And never forget, where serious industry is, that’s where the real jobs are. Even if it’s a little short on Gastown movie shoots.

#374 Daisy Mae on 09.03.15 at 8:03 pm

#294: “My parents were not poor and still didn’t give me any money for my education. I’m sure they would have, but I simply didn’t ask for it.”

*****************

Exactly. You have become an ‘adult’….and must, henceforth, take care of yourself. Simple as that.

#375 Daisy Mae on 09.03.15 at 8:13 pm

#303: “If I’d get a few bucks every time I read the sentence “I came to Canada with just a few bucks”

*****************

Right up there with: “I walked three miles to school…uphill both ways”? LOL

#376 tell it like it is on 09.03.15 at 11:26 pm

“Meanwhile, if this blog’s any indication, a mess of these Millennials have morphed into left-leaning, bitter, Boomer-hating, entitled baby socialists who come here to praise Mulcair, Norway and higher taxes. So, perchance their parents erred by not booting them out on their pliant, soft derrieres?”

Garth: I think that you should recruit Jen to contribute to your blog once a week. She articulated in such a clear way the difficulties that this generation faces on a daily basis. What she has stated is REALITY for so many of us; those who do not have trust-funds, houses gifted to us by parents, etc…
I really hope that you will tone down the blurbs
(like I cut and pasted above) that are so insulting to a
whole generation of people who you are unfortunately rather out of touch with.

Get over yourself. I ridicule everyone. — Garth

#377 Former Mechanical Engineer on 09.04.15 at 4:22 am

I generally disagree with most of her rant, but was especially upset with her husband. I also have a degree in Mechanical Engineering and had multiple opportunities before I went to grad school last year. If you send 10-20 resumes a day with no response then you are obviously doing something WRONG. Maybe approach potential employers on LinkedIn, or contact recruiters so they can do the legwork for you… even now there are lots of openings for mechanical engineers in Van. Unemployment rates for engineers has historically been much lower than the general unemployment rate so all I can say is… FAIL.

Also – go out and vote. Countless people died for that right and in many countries around the world people are still dying for that right. So ignorant.

#378 JL on 09.04.15 at 10:00 am

Jen, YOU MUST VOTE: municipally, provincially, federally. get involved with you community association. grass roots change can move up. want to change things, get involved and make it happen on a micro-level. not telling you to vote green, but they might be the closest to taking on what you complain no party takes on. is that not better than what we have now? If you don’t vote, don’t complain. you have no excuse. Aside from that, agree with much of what you say, as a gen-x-er.

#379 Alex N Calgary on 09.04.15 at 10:50 am

Brilliant letter showing exactly the problem, how complex shes thought about it and assigned blame to everyone else but herself, a perfect example of the problem, great post Garth, how could you make that kind of stuff up!

#380 Montrealer on 09.04.15 at 12:03 pm

I make about $65K at a desk job (legal management, 10 years at the same firm).
High school only.
Not having to pay off school debt has allowed me to keep in the black + save.

Then again, I know that my wage will plateau at a certain point and will be much less than if I had went to law school.

However, if I continue living within my means, being happy, and avoiding debt, it’s a bit of a wash in the end right? Or maybe I’m being too simplistic, I am only 33 after all … According to Google, that makes me a young millennial although I’ve never thought to label myself like that before.

Garth – would love to hear some of your predictions for the Montreal market. I know we’re more than a bit ‘special’ over here but still, would be interesting!

#381 Armando on 09.04.15 at 1:40 pm

Poor Jen, she like many other Millenials thinks that the problems created by too much Socialism (both of the Big Government and Monetary variety) can be solved by even MORE Socialism! Central Bank monetary manipulations have resulted in peak debt, while Government intervention and redistribution have crippled economic growth to greater or lesser extent in all large Developed economies. So good luck with Jen’s plan to “fix” the problem (i.e. putting Socialists in power). All this while she and other Millenials wring groan and moan about “global warming”!!

#382 straight six on 09.04.15 at 3:05 pm

Jen’s husband, making only 30K working for a crown corporation? I know multinationals are quietly shredding formerly good wages and benefits in BC under the watchful eye of the Libs.

spoiled millennials.. na, they’re just misunderstood.
a recent 3 day concert at the Pemberton music fest showed millennials leaving a sea of perfectly good gear behind like so much detrius, couldn’t be bothered to pack it out.

As to a future.. don’t count on one you’d recognize, it’s a global reality now, and as to blaming Boomers?
The fact is, greed spans ALL generations.
whoever controls the trough high-grades the buffet.

ascribe blame.. justify your theories..
Jen asks.. Who speaks for us?
Her generation will have to.. it’s her world, or what’s left of it.

