The resistance

Deplorables Week continues on this pathetic blog as we flotsam and jetsam are sloshed and slammed between the shoals of Trudeauesque socialism and Trumpian cavalier capitalism. Here we have a government bent on redistributing wealth, and to the south a machine focused on creating it. In Canada taxes are about to rise. Again. In America, they’ll soon fall. They elected a billionaire business guy. We picked a teacher. With tats.

And judging by yesterday’s comment section slugfest, this land of crazed beavers and horny moose is growing as divided as the States. An astonishing number of people think all investors are greedy, deserve to be Hoovered and have the ethics of weasels. The 1%ers (and those aspiring to be) believe a top tax bracket of 54% is theft. So a 50% jump in capital gains tax is simply over the top.

Class warfare. Economic insurrection. Disdain and outrage. How can this end well?

Beats me. Trump may blow up, or send the Dow to 30,000. Canada may drift further left or end up with failed mutual-fund flogger Kevin O’Leary at the helm. Imagine. Another reality TV ego. Oy.

Well, we can’t change the government here at GreaterFool, but we can change your life a little. So if T2 dramatically raises the tax load on capital gains (we’ll know within the next three weeks) here are ten simple things you might want to consider in response (or anyway).

1 The first money to invest should go into your TFSA. The room has risen above $50,000, so this is finally a serious vehicle. Money inside grows free of all tax, forever, and can be used to provide taxless income in retirement which will not push you into a higher bracket nor cause the seniors’ pogey to be clawed back. Yes, it’s a capital gains tax-free zone. Besides, there’s no refund for making a contribution, so the bicycle-riding, metrosexual, lefty social justice detractors have nothing to say.

2 If Ottawa does make investing in a non-registered account more taxing, then up your exposure to RRSPs. Here invested money also grows entirely free of taxation, plus you receive a tax refund for contributing an amount as big as 18% of your annual income (to $25,370). Of course, by putting money in a plan you’re making it taxable again, so try to time withdrawals for points in your life when you income (and tax bracket) will be lower.

3 It shouldn’t need to be spelled out, but after yesterday’s comments everything requires crayons. Never put a GIC into your TFSA or RRSP, or hold cash there in a so-called ‘high-yield’ account. If you’re going to shelter assets from tax, invest in things with a high potential for growth, especially inside the TFSA. That means equity-based ETFs. And don’t forget to hold a hunk of your portfolio in US$. We all know where the loonie is headed.

4 If dear leader does target capital gains in the coming budget, don’t trigger any. After all, unrealized profits attract no tax whatsoever – which means you can hold on to growing assets, enjoy the advance, and pay nothing until this all blows over. That could be the autumn of 2019.

5 Of course, capital gains are not the only way to make money. Dividends are cool, too. Thanks to the dividend tax credit, income received in this form is also taxed less than income from employment (but don’t tell the steerage section). Among my fav divvy-producing assets are preferred shares, currently kicking out a yield close to 5%. Sweet.

6 Hopefully you’ve heard that taxes on capital gains can be reduced or eliminated entirely by applying capital losses against them. If you still own those crap shares in that loser junior oil drilling outfit your BIL told you was a sure thing, sell them and use the loss to wipe out taxable profits on the better stuff. Try to overcome that human mistake of hanging on to junk until it rises enough to wipe out your initial dumb decision. Chances are it won’t. Sell. Tell her you made a genius move. It was all planned.

7 Capital gains taxes are based on marginal incomes. The more you make, the more you pay. So if you earn a modest amount, don’t sweat this stuff. Leave now and visit the plus-size Victoria’s Secret blog next door.

8 Remember, conversely, the more you earn the more that tax shelters will benefit you. For example, RRSP contribution room is based on your previous year’s income – so someone toiling in the 54% bracket can reduce their tax bill by a whopping $12,000 just for moving assets from a taxable account into a registered one. (Meanwhile the TFSA is completely egalitarian with everyone getting the same room, regardless of income. And which one did Trudeau target?)

9 Better yet, move those assets into a spousal RRSP with your less-taxed partner as the beneficiary and you’ll not only defer a mess of tax, but split income at the same time. You get the deduction from your taxable income, your squeeze gets the money and can eventually take it out at a highly-reduced rate. Also open a joint non-registered plan – and half the income can be attributed to the person who pays less, which will reduce the capital gains tax hit.

10 Finally, if you’re a typical Canadian, house-rich and liquidity-starved, consider borrowing against all that windfall equity to diversify. Home equity lines of credit are cheap, can equal 65% of your home’s value and if used to invest in a financial portfolio are tax-deductible. Make interest-only payments, and every dollar can be deducted from your taxable income while the assets you bought gain value over time. Revenge.

We will never surrender.

162 comments ↓

#1 For those about to flop... on 02.09.17 at 6:32 pm

Pink Snow falling in Vancouver.

Both these guys bought these houses last year supposedly to flip and are now stuck.

2273 Graveley was supposedly sold but the deal must have fallen through and now they have to do the dance again in a declining market.Maybe Broadway knows more.
They thought they had stopped the bleeding but now they will have to wait and see.
Bought for 1.6m in May 2016
For sale asking 1.5m,lowered the price to 1.399 to try and get a bite,now back up.

3399 Nanaimo st has had one price reduction but they seem reluctant to drop it anymore as they are pretty much at their brake even point.
It’s a hundred year old house and developers could probably find a cheaper lot somewhere else.Assessed at 1.37m
Bought for 1.45 in April 2016
For sale asking 1.598 …back on since September 2016

It’s not looking good for these two ,but real estate is still the official religion here…

M42BC

https://evaluebc.bcassessment.ca/Property.aspx?_oa=QTAwMDAwMVZFWg==

https://evaluebc.bcassessment.ca/Property.aspx?_oa=QTAwMDAwMVlVSw==

#2 pathcontrolmonk on 02.09.17 at 6:34 pm

We are all pooched!

#3 poutine-r-us on 02.09.17 at 6:37 pm

Garth

Best be avoiding your poutine fix for a while.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4208546/Women-break-brawl-floor-fast-food-chain.html

#4 Robbie on 02.09.17 at 6:45 pm

Didn’t I see those dogs with the signs in a past posting?

#5 Dennis on 02.09.17 at 6:49 pm

If I’m going to have some fixed income in the form of GICs isn’t the best place sheltered in RRSP or TFSA with equities non-sheltered where they are taxed less (whatever the inclusion rate) and capital losses can be deducted?

#6 Deplorable Investor on 02.09.17 at 6:51 pm

Did all that in spades.. What next!

The trumpeter is gonna be an ornery mood when T2 visits!

#7 Chaddywack on 02.09.17 at 6:52 pm

Just curious if it makes sense to sell the losers after the capital gains tax goes up?

Would you be able to sell a loser at a 75% inclusion rate and apply it against a gain that only occurred at 50%. If that’s allowed that would be one nice benefit…..I’m thinking silver lining here.

#8 the Awakened One on 02.09.17 at 6:55 pm

Great, thanks Garth !

No, we never will ! Resist, resist ! Look what we voted in:
How low can this gang get, hmm??

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/troops-serving-in-kuwait-lose-major-tax-exemption-1.3277313

#9 AK on 02.09.17 at 6:55 pm

“Canada may drift further left or end up with failed mutual-fund flogger Kevin O’Leary at the helm. Imagine. Another reality TV ego. Oy.”
—————————————————————–
Much better than what we have now.

#10 TurnerNation on 02.09.17 at 6:58 pm

Why can’t The Poor just eat peanut butter? Over 100 calories per spoonful.

Too bad The Lefties banned it out of schools.

Dollarama stock back into triple digits. All is well

#11 acdel on 02.09.17 at 7:05 pm

Good one Garth!
Who knows where the economy is going or what other foolish tax they will attempt to come up with.

Today’s politician’s should never be in the job that they are in; they are just not qualified, they are most likely the dumbest of the dumbest in human history. We vote (if patriotic) because we have no one else to vote for. Done on purpose by a selected few, you tell me! Seriously this whole system has gone mad..

Our ancestors are probably rolling in their graves!

#12 RentYVR on 02.09.17 at 7:07 pm

Or just ensure your skills are easily transferable to other countries and peace out of here until the current gang is ousted. Texas has less tax and nicer weather. And a mega-mansion costs less than a 1 bed here in lala land!

#13 Brian Gordon on 02.09.17 at 7:09 pm

Just over 3 years ago, I was in the process of purchasing a property at 15 Coral Cove Cres. (Toronto, DVP & Lawrence) and had to back out of because I got laid off. The exact home/model, 3 doors down, and in worst condition (I went to the open house), sold for 1.5 million on Tuesday (firm). The house was listed for $998,800. I spoke with the realtor and she said her clients were expecting around 1.2million. The property hasn’t been removed from mls yet, but my realtor confirmed it’s sold (mls# C3696586).

I rent a small townhouse in the hood so I know the area well. The schools aren’t good and we have apartment buildings everywhere. There is NO reason prices should be this high.
We’ve hit the level of insanity my friends!

#14 Gary in Kelowna on 02.09.17 at 7:09 pm

Garth, do you think T2 will go after TFSAs? Seems like everything is fair game for this guy. C

#15 Ed on 02.09.17 at 7:12 pm

2019 seems far away…

#16 conan on 02.09.17 at 7:14 pm

So Trump’s ill thought out refugee-ban plan was struck down about an hour ago . Imagine, the person who thought it would be legal, and told Trump that it would hold up…….” You are fired!

” The decision led to tearful reunions at airports round the country.”

Literary thousands of people stranded. For no reason, except bad policy. So what does Trump do now? Bounce off a couple of Chinese islands? Night time maneuvers in Tehran? Agent Orange in the Sinai? Anyway, it is loose canon alert as far as I am concerned.

Trying to think positive…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1dyutvty0U

#17 Doug t on 02.09.17 at 7:15 pm

RATM bitchez

#18 bigtowne on 02.09.17 at 7:16 pm

Many many disconnects…where to start?

RRSP’s tilted to those with big incomes. The disconnect: T2 cuts the TFSA back to $5,000 limit. TFSA’s are equal for all and a perfect example of socialism at its best…who would ever reject such a savings account for all including the steerage class?

Carbon Tax?

The Disconnect: When rural folk in Ontario have to burn their kitchen chairs to heat the house it’s getting the feel of a 19th century Charles Dickens novel.

2016 new job creation was mostly temp.

The Disconnect: Big immigration in past five years and with more and more automated and artificial intelligence do we need thousands more when there are thousands less jobs?

Next to zero rental vacancy and unaffordable homes in major cities in Canada for more than a decade.

The Disconnect: Huge immigration without any thought to available housing or jobs.

The Media and the bank’s number crunchers and Bank of Canada and Ottawa all full of concern about Trump and his new regime.

The Disconnect: Hone in on T2 policy and Canadian policy and examine if appropriate for Canada and worry about Canadian policies and how they affect Canada and Canada’s economy and we will be able to manage if our own house is in order.

#19 mike from mtl on 02.09.17 at 7:20 pm

Which is precisely why the risk of holding accounts here (registered or not) grows.

Financial assets can be taxed and seized so easily if history is any guide. Though I personally don’t believe it will happen outright, rather slowly and indirectly.

And you RE brick lovers don’t get too excited, big gov can seize ‘your’ land at the flick of a pen. Too bad the folks in rural UK or France are nearly no longer amongst us to tell you about WWII.

#20 just a dude on 02.09.17 at 7:21 pm

Garth,

Nice to get these great summaries of financial wisdom every now and then. Thank you.

As for the whiners who envy those who’ve been successful and keep this country afloat, quit your whining, stop wasting your money useless expenses & on a one-asset “strategy” (freakin housing?!), learn from some of the smart folk on this blog and get to work. And then when you’re on a more solid financial footing, help out those in our society most in need (there are plenty of fantasitc local charities to choose from) and contribute towards improving things for those truly less fortunate amongst us. Simple, good, honest living with nothing to be ashamed of, especially with one’s success earned in one fantastic country.

#21 dr. talc on 02.09.17 at 7:27 pm

here’s one for the trump cheerleaders

Trump’s biometric tracking order raises concern

http://www.wgrz.com/news/local/trumps-biometric-tracking-order-raises-concern/395125588

#22 yorkville renter on 02.09.17 at 7:29 pm

if a private corporation goes bankrupt and I invested in it, can I apply those capital losses?

#23 Suede on 02.09.17 at 7:30 pm

Trudeau is really going to put this country into a hole.

Brain drain 2.0 will start.

He’s encouraging mediocrity vs innovation.

He can’t possibly that clueless.

I buy shares and invest with after tax income already. Tax tax tax. When does it end.

Anyone striving to improve their life and those around them will not be voting for JT next round. Kevin has it locked in..

#24 Jeff on 02.09.17 at 7:30 pm

11. If T2 goes too far the 1%ers will revolt. Lets see what happens if they stop spending on luxury goods.

#25 TurnerNation on 02.09.17 at 7:31 pm

weird… somehow Im looking at Turner Nations screen? (This is Yorkville Renter)

#26 Alice on 02.09.17 at 7:32 pm

Speculation nation continues. Over 99k unoccupied homes in Toronto.

https://betterdwelling.com/city/toronto/toronto-has-over-99000-unoccupied-homes-heres-where-they-are-interactive/

#27 Fish on 02.09.17 at 7:33 pm

GOOD One, very informative, this is much more gentle, let’s see,
RE # 7, I’m not a plus size, I m xsm, I am still here
Waiting, no need to buy a house

#28 joblo on 02.09.17 at 7:42 pm

11 Grab a bottle of Champagne, sit back, wait for the system to collapse under it’s own weight. Then vultch!
Cheers

#29 IHCTD9 on 02.09.17 at 7:46 pm

#274 Metaxa on 02.09.17 at 3:12 pm

Almost all the rest of you…how can you ever again accuse the liberals or Liberals or snowflakes or SJW’s of whinging after this display of stamp my feet, hold my breath and bellyache?
———

There you go dogs, Metaxa the Man has it all figured out. Nothing to worry about! Stop all that “winging”!!

Personally, I hope Trudeau will stop winging it too.

#30 yorkville renter on 02.09.17 at 7:47 pm

#27… I dunno, wouldnt carrying costs and taxes really hurt the bottom line? wouldnt renting the property be a logical move? maybe the respondents didnt want the guvmint to know about their rental income?

#31 Joseph R. on 02.09.17 at 7:48 pm

#10 AK on 02.09.17 at 6:55 pm
“Canada may drift further left or end up with failed mutual-fund flogger Kevin O’Leary at the helm. Imagine. Another reality TV ego. Oy.”
—————————————————————–
Much better than what we have now.

———————————————-
Sending a former schoolteacher to deal with a petulant POTUS seems to be wise to me.

#32 Guy in Calgary on 02.09.17 at 7:50 pm

I tip my millennial fedora to you as I am glad my wife and I stocked up on CPD a few months ago in our unregistered account, up close to 10% now plus the monthly dividend. How sweet it is. I don’t have a fedora btw.

JT building the middle class by taxing the middle class, gotta love it. I do not even know what middle class means anymore. Building wealth is easy if you are able to go without. Once you stop caring about what people think and stop blaming people for your problems, you too can build wealth fellow bearded, fedora sporting millenials. It is not hard.

Off to Mexico Saturday, hopefully my Canadian accent is strong enough for them to know I am not a wall builder.

#33 CanadianUSPerson on 02.09.17 at 7:54 pm

Yes! There is hope for freedom from the US master for those unfortunate Canadians with a red, white and blue tattoo!

Contrary to popular rhetoric, we are not tax cheats nor are we hiding ‘billions’ stashed in GIC’s in Canadian banks from the USA. We live, work and pay taxes in Canada just like all the other Canadians. Heck, some of us have no American DNA and not a single memory of the short time we lived south of the border after our Canadian parents birthed us there.

Nigel Green, deVere Group CEO announced a Washington DC-based Campaign to Repeal FATCA. He is teaming up with Jim Jatras, former US diplomat and long-time Senate leadership staffer, who together are “lobbying to have America’s toxic, imperialistic global tax law swept into the dustbin of history.”

Jatras recently stated: “Billions of dollars have been wasted worldwide complying with FATCA, billions of words have been written complaining about it. Now it’s time for action. When that tax bill gets to President Trump’s desk, we want FATCA repeal in it.”

http://www.cityam.com/258775/our-best-chance-scrap-toxic-american-tax-law-makes-pariahs

#34 Felix on 02.09.17 at 7:59 pm

Thank you for removing that picture of those stupid dogs, Garth.

It only took you twelve minutes after our cease and desist demand letter was delivered for you to get the message.

Next time you will only have five :(

Meanwhile, some more reminders of why dogs are so pathetic and cats are so awesome:

http://www.neatorama.com/pet/2014/09/18/9-Cats-That-Are-Serious-Heroes/

#35 Spaccone on 02.09.17 at 8:00 pm

I keep my TFSA as the high-yield portion of my balanced portfolio (currently XHY) after vapourizing $~5k in there on an individual company bet. I assume that even with it being Fixed Income the performance generally shadows equity markets? It pays me around $330-350 pre-tax equivalent each month…chump change in Toronto but still sweet, virgin coin. On top of this position DRIPping each month I keep cash to the absolute minimum by buying an odd lot with each year’s contribution.

#36 Jessica on 02.09.17 at 8:04 pm

Hi Garth, really enjoying your blog lately.

But this one’s not quite right, is it?

“Thanks to the dividend tax credit, income received in this form is also taxed less than income from employment (but don’t tell the steerage section).”

Of course it feels like that if they’re not from your own business. The point is, CRA gets its share one way or another. Death and taxes.

The tax rate on dividends works out to be the same approximately as on any other type of income, with the exception of course of the reduced tax on capital gains.

Incorrect, unless the dividend is from a company you own, — Garth

#37 Fish on 02.09.17 at 8:11 pm

Remember that old song, Burton Cummings,
Take the money and run,

#38 Irish Stew on 02.09.17 at 8:13 pm

Crazy question…..if a relative has room in their TFSA but cannot afford to fill it…..can I not put money in that TFSA and let it grow until I want it back?

#39 Alex on 02.09.17 at 8:26 pm

Don’t trade too often in your TFSA and reach the million mark too fast !
http://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/tfsa/this-bay-st-trader-managed-to-amass-1-25-million-in-his-tfsa-now-the-taxman-wants-to-know-how

#40 GB on 02.09.17 at 8:33 pm

Garth, your blanket statement that all first money should stream into a TFSA is somewhat outrageous without fully understanding individual circumstances.

In the end…it’s all about two things: 1) Building wealth and 2) tax efficiency.

How best to invest retirement cash (RRSP vs TSFA) will depend on a variety of factors.

I think you should make that clear for your readers. Not all circumstances would necessarily suggest TSFA first.

#41 MF on 02.09.17 at 8:39 pm

Laugh out loud at the idiots who voted for this clown to try and “get back at Harper”. How’d that work out? Pathetic.

“Millennials finally fall out of love with Justin Trudeau after he abandons electoral reform”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/falling-out-of-love-with-trudeau-1.3972771

“4 If dear leader does target capital gains in the coming budget, don’t trigger any. After all, unrealized profits attract no tax whatsoever – which means you can hold on to growing assets, enjoy the advance, and pay nothing until this all blows over. That could be the autumn of 2019.”

-I am starting to sense Garth’s (among others) frustration with T2. Correction to the above paragraph..It WILL BE autumn 2019.

#17 conan on 02.09.17 at 7:14 pm

Masterful move. If there is a terror attack in the US (or anywhere) Trump can say he tried to prevent it. If there is not he can still say he tried to make everyone safe.

What is happening in the US is predictable and strategic. After years of left leaning policies easily being shoved down our throats, the left leaning establishment is having temper tantrums as they lose support and control. No one said this would be easy but it is necessary and will take time. Sort of like a detox after taking cocaine/heroin for years. I think Trump purposefully is being bold in his orders to elicit a strong response. The strong response is then seen by the silent majority who then quietly rally behind him.

MF

#42 hawkeye on 02.09.17 at 8:40 pm

Small business is the backbone of the country which produces the most jobs, in Canada take away the tax incentives and who would work 60 to 100hrs a week with no set wage as a business owner because that is what most successful business owners do.It is called hard work and a labour of love or you would not be in business for long. If the government changes the tax laws we are in for a lot of unemployment. No one talks about or mentions the one or five people that are now getting terminated because of the present economy. The government hides this with job share people work 20hrs a week and the government shores up the wage to hide unemployment numbers.

#43 Stock Picker on 02.09.17 at 8:43 pm

DELETED

#44 Not 1st on 02.09.17 at 8:44 pm

….or we could just do nothing and wait for oleary.

Honestly Garth if those Tfsa aren’t taxed in 20yrs I will eat my hat. The have savaged every other program, tax shelter and sources of income. They won’t stop.

#45 Hotdogs from Heaven on 02.09.17 at 8:46 pm

#37 Jessica on 02.09.17 at 8:04 pm

Hi Garth, really enjoying your blog lately.

But this one’s not quite right, is it?

“Thanks to the dividend tax credit, income received in this form is also taxed less than income from employment (but don’t tell the steerage section).”

Of course it feels like that if they’re not from your own business. The point is, CRA gets its share one way or another. Death and taxes.

The tax rate on dividends works out to be the same approximately as on any other type of income, with the exception of course of the reduced tax on capital gains.

Incorrect, unless the dividend is from a company you own, — Garth
————————————————
Jessica, check out the second part of this link entitled “Combined Federal & Ontario Tax Brackets and Tax Rates Including Surtaxes”:
http://www.taxtips.ca/taxrates/on.htm

#46 mike from mtl on 02.09.17 at 8:51 pm

#41 GB on 02.09.17 at 8:33 pm
I think you should make that clear for your readers. Not all circumstances would necessarily suggest TSFA first.
////////////////////////////////////////////////

Still a very valid point as lower brackets should work to max TFSA only. And higher same but add RRSP. Even higher by almost coincidental definition can max TFSA plus contribute to almost max RRSP for their bracket.

RRSP is an incorrect vehicle for the <60k gross folks as in retirement they'll probably be in the same bracket as today. So be double taxed on your hard earned saved after-tax income makes little sense.

Myself I can easily afford to max TFSA without trying hopefully CRA doesn't take note.

#47 mike from mtl on 02.09.17 at 8:59 pm

#39 Irish Stew on 02.09.17 at 8:13 pm
Crazy question…..if a relative has room in their TFSA but cannot afford to fill it…..can I not put money in that TFSA and let it grow until I want it back?
////////////////////////////////////////////////

You can, nothing stopping you, but try getting actual money from a relative, especially one you don’t sleep with.

Good, luck, with, that.

#48 TurnerNation on 02.09.17 at 9:00 pm

#26 …well if you somehow cracked my VPN, router and firewall which I’m using…Not much to look at here except for Profits.

#49 MF on 02.09.17 at 9:02 pm

#40 Alex on 02.09.17 at 8:26 pm

I’m sorry but I think I agree with the CRA here.

Total annual contribution room is 5.5k with a max of about 50K now, but his account is now worth 1.25 million?

Of course it seems fishy.

“As an accredited investor he was also able to invest in initial public offerings of Baytex Energy Corp. and Seven Generations Energy Inc. Both shot up quickly and he’s since sold.”

The TFSA was created for the average Canadian to invest, have their investments grow over time, and to have a nice retirement fund with tax free income. Of course a guy with inside knowledge and huge gains is going to cause some interest.

We don’t know the result of the audit either.

MF

#50 Gulf breeze on 02.09.17 at 9:08 pm

Quick question for anybody who is or has been in the same boat. I have passive income from commercial real estate in U.S. The building is going to sell in the next few years.

I live in Canada, am a Canadian. I inherited the business from my American husband, when he died. My husband was a permanent resident of Canada but American citizen

So, when business sells, will the capital gains be taxed by the U.S. or Canada or both?

If you file with the IRS, the U.S. will withhold. — Garth

#51 Metaxa on 02.09.17 at 9:20 pm

There you go dogs, Metaxa the Man has it all figured out. Nothing to worry about! Stop all that “winging”!!

Personally, I hope Trudeau will stop winging it too.

Its whinging not winging.

Look it up, real word, not fake.
I’ll be sure and dumb down my vocabulary for you in future now I know you read my every post.

#52 Madcat on 02.09.17 at 9:24 pm

Hate to say to say it but I like the idea of Kevin O’Leary for PM. He might be pompous but I almost always agreed with him on dragons den :))

#53 BG on 02.09.17 at 9:31 pm

I love these practical posts.
Thank you Garth.

#54 slick on 02.09.17 at 9:35 pm

Don’t worry about it.
Skim $30 + billion more per year from the taxpayers,
and ‘the budget will balance itself’

#55 Entrepreneur on 02.09.17 at 9:38 pm

Keep it up T2 and Kevin O’Leary is starting to shine.

Noticed in the news that the three prairie provinces are leading in job creations and those provinces are not lead by Liberals. Now that says it all!

#43 hawkeye…small business are dying in Canada and is treated like a dime a dozen, next. I think stats on job creation should be on full time jobs with one picture an part time, casual as another picture on how to improve productivity. When the bigger picture is shown maybe look at these free international deals that was suppose to be so good for Canadians.

At election time T2 played Tom Mulcair as if he was concerned about the TPP but once in power full steam ahead and T2 played Elizabeth May on the pipeline, full steam ahead. Played both on the electoral reform, now no reform.

Watched that video of Obama and that was scary. He knew how to talk to a crowd but did not really connect to everyone, ignored working groups.

#56 Spectacle on 02.09.17 at 9:59 pm

A big thank you Garth TURNER FOR ALL YOU DO FOR US, AND FOR THE 10 list of how to take action. I’ll read it all later this evening.

How low can Trudeau go : every 2 hours, in North america, a U.S. veteran takes his/her life by suicide. Those people step in front of a bullet for us and our country and that is how Trudeau treats them.
Complete Ass…e.

I’ve got several friends with PTSD from serving their country. M.

#9 Awakened One on 02.09.17 at 6:55 pm
Great, thanks Garth !

No, we never will ! Resist, resist ! Look what we voted in:
How low can this gang get, hmm??

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/troops-serving-in-kuwait-lose-major-tax-exemption-1.3277313

#57 NoName on 02.09.17 at 10:02 pm

#56 Entrepreneur on 02.09.17 at 9:38 pm

Watched that video of Obama and that was scary. He knew how to talk to a crowd but did not really connect to everyone, ignored working groups.

—-

some time ago i red that an average deplorable travels only fas as 200 miles from where he lives, Donny the Great Connector, choosing to build and make all those new shiny airports instead of fixing crumbling bridges or God forbid fixing suige systems across us.
answer me this, When you flush, where does it go?

Flushing the Toilet Has Never Been Riskiers

#58 Bottoms_Up on 02.09.17 at 10:14 pm

#237 IHCTD9 on 02.09.17 at 10:31 am
——————————–
Sorry, you missed the point. You wouldn’t have been able to build that house without a civilization around you. Taxes buy civilization.

#59 Andrew Woburn on 02.09.17 at 10:20 pm

There was a lot of heat and perhaps some light generated here recently about the virtues of CPP and the evilness of undeserved OAS.

Despite the evident disdain of the more fortunate/thrifty blog dogs, many Canadian couples are and will be largely dependent on their combined CPP and OAS to keep a roof over their heads in retirement. How many are aware that when one spouse dies, the other immediately loses all of the deceased spouse’s OAS and most of their CPP.

The survivor’s ongoing CPP plus the “survivor benefits” will max out at a current $1,141 per month and can be a lot less. In other words, what had been the combined family government pension will be basically cut in half. Given that women tend to outlive men, that probably means a lot of widows will be driven out of their houses or into reverse mortgages. Claims for the guaranteed income supplement will inevitably increase.

“What many do not realize is that there is a recalculation of the survivor’s pension upon reaching age 65,” Ms. Koiv says. “Many widows or widowers will be really surprised by the fall in their family incomes, including the loss of their spouse’s OAS. If that’s a large part of the family’s income, it can be calamitous to lose that thousand dollars a month plus the partner’s OAS, especially if you are not entitled to GIS [guaranteed income supplement].”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/retirement/retire-planning/when-you-dont-get-the-cpp-survivor-benefit-you-expect/article33949647/

#60 Stock Picker on 02.09.17 at 10:24 pm

#25 Jeff….the ” 1% ” has nothin to fear, their have great accountants. What T2 has to fear is already happening. Highly educated and experienced Canadians are leaving in droves to be replaced by dubious credentials with zero experience.

I spent five years in Dallas….every flight was full of departing Canadian specialists…the office towers and malls are full of Canadians…buying beautiful cheap cars and lovely cheap homes. The best are leaving and the newly minted are packing.

I live in Bangkok now where international business are relocating in droves…big businesses full of ex pats getting paid big international salaries and loving the 15% income tax and zero sales tax. Never mind the super cheap beach front villas along the coast for the weekends. Thailand has way more holidays as well….it’s seemed every month has at least one five day holiday. Cheap to live here…high quality of life. Sure we get the degenerates, but they are no where near where regular people live.

Any way….I pay no EI or CPP….no carbon tax or gst…none of that crap and save many thousands because of it….like almost free money not being drowned in the Canadian tax and fee creep. We liquidated everything Canadian and have only our passports….we leave the young liberals with the mess they’re creating. I’ll take the sunshine over Trudeaus sunny ways any day.

Canadian administration by accounts I hear is becoming less efficient and more corrupt due to the colour coded hiring practises. So….people like us….and the dozens of people I know….who all know dozens more….adding to many thousands leaving every year. Leaving is smart investing. My bonuses and RSU are all paid in USD like international companies do. I won’t return to Canada to spend my retirement burning my kitchen chairs and eating cat food ….who would?

#61 paulo on 02.09.17 at 10:28 pm

Update- Trump gets smoked – Travel ban injunction upheld
in S.F. District supreme court 3 judges 2 dem 1 rep
vote 3-0 unwritten (signed) judgement.
Essentially Trumps powers do not permit his action, goverment lawyers failed to show a security issue

#62 Vancouver Troy on 02.09.17 at 10:42 pm

I love these kinds of posts with lists of tips!

Thanks Garth.

#63 mike on 02.09.17 at 10:46 pm

a machine focused on creating wealth?

Garth , give up on forecasting, no one can do it, and neither can you. Hindsight is 20/20.

Trump will only create wealth for himself. Time will tell. Trump has got no clue about economics or trade. Protectionism backfires. He will bring America down, not forward.

#64 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.09.17 at 10:47 pm

@#53 madcat
“Hate to say to say it but I like the idea of Kevin O’Leary for PM. He might be pompous but I almost always agreed with him on dragons den :))”
****************************************

O….M….G

The majority has spoken…….

#65 Mark on 02.09.17 at 10:50 pm

“Highly educated and experienced Canadians are leaving in droves to be replaced by dubious credentials with zero experience. “

Yet TN-1 visa issuance (the visa Canadians use to work in the USA) has crashed. Even more than simply implied by the 3 year validity period (formerly 1 year).

So that’s good theory and all, that Canadians are migrating away from Canada, but I don’t see any evidence of it in the TN-1 visa issuance numbers.

If anything, amongst the professionals I know who did migrate south, many have either returned or are looking to return on account of the perceived deteriorating political and social situation in the United States. A trend that was occurring well before even Donald Trump came onto the scene.

#66 crowdedelevatorfartz on 02.09.17 at 10:56 pm

@#61 Stock Picker
“I won’t return to Canada to spend my retirement burning my kitchen chairs and eating cat food ….who would?’
********************************************

But, but, but, thats how you build character!
Through trial, tribulation and punatively higher taxes!Them spend thrift boomers gotta wake up sometime!
I mean Jaysuz!
Suffering is a Canadian right of birth from the day you were born and the midwife stuffed snow in yer mouth to shut you up so the wolves wouldnt find you……..til now….
Lazing away , fat and tanned on a beach in southern Thigh-land like some creepy old pale white male German tourist lookin fer …..luuuuuuuv.
Time for you to tear up that boring old passe canuck passport and buy a Liberian one, you international rock star

#67 MF on 02.09.17 at 11:01 pm

Yes T2 is garbage and will be gone in about 3 years but anyone else getting tired of these ex pats knocking Canada at every turn?

My GF left SE Asia to come to Canada. Reasons: stability, safety, jobs, acceptance. She lived in Singapore with some of these “ex pats” from the US. Why are 90% of these guys older, fat guys with a fetish who couldn’t make it in the US? Interestingly, she said a lot of them ended up with a desperate local girl and moved back to the US as soon as they could too.

It’s one thing to complain about higher taxes in Canada (T2 is a disaster but his policies will be reversed when he is kicked out in 3 years), but another thing to brag about taxes being low in a third world banana republic facade that is functioning off the backs of the working poor natives.

One Coup’ or natural disaster and these supposed CEO 10k/day “ex pats” with some fetish will be running back to the “boringness” of Canada.

Good riddance I say

MF

#68 Ace Goodheart on 02.09.17 at 11:06 pm

Not sure if you folks have noticed this amidst all the hubbub and complaining and while the Trumpster goes down in democratic flames, but it is now possible to purchase investment grade commercial paper with a 4% yield paid monthly.

Oh wrt the tax stuff, trust fund kids turned PMs always leave a way out. I remember when they brought in the part 4.1 tax everyone thought we were screwed. But they left loopholes. There will be holes in these new taxes too. The wealthy and their children always leave themselves a way out. Just have to find it…..

#69 Pete from St. Cesaire on 02.09.17 at 11:17 pm

So Trump’s ill thought out refugee-ban plan was struck down about an hour ago . Imagine, the person who thought it would be legal, and told Trump that it would hold up…….” You are fired!
————————————————
It wasn’t Trumps plan. This code was written before Trump took office, so he’s totally in the clear on this.

8 U.S. Code 1182 – Inadmissible aliens – (f) Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President

Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate. Whenever the Attorney General finds that a commercial airline has failed to comply with regulations of the Attorney General relating to requirements of airlines for the detection of fraudulent documents used by passengers traveling to the United States (including the training of personnel in such detection), the Attorney General may suspend the entry of some or all aliens transported to the United States by such airline.

#70 Ontario's Left Coast on 02.09.17 at 11:29 pm

#38 Fish – Take the money and run…

It wasn’t by Burton Cummings, this hit belonged to the Steve Miller Band.

#71 For those about to flop... on 02.09.17 at 11:29 pm

Vancouver has a new top dog when it comes to most expensive house for sale.

Let’s just round it up to 50 million between friends…

M42BC

https://www.zolo.ca/vancouver-real-estate/1238-tecumseh-avenue

#72 mark on 02.09.17 at 11:40 pm

RRSP are protected from creditors.
TFSA and open accounts are not.
TFSA will be taxed in future.

Some use there rrsp for that reason.
120000 Canadians Went BANKRUPT Last Year.

#73 Jessica on 02.09.17 at 11:48 pm

Incorrect, unless the dividend is from a company you own, — Garth

I’m assuming you mean then that the tax an individual will pay is less than on employment income due to the dividend tax credit.

However, what is that credit for? It’s a credit for what the business already paid in corporate tax, so that there isn’t double taxation.

When you add up the corporate tax paid and the tax the receiving individual pays, it will approximate the same tax rate that individual would have paid if that income was earned directly. So dividends are taxed at the same rate as employment income; it’s just you pay some and the issuing company pays some.

Why I point this out is related to yesterday’s post: capital gains are really the exception. All other forms of income are taxed at the same marginal rate. The reason why they are an exception is because of the debate as to whether they are a form of income or whether this is rather a tax on wealth. There are good arguments for and against. The government’s current position is to strike a balance between these points of view by taxing only 50%.

I think we all know why there’s a dividend tax credit. If you own the company giving you the payment there is no net tax saving. If the dividend comes from a publicly-held company (for example) then you certainly benefit, as the corp has paid a portion of your tax already. — Garth

#74 yorkville renter on 02.09.17 at 11:49 pm

TurnerNation… no, seriously the blog reloaded with your post about eating butter and I saw your email address (a couple letters followed by a free email domain).

Just letting Garth know what I saw

#75 @Mark on 02.10.17 at 12:15 am

#66 Mark on 02.09.17 at 10:50 pm
“Highly educated and experienced Canadians are leaving in droves to be replaced by dubious credentials with zero experience. “

Yet TN-1 visa issuance (the visa Canadians use to work in the USA) has crashed. Even more than simply implied by the 3 year validity period (formerly 1 year).

So that’s good theory and all, that Canadians are migrating away from Canada, but I don’t see any evidence of it in the TN-1 visa issuance numbers.

If anything, amongst the professionals I know who did migrate south, many have either returned or are looking to return on account of the perceived deteriorating political and social situation in the United States. A trend that was occurring well before even Donald Trump came onto the scene.

—- The docs can head south but can’t open up their own ‘business’. They can work for someone else but that is not very profitable.

Fear mongering.

#76 chapter 9 on 02.10.17 at 12:52 am

#17 Conan

First Trump didn’t dream this up. Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 “Whenever the president finds that the entry of aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interest of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or non-immigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate.
Every president has used this statute. Perhaps it is worth noting how other country’s deal with national security. Japan has an extreme vetting process for anyone from an Islamic country,and their supreme court ruled in July of last year that the government will continue to monitor all activities by their Muslim population as a necessary and inevitable guard against international terrorism. To date, no harm has come to any citizens.

#77 When Will They Raise Rates? on 02.10.17 at 1:02 am

Nice post today. Bookmarked.

#78 When Will They Raise Rates? on 02.10.17 at 1:04 am

#14 Brian Gordon on 02.09.17 at 7:09 pm

Just over 3 years ago, I was in the process of purchasing a property at 15 Coral Cove Cres. (Toronto, DVP & Lawrence) and had to back out of because I got laid off. The exact home/model, 3 doors down, and in worst condition (I went to the open house), sold for 1.5 million on Tuesday (firm). The house was listed for $998,800. I spoke with the realtor and she said her clients were expecting around 1.2million. The property hasn’t been removed from mls yet, but my realtor confirmed it’s sold (mls# C3696586).

I rent a small townhouse in the hood so I know the area well. The schools aren’t good and we have apartment buildings everywhere. There is NO reason prices should be this high.
We’ve hit the level of insanity my friends!
—————-

If you think that’s insane, look at this:

http://watch.ohmyhome.ca/#/mls/E3696546

#79 mark on 02.10.17 at 1:12 am

Damf.

#80 Trumpian cavalier capitalism on 02.10.17 at 3:23 am

I think “caviar” would have been better than “cavalier”.

#10 not so sure Garth. Last asset of defense financially. Too swashbuckling to use as an investments ATM card. Also, prices are arresting in RE. Little revenge there now.

#81 Dan on 02.10.17 at 5:37 am

Hi Golf Breeze,

As your husband was American and he left you the business, you will be entitled to Marital tax credits (I believe up to $1M US) and possibly other credits. It all depends how the business was transferred from your husband to you. Any US asset disposition will be taxable in the US; however, there is a Canada US tax treaty that handles these cases. When your husband passed away, you would have been given 90 days to file with the US to take advantage of some other credits. My advice is to get a good tax specialist who may save you thousands of dollars

#82 Richard on 02.10.17 at 5:55 am

After living in the city for many years ,
I went rural 22 years ago.
Live on a river surrounded by forest and commuted to an assortment of contract jobs in my profession.
My property has risen steadiy in value,
No windfall, but it was a lifestyle choice, not an investment. No debt and a peaceful life.
Seems my forest has really risen in value so as I move to retirement, I will harvest some wood to supplement my retirement and spend a lot more time at the river flyfishing.
Do I miss urban life? No
Starbucks? I can buy it by the bag anywhere. Prefer Salt Spring coffee anyway.
Conversation?
There’s more of that in a rural area.
Thanks for the investment advice Garth.

#83 Looney Baloney on 02.10.17 at 6:25 am

32 Joseph R. on 02.09.17 at 7:48 pm

Sending a former schoolteacher to deal with a petulant POTUS seems to be wise to me.
———————————————-

You’re right, a reality TV star could probably use a few pointers from a former part time drama teacher. Perhaps T2 will teach him how to take the perfect selfie that’s all about you?

#84 Ace Goodheart on 02.10.17 at 6:53 am

#68 MF:

“It’s one thing to complain about higher taxes in Canada (T2 is a disaster but his policies will be reversed when he is kicked out in 3 years), but another thing to brag about taxes being low in a third world banana republic facade that is functioning off the backs of the working poor natives.”

Third world countries function kinda differently than here. Here, a person is this massive bundle of rights and each human is treated with a respect that is really not found in the third world. I have lived there so I have seen it. In most of the world (which is the “third world”) human life is worthless. A person is not of any value. The value in these places is the money, which is all concentrated in one spot, usually a corporate spot with a puppet person who acts as “leader of the people” or some such thing. Everyone tries to cling to him (I am not being sexist, it is always a “him”) and his inner circle, and that is where all the money and power is. Outside of that, it is a primal existence, kill or be killed, with human life being worth less than the life of a piece of livestock.

We have this weird thing here called democracy which is run by rules, and we follow the rules. No one else does this. People who want to complain about having their money taken here or being taxed or having leaders who care about other folks, really have to go and live in a third world country. Just try it for a year or two. If you survive, when you come back here (most likely with PTSD from all the killing and the brutal lack of humanity that you have witnessed first hand) all you will feel is very happy to be home.

#85 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 7:17 am

#59 Bottoms_Up on 02.09.17 at 10:14 pm
#237 IHCTD9 on 02.09.17 at 10:31 am
——————————–
Sorry, you missed the point. You wouldn’t have been able to build that house without a civilization around you. Taxes buy civilization.
_____________________________

Ahhh, right – I didn’t build that.

So how did civilization get built in the first place?

Ancient Aliens?

#86 pBrasseur on 02.10.17 at 7:23 am

The resistance against what?

Nothing has happened and most likely nothing will.

#87 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 7:31 am

#58 NoName on 02.09.17 at 10:02 pm

…answer me this, When you flush, where does it go?
____________________________________

Out into the weeping bed out back, then into a tanker every 5 years or so :).

#88 jess on 02.10.17 at 7:31 am

13 RentYVR on 02.09.17 at 7:07 pm

texas yield chasing?
Austin, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio carry a whopping $22.6 billion in unfunded pension liability, according to Moody’s, the financial analysis firm.

“Rapid growth in unfunded pension liabilities over the past 10 years has transformed local governments’ balance sheet burdens to historically high levels,” the Moody’s report stated….
“In Dallas, Democratic Mayor Mike Rawlings has ordered an independent investigation into the handling of police and fire pensions there…

“The city’s funds had invested in speculative real estate deals. With estimated losses at $545 million, the police and fire pension system now teeters on the brink of bankruptcy.”
http://watchdog.org/285551/texas-pension-crisis/

===============
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-inventor-of-the-401k-says-he-created-a-monster-2016-05-16

How to
GRATS
http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2012/03/20/how-facebook-billionaires-dodge-mega-millions-in-taxes/#45c80e2465f6

How does this create jobs?
EXCLUSIVE: Steve Mnuchin says there will be ‘no absolute tax cut for the upper class’
Elizabeth Gurdus
Wednesday, 30 Nov 2016 | 9:09 AM ET

————————————–
“President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed tax cuts will primarily serve the middle class and will not include an absolute tax cut for the wealthy, Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Wednesday, shortly after confirming he has been chosen to head the Treasury Department.

Yet one of the first priorities of Republicans in Congress is to give an exclusive tax break to multi-millionaires and billionaires. They plan to abolish the estate tax and allow tax loopholes for billionaires to continue.
http://inequality.org/tax-heirs/

The estate tax, sometimes derided as a “death tax,” is only paid by households with assets over $11 million. In 2013, 99.8 percent of the population was exempt.

http://inequality.org/trumps-test-taxes/

=======

#89 prairiegopher on 02.10.17 at 7:39 am

After Trump has his meeting with baby Castro he will know that Canadians are truly “hosers.” Who else would elect a guy who’s only talent was pretending to be something he wasn’t. Oh, the drama!

#90 MF on 02.10.17 at 7:40 am

#84 Ace Goodheart on 02.10.17 at 6:53 am

100% spot on.

MF

#91 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 7:58 am

#53 Madcat on 02.09.17 at 9:24 pm
Hate to say to say it but I like the idea of Kevin O’Leary for PM. He might be pompous but I almost always agreed with him on dragons den :))
_____________________________

I like the idea of a pile of dirt for PM compared to Trudeau.

Much less damaging to the country, and is much more productive.

Seriously, a hunk of limestone sitting on a table somewhere for the last 1.5 years would have left Canadians in better shape than Trudeau has.

#92 Evangeline on 02.10.17 at 8:09 am

#11 Turner Nation

There’s a quite few good reasons Dollarama is doing well.

In addition to its extremely low prices, there are small details that make shopping at Dollarama a pleasure. For example, it uses classic regular shopping carts. Another is that it doesn’t charge for bags, and will even double a super-big bag free of charge. Small things that make shopping less of a pain.

I mildly injured my back a few weeks ago, and could not shop for paper or cleaning products at Canadian drug stores because they now use hinky little plastic shopping carts, that you have to bend over to empty at the cash, and I was physically unable to do that.

I’d guess that the largest group of shoppers at the drug stores are seniors who may have physical problems that make bending over to empty a shopping cart quite difficult. My mother was able to continue grocery shopping for herself, which she loved to do, far into her senior years because as she said, she could “lean on the cart.” What kind of management imposes barriers to shopping on possibly their largest segment of shoppers?

MSGA*
*Make Shopping Great Again

#93 Evangeline on 02.10.17 at 8:14 am

#12 acdel

As the saying, the price of freedom is eternal vigilance. Somewhere along the way, Canadians stopped watching, and the interlopers interloped, into the schools and justice system, and here we are. The good news is that it’s never too late to start watching.

#94 maxx on 02.10.17 at 8:14 am

#16 Ed on 02.09.17 at 7:12 pm

“2019 seems far away…”

Eons………..if the selfie brigade had resisted ageist, arrogant, “we’re taking over” policy and left the TFSA as it was, there wouldn’t be this level of revulsion for the party.

If this inept, pathetic party gets voted out next election, perhaps it can apply for financing for public pushup competitions- a new Canada day event.

Perhaps there’ll be a free demo in D.C. on Monday…..”this is how Canada brings it”.

#95 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 8:22 am

#52 Metaxa on 02.09.17 at 9:20 pm

…I’ll be sure and dumb down my vocabulary for you in future now I know you read my every post.
_______________________________________

Like that Latina “chick with a dick” comment a couple days ago?

Yep, I saw it. Probably a post you regretted later eh?

Too bad you can’t delete it.

You’ve certainly got the dumb part down pat. I look forward to hearing more transgender jokes from Metaxa the man :).

#96 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 8:34 am

#45 Not 1st on 02.09.17 at 8:44 pm
….or we could just do nothing and wait for oleary.

Honestly Garth if those Tfsa aren’t taxed in 20yrs I will eat my hat. The have savaged every other program, tax shelter and sources of income. They won’t stop.
___________________________________

This is my fear. The problem is they’re broke and the easiest way to solve that problem is pull out the pen…

It’s a hell of a thing when you can’t trust the government with long term social agreements. Trudeau is breaking all his short term promises without the slightest blush. What does the future bring?

IMHO, more broke Canadian Citizens and Governments that hardly need an excuse to take from those who managed to save.

11 million people have TFSAs. They are untouchable. — Garth

#97 chris on 02.10.17 at 8:40 am

Thank you Mark #74 and Ace #84 for sobering advice to
the deserters. I know its February but can we please have some positive thoughts on Canada and our system of social fairness. I don’t know about the rest of you but when i get back here after a month or so away I get very positive feelings about most of our social institutions.
Buy Canadian but refuse to pay corporate rip off prices

#98 The Technical Analyst, CSTA, CPD on 02.10.17 at 8:42 am

Nice post today Garth, I like the advice above.

Just wanted to touch upon:

“And don’t forget to hold a hunk of your portfolio in US$. We all know where the loonie is headed.”

True, although, I would say the CAD isn’t really going to go down much more than it is now (oil+ and USD-). The USD (DXY), yes it might further weaken this year as the FED policies are a little less hawkish.

My edge? I’m trade FOREX and last week sold the remainder of my USD holdings as it DXY hit my floor technical level and fell below it (DXY 99), which is a bearish indicator. For 2016, my exchange rate averaged 36%. I don’t expect to do that in 2017.

#99 Wrk.dover on 02.10.17 at 8:51 am

In Case anyone notices the teacher contract situation in NS has gone to blow off stage, it is not about $ at all.

The short bus kids are in the big class room nowadays where no one is allowed to fail for any reason until higher grade levels, whether they can read or not. Each level of special needs kid is to have a custom programme with forms and documentation, hours a week of paperwork per kid, which can apply to half of the kids in the room what with ADHD and ritalin now being common place, and of course all of the regular old job description duties going on too. It is not the money, it is the undue stress of the teacher having six hours of homework every night. T2 was smart to bail out of teaching…

Gotta love those govt jobs? Not these ones!

#100 JimH on 02.10.17 at 9:04 am

Rumor has it that Sarah Palin is in the running to be the US Ambassador to Canada.

The huge entertainment value of such a move aside, Canada has my sympathy. But, there is absolutely no reason you should be exempt from additional bumbling ineptitude. This party is just getting started!

#101 neo on 02.10.17 at 9:10 am

Hmmm. So Canada has gained the US equivalent of 1 million jobs the past two months and the BOC says it isn’t even close to raising interest rates in an environment with house prices also going parabolic. Ok.

#102 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 9:25 am

#98 chris on 02.10.17 at 8:40 am
Thank you Mark #74 and Ace #84 for sobering advice to
the deserters. I know its February but can we please have some positive thoughts on Canada and our system of social fairness. I don’t know about the rest of you but when i get back here after a month or so away I get very positive feelings about most of our social institutions.
__________________________________________

Don’t get mixed up regarding the work of the institutions here in Canada and the increasing doomerism. Canada is bloody hard to beat on any front. I even like freezing cold and snow/ice. I’ve had pretty good experiences on the medical front, law enforcement front, my wife works for a government institution on the medical front and folks generally appreciate the services on offer. IMHO, the institutions and the folks who work there are mostly great (mind you, I live rurally)

The doomerism comes from projections for the future due to Trudeau’s debt binging and the crap global economy. We will not pay future debt with anywhere near the ease that we “paid” debts of the past.

As we collectively become increasingly insolvent, these institutions will start being shut down or sold off (ie. Hydro One) to maintain the status quo. We’re burning the candle at both ends with no eye to the future, and many of us (not enough though) realize where we’re headed.

There is reason to fear a newly insolvent government that has it’s tentacles in near every activity in the country.

#103 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 9:29 am

11 million people have TFSAs. They are untouchable. — Garth
___________________________________________

I appreciate your insistence on this, I still need to work on my pessimism (which is increasing these days instead of decreasing).

#104 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 9:31 am

#101 JimH on 02.10.17 at 9:04 am

Rumor has it that Sarah Palin is in the running to be the US Ambassador to Canada.

…This party is just getting started!
__________

Jerry! Jerry! Jerry!

#105 Bat Flipper on 02.10.17 at 9:31 am

Obviously, speculation is the biggest risk to the housing market as is all markets.
GTA population: 6,054M as of 2011
average household size = 2.58 people
2.346M households.

99K unoccupied = 4.22% of the total housing supply.

What would happen if that 4.22% was put up for rent or sale due to a vacant home tax like Vancouver?

#106 DonutStocks on 02.10.17 at 9:32 am

Garth, are you telling us that the 50% tax “rebate” we have on capital gains will go down to a 25% “rebate”?

Wouldn’t that have a huge impact on TSX? I mean, I’m not going to risk my money on a growth ETF if I loose 50% of the current tax advantage! I’ll switch to a dividend ETF!

#107 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 9:45 am

Canada’s economy added 48,000 jobs in January.

“Most of the new jobs were part time, although there were also more than 15,000 new full-time jobs created. Almost all of the new jobs were in the service sector, the data agency said.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/jobs-statistics-canada-january-1.3975643

#108 maxx on 02.10.17 at 9:46 am

#29 joblo on 02.09.17 at 7:42 pm

“11 Grab a bottle of Champagne, sit back, wait for the system to collapse under it’s own weight. Then vultch!
Cheers”

Exactly so. Despite all of the slimy little bits that writhe incessantly in the minds of the clueless selfie brigade, smart, unrelenting fiscal planning results in excellent quality of life- so much of it not even requiring cash.

On the subject of cash, one of today’s great ironies is that cash is unloved and because of stupid low rates, has the specter of nearly-nil value hanging over it, whilst most have epic debt. Debt restructuring firms are in their heyday. RSPs and TFSAs are raided and reverse mortgages abound.

The perspective now moves from “the difference between what we and the Jones’s had” to “what we now have relative to the debt the Jones’s are on the hook for, because we saved and took on zero debt”.

Make no mistake, money is as valuable as it ever was.

#109 TurnerNation on 02.10.17 at 9:47 am

Just buy these markets. Morgan Stanley (MS) likely to hit $50 soon. ..and double again in coming years.
Computers fully in control

#110 Yanniel on 02.10.17 at 9:57 am

Thank you Mr Garth. Thank you.

#111 Deano on 02.10.17 at 9:57 am

#85 Ace Goodheart on 02.10.17 at 6:53 am

Ace, I’ve noticed that you’ve made quite a few sensible posts in the time that I have been reading this blog. Sometimes it’s almost like you are reading my mind. You’ve got to slow down, you are ruining the Doomers party.

#112 InvestorLoveHate on 02.10.17 at 10:01 am

@Bat Flipper, my thoughts are the same!
We have been looking for a home to live in GTA for the past 6 months. Always getting priced out with a 20% downpayment. Interestingly, almost every home that was sold to the highest bid (always overvalued in my opinion) was or is still on the rental market.

I am not against buying homes for investment, but are people doing their due diligence economically before paying an insane price for 4 walls? Who would have thought BC would be in the situation it is in now? What will happen here if we follow?

#113 Paul on 02.10.17 at 10:07 am

No police at Pride parade! This won’t end well for anyone.

#114 maxx on 02.10.17 at 10:07 am

#32 Joseph R. on 02.09.17 at 7:48 pm

….”Sending a former schoolteacher to deal with a petulant POTUS seems to be wise to me.”

OMG. Miss Scale and Economic diversity 101? You could pluck a large number of bog standard Canucks from the street who might very well do a better job come Monday.

As flawed as things may be in the US (hint: we all are), we can do nearly diddly about what the POTUS decides. Without bending over, we can still be NICE to our neighbours, use some creativity to come up with possible synergistic advantages and display willingness to cooperate.
Anyone who thinks Canada’s little twig will hold any sway needs a serious head shaking.

Jaysus, the arrogance never stops gushing.

#115 jess on 02.10.17 at 10:08 am

By Doug G. Ware | June 17, 2016 at 3:26 PM Follow @upi
http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2016/06/17/Ex-Guatemalan-president-VP-among-70-charged-with-corruption/9421466184757/
They face charges of embezzlement and money-laundering, officials said.
Prado said the president and vice president went to great lengths to conceal their financial crimes — including even setting up bogus “shell” companies to hide the cash.
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Guatemala-Elite-Accused-of-Coopting-Govt-to-Run-Huge-Fraud-Ring-20160615-0001.html
===================
Earlier this year, over 180 organizations from across Latin America penned a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau demanding the government act in the face of runaway abuses by Canadian mining companies….urging the Canadian government to reform its policy of industry self-regulation in favor of more strict requirements for extractive companies.

Below: Communique by Canadian Centre for International Justice

http://miningwatch.ca/news/2016/10/31/guatemalans-appeal-case-against-tahoe-resources-bc-court-reminder-canada-must-be
https://justice-project.org/the-canada-brand-violence-and-canadian-mining-companies-in-latin-america/

The Canadian government continues to promote the “Canada Brand” by relying on voluntary, non-enforceable Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) codes to measure company conduct. The two main government offices responsible for CSR are the Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility Counsellor (CSR Counsellor) and the National Contact Point (NCP) under the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Neither office conducts investigations, nor do they have the power to sanction companies directly or compensate victims. Their only power is to recommend the withdrawal of Canadian government financial and embassy support.
The report is far from the first time the Canadian mining industry has been thrust into the spotlight for its rampant abuses. In fact, a number of high-profile international bodies — including four United Nations bodies and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights—have condemned the systematic abuses committed at the hands of Canadian companies,

#116 Reply to #85 on 02.10.17 at 10:14 am

Trump seems to be gnawing away at the edges of the democratic and moral fabric of American society.

Look at how he has undermined free speech, a free press, free exercise of religion, freedom of assembly, due process, and the rule of law.

It must have come as quite a shock to Trump last week when he learned that there are three co-equal branches of government that provide checks and balances on one another.

#117 Ole Doberman on 02.10.17 at 10:20 am

Sounds like China working to cap cash flow out of country – more bad news for Vancouver:

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/china/china-looking-to-regulate-gold-bitcoin/

#118 Noel on 02.10.17 at 10:29 am

Lol at thinking taxes are going down in the US for regular people. How do you think they’re going to fund the $20bn wall, military misadventures in Iran, a trillion dollar infrastructure package and a 40k strong deportation squad?

#119 Simon on 02.10.17 at 10:36 am

A lot of good information on Capital Gains… what about Dividends, dividend splitting with spouse, tax breaks on dividends etc? Garth, would love to hear about that topic in a future article.

#120 pBrasseur on 02.10.17 at 10:44 am

#93 Evangeline

Dollarama is good for shopping and it shows in its results as well, it’s been one hell of a stock in my portolio, 298% in a few years to be exact, one of the few Canadian stocks I own!

#121 TurnerNation on 02.10.17 at 11:05 am

Yorkville renter thanks for info. Were you in downtown core at the time? I was using free wifi for that post…via VPN tho…
Let’s hope ‘lefties’ are not doxxing this blog..

#122 NoName on 02.10.17 at 11:15 am

#110 TurnerNation on 02.10.17 at 9:47 am

A stock trading bot powered by Trump tweets
https://github.com/maxbbraun/trump2cash

—-
#11 TurnerNation on 02.09.17 at 6:58 pm
Forget about dollarama , prisons are business to be in, what is interesting, growth of private/publicly traded prisons since election. (nov 18 2016).
NYSE:GEO geo group up 45%, and NYSE:CXW corrective inc 50%.
interesting times we live in…

#123 Donald on 02.10.17 at 11:28 am

DELETED

#124 NoName on 02.10.17 at 11:29 am

Interesting read

Computer scientists from the Google-owned firm have studied how their AI behaves in social situations by using principles from game theory and social sciences. During the work, they found it is possible for AI to act in an “aggressive manner” when it feels it is going to lose out, but agents will work as a team when there is more to be gained.

http://www.wired.co.uk/article/artificial-intelligence-social-impact-deepmind

#125 For those about to flop... on 02.10.17 at 11:47 am

Pink Snow falling in North Vancouver.

These guys spent 1.9 million on a 1952 special at the peak in April 2016 and now were forced to lower it to less than 5% above where they started.

Bigger prices means bigger chance of an avalanche on the North Shore…

M42BC

955 Forest Hills Drive, North Vancouver

Nov 7:$2,199,000
Feb 9: $1,999,000
Change: – 200000.00 -9%

https://evaluebc.bcassessment.ca/Property.aspx?_oa=QTAwMDAyODRCUQ==

#126 DON on 02.10.17 at 11:58 am

#96 IHCTD9 on 02.10.17 at 8:22 am

#52 Metaxa on 02.09.17 at 9:20 pm

…I’ll be sure and dumb down my vocabulary for you in future now I know you read my every post.
_______________________________________

Like that Latina “chick with a dick” comment a couple days ago?

Yep, I saw it. Probably a post you regretted later eh?

Too bad you can’t delete it.

You’ve certainly got the dumb part down pat. I look forward to hearing more transgender jokes from Metaxa the man :).

***************

Don’t brother with MeTaxa he still believes Campbell River is a boon town full of jobs and real estate that will never go down in value. Migration to Victoria has increased as the BC Lieberals are trying to increase job numbers, so the anti public sector BC liberal are using public sector jobs to raise the numbers due to the lack of hiring in the private sector. Clowns to the left of me jokers to the right….stuck in the middle with you.

Migration to all other places on the island is decreasing, yes people are still moving here but a lot of people are dying…quite the sustainable real estate economy we have on the island, not much else

#127 DON on 02.10.17 at 12:00 pm

Fukishima is still leaking…but I thought the govs said it was contained. Now it is too hot for the robot. Yikes to say the least.

#128 PokerCat on 02.10.17 at 12:00 pm

“Finally, if you’re a typical Canadian, house-rich and liquidity-starved, consider borrowing against all that windfall equity to diversify.”

Garth,

I understand why you say this, and despite that, it still horrifies me that you said it at all, based on the high level of debt the average Canadian holds.

Deductible debt which can be paid off by growing liquid assets in a heartbeat bears no relation to the unrepayable levels of household debt most wage slaves now carry. — Garth

#129 Just Ed on 02.10.17 at 12:17 pm

@ #69 Ace Goodheart

mind sharing a few samples….

#130 milleniallmoose on 02.10.17 at 12:25 pm

I too worry about the future of the TFSA. What is stopping the government from removing/meddling the tax shelter eventually?

Groundless fear. It will never happen with 11 million accounts holders. Political suicide. — Garth

#131 For those about to flop... on 02.10.17 at 12:37 pm

Pink Snow falling in Richmond.

I have featured these guys before, but they just took another 20k off this condo as the blood continues to drip faster.

They paid 685k ,this time last year,overpaying by about 100k.

Have been trying to get the bulk of their money back for months ,but buyers have a flood of new products to choose from…

M42BC

6019-5511 HOLLYBRIDGE WAY RICHMOND

https://www.zolo.ca/richmond-real-estate/5511-hollybridge-way/6019

https://evaluebc.bcassessment.ca/Property.aspx?_oa=RDAwMDBOQjRDSw==

Oct 11:$685,000
Feb 9: $628,000
Change: – 57000.00 -8%

#132 pBrasseur on 02.10.17 at 12:50 pm

Hmmm. So Canada has gained the US equivalent of 1 million jobs the past two months and the BOC says it isn’t even close to raising interest rates in an environment with house prices also going parabolic. Ok. – #102 neo

Puzzling isn’t it?

Maybe not. The low CAD in conjunction with the US recovery is surely providing some relief in some sectors, in particular tourism. But mainly this is about consumption. After all this is a consumer economy, at least 60% of it and consumption is doing well because Canadian household are still on a debt binge, just check out Canadian shopping mall any given day! That new debt money keeps on being spent right here to buy among other things real estate and services, two «job rich» sectors. To the economy that growing debt is perceived like a massive income increase.

So there you have it, this growth is not sound and viable economic growth, it’s a flash in the pan that cannot last. Not only that but the longer it lasts the higher the risks. Under the circumstances the good job numbers can in part be interpreted as bad news.

And the BOC knows it.

#133 Fish on 02.10.17 at 12:58 pm

RE #71 Ontario’s Left Coast
Oh, ok sorry thanks I like that song!!

#134 n1tro on 02.10.17 at 1:06 pm

“Groundless fear. It will never happen with 11 million accounts holders. Political suicide. — Garth”

Hmmm….seems like a no brainer then to base a political platform partly on increasing the TFSA. Throw a couple of negative political ads showing the evil people who are reducing the limit and you got a winner. Even if only half understand the TFSA’s importance, that surely would be enough votes to carry one into the PM seat.

#135 Ponzius Pilatus on 02.10.17 at 1:11 pm

Worried about your investments being taxed away?
Consider the time-honored method of stashing your money into your mattress.
Independent reseach has shown that people who sleep on their own cash have 80% fewer nightmares involving money matters, than those who are invested in the market.
BTW, Sleep Country’s bestselling mattress the Money Stasher now comes with $100 cash “pre-stashed”.
Also, according to the study, substituting Canadian Tire money for real money does not convey any benefits.

#136 yorkville renter on 02.10.17 at 1:17 pm

TurnerNation – I was in a “limo” coming back from the airport, on the Rogers network. Seems like a forum hiccup.

#137 Euro observer on 02.10.17 at 1:18 pm

To try to offset the biggest credit bubble in housing in history (and the fake, overblown, artificial economy that this credit bubble creates) with tax increases (hence spending decreases) borders with idiocy and insanity.

The logical step is to actually cut taxes and print money.

Surely if the intent is to further increase national debt (and that might be the goal after all) before applying monetary easing I understand. But I don’t think there is any room in increase of the overall debt load.

Just think about it – national debt + hidden debt on CHMC ‘guarantees’ + record provincial debt + municipality debt + record personal debt. There is no room to further grow that monster.

But I am not sure these guys understand what they are doing.

#138 45north on 02.10.17 at 1:19 pm

So if Justin Trudeau dramatically raises the tax load on capital gains here are ten simple things you might want to consider in response (or anyway).

House of Parliament, Ottawa

Leader of the Opposition: Mr. Speaker! The Government has just announced the increase on capital gains. It’s gone from 50% to 66% and one might suppose that Government revenue would increase proportionately but that ignores the actions of Canadian investors to legitimately reduce the taxes they pay. I would like to ask the Minister of Finance to explicitly analyze these changes in its annual report to Parliament. This report would show on aggregate:
– changes in TFSA contributions
– changes in RRSP contributions
– reductions in declarations of capital gains
– shift to dividend income
– increase in declared capital loses
– reduction in income
– increase in spousal income

Mr Speaker these are legitimate measures Canadian taxpayers can take to reduce their taxes and Revenue Canada has everything it needs to produce a detailed and accurate report.

Mr Speaker let us be clear: it is totally possible that the announced increases in capital gains will produce only a marginal net increase in revenue yet cause huge damage to the Canadian investment community.

Mr Speaker it is fair and just that in announcing these changes the Minister of Finance be subject to the scrutiny of Parliament.

#139 For those about to flop... on 02.10.17 at 1:34 pm

Not too sure if this one is pure Pink Snow or what ,as it has the potential to be an absolute bomb or a tidy profit for these guys.

They paid over 3 million for a condo in the not overly desired city of Richmond.

While everyone else’s assessment bloated last summer these guy’s actually got rolled back slightly.

The chances of someone forking up 3 million to buy a condo in a city in rapid decline is slim ,but I am surprised by the madness I see everyday,so why should this one be any different…

M42BC

102-5131 Brighouse Way, Richmond

Nov 27:$3,988,000
Feb 9: $3,880,000
Change: – 108000.00 -3%

https://evaluebc.bcassessment.ca/Property.aspx?_oa=RDAwMDBLMkI3VA==
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YWindmxDrBY

#140 Metaxa on 02.10.17 at 1:34 pm

Don’t brother with MeTaxa he still believes Campbell River is a boon town full of jobs and real estate that will never go down in value.

I’m no where near Campbell River.

Brother?

#141 45north on 02.10.17 at 1:40 pm

“increase in spousal income” should be
“increase in spousal RRSPs”

#142 Euro observer on 02.10.17 at 2:00 pm

#131 milleniallmoose on 02.10.17 at 12:25 pm
I too worry about the future of the TFSA. What is stopping the government from removing/meddling the tax shelter eventually?

Groundless fear. It will never happen with 11 million accounts holders. Political suicide. — Garth

—————————–

If we continue with the current economic direction of destroying the real economy and fake ‘growth’ based on further debt, I am quite certain that not just TFSA but eventually RRSPs will be in jeopardy, temptation for the greedy hands of politicians.

So I am developing tax – minimization strategy on reducing that exposure.

#143 Balmuto on 02.10.17 at 2:49 pm

uh-oh:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-10/canada-s-aaa-rating-on-thin-ice-as-trump-policies-threaten-trade

#144 They'll eventually come for your TFSA $$$ on 02.10.17 at 2:57 pm

“Groundless fear. It will never happen with 11 million accounts holders. Political suicide. — Garth”

It’s not political suicide, because, uh, he has nice hair and his dad was a “rock star”. Apparently. Canadians are really dumb.

If you recall, T2 won the election on a platform that included SCRAPPING the TFSA increase, the 11 million account holders be damned. (the majority of them probably even voted for him)

His father sold us out to the international banking cartel by giving our power to create money away… Since T1, we have paid over a trillion dollars in interest payments, nearly all of it unnecessary.

Look what his daddy did:

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/sites/default/files/authors/brief%20history%2012.png

And yet, I hear no protests.

They WILL take the TFSA cash when the time comes. And it will. Canadians love to pay their fair share. LOL!

#145 Tudval on 02.10.17 at 3:08 pm

#14 Brian Gordon I’ve been a bull on RE for years, but yeah, 1.5 mil for that location is crazy.. I mean, at least in relative terms, you can get much better for the money, unless the market jumped 20% in just 2 months (last I’ve done a comparative analysis was November). But really, it’s out of reach for the ‘average buyer’ at 1 mil or 1.2, or 1.5, so does it really matter?

#146 Jay on 02.10.17 at 3:29 pm

“Another failed reality TV ego,” but we currently have someone that’s using being the Prime Minister as a reality tv show.

#147 Bezengy on 02.10.17 at 4:34 pm

TFSA Rule #1 Do not over invest in a TFSA. If mister trader cashes in his 1 million TFSA on January 1st, and then reinvests his 1 million Jan 15th he would trigger a $10k fine for each of the next 12 months, for a total of a $120k fine. Trust me on this, you can fight it all you want, but T2 has given the CRA their marching orders. Got money?, better be careful. Note to moderator..my calculator wasn’t working properly..please delete first post.

#148 Free Bird on 02.10.17 at 4:52 pm

Really good post with practical tips. Now if only this was the 5/10 yr plan for those who are living on a house of cards instead of new flooring or finishing the basement cave?

Thx

#149 NoName on 02.10.17 at 5:11 pm

Interesting read and definitely watch 12min video.

The AI Threat Isn’t Skynet. It’s the End of the Middle Class
(sceriest title YTD)

https://www.wired.com/2017/02/ai-threat-isnt-skynet-end-middle-class/

#150 Free Bird on 02.10.17 at 5:11 pm

BTW Politicians are being forced to use social media, incl the ‘selfy’ as a communication tool to reach younger voters and increasingly business types. Using it doesnt equal wanting to be a reality star. However the use of social media esp Twitter by the current POTUS obv increases the risk of creating issues where none exists (at best) and or inciting animosity with those who can and will hit back (at worst). As a country I hope we’re snarter then others and manage to keep our head out of our a**es! Not a good look…

#151 Free Bird on 02.10.17 at 5:13 pm

If only I could spell….

Oh well!

#152 Victor V on 02.10.17 at 5:23 pm

‘A healthy report’: Canada unexpectedly adds 48,300 jobs in January

http://www.bnn.ca/a-healthy-report-canada-unexpectedly-adds-48-300-jobs-in-january-1.668443

While the report was not likely to move the Bank of Canada off the sidelines, the figures could reduce the risk of another interest rate cut, economists said.

“The continued strength in the labor market data means Governor Poloz will find it harder convincing markets that a rate cut is still on the table,” said Andrew Grantham, senior economist at CIBC Capital Markets.

#153 Donald on 02.10.17 at 6:04 pm

Garth

The past few days you deleted two posts from people in my office. We read your blog at work but are confused about the deletion standards. The posts were not abusive, obscene or disrespectful.

What’s up??

-Donald P.

(On behalf of my partner David and myself)

Get back to work. — Garth

#154 DON on 02.10.17 at 6:26 pm

#153 Victor V on 02.10.17 at 5:23 pm
‘A healthy report’: Canada unexpectedly adds 48,300 jobs in January

http://www.bnn.ca/a-healthy-report-canada-unexpectedly-adds-48-300-jobs-in-january-1.668443

While the report was not likely to move the Bank of Canada off the sidelines, the figures could reduce the risk of another interest rate cut, economists said.

“The continued strength in the labor market data means Governor Poloz will find it harder convincing markets that a rate cut is still on the table,” said Andrew Grantham, senior economist at CIBC Capital Markets.
*********************

Do they even know what they are doing…really! Canada is doing great yet it is not…or wait a minute everything is fine…well except for quality jobs. Hey look over there on the horizon that looks good…oh the clouds are dark…oh well everything will be ok. Vote for us again anything else would put us in a bad place.

In other news how to get a job in recession Alberta…economist says bright spots emerging but job growth to lag, but a recruiter is optimistic for the future. Geezus, are there any experts left in high-level roles or just the valley boys and valley girls with over confidence running the show.

Idiocracy remember this movie…scary eh!

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=idiocracy+u+tube&view=detail&mid=418E7C8397BBDA2DC4AB418E7C8397BBDA2DC4AB&FORM=VIRE

#155 DON on 02.10.17 at 6:40 pm

#141 Metaxa on 02.10.17 at 1:34 pm
Don’t brother with MeTaxa he still believes Campbell River is a boon town full of jobs and real estate that will never go down in value.

I’m no where near Campbell River.

Brother?
***************
Whoops thanks for pointing out the spelling mistake. I take it you couldn’t understand the what I was saying. And for that I apologize.

If memory serves me correct you countered my comment about real estate being stale in Campbell River last summer.

#156 acdel on 02.10.17 at 8:06 pm

#94 Evangeline

Touche!

Good analogy! :)

#157 Rexx Rock on 02.10.17 at 9:03 pm

#25STOCK PICKER
Your so right.The smart ones are leaving Canada in droves because there fed up with high taxes and very high cost of living.I’ll be in Thailand next month which is heaven compared to Canada.
The USA is the place for the educated.Our government knows most people are a afraid to leave Canada that’s why the don’t care if they tax you by a thousand cuts.

#158 Some idiot ... on 02.11.17 at 1:02 am

Spent over a million for that shack in Greek town ?

That can’t be for real

#159 Real estate on 02.11.17 at 7:35 am

Many many ‘experts’ prematurely called for its correction, not just Garth

Kudos to those that kept the faith

#160 antiflakflak on 02.11.17 at 12:16 pm

Degree in uselessness from your local diploma mill?

#161 2017 on 02.11.17 at 12:36 pm

Simple question from the ground by former US marine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncjq-GtXNLE