#383 Hair guy on 09.04.15 at 4:09 pm

There are so many comments here that I’d like to respond to directly that I would sound rather deranged if I tried. I’ll stick to two points.

I’m an older millennial (’86) and I’ve had the fortune of looking for work before 2009. This gave me an enormous psychological advantage during my own recent job search, because I knew it wasn’t just me, that the job market really is that awful. If I could say one thing to my fellow millennials, it would be that: that the difficulties you are experiencing are due to forces outside your control. They do not reflect on your character and are not a signal you should give up. The corollary is that complaining about forces outside your control is a loser’s game, and a waste of energy.

To the boomers who read past my third sentence I feel compelled to say this: I see a lot of advice here to just buckle down and work harder. I know this advice is sincere and meant to be helpful. But it’s bad advice. And I say this as someone who’s worked night shifts on an oil rig, then stayed on when the day shift was shorthanded. Work ethic is important, but it’s not as important or difficult as it’s made out to be. No matter how hard I work, a robot or unpaid intern can do the same work at a fraction of the cost. We do not need advice on how to work harder. We need advice on how to work smarter. I’ve seen some of that, but not as much as I’d like.

And I second everyone saying the youth should vote Green. Especially if you’re in BC, where they can be more than a protest vote.

#384 zeeman1 on 09.04.15 at 4:41 pm

“Meanwhile, if this blog’s any indication, a mess of these Millennials have morphed into left-leaning, bitter, Boomer-hating, entitled baby socialists who come here to praise Mulcair, Norway and higher taxes. So, perchance their parents erred by not booting them out on their pliant, soft derrieres?”

So ironic that Jen lives up to your description perfectly. These little “progressive” leftists can’t grasp irony, apparently.

#385 Joe on 09.05.15 at 12:40 am

I’m not a Millennial, but much of what Jennifer claims is 100% true. Here’s the thing regarding the critiques of here points. Some, like Garth, strictly look at the world through the eyes of an economist, and miss the important “political economy” viewpoints, which are much more thorough, and substantive, than what economists interpret. There are more frequent crisis of accumulation under capitalism, and as it spreads across the globe, encompassing the global workforce via outsourcing for cheaper labour, this negatively impacts the job markets in the OECD countries. Furthermore, the crisis of accumulation are more frequent, and more disruptive each time, and even though we find ways to “correct” the system, and get it back on track, it is never as it was, but in fact, more contracted each time than before. The other aspect of all this, is that it fuels speculation, in the stock market, real estate, commodities, etc., which balloons the prices, and, lures people in who will be the poor victims when the balloon bursts.

People can criticize subsequent generations, but this doesn’t really do anything but fuel the already existing animosity. The real problem is over the long run, and therein lies the biggest problem; economists, politicians, and business elites, DO NOT look at the long run, because the system’s rules of the game do not permit this. The rich don’t want to pay taxes, the middle class don’t want to pay taxes, and the poor can’t pay taxes…but we all expect our government to provide services (although, I would argue, that what people expect government to provide has gone way overboard beyond what they reasonably should, but I digress), and people are going to have to wake up to the reality that you cannot just keep printing money, and borrowing, to pay for everything. Either there will have to be cuts (lots of them, meaning broad, and deep), or, taxes will have to go up, but you cannot have both low taxes and a high level of services. Political economy is a very complex myriad web, which I would say about 93-96% of the population doesn’t understand, including most economists, and I would say, about 99% of our politicians. The people in charge are not really that bright, and this becomes more and more evident, the more you listen to them speak, so for all those people who are content to just shove their heads in the ground, and put your faith in those “in charge”, you are likely going to be in for a surprise you won’t necessarily like.

Age is not the best indicator for knowledge and wisdom, because I have met some really bright young people, and older people who are stunningly full of s$%t, and everything else in between. Now, young people are the most educated cohort ever, and many of them don’t vote, and you know why…because they are smart enough to know that it makes absolutely no difference who you vote for, as every political party rules in the interest of a particular class. There is a very good reason why George Washington was 100% against political parties (most people wouldn’t know this, because they aren’t interested in history), and I think people would do themselves a great service to look this up. Now, what is my point in all this? If people would turn their TV off once in a while, and actually read a few books on political theory, history, philosophy, economics, just to name a few topics, they might get a little bit upset, and they might come to realise that they should join together with others, instead of maintaining an antagonistic position against them…as if their class position permitted such a false pretense.

If anyone wishes to enter into a debate over this…feel free.

#386 Joe on 09.05.15 at 12:42 am

@zeeman1:

“So ironic that Jen lives up to your description perfectly. These little “progressive” leftists can’t grasp irony, apparently.”

Apparently not…that’s the price for being grounded in reality. Political realism is an exiting discipline…you should check it out…you might like it